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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 17, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news, the headlines... us presidentjoe biden is in buffalo, where he met the families of people killed in saturday's racially motivated shooting. he laid flowers at a makeshift memorial and said white supremacy was a "poison" running through the united states. the evacuation of the defenders of the azovstal steelworks in mariupol has continued, with a convoy of at least seven buses carrying ukrainian troops leaving the complex, escorted by pro—russian forces. last night, the first batch of soldiers were taken to russian—controlled territory. a conservative member of parliament has been arrested on suspicion of rape. the unnamed mp has been asked to stay away from parliament.
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the british government has outlined changes to the post—brexit deal which oversees goods moving to northern ireland. hello, and welcome to our look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are camilla turner, who's chief political correspondent at the daily telegraph, and the writer and broadcaster mihir bose. we will say hello properly to both in just a second. first, we will say hello properly to both injust a second. first, let's we will say hello properly to both in just a second. first, let's take a look at the front pages. the metro leads with the news that a conservative mp has been arrested on suspicion of rape. the telegraph has the same story, saying the tory chief whip has asked the mp to stay away from parliament while police investigate. the financial times leads with the latest data on the economy, saying the historic low level
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of unemployment risks pushing inflation even higher. the guardian says the chancellor is under pressure from his own backbenchers to do more to help, with some mps warning the poorest face paying £1,000 a year extra for food. the i claims rishi sunak plans to cut income tax by a penny this year to help with the cost of living. the times believes he will also increase payments to some of the poorest households through the warm homes discount. the daily mail criticises the bank of england for allowing staff to work from home four days a week. while the sun features the latest developments in the "wagatha christie" court case, focusing on comments made by the two husbands, wayne rooney and jamie vardy. lots to get there, let's begin. good evening to you both, thanks for coming on. starting with a bit of
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politics, camilla, you'll kick us off. but it's a really awful headline, "tory mp is arrested for rape" the front page on the metro, a story carried across several of the front pages. they are allegations at the moment, but tell us the details that we know. 50 the moment, but tell us the details that we know— the moment, but tell us the details that we know-— that we know. so this is a story that we know. so this is a story that broke _ that we know. so this is a story that broke late _ that we know. so this is a story that broke late this afternoon, | that broke late this afternoon, first exposed by the sun and it's shown up on a lot of front newspaper pages. he's been arrested for a string of sexual assault offences, this mp remains in police custody and we've heard from the witness office he's been told to stay away from the parliamentary estate while the investigation is ongoing. clearly there dumbing of these are very serious allegations broken here, and just the latest in a string of sleaze scandals we've had in recent weeks coming out of the
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tory party. i suppose this is really quite a worrying development, very serious allegations here, and the public will think, "here's yet another sex scandal coming out of the government." the another sex scandal coming out of the government."— another sex scandal coming out of the government." the headline on the front -a~e the government." the headline on the front page of — the government." the headline on the front page of the _ the government." the headline on the front page of the telegraph, _ the government." the headline on the front page of the telegraph, "tory - front page of the telegraph, "tory mp held on suspicion of rape." we can't see a great deal right now? the interesting thing about this story— the interesting thing about this story is— the interesting thing about this story is that these allegations go back several years, there was a two-year— back several years, there was a two—year police investigation, the allegations are supposed to refer to incidents_ allegations are supposed to refer to incidents that have taken place between — incidents that have taken place between 2002— 09. and of course, as camilla _ between 2002— 09. and of course, as camilla has— between 2002— 09. and of course, as camilla has said, we've had a number of allegations, some criminal convictions, a conservative mp resigning — convictions, a conservative mp resigning because he was watching pawn— resigning because he was watching pawn in the houses of parliament. it raises _ pawn in the houses of parliament. it raises questions about the quality
