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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 18, 2022 10:00am-1:01pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. prices in the uk are rising at their fastest rate for a0 years, as inflation hits 9%. alongside fuel and food, soaring energy costs are driving the increase. these are a broad—based price increases, but a large part of it is energy and energy affects the prices of everything, the cost of distribution, transport and manufacture. an unnamed conservative mp, arrested on suspicion of rape and sexual assault, has been released on bail pending further police enquiries. the international criminal court has sent its biggest team ever to
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investigate the alleged war crimes. ukrainian police say they have already found the bodies of more than 1200 civilians in the kyiv region alone. and, a huge tunnel has been discovered running under the mexico us border, with its own rail track, electricity and ventilation system. authorities say it was being used to smuggle drugs. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. the uk's rate of inflation — the measure of the rise in the cost of living — has hit its highest level for a0 yea rs. and the rate at which it is increasing is the fastest since records began. it reached 9% in april, up from 7% the month before. that means the prices we pay
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for goods and services are on average 9% higher than they were last year. most of the rise was due to the large increase in energy bills after the lifting of the price cap last month. the chancellor rishi sunak blamed higher global energy prices — he said the government could not protect people completely from what he called "these global challenges" but added: "we are providing significant support where we can, and stand ready to take further action". labour said the actions the government has taken were not sufficient and repeated its calls for an emergency budget. earlier today, i spoke to our business correpondent ramzan karmali who told us inflation rates are likely to continue rising. the price cap was changed in april. it went up from around £1200 on average almost £2000, so that is a big increase and that is partly a
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massive factor in this. also, petrol is now at a record high. in april it reached £1.62 a litre. if you think about it, this time last year it was about it, this time last year it was about 40p less because of that is a significant increase. going back to what rishi sunak said it being a global issue, we still do have the highest inflation rate out of the g7 of the big seven economies around the world. the us inflation rate is 8.3%. germany is 7.4%. france is 4.8%. sadly, we are at the top of the table at the moment. yes, the bank of england have warned that inflation will go even higher, possibly up to 10%. i'm afraid, i would love to give you some good news but at the moment itjust would love to give you some good news but at the moment it just seems like we're heading in one direction. it is interesting you talk about pounds and pence because in some ways that brings it home much more than these percentages, which can all become a bit confusing. what all become a bit confusing. what will the impact _ all become a bit confusing. what will the impact be? _ all become a bit confusing. what will the impact be? one - all become a bit confusing. what will the impact be? one of- all become a bit confusing. wiat will the impact be? one of the think tanks have said the poorest people
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will be hit the hardest because they spend more money proportionally on their energy bills and on transport and any other group. so they are likely to be hit the hardest, and i think that is quite significant. it is something that has been felt across the economy. don't forget, the bank of england have put up rates. the way they say they can control inflation is by carrying on putting up rates. this is what people are worried about, that was the end of the year we could have interest rate of 2%. next year, 3%. and that also adds to the tightness on our purse. £31 and that also adds to the tightness on our purse-— on our purse. of course, don't foruet on our purse. of course, don't forget the _ on our purse. of course, don't forget the governor _ on our purse. of course, don't forget the governor of - on our purse. of course, don't forget the governor of the - on our purse. of course, don't. forget the governor of the bank on our purse. of course, don't - forget the governor of the bank of england has warned that we could see a massive rise in food prices. there is around 25 — a massive rise in food prices. there is around 25 million _ a massive rise in food prices. there is around 25 million tonnes - a massive rise in food prices. there is around 25 million tonnes of - a massive rise in food prices. there is around 25 million tonnes of grain | is around 25 million tonnes of grain in ukrainian ports that are not getting out, and that is having a massive impact, too. things like that will have an impact on our daily shop and people are seeing that, and there are things that we are seeing in our shops. we think, they are going up in price slowly but it is noticeable for sure. you have suggested _
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but it is noticeable for sure. you have suggested that things could get worse before they get better, but is there any sense of when inflation might start to come down the other side? �* ., ~ ., ., ., side? the bank of england are bettin: side? the bank of england are betting that — side? the bank of england are betting that actually, - side? the bank of england are betting that actually, inflation | betting that actually, inflation will start to come down towards the end of the year and into next year. it is hard to see how they are so confident about this, but that is their prediction, that inflation will start to come down towards the end of the year. but i think a lot of this is also dependent on how long the conflict in ukraine last because that is having an impact on our energy bills, food prices, and i think that is the major question, which the bank of england don't have an answer to, which the bank of england don't have an answerto, and nor which the bank of england don't have an answer to, and nor does the government. an answer to, and nor does the government-— an answer to, and nor does the government. �* ., , ., , government. and the covid shutdowns in china, government. and the covid shutdowns in china. there — government. and the covid shutdowns in china, there is _ government. and the covid shutdowns in china, there is a _ government. and the covid shutdowns in china, there is a supply _ government. and the covid shutdowns in china, there is a supply issue. - in china, there is a supply issue. yes, so people are having to pay more to get their goods out of areas where, for instance, car manufacturing, you know, chips on your phone is, they are all coming out of china. that is slowing down the process, and increasing prices. thank you. so, how are people coping
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with the large rises in the cost of living? 0ur correspondent coletta smith has been finding out. shopping's like a tenner more sometimes, perweek. itjust gets so much more expensive. bread, i mean, that's gone up. i think the bread that i have has gone up about 50p. kira is 19 and lives in greater manchester on her student loan and wages from her part timejob. but it's not easy. before the student loan in april, i had £17 in my bank left. nothing — no savings, no nothing. when it comes to affording shopping at the moment, how are you making ends meet? i shop less, so, i shop every two weeks now. i try and get a big batch of chicken, and then i'll freeze it all so it don't go out of date. and then, i'll make sure that i kind of split them up and make meals, and maybe make like a batch meal. kind of saw people doing this. and kira has another trick too. this is what these are — budget binders. ok, so show me inside, show me inside — i want to see! so, this is long term. she puts physical notes into binder pockets for each type
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of saving and spending. and if you get change then, if you're spending any of these, you know, tenners, and you get a bit of change, that goes into these these these massive pots? yes. 0k. so if i spend £7 of this, or £7 something, the change will go into these. so the pounds all go into here, and the silver and copper all goes into there. so there's about £60 in there at the minute. so i'll basically wait until they get full, or wait until they get to £100 or £150, and then that will go into my savings in my bank. in castleford, saving is becoming increasingly hard. cheryl and her husband both work full—time, but with their energy bills bouncing up and up, the plan to buy their own family home is feeling more like a pipe dream. i'm constantly turning everything off at the switch. every night we turn everything off. we ensure that we use a full dishwasher, full washing machine, like, full load when we're washing. so i'm sort of running out of ideas at the minute,
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because i am doing everything i can to sort of keep my energy bills as low as possible. but it is a battle, and it seems that there's not really much more i can do at the minute. how does it feel to know that those bills are going up again in the autumn? there's nothing more that i can do. it's almost like i've come to the point where i've accepted that my savings are going to be less going forward, and that'sjust what i've got to do for now. sky high petrol and diesel prices are causing problems for mike and ev. they're making hard choices about how often they can afford to visit their children and grandchildren. the hotel prices have gone up, fuel prices have gone up. and from here, stoke—on—trent, is 195 miles each way. that makes it very difficult for us to see our family on a regular basis, because you just can't afford it any more. it's not there. the money's not there. the figures don't add up. as pensioners, everything is negative. there is no...
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the only positive we've got in life is we're happy. we are happy, yes. those big drivers of inflation — fuel costs. food prices at every shop, and most of all, energy bills — are all continuing to rise, limiting choices, dreams and budgets in every home. coletta smith, bbc news. here with me now is hannah wood of bowland foods. hannah, i know that you supply butchers because you are a meat supplier, just to explain to our viewers what you do. it is good to have you with us. we are discussing this headline, an inflation rate of 9%. i wondered what your inflation rate was, how much it costs —— mark how much our cost going up for you. at the minute in agriculture is estimated that inflation is at about
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30%. of the sea, that is just a crazy amount and it is becoming very difficult forfarmers to crazy amount and it is becoming very difficult for farmers to produce a product that we are used to, and their margins are being squeezed very tightly. 0bviously with that becomes many difficulties. in the future we are going to see a definite reduction of uk producers because they margins are just so small, it's starting to get to a point where it is not ready worth it for them. and obviously, i think something that you have got to take into consideration in terms of meat is it is notjust an on or off product. 0nce is it is notjust an on or off product. once an animal is on the ground, it has got to be looked after, it has to go right through to the end process. that can take up to 15 months, really. with all the rising and increases in fuel, fertiliser, and feed costs which are astronomical, is definitely becoming difficult for the producers. just astronomical, is definitely becoming difficult for the producers.— difficult for the producers. just to to back to
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difficult for the producers. just to go back to that _ difficult for the producers. just to go back to that a _ difficult for the producers. just to go back to that a staggering - difficult for the producers. just to | go back to that a staggering figure you said, that your costs have gone up you said, that your costs have gone up by you said, that your costs have gone up by nearly a third. you mentioned fuel, fertiliser and feed. is that what is causing it, or is it anything else? it what is causing it, or is it anything else?— what is causing it, or is it anything else? what is causing it, or is it an hinuelse? , , ., ., , anything else? it seems to have been anything else? it seems to have been a bit of a mixture, _ anything else? it seems to have been a bit of a mixture, really. _ anything else? it seems to have been a bit of a mixture, really. it _ a bit of a mixture, really. it started with the pandemic. 0f a bit of a mixture, really. it started with the pandemic. of italy, for a lot of food manufacturing businesses, they had such a labour shortage, which caused a lot of places to shut. that started the peak, and since then we have seen a huge increase in all of the outside external factors, huge increase in all of the outside externalfactors, and huge increase in all of the outside external factors, and then obviously now we are starting to see a lack of supply, now we are starting to see a lack of supply, which again is driving the price up. at the moment beef and bmb price up. at the moment beef and lamb is crazy expensive, the price has newly doubled in some parts for some commodities. mt; has newly doubled in some parts for some commodities. my understanding is that the price _ some commodities. my understanding is that the price of _ some commodities. my understanding is that the price of cows _ some commodities. my understanding is that the price of cows has _ some commodities. my understanding is that the price of cows has almost i is that the price of cows has almost doubled. yes. if you are saying your prices have gone up by a third, my question to you is, are you then
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passing that price rise on to, say, the butchers you supply, and are they then passing it on to the customers that they supply? i would sa that customers that they supply? i would say that the — customers that they supply? i would say that the food _ customers that they supply? i would say that the food industry _ customers that they supply? i would say that the food industry is - customers that they supply? i would say that the food industry is quite i say that the food industry is quite unique with that. it is very difficult to pass prices on. this is something that we have never seen to these extent before, but it is something that something as an industry we have always struggled with this. it is very volatile. so it is difficult to pass prices on, however we have got to the point now where we are just saying, you know, we can't take any more, we are going to have to pass a little bit to our customers. it is difficult for them as well because they see a lot of resistance with consumers, understandably, because they have got so many rising prices in general life, notjust food. unfortunately, ithink life, notjust food. unfortunately, i think we are going to have to get used to seeing more expensive food on the shelves, definitely.— on the shelves, definitely. hannah wood from — on the shelves, definitely. hannah wood from boland _ on the shelves, definitely. hannah wood from boland foods, - on the shelves, definitely. hannah wood from boland foods, really i on the shelves, definitely. hannah i wood from boland foods, really good to have your insight. thank you for joining us. to have your insight. thank you for “oininr us. ., ~ to have your insight. thank you for “oininr us. . ,, i.