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of the _ raises questions about the quality of the mps, what's been going on and being _ of the mps, what's been going on and being reported, things like that. we've _ being reported, things like that. we've always believed that the great and the _ we've always believed that the great and the good go to our parliament, the people we send to our parliament to resent_ the people we send to our parliament to resent democrat present us. it's a question— to resent democrat present us. it's a question of the quality of the people. — a question of the quality of the people, and these things may have happened _ people, and these things may have happened in the past but now people report them and they are being investigated. i think we need to ask ourselves— investigated. i think we need to ask ourselves as to why we are not getting — ourselves as to why we are not getting better mps in the house of commons, in the oldest parliament in the world _ commons, in the oldest parliament in the world. and why are our best men and women _ the world. and why are our best men and women not going to parliament? the scotland yard spokesperson said this was the result of a two—year investigation by the specialist crime unit, following a report received in january 2020. crime unit, following a report received injanuary 2020. alleged offences taking place from 2002 to 2009 in london. we leave that story
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there for a moment and go to the front page of the telegraph, they cover that story, of course, but a second—story underneath the photo, the top story. the headline is, "ministers warm to wildly popular energy windfall tax." and one of the reporters on this story is camilla turner — take it away, camilla. this turner - take it away, camilla. this is the story — turner - take it away, camilla. this is the story on _ turner — take it away, camilla. ti 3 is the story on tomorrow's front paper which is based on some polling conducted in whitehall, this was research on how the public feel about this windfall tax we've been hearing so much about from labour, it's what they've been really pushing in recent weeks and months. in this polling actually found the policy is wildly popular there with the public, as many as eight in ten people supported, and people think these oil and energy gas bosses have acted like corporate cowboys, profiting at a time when households up profiting at a time when households up and doused the country are paying the soaring bills —— up and down the
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country. today was the debate triggered by labour trying to put pressure on the government to bring about this windfall tax, and it was very interesting to see, we had some very interesting to see, we had some very senior tory mps who select committee chairs — both openly calling on the government to back this policy. but of course, if the government were to adopt this policy, it would be a huge win for labour and it really displays into that idea of those who say the tory government are out of ideas and steam at our having to borrow ideas from their opposition. it’s from their opposition. it's interesting _ from their opposition. it's interesting that _ from their opposition. it's interesting that one of the lines out of the government is "we don't want to implement this windfall tax, we want the big energy companies to invest, and that helps the long term prospects for energy security in the uk." but it seems like that argument will have to give way potentially? yes, and the argument will probably
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-ive yes, and the argument will probably give way, _ yes, and the argument will probably give way, if— yes, and the argument will probably give way, if camilla's group is true, — give way, if camilla's group is true, because the opinion polls show that the _ true, because the opinion polls show that the public favourite. so as ever _ that the public favourite. so as ever with — that the public favourite. so as ever with the way modern politics work, _ ever with the way modern politics work. if— ever with the way modern politics work. if a — ever with the way modern politics work, if a scheme is right, it is only implemented if it's a thing that will— only implemented if it's a thing that will buy favour with the public - not— that will buy favour with the public - not on— that will buy favour with the public - not on its— that will buy favour with the public — not on its merit, as it were, the lahour— — not on its merit, as it were, the labour party— — not on its merit, as it were, the labour party has been calling for this for— labour party has been calling for this for sometime in the government out and _ this for sometime in the government out and carries out some research, than _ out and carries out some research, than it— out and carries out some research, than it feels — out and carries out some research, than it feels if it's popular it'll swing — than it feels if it's popular it'll swing the _ than it feels if it's popular it'll swing the voters behind it. at the moment— swing the voters behind it. at the moment it's unpopular, it's trailing the lahour— moment it's unpopular, it's trailing the labour party, and it also steals a good _ the labour party, and it also steals a good opposition policy and makes it its own _ a good opposition policy and makes it its own. as far as the public is concerned. _ it its own. as far as the public is concerned, it won't be very much concerned about who suggested it if the government does and it helps them, _ the government does and it helps them, then the government regains its popularity. this them, then the government regains its pepularity-_ its popularity. this story comes under a banner _ its popularity. this story comes under a banner of _ its popularity. this story comes under a banner of calls - its popularity. this story comes under a banner of calls trying . its popularity. this story comes| under a banner of calls trying to sort out the cost of living which is
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having such an extreme and damaging impact on so new people in the months ahead, it looks like it'll get worse. let's go to the times's front page because they focus on the chancellor rishi sunak, and the headline is, "sunak lands heating bill discounts and tax cuts." camilla, what is the times reporting here? , , ., ., camilla, what is the times reporting here? , ,., ., here? this is another scoop similarly — here? this is another scoop similarly on _ here? this is another scoop similarly on the _ here? this is another scoop similarly on the cost - here? this is another scoop similarly on the cost of - here? this is another scoop l similarly on the cost of living process and the ways the government will potentially try and alleviate the soaring bills that households are facing. the times are saying the chancellor is drawing up plans to increase the warm home discount, then later in the year cut taxes. so a two—pronged approach to tackle the cost of living— this warm home discount currently takes 150 million -- £150 off discount currently takes 150 million —— £150 off the poorest households