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joining me now is rebecca mcdonald, who is a senior economist at thejoesph rowntree found, a think—tank focused on tackling poverty in the uk. good to have you with us. thank you forjoining us on bbc news. what will this figure of 9% inflation mean for people, and how many new people do you think it could mean are pulled into poverty? goad are pulled into poverty? good morning- _ are pulled into poverty? good morning. this _ are pulled into poverty? good morning. this figure - are pulled into poverty? good morning. this figure is - are pulled into poverty? (13mm morning. this figure is horrendous. we have got really high levels of price rises at the moment. in march it was 7%, and now it isjumping up to 9% because these figures now incorporate the energy price cap jump incorporate the energy price cap jump that happened in april. while we will all feel the effects of that, as you say for the poorest families in the country, this is particularly devastating. partly thatis particularly devastating. partly that is because of the fact that inflation at the moment is being driven by essentials like energy bills and food costs, and it is so hard to adapt if most of your budget
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is already going on essentials. but also, the context in which this is taking place is particularly difficult because of the fact that families who receive benefits to top up families who receive benefits to top up their incomes actually, whilst inflation is at a a0 year high, the rate and the adequacy of benefits is at a 35 year low. and that contrast means that people are having to try to find the money to pay higher prices and to pay these higher bills, but actually, they have got less money in their pocket to do so. and presumably had less ability to build up lots of savings in the pandemic, which are more affluent people might have done. so, does it mean that we will see more people dragged into poverty because of this rise in cost of living? yes. dragged into poverty because of this rise in cost of living?— rise in cost of living? yes, of course- _ rise in cost of living? yes, of course- 50 — rise in cost of living? yes, of course. so what _ rise in cost of living? yes, of course. so what is _ rise in cost of living? yes, of| course. so what is happening rise in cost of living? yes, of i course. so what is happening in particular that is affecting that is at last year benefits rose by 3.1%, whilst we now know that inflation is going up by 9%. the norm is that benefits would rise with inflation, so this means there has been a huge
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real term cut in terms of incomes people are receiving and how big they are. we estimated before that cut took place that would pull around about 600,000 people into poverty as a result, and a quarter of those would—be children. because inflation is higher than i think we were expecting when we crunched those numbers, i suspect sadly that has actually gone up in terms of the number people who will be being pulled into poverty.— pulled into poverty. rebecca macdonald _ pulled into poverty. rebecca macdonald of _ pulled into poverty. rebecca macdonald of the _ pulled into poverty. rebecca macdonald of the joseph - pulled into poverty. rebecca - macdonald of the joseph rowntree macdonald of thejoseph rowntree foundation, good to talk to you, many thanks. prices in the uk are rising for the fastest rate for a0 years. alongside fuel and food, soaring energy costs are driving the increase. the international criminal court has sent its biggest ever team to ukraine to investigate alleged war crimes. ukrainian police say they have already found the bodies of
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more than 1200 civilians in kyiv alone. and an unnamed conservative mp, arrested on suspicion of rape and sexual assault has been released on bail pending further police inquiries. officials in ukraine say they're doing "everything possible and impossible" to save the remaining fighters trapped in mariupol�*s azovstal steelworks. soldiers evacuated over the last two days have been taken to a detention facility in russian—controlled territory. ukraine has urged moscow to exchange them for russian prisoners. meanwhile the prosecutor at the international criminal court has sent its biggest ever team to investigate alleged warcrimes in ukraine. earlier, we spoke to our kyiv correspondent james waterhouse, who told us that it will be a long road told us that it will be a long road to justice for ukrainians. i told us that it will be a long road to justice for ukrainians.- to 'ustice for ukrainians. i think it to justice for ukrainians. i think it is going _ to justice for ukrainians. i think it is going to — to justice for ukrainians. i think it is going to be _ to justice for ukrainians. i think it is going to be many - to justice for ukrainians. i think it is going to be many years - to justice for ukrainians. i think.
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it is going to be many years before all of the horrors of this invasion are fully uncovered. nevertheless, prosecutors are making their way here, and here in kyiv, the trial will start later today of a russian soldier accused of shooting a man dead as he pushed his bike. we have been to a town which became one of the most heavily shelled places so far in this invasion, and we met one man who those prosecutors are investigating on behalf of. the story of ukraine's war isn't over, but so many lives are. there is nothing here that resembles ivan's home. then you look closer, and realise it's notjust rubble.
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with extraordinary composure and detail, ivan shows me what he's lost. translation: we found my mother dead on the fridge here. _ and then we kept searching. 200 metres away, he found his brother next to his dog. then he found his grandmother, covered in bricks. then his one—year—old daughter on a sofa, still breathing. then his wife. then his father. translation: it was a horror. - very scary and hard to understand. you hope that someone was still alive, hiding in a basement. all he's left with are memories and pictures. paulina died the same day. ivan lost six of his family. this is the police station where ivan was working when his home was hit. now, ivan isn't
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interested injustice. in his words, he wants the russians who carried out that attack to die inside ukraine, to send a message. but the police force he works for, says it is working towards holding those russians to account. but that is a long way off, if it happens at all. today, ivan has a new police station to go to, and is also being recognised by the head of ukraine's national police. translation: we will remember the heroism and also _ the grief of our people. the most important thing is that police will be close to people, and they will know where to come for help. ivan is given an award for courage. he helped people escape after the russians moved in, even after losing everything. applause. translation: my relatives are upset,
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crying, especially when we go - to a cemetery and see six graves there. every time you go there, you cry. ivan's life has changed forever. so has his country. we have received some figures from the russian defence ministry who say it is a total of 959 ukrainian fighters, including 80 windows that have surrendered from the bunkers and tunnels below the steelworks in mariupol. that is since monday. the defence ministry said 69a ukrainian fighters have surrendered in the past 2a hours. my question to you is do those figures sound about right, and do you have any sense of the
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fate that awaits those fighters? 0n the former point, those figures do sound about right. those people include fighters, soldiers, marines, volunteers. they include police officers to that have been holed up in that soviet—era nuclear plant for the last a0 days. a number of fighters have made it out, they have been taken on buses to russian occupied territory to a detention centre. i think what we can take from that is that the fighting has stopped, but there are still hundreds of fighters are still there. clearly they have received orders to not fight any more, but president zelensky is saying diplomatic efforts are very much happening to try and secure a favourable outcome. he says it is delicate and it will take time. this is the difficult question that the ukrainian government will want answering. what is going to happen
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to them? they have no military influence on this area now. mariupol has fallen, the second major city to do so in this war. those men, if they make it out, are likely to be taken to russian occupied territory. president putin has said, we will follow international laws in treating these people, but at the same time, politicians in moscow are drawing up plans to recognise some of them as war criminals. when that happens, it makes the ideal of any kind of prisoner of war exchange extremely unlikely, and it is often prisoner exchanges that lead to people being released in times of war. but on the battlefield, we have seen prosecutors pursuing justice, thatis seen prosecutors pursuing justice, that is significant. but fighting is continuing and on the battlefield, it means russia now holds a sizeable corridor to the south and east of ukraine. yes, the russians have been pushed back. yes, they have had to revise their aims in this so—called special military operation. but a