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in the country. there are talks to increase this to up to even £600, so this would be a one—off measure that they are looking at, just to tackle they are looking at, just to tackle the soaring household bills that households are expensing of the moment. it's quite poignant we've got multiple newspaper front pages all looking at different ideas or policies that the treasury will be looking at. i think it's no coincidence that all of these have come on a day when labour held their debate on the windfall tax, and clearly rather than the government having a whole bunch of front pages on their hands to democrat attacking them for their policy is, what we have instead are lots of different policy ideas on the front pages about things they could be doing. it really points to the pressure being on and the government know they have to do something, and they know they have to act quicklyjust to make sure they're leading the way on
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this, ratherthanjust sure they're leading the way on this, rather than just being sure they're leading the way on this, rather thanjust being bashed by labour for not doing enough. this, rather thanjust being bashed by labourfor not doing enough. aha, by labour for not doing enough. a really interesting peek behind the curtain there about how the whole operation works, thank you for that. how troubling do you think this whole issue is for the conservatives? i whole issue is for the conservatives? ~ 3 , conservatives? i think it's very troubling- _ conservatives? i think it's very troubling- l— conservatives? i think it's very troubling. i think _ conservatives? i think it's very troubling. i think the - conservatives? i think it's very troubling. i think the fact - conservatives? i think it's very troubling. i think the fact that l conservatives? i think it's very i troubling. i think the fact that we have _ troubling. i think the fact that we have food — troubling. i think the fact that we have food banks in this country, you io have food banks in this country, you go to— have food banks in this country, you go to a _ have food banks in this country, you go to a supermarket and supermarket i have, _ go to a supermarket and supermarket i have, there's a huge case they're saying. _ i have, there's a huge case they're saying. why— i have, there's a huge case they're saying, why don't you donate food? people _ saying, why don't you donate food? people are — saying, why don't you donate food? people are going and taking shelter in mcdonald's and other places because — in mcdonald's and other places because they can't heat their homes, and so _ because they can't heat their homes, and so on _ because they can't heat their homes, and so on. we are one of the largest economies— and so on. we are one of the largest economies in— and so on. we are one of the largest economies in the world — when that is happening in that situation, it raises _ is happening in that situation, it raises all— is happening in that situation, it raises all sorts of questions about the management of the economy. 0k, there are _ the management of the economy. 0k, there are other factors here beyond there are other factors here beyond the control— there are other factors here beyond the control of the government, but the control of the government, but the government has to act and show it cares—
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the government has to act and show it cares for— the government has to act and show it cares for the people. the times story— it cares for the people. the times storv also— it cares for the people. the times story also shows that rishi sunak's approach _ story also shows that rishi sunak's approach would be a two—pronged policy, _ approach would be a two—pronged policy, discount on energy bills for those _ policy, discount on energy bills for those on _ policy, discount on energy bills for those on low income and also an autumn strategy of cutting income tax, autumn strategy of cutting income tax. the _ autumn strategy of cutting income tax, the cuts he promised, bringing it forward — tax, the cuts he promised, bringing it forward in— tax, the cuts he promised, bringing it forward. in the government can't io it forward. in the government can't go on _ it forward. in the government can't go on appearing to say, well, these are measures beyond our control. the government— are measures beyond our control. the government is to show that it is acting on— government is to show that it is acting on behalf of the people, so it has— acting on behalf of the people, so it has to _ acting on behalf of the people, so it has to act. and i think this is a very— it has to act. and i think this is a very serious _ it has to act. and i think this is a very serious crisis we are facing, probably— very serious crisis we are facing, probably the likes we haven't faced since _ probably the likes we haven't faced since the _ probably the likes we haven't faced since the three—day week back in the 1970s_ since the three—day week back in the 1970s which i remember as a student. going _ 1970s which i remember as a student. going to _ 1970s which i remember as a student. going to the _ 1970s which i remember as a student. going to the front page of the daily mail now, this is related tangentially — basically it talks about inflation, the cost of living going up and all things that we buy, and the bank of england's role in all that. in the headline is, "so
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that's why the bank of england is helpless." can you help us understand this, camilla? so helpless." can you help us understand this, camilla? so this is mar in: understand this, camilla? so this is marrying two _ understand this, camilla? so this is marrying two recent issues - understand this, camilla? so this is marrying two recent issues that - understand this, camilla? so this is| marrying two recent issues that have been around the news, one of which is the blame game and the bank of england coming under some criticism from tory mps, wondering why it wasn't doing enough, it's meant to keep inflation around 2%, what's going on here? we have the bank of england saying they are actually helpless to get this in line because there are some things that are so completely out of their control like the war in ukraine and the pandemic, and these massive global forces that mean it's definitely not in their control to keep inflation in check. now the second issue which the daily mail has been campaigning very hard on is this working from home problem where they've been looking at
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various different government departments and shining a light on the slow return to the office at different whitehall departments. now they are having a look at the bank of england, saying that actually, officials are just coming in for one day a week at the moment and they are drawing these two themes together, they got a quote from the former cabinet minister liam fox, saying the bank of england should be doing all it can to ease this inflation pressure, so why on earth is it that they are only coming into the office one day a week was mike these are two issues brought together here. do these are two issues brought together here.— together here. do you think inflation is _ together here. do you think inflation is due _ together here. do you think inflation is due to _ together here. do you think inflation is due to the - together here. do you think| inflation is due to the global pressures and coming out of covid, and all around the world, or do you think it's working from home? i think it's working from home? i don't think inflation can be related directly— don't think inflation can be related directly to— don't think inflation can be related directly to working from home. there are wider— directly to working from home. there are wider pressures at work here, but i _ are wider pressures at work here, but i think— are wider pressures at work here, but i think this story at the mail is about— but i think this story at the mail is about the stewardship of the bank
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under— is about the stewardship of the bank under andrew bailey. for a long time now they've _ under andrew bailey. for a long time now they've been attacking andrew bailey. _ now they've been attacking andrew bailey, who himself said he can't control— bailey, who himself said he can't control inflation, he spoken of apoplectic food prices. the question is whether— apoplectic food prices. the question is whether the governor is up for hisioh, — is whether the governor is up for hisioh, and _ is whether the governor is up for hisjob, and whether in fact having an independent bank is the right policv? — an independent bank is the right policy? rememberwhen an independent bank is the right policy? remember when labour came to power— policy? remember when labour came to power in _ policy? remember when labour came to power in 1997, gordon brown made the bank independent, and they had been hailed _ bank independent, and they had been hailed until now is the right policy to follow — hailed until now is the right policy to follow i— hailed until now is the right policy to follow. i think the mail is raising _ to follow. i think the mail is raising questions, and this question has been _ raising questions, and this question has been raised within the conservative party as to whether the stewardship of andrew bailey is worth— stewardship of andrew bailey is worth having, and whether he's providing — worth having, and whether he's providing the right leadership. and i providing the right leadership. and i suspect— providing the right leadership. and i suspect this daily mail campaign will go _ i suspect this daily mail campaign will go on — i suspect this daily mail campaign will go on if measures are not shown to he _ will go on if measures are not shown to be taken, —
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will go on if measures are not shown to be taken, providing some relief to be taken, providing some relief to people — to be taken, providing some relief to people who are under pressure with rising — to people who are under pressure with rising inflation. that certainly _ with rising inflation. that certainly would _ with rising inflation. that certainly would be - with rising inflation. that certainly would be a - with rising inflation. twat certainly would be a structural change. the i has a significant point, i know we've been talking about the cost of living in various measures and ideas. this is a particularly striking one, the headline is, "sunak plots 1p income tax cut this year." why is this significant? tax cut this year. " why is this significant?— significant? this is a very interesting _ significant? this is a very interesting story - significant? this is a very interesting story from - significant? this is a very | interesting story from the significant? this is a very i interesting story from the i, significant? this is a very - interesting story from the i, yet again more potential leaks or glimpses at what it is the treasurer —— treasury are looking at to ease the cost of living. the i suggests there will be an income tax cut at 1p, of course cutting taxes is very popular among core conservative voters, they think the tory party should be the party of low tax. there was lots of commentary around the spring budget, by the taxes were at their highest level in decades.