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large part of ukraine is not in the control of ukraine, and this war is showing no signs of an outcome, as ever, frankly, with peace talks very much on hold. 0ur correspondence james waterhouse in kyiv talking to us a little earlier. finland and sweden have formally applied to join the nato military alliance. ambassadors from the two countries handed in their applications to nato secretary general, jens stoltenberg, a little earlier. it sets in motion an accession process that could take a little as a few weeks, initiated in the wake of russia's invasion of ukraine. nato member turkey has stated its opposition to the two nordic countries joining. the applications you have made today are an historic step. allies will now consider the next steps on the path to nato. the security interests of all allies have to be taken into account. and we are determined
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to work through all issues and reach rapid conclusions. let's talk to kenneth forslund, member of parliament for sweden's governing social democrats, and head of its the foreign affairs committee. good morning. good morning. your .a l good morning. good morning. your -a , the good morning. good morning. your party. the social— good morning. good morning. your party, the social democrats, - good morning. good morning. your party, the social democrats, have l party, the social democrats, have opposed nato membership for more than seven decades. 0bviously, opposed nato membership for more than seven decades. obviously, it has now changed its mind, and i'm assuming that is in the wake of the invasion of ukraine by russia. is that right? yes, definitely so. the long time nonalignment of sweden, more than 200 years, has been founded on the respect of the helsinki treaty back in 1975, and since russia is now so totally breaking it, that also breaks the
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foundation for the swedish nonalignment that is our evaluation of the situation.— of the situation. nonetheless, the swedish pro _ of the situation. nonetheless, the swedish pro minister— of the situation. nonetheless, the swedish pro minister has - of the situation. nonetheless, the swedish pro minister has said - of the situation. nonetheless, the | swedish pro minister has said there will be no permanent nato military bases on its soil. there will be no nuclear weapons on swedish soil either. so i suppose, how committed is sweden? how fully committed is sweden to nato membership? sweden and finland have _ sweden to nato membership? sweden and finland have close _ sweden to nato membership? sweden and finland have close cooperation - and finland have close cooperation and finland have close cooperation and partnership with nato, and too many nato officials sweden and finland are very closely associated and engaged than some of the alliance members, actually. so it will be a full support in sweden. swedish people in general, when we do something we do it wholeheartedly.- do something we do it wholeheartedl . ., , wholeheartedly. the kremlin has said however that — wholeheartedly. the kremlin has said however that if _ wholeheartedly. the kremlin has said however that if sweden _ wholeheartedly. the kremlin has said however that if sweden and _
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wholeheartedly. the kremlin has said however that if sweden and finland . however that if sweden and finland join nato it will trigger a russian response. how concerned are you that joining nato might actually make sweden more vulnerable? weill. joining nato might actually make sweden more vulnerable? well, i think that the — sweden more vulnerable? well, i think that the vulnerable - sweden more vulnerable? well, i think that the vulnerable period l sweden more vulnerable? well, i | think that the vulnerable period is right now, when we are in between nonalignment and future membership. we have strengthened our capacities and awareness due to that. i think that one of the effects, especially for land entering nato, is that we would see an increase of military presence along that 13a miles of border between finland and russia. that doesn't really help with whatever regime there is in russia. that is one of the consequences that
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i have been pointing out for a long period of time, of the membership for especially finland but also sweden of nato. now i think that we will see in the future, not the near future since the russian troops are heavily engaged in ukraine at the moment, but in the longer term. this moment, but in the longer term. as ou moment, but in the longer term. as you say, the application has been handed in, and now you are in this period of waiting, aren't you? how confident are you that turkey will back your application, and is there any sense in the government about the swedish government might change its policies in order to make sure that turkey doesn't support the application?— application? well, the swedish government. — application? well, the swedish government, and _ application? well, the swedish government, and whatever - application? well, the swedish - government, and whatever swedish government, and whatever swedish government there is, we are going up to an election in september, will stick to the eu lists of sanction organisations and different eu mechanisms, so they won't be any
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changes in this swedish policy. the turkish reaction, i think, was rather predictable. we have seen that before when it has been about other countries seeking full membership in nato. turkey has often had different demands and there has been a wave of negotiations and discussions within the alliance. member of parliament for sweden 's governing social democrats, and head of its foreign affairs committee, many thanks forjoining us on bbc news. a conservative mp has been released on bail after being arrested on suspicion of rape and sexual assault. the allegations date back to between 2002 and 2009. the mp has been asked by the party's whips not to attend parliament while the police investigation is ongoing. joining us us now from westminster — mike clancy who is the general
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secretary of the prospect union which represents some staff in parliament. it has been calling for some time for parliament's rules to be changed for mps being investigated for sexual misconduct. we will come onto that in a minute. 0bviously, we will come onto that in a minute. obviously, we can't really go into the specific case while it is ongoing, but tell us about your general concerns, if you would. well, all too regularly parliament has been called into question. we have been saying for some time that parliament needs to make sure it has standards because it is, after all, a workplace and must conform with workplaces up and down the country, and in particular, it is inadequate that mps arejust and in particular, it is inadequate that mps are just asked to stay away if an issue of this important, sensitivity and magnitude rises. it should be capable of keeping them away. unions are well versed with dealing with these issues, and it
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often embodies a precautionary suspension notjudging the merits of the case, but make sure that those involved in the complaints and perhaps the victim of a properly protected. this is a workplace parliament and it needs to be safe for people to go to work.— parliament and it needs to be safe for people to go to work. when you say requiring _ for people to go to work. when you say requiring them _ for people to go to work. when you say requiring them to _ for people to go to work. when you say requiring them to stay - for people to go to work. when you say requiring them to stay away, i l say requiring them to stay away, i suppose it raises the issue, doesn't it, that you are innocent until proven guilty? in effect, by banning someone from the workplace, are you perhaps prejudging whether they are innocent or guilty?— innocent or guilty? employers who are listening _ innocent or guilty? employers who are listening to _ innocent or guilty? employers who are listening to this _ innocent or guilty? employers who are listening to this will _ innocent or guilty? employers who are listening to this will know - innocent or guilty? employers who are listening to this will know that | are listening to this will know that their policies deal with these sorts of issues by ensuring there is separation and does not prejudge the issues. the words are clear. we can work with parliamentary authorities, a conference to deal with these matters in a way that recognises the circumstances of parliament, but parliament needs to start presenting itself as a totally unique because
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itself as a totally unique because it looks detached, people know what is right and wrong in the workplace and they know when these things, they need to be dealt with in an appropriate way. we wrote in april, and were rejected by the parliamentary procedure committee, the chair, to have an inquiry into this process. it would have been better if they had engaged with us on this and we found some solutions. this cannot carry on. what does it take for change to happen in parliament? when it should be the beacon of good behaviour given that they are actually passing laws which affect all of us.— affect all of us. really good to talk to you- — affect all of us. really good to talk to you. many _ affect all of us. really good to talk to you. many thanks. - sport now, and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good morning. it's been another busy morning in english cricket. yesterday we found out chief executive tom harrison was stepping down and now we've get a first look at a new era of test cricket and also a new coach is hired.