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so this would be a popular measure with backbenchers, but the question is whether this tax cut will come in, will it come in this year or wait until this autumn? there are a couple other points that i say, that he is also lobbying the chancellor to reverse the national insurance hike and vat on fuel bills. clearly there are a few different ideas being bandied around that they are focusing on this 1p income tax cut, which would certainly be a very bold move, sending a message that the chancellor really is trying to get a grip on things without —— by using household bills. grip on things without -- by using household bills.— household bills. let's go international— household bills. let's go international now - household bills. let's go international now and i household bills. let's go l international now and look household bills. let's go - international now and look at ukraine and russia over the front page of the guardian. the story on the bottom right headline, "fate of azovstal soldiers and clear after
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surrender." azovstal soldiers and clear after surrender- "— azovstal soldiers and clear after surrender." , ., ,., , surrender." these are the soldiers defendin: surrender." these are the soldiers defending mariupol. _ surrender." these are the soldiers defending mariupol. the _ surrender." these are the soldiers defending mariupol. the two - defending mariupol. the two contradictory stories here — there is a prisoner— contradictory stories here — there is a prisoner exchange, which has released — is a prisoner exchange, which has released them according to the ukrainians, but according to the russians— ukrainians, but according to the russians they actually surrendered to the _ russians they actually surrendered to the russians, and also part of the story— to the russians, and also part of the story here is that the russians are planning to put them on trial, claiming — are planning to put them on trial, claiming they've committed crimes. this would — claiming they've committed crimes. this would be an extra ordinary situation — this would be an extra ordinary situation - _ this would be an extra ordinary situation — these were people defending their land against the russian — defending their land against the russian invaders, and the russian invaders _ russian invaders, and the russian invaders now are suggesting that these _ invaders now are suggesting that these defenders of the country actuallv — these defenders of the country actually committed crimes against their own — actually committed crimes against their own people. that would be an extraordinary situation, but that is the story— extraordinary situation, but that is the story here, and it's a very worrying _ the story here, and it's a very worrying story if indeed these soldiers. _ worrying story if indeed these soldiers, who were supposed to be swapped _ soldiers, who were supposed to be swapped as a prisoner exchange, ukrainians— swapped as a prisoner exchange, ukrainians with russians, and are now being — ukrainians with russians, and are now being held captive by russians
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and may— now being held captive by russians and may be put on trial. will now being held captive by russians and may be put on trial.— and may be put on trial. will be coverin: and may be put on trial. will be covering the — and may be put on trial. will be covering the fate _ and may be put on trial. will be covering the fate of _ and may be put on trial. will be covering the fate of those - and may be put on trial. will be i covering the fate of those soldiers very closely here, as well. i'm afraid we're almost out of time, let's go for one last story which i wasn't expecting to cover this evening, but there we are. the front page of the daily star goes very big with it — page of the daily star goes very big with it - "ufos page of the daily star goes very big with it — "ufos are real". aha, page of the daily star goes very big with it - "ufos are real".— with it - "ufos are real". a great front page _ with it - "ufos are real". a great front page from _ with it - "ufos are real". a great front page from the _ with it - "ufos are real". a great front page from the daily - with it - "ufos are real". a great front page from the daily star - with it - "ufos are real". a great i front page from the daily star here, quite a difference from other pages. this is quite a story coming out of america today where we had intelligence officials briefing congress on ufos. and there were some interesting pieces that came from that — they said they've had 11 near misses with the military gaps, and they also said there had been multiple sightings of these ufos. and with the ufos, this is something that once upon a time was thought to
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be the field of conspiracy theorists are crazy people who wanted to fantasise about these things. but here we have the congress hearing first—hand from intelligence officials about the existence of these. 0ne officials about the existence of these. one thing to mention is that they did say there is no suggestion that these had extraterrestrial origins. that these had extraterrestrial oriains. �* . v that these had extraterrestrial oriains. �* ., �*, ., that these had extraterrestrial oriins. �* ., �*, ., . . ., origins. and that's quite a crucial oint we origins. and that's quite a crucial point we should _ origins. and that's quite a crucial point we should get _ origins. and that's quite a crucial point we should get in _ origins. and that's quite a crucial point we should get in there. - origins. and that's quite a crucial point we should get in there. in | origins. and that's quite a crucial. point we should get in there. in the last 30 seconds, it will this just be fuel to conspiracy theorists? 0bviously be fuel to conspiracy theorists? obviously the star is saying we should — obviously the star is saying we should give it a surprise. they would — should give it a surprise. they would require the ufo to come in and -ive would require the ufo to come in and give it— would require the ufo to come in and give it a _ would require the ufo to come in and give it a pulitzer prize. brilliantly done, thanks so much to both of you for talking us through the papers we will all be talking about tomorrow morning and throughout the day. we appreciate your time, thank you very much. the papers will be back
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again tomorrow evening join us then if you can. thanks for much for your company, join us then if you can. thanks for much foryour company, i'm louis vaughn much foryour company, i'm louis vaugthones and this is bbc news. bye—bye. good evening, this is your update from the bbc sport centre. liverpool have beaten southampton 2—1 at st mary's, to keep their title hopes alive. it all goes down to the final day — they're now one point behind premier league leaders manchester city. andy swiss reports. down to the wire we go. after a night when liverpool kept the title race alive, albeit not without a few jitters. they knew if they lost to southampton, their hopes were over, so this was all they needed. nathan redmond firing the saints ahead, leaving jurgen klopp unimpressed. he thought there'd been a foul —
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well, this at least should've cheered him up, as liverpool promptly equalised. takumi minamino lashing at home to make it all square at the break. so, could they find a winner? well, they weren't short of chances, but none of them would go in! the tension was palpable. finally, though, they got their reward. a looping header from joel matip spiking delight among the players and relief among the fans. not a goal of the season contender, perhaps but that hardly mattered. so the title race goes to the final day — and while liverpool need manchester city to slip up, they'll believe anything is still possible. andy swiss, bbc news. nottingham forest are through to the championship play—off final after beating sheffield united on penalties. brennanjohnson opened the scoring — that put forest 1—0 up on the night, and 3—1 ahead on aggregate. but sheffield united struck back, with goals from morgan gibbs—white and john fleck to make it 3—3 on aggregate and force extra time. nothing to separate them there, so penalties needed.
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and the hero of night was brice samba — the forest keeper saved three spot kicks, the final one from gibbs—white, which sparked the wild celebrations and the fans onto the pitch. forest take on huddersfield in the final later this month for a chance to be back in the top flight for the first time since 1999. steph houghton has been included in england's 28—woman provisional squad for this summer's european championships. the former captain has been out injured since january and hasn't played under boss sarina wiegman yet. however, tough news for arsenal midfielderjordan nobbs — she's been left out after picking up a knee injury earlier this month. she looks set to miss another major tournament, having not played at the 2019 world cup. yes, so the arsenal midfielder, jordan nobbs, she went to the world cup in 2015 but barely played because she went injured and wasn't really fit to play while she was out there. she's talked about how hard it was to be part of a squad that won a bronze medal, and her barely playing a minute. she missed the last world cup in 2019 because of an awful knee injury. so the fact that she's missing out
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again with a knee injury will be very hard for her to take. now the 23—player squad selection will take place mid—june. the tournament starts in 50 days today when england host austria at old trafford. manchester city are losing their all—time top goal—scorer, england midfielder georgia stanway. she'sjoining german club bayern munich. she made her senior debut for city at 16, and leaves with 57 goals in 165 appearances. the 23—year—old's last game was the fa cup final defeat to chelsea on sunday. eritrea's biniam girmay has made cycling history at the giro d'italia — he's become the first black african rider to win a stage at a grand tour. it happened on stage ten of the giro and against top—class opposition in the shape of mathieu van der poel, who put his thumb up to admit defeat as the eritrean beat him to the finish line. girmay continues to make history, having become the first black african to win a one—day classic race this season, but this is the biggest victory of the 22—year—old's career so far. british number one cameron norrie continued his preparations for the french open, with a straight—sets win at the atp event in lyon.