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0ur sports correspondentjoe wilson is with me now, joe a first look at brendan mccullom's test side to face new zealand... what is that looking like? as you said, a what is that looking like? as you said. a new _ what is that looking like? as you said, a new era, _ what is that looking like? as you said, a new era, ben _ what is that looking like? as you said, a new era, ben stokes - what is that looking like? as you said, a new era, ben stokes is i what is that looking like? as you | said, a new era, ben stokes is the new captain, would you believe two of the most familiar names back in the squad, james anderson and stuart broad who will turn a0 and 36 respectively this summer. it only feels like yesterday i was sitting in the chair talking about england moving on with their series in the caribbean, here we are at the start of another english summer and there they are back in the squad. they want to play bold, aggressive imaginative test cricket, i can promise you i was going to make you the most imaginative meal i ever had, ifi the most imaginative meal i ever had, if i open the fridge and i don't have the ingredients i can only use what is there. this test squad, we have got two new players,
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some guys who have tried and not come off, but they need that experience future... the future is the next game because we are almost forgetting the last time the one a test match. forgetting the last time the one a test match-— forgetting the last time the one a test match. ~._ , ., , ., test match. maybe not quite in your area with those _ test match. maybe not quite in your area with those familiar— test match. maybe not quite in your area with those familiar faces, - test match. maybe not quite in your area with those familiar faces, but l area with those familiar faces, but in the game we may have a new coach who is going to be taking over. remember england are splitting the coaching role, it will be the white ball cricket, it is an interesting appointment because he has made his name in women's cricket, coaching the australian women's team, it is a sign of stature and credibility of women's cricket that england with recruit from there, he is an extremely and, he has experience, and played state cricket in australia, he is good friends with brendon mccullum. when we look at england trying to move on, these two
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crucial coaching appointments, they both come from overseas.— crucial coaching appointments, they both come from overseas. thank you ve much both come from overseas. thank you very much for— both come from overseas. thank you very much forjoining _ both come from overseas. thank you very much forjoining us. _ it's one of the biggest matches in rangers' history and and tens of thousands of fans are in seville to support them ahead of the europa league final. police expected up to a hundred thousand supporters to travel to the spanish city for the match against eintract frankfurt — who'll bring 50,000 of their own fans. the stadium hosting the final can only hostjust under a3 thousand. ticketless rangers fans will also be able to watch the match in the north of seville at a 57,000 capacity stadium. this could be one of the great moments, they have been to european venues before, it is 1972 still since the 11. for rangers fans, this is a day never to forget. if you look around here, there are if you
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eintracht frankfurt fans but everywhere you look the colour is blue. it is a massive day for scottish football and if rangers can win, going forward, the effect not only the glory, but financially as well is absolutely incredible. it is going to be a fight to the finish it's going to be a fight to the finish in the race for the premier league title after liverpool fought back to beat southampton 2—1 at st mary's... the saints went ahead before liverpool struck twice ; theirfirst goal a superb shot from takumi minamino. joel matip with the winner. jurgen klopp's side are a point behind defending champions manchester city ahead of the final day on sunday. and staying with english football, a man has been arrested after the sheffield united captain billy sharp was assaulted as his side lost to nottingham forrest on penalties in their championship play—off semi final... sharp was knocked to the ground during a pitch invasion and required stitches. he's taken to social media in the last hour to thank fans for their support. forrest have apologised and said they will be issuing a lifetime ban.
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that's all the sport for now. let's get some more now on the international criminal court sending its biggest ever team to ukraine to investigate alleged war crimes. maria varaki is co—director of the war crimes research group at king's college london. good to have you with us. this is the largest ever team the international criminal court has ever sent to ukraine. what does that tell us? ,., ., ., , tell us? good morning. it is true, it is an unprecedented _ tell us? good morning. it is true, . it is an unprecedented development. the icc sent the largest ever investigative team to the territory of ukraine. this moment indicates the will of the international community to support the effort of the... and the commitment to collect and preserve evidence for future use
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before any international proceedings.— before any international proceedings. before any international ”roceedins. ., , before any international ”roceedins. ., , proceedings. can you give us a sense of what the — proceedings. can you give us a sense of what the investigators _ proceedings. can you give us a sense of what the investigators will - proceedings. can you give us a sense of what the investigators will do? - of what the investigators will do? the investigators are on the ground, expert forensic experts, the try to collect evidence, forensic evidence but also evidence we have from new tools, new technology has provided us with. satellite images, drone footage, testimonies of wetness from the ground, they are trying to collect this evidence to substantiate, to verify this evidence in order to have an incredible database for future proceedings. this is a coordinated effort, several seconded experts from the international criminal court and the ukrainian investigators on the ground, so this is a massive effort and they want to
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make sure that any evidence will not be lost. ., , ., ., , be lost. you explain that very well, can ou be lost. you explain that very well, can you exoiain _ be lost. you explain that very well, can you explain exactly _ be lost. you explain that very well, can you explain exactly what - can you explain exactly what constitutes a war crime? aha, can you explain exactly what constitutes a war crime? a war crime is a serious — constitutes a war crime? a war crime is a serious violation _ constitutes a war crime? a war crime is a serious violation of _ is a serious violation of international humanitarian law, the law relating to the regulation of conduct, because in a war, there are rules and limits. to give you an example, deliberate killing of a civilian is a war crime. indiscriminate attacks against civilians objects as a war crime. executions, torture, forced disappearance is a war crime taking place within the context of a non—conflict. to date human rights watch reported and themselves, large scale atrocities that have been committed by russian forces on the territory of ukraine. we have
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evidence that war crimes have been committed and that is why the international criminal court and the international community as a whole has been activated in order to make sure that the evidence will not be lost. ., ., ,., ., , lost. tell me more about who they could t , lost. tell me more about who they could try, because _ lost. tell me more about who they could try, because we _ lost. tell me more about who they could try, because we have - lost. tell me more about who they could try, because we have seen i lost. tell me more about who they i could try, because we have seen the ukrainian trial of a 21—year—old russian soldier. is it going to be trials like that or could it go much further up to the very top and president putin himself? it depends the evidence. _ president putin himself? it depends the evidence, we _ president putin himself? it depends the evidence, we need _ president putin himself? it depends the evidence, we need credible - the evidence, we need credible evidence, it is challenging for the investigators to find credible evidence. as you have said, today in ukraine we have the trial of a 21—year—old russian soldier is prosecuted for the killing of a civilian. what we will see in the future will be various trials,
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whether they are domestic which is something we have in ukraine are other countries where a restriction has been activated, or an internationalforum. the international criminal court prosecutes and investigates the most responsible offenders for the crimes under thejurisdiction responsible offenders for the crimes under the jurisdiction of the icc. as i said, we will see, i am sure we will see from junior officers such as officers on the ground to military commanders depending on the evidence, and why not even to all the way, if the establish a chain of command, to political leaders. thank ou ve command, to political leaders. thank you very much _ command, to political leaders. thank you very much for — command, to political leaders. thank you very much for your— command, to political leaders. thank you very much for your insight. - in afghanistan, secret schools are being set up to educate girls — whom the taliban are not allowing back into the classroom. the leadership continues to insist girls' secondary schools
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will eventually re—open, but many afghans are losing hope. secunder kermani has been to one secret school and sent this report. hidden away in a residential neighbourhood... ..a small but powerful act of defiance. these teenage girls — like most in the country — have not been allowed back to school by the taliban... ..so they are attending lessons secretly. today's class, trigonometry. for their security, we are not revealing anyone's name or identity. are you afraid of what could happen to you? if they arrest me, they beat me... but it's worth it to do that. it's worth it? of course, of course it's worth it. back in march, it seemed girls' schools were finally reopening — but at the last minute, the taliban leadership overruled the decision. for students here,
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the pain is still raw. translation: on the day we went to school, they told us it is not - clear if girls will be allowed or not. perhaps they will, later on. it has been two months now and it has not happened. it makes me so sad. younger girls have been allowed back to school, but it is not clear when — or if — older girls will be. the taliban say they need to create the correct islamic environment first. taliban officials admit that female education is a sensitive issue for them, with some influential hardliners apparently opposed to it. but in private, others within the group have expressed their disappointment at the decision not to allow all girls' schools to reopen. a number of religious scholars linked to the taliban have made public declarations in support of the right of girls to learn. sheikh rahimullah haqqani is an afghan cleric,
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well respected by the taliban, based in pakistan. on a recent trip to kabul, he met seniorfigures in the group. he's careful not to criticise the continued closure of girls' schools, but has issued a religious decree stating they can and should be educated. translation: there is no | justification in sharia to say female education is not allowed, no justification at all. all the religious books have stated female education is permissible and obligatory because, for example, if a woman gets sick in an islamic environment like afghanistan or pakistan, and needs treatment, it is much better if she is treated by a female doctor. boys of all ages are back in the classroom, but the taliban have now formed a committee to debate what to do about girls' secondary schools.
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for now, it seems, their most hardline elements are the ones deciding what the country's future will look like. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. the met office says extreme heatwaves in south asia have been made more than 100 times more likely because of climate change. temperatures once predicted to occur every 300 years, could now be experienced three times a decade. 0ur climate editor justin rowlatt is here. tell us more about what they have been saying. tell us more about what they have been saying-— tell us more about what they have been saying. increasingly, weather forecast have _ been saying. increasingly, weather forecast have discerned _ been saying. increasingly, weather forecast have discerned the - forecast have discerned the fingerprint of climate change and extreme weather events, they have been looking back at a heat wave in 2010, a record, looking at how climate change has made the likelihood of an event like that happening more probable and they found that it is 100 times more likely, once every three years, this
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is released at a time when india and pakistan have experienced a series of heatwaves with record temperatures. pakistan, 51 celsius, india at the weekend, a9.2 celsius, a timely report emphasising how much climate change is already changing our world. , ., , our world. there is more in this re ort our world. there is more in this report than _ our world. there is more in this report than that. _ our world. there is more in this report than that. there - our world. there is more in this report than that. there is - our world. there is more in this report than that. there is a - report than that. there is a separate — report than that. there is a separate report _ report than that. there is a separate report from - report than that. there is a separate report from the i report than that. there is a - separate report from the world meteorological organisation which they do every year, a state of the climate, taking stock where we are at, a worrying headline, four key indicators of planetary health, sea level rise, ocean heat, how hot the sea has become, 90% of the heat that goes into the earth goes into the ocean than the atmosphere, all reached record levels in 2021. it is quite interesting because i was chatting to equality, and he was