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top seed norrie, ranked 11th in the world, won 6—4 6—4 against argentina's francisco cerundolo to reach the quarterfinals. worcester clinched the 2022 premiership cup after a nail—biting win against london irish at brentford's community stadium. veteran forward matt kvesic scored the opening try for the warriors, catching the exiles asleep at the breakdown for a free run to the line. the victory had looked set to go to london irish, but kyle hatherall stole in at the death to force a dramatic extra time. and neither side could find the breakthrough in the added ten minutes, meaning worcester sealed the title on tries scored. well, london irish teenager henry arundell has been named in a 36—man england squad for a training camp next week. the 19—year—old only made his premiership debut in february, but he's been in blistering form. the full—back has scored 11 tries in 15 matches for irish
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and england under—20s this season. 0wen farrell, manu tuilagi, mako vunipola, and anthony watson are all back in the squad, ahead of a three—test tour in australia. some sad news to bring you — former rugby league chief executive maurice lindsay has died, aged 81. lindsay masterminded wigan's revival in the 1980s as chairman, and was heavily involved in the creation of super league in 1996. current rfl chief executive ralph rimmer said, "he will be remembered as one of the most significant leaders in the sport's history." the rebuild of english men's cricket continues. tom harrison, the chief executive of the england and wales cricket board, has resigned after seven years in charge. harrison oversaw success in limited overs cricket, with both england's women and men's teams winning the world cup. but recent failures in test cricket have seen an overhaul at the ecb, with a new test coach, captain, and managing director being appointed. harrison's biggest project was introducing a new limited—overs competition — the hundred — which started last year.
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and london—born defensive end jack crawford has announced his retirement after a ten—year career in the nfl. he was draughted by the raiders in 2012 and played for the dallas cowboys, atlanta falcons, and tennessee titans. he recorded a sack and forced fumble for the cowboys at wembley stadium against the jacksonville jaguars, which he says was his career highlight. and that's all the sport for now, we'll see you soon. hello there. rain and heavy, thundery showers has been moving their way northwards and eastwards through the night. behind it, a little bit of patchy fog, certainly a warm night and still quite a bit of rain in the north and west. and it's pretty windy, a windier day ahead across northwestern parts of both scotland and northern ireland, blowing that rain out the way. so, increasing amounts of sunshine here and for northern ireland, england and wales, as well. and it should stay drier for longer before the rain pushes towards northern ireland, and the cloud starts to build in the south ahead of potentially
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more thundery rain to come. so, 20—24 celsius, i think, in southern areas, certainly the high teens pushing towards 20 across eastern scotland and the east of northern ireland, 18 celsius. but potentially, through this evening and overnight turning much wetter, heavier, thundery rain split way north eastwards. again, towards morning, it should clear away. and a drier day on thursday, but more widely unsettled by day on friday. more online.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm mariko 0i. the headlines... president biden visits buffalo which witnessed a mass shooting at the weekend and urges americans to reject the "poison" of white supremacy. what happened here is simple and straightforward, terrorism. terrorism. domestic terrorism. also on newsday — after holding out for nearly three months — ukrainian forces leave their last refuge in mariupol. more than 200 of them are searched by the invading army — and taken to territory controlled by the russians. the bbc investigates the disappearance of a prominentjournalist who kick—started china's #metoo movement. and the leader of north korea
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condemns his health officials —

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