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like, that always goes up. but that is the point, we have to emphasise these things. more acidic oceans and hotter oceans make it more challenging for animals and plants to survive in the sea. it is absolutely crucial to the fundamental ecosystems of the world that they remain healthy. i think it is really important they are drawing attention to this. the un january secretarial said the state of the climate report is a litany of humanity's failure to tackle climate change. underscoring the secretary—general there, the importance of tackling these key climate issues, yes, there is a lot happening in the world, but we really do have to focus on this because this will determine the planet that our future generation survive in. we need to grasp this now even though there are other issues on the horizon.— now even though there are other issues on the horizon. other issues, of course. — issues on the horizon. other issues, of course. the _ issues on the horizon. other issues, of course, the energy _ issues on the horizon. other issues, of course, the energy crisis - issues on the horizon. other issues, of course, the energy crisis caused i of course, the energy crisis caused by the war in ukraine and eu leaders
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are meeting to discuss that today. it is not only the un focusing on this. , ., ., ~ ., .., this. the un is looking how it can move away _ this. the un is looking how it can move away from _ this. the un is looking how it can move away from russian - this. the un is looking how it can move away from russian oil- this. the un is looking how it can - move away from russian oil and gas, they have a big meeting and they are looking at what they can do to break the link between the eu and russia. they are looking, partly, investing in fossil fuels, they are looking, partly, investing infossilfuels, liquefied they are looking, partly, investing in fossilfuels, liquefied gas terminals so they can import gas from all around the world. lots of people produce it but we don't have the terminals to use it at the moment. there is also a huge component investment in renewables. we are expecting ambitious targets for solar and wind in europe coming out of this meeting at lunchtime today. out of this meeting at lunchtime toda . , , , ., a new report says one—sixth of all deaths worldwide can be directly linked to some form of pollution. scientists say the number of people killed by pollution annually — nine million — hasn't changed in recent years,
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but the causes have. the say in a report in the lancet that some modest improvements in the situation have been cancelled out by uncontrolled industrialisation. the headlines on bbc news... prices in the uk are rising at their fastest rate for a0 years, as inflation hits 9%. alongside fuel and food, soaring energy costs are driving the increase. the international criminal court has sent its biggest ever team to ukraine to investigate alleged war crimes. ukrainian police say they've already found the bodies of more than 1,200 civilians in the kyiv region alone. an unnamed conservative mp, arrested on suspicion of rape and sexual assault, has been released on bail pending further police enquiries. new figures from the nursing and midwifery council show half
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of the new nurses and midwives registered to work in the uk in the past year have come from abroad. india and the philippines are the countries which are supplying the most. it comes as the uk has struggled to increase the number of home—grown nurses joining the register. with me now is pat cullen, chief executive at the royal college of nursing. good to have you with us. can you give us your view about why we are finding it so difficult to recruit and retain nurses in this country? you are right in saying that of the a8,000 nurses thatjoin the register in the last year, half of those nurses have come from overseas countries and it is those countries outside the european economic area which is interesting. international nurses come here from countries that the world health organization have
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categorised as no—go or red list countries. that is worrying, countries. that is worrying, countries like ghana and nigeria who have critical workforce issues of their own and yet our government is heavily reliant on taking those nurses from those countries who have serious problems of their own. there is nothing ethical about that and whilst we are a country that welcomes those nurses with open arms, they are an incredible, they make incredible contributions to our profession and to the patients the care for and we welcome them with open arms, but the fact of the matter is our government needs to take responsibility for growing their own domestic workforce in the uk. right across the uk, in scotland, wales, northern ireland andindeedin scotland, wales, northern ireland and indeed in england where we have tens of thousands of vacancies. my
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original question, why are we struggling to recruit in the uk? the government says it is sustainable, the recruiting of people from overseas, why are we struggling to recruit so many here in the uk? we do not recruit so many here in the uk? - do not treat nurses properly in the uk. if you think of nurses coming out of their registration and their training with thousands and thousands of pounds of debt. that is not sustainable for a young nurse earning £25,000 for many years after the qualified, that is not sustainable. the second thing is they are going into a workforce where they are receiving the lowest pay they can possibly provide for a registered nurse after spending three years at university. are going into a workforce, services under enormous pressure with long waiting lists, thousands of vacancies, and if you look at this report today, what it is really saying when you
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ask those nurses why they are leaving the profession prematurely they say it is because of the workforce cultures that predominantly we are losing nurses. if you see that a8,000 nurses are joining, over25,000 nurses if you see that a8,000 nurses are joining, over 25,000 nurses left last year. if you asked them why they left, for the reasons i said, they left, for the reasons i said, they can no longer tolerate the pressures they are working under in the system. pressures they are working under in the system-— pressures they are working under in the s stem. ., , , , the system. some leave because they are retirin: the system. some leave because they are retiring and _ the system. some leave because they are retiring and you _ the system. some leave because they are retiring and you would _ the system. some leave because they are retiring and you would expect - are retiring and you would expect that to happen, what about the introduction by the government of a maintenance grant which was introduced in 2020 to help nurses financially? that is not necessarily going to have an impact in the short term, but in the longer term, could that help improve the situation? what would really improve the situation is to reinstate the bursary available in other countries. that's really important. we have seen and crosses in the
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other countries in those areas where the bursary has been retained. in england it was withdrawn. that was the start of nurses feeling under enormous pressure. if you think their pay has not kept up with the pressures they are under financially as well, lowest pay award you can possibly give them, this year, nurses finding that they are struggling significantly to pay their bills. and having to work additional hours, extra jobs, and those nurses that are working significantly additional hours and not getting paid for them, nurses constantly continue to keep the health service afloat. it really as over to government now to step up to the plate and do the right thing for nurses because when you do the right thing for nurses, you do the right thing for nurses, you do the right thing for nurses, you do the right thing for patients.— thing for nurses, you do the right thing for patients. from the royal colle . e thing for patients. from the royal colleae of thing for patients. from the royal college of nursing, _ thing for patients. from the royal college of nursing, thank - thing for patients. from the royal college of nursing, thank you - thing for patients. from the royal| college of nursing, thank you very much.
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federal agents in the united states have discovered what they think is the longest and most sophisticated drug smuggling tunnel they've ever seen. it links tijuana in mexico with san diego in california and is equipped with its own railway track, electricity and ventilation system. 0ur north america correspondent david willis has the story. in a san diego warehouse, officials discovered a hole carved into the concrete floor. it led them to a series of subterranean passageways, roughly six storeys deep. along rail tracks you can see on the ground, it's thought a mexican cartel smuggled vast quantities of illegal drugs under the border and into the united states. by no means the first such venture of its kind but — complete with electricity and ventilation — undoubtedly one of the more sophisticated. the tunnel leads all the way to a house in the mexican border town of tijuana, and one very bemused owner. "i came back from a stroll and now they won't let me enter my home," says javierjimenez.
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"i wasn't aware of anything going on, it was all hidden. i didn't hear a thing. in 12 years of living here i've never seen anything suspicious, nothing at all." 0fficials seized cocaine, heroin and methamphetamine with an estimated street value of $25 million. six people from california have been arrested. army officials are now guarding the entrance to the tunnel on the mexican side of the border, before the us side is filled with concrete. a local us attorney said there was no more light at the end of this narco tunnel, but it's likely others may emerge to take its place. biniam girmay, who made history on tuesday when he became the first black african to win a stage on one of cycling's three grand tours, has had to pull out of the giro d'italia with an unfortunate injury. he claimed victory on stage 10, but his team confirmed that the 22—year—old eritrean has
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had to withdraw from the rest of the race after he was struck in the eye by the cork when fumbling with a magnum of champagne on the winners' podium. he was taken to hospital straight after the presentation after being struck in the left eye. you are watching bbc news. yesterday we brought a high of 27.5 degrees at heathrow airport, the warmest day of the year so far. today it is not as warm, pleasant in the sunshine, but later in the afternoon and into the evening we will see some heavy thundery rain. the satellite picture shows cloud to the west of us, low pressure, one band of cloud bringing rain across scotland over night, clearing north—east, more cloud in the south—west. for most of us, a little sunshine, quite breezy in the
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west, some rain in northern ireland later, cloud in the parts of wales and into the midlands. highest temperatures across east and south—east england, 2a celsius. north—east scotland, 20 celsius. in the evening, rain in northern ireland but really wet weather overnight east wales and central and eastern england. a potentialfor severe thunderstorms with torrential rain, could cause localised flooding, some hail possible as well. it will clear to the east, some rain across scotland as well. by some rain across scotland as well. by the end of the night most places will be dry and clear. temperatures lower, towards the west, but for most e—mailed night. rain first thing tomorrow possibly in the south—east corner, in a few showers in the north west of scotland. elsewhere, a decent day, spells of
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sunshine, quite breezy in the west and north west, lighter winds further south and east. temperatures 23 degrees in the south—east corner, 17 degrees in glasgow and belfast. friday, one weather system close to the south—east of england, some rain here. a frontal system pushing in from the west, outbreaks of rain in northern ireland, scotland, west of england, and wales. dry gaps in between. temperatures, 15 celsius in aberdeen and 19 celsius in london. at the weekend, dry in the south, further north, more cloud bringing some rain at times.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling. the headlines at 11. prices are rising at their fastest rate for a0 years, as inflation hits 9%. alongside fuel and food, soaring energy costs are driving the increase. these are broad based price increases, but a large part of it is due to energy and of course energy affects the prices of everything else, because it affects the cost of distribution, transport, manufacture. that pushes up prices for other goods. boris johnson is likely to face questions about the government's response to the rising cost of living at prime minister's questions, coming up just after midday. the international criminal court has sent its biggest ever team to ukraine to investigate alleged war crimes. ukrainian police say they've already found the bodies of more than 1200 civilians in the kyiv region alone. the family of a teenage girl who died from an allergic reaction
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to a baguette are setting up a clinical trial to see if everyday food products could be used to treat serious allergies. and a huge tunnel has been discovered running under the mexico us border, with its own rail track, electricity and ventilation system. authorities say it was being used to smuggle drugs. the uk's rate of inflation — the measure of the rise in the cost of living — has hit its highest level for a0 yea rs. and the rate at which it is increasing is the fastest since records began. it reached 9% in april, up from 7% the month before. that means the prices we pay for goods and services are on average 9% higher than they were last year.
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most of the rise was due to the large increase in energy bills after the lifting of the price cap last month. the chancellor rishi sunak blamed higher global energy prices — he said the government could not protect people completely from what he called "these global challenges" but added, "we are providing significant support where we can, and stand ready to take further action". labour said the actions the government has taken were not sufficient and repeated its calls for an emergency budget. our business correspondent andy verity is here. inflation is at 9%, that's something that many of us won't have experienced before and went remember. i experienced before and went remember-— experienced before and went remember. ~ ., ., ., remember. i don't know how old you are but i remember. i don't know how old you are but i can — remember. i don't know how old you are but i can just _ remember. i don't know how old you are but i can just about _ remember. i don't know how old you are but i can just about remember i are but i canjust about remember when inflation was higher, march 1982 was the last time it was this high and then it got up to above 9%. our older viewers will remember the 0ur older viewers will remember the 19705 0ur older viewers will remember the 1970s when it was 20 or 25%. this isn't a record rate although it is a
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record acceleration, going from 7% to 9% is faster than we've had as an acceleration of price rises for a very long time. it reflects the success of policy in a way, in controlling inflation for the last 30 or a0 years. but there's a few things pushing inflation up and it is largely global, a series of supply shocks, shocks to the supply of global commodities from petrol to gas to wheat. 0ne of global commodities from petrol to gas to wheat. one is the reopening of the economy post—pandemic and the other of course is the war in ukraine, which has disrupted the supply of gas and wheat. those go into things like pasta and bread and that's why you are seeing a domino effect of those price rises flooding over into other price rises. 50. effect of those price rises flooding over into other price rises. so, how lona over into other price rises. so, how long might — over into other price rises. so, how long might it— over into other price rises. so, how long might it go — over into other price rises. so, how long might it go on _ over into other price rises. so, how long might it go on and _ over into other price rises. so, how long might it go on and how - over into other price rises. so, how long might it go on and how high i over into other price rises. so, howl long might it go on and how high my it go? we long might it go on and how high my it to? ~ ., , long might it go on and how high my it to? . ., , ., it go? we are putting a finger in the wind, it go? we are putting a finger in the wind. we — it go? we are putting a finger in the wind, we can't _ it go? we are putting a finger in the wind, we can't know- it go? we are putting a finger in the wind, we can't know for- it go? we are putting a finger in | the wind, we can't know for sure it go? we are putting a finger in - the wind, we can't know for sure but if you look at the official forecast from the bank of england they are
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saying it will get up into double figures at the other end of the year and will have to raise interest rates to try to control inflation in the medium term, but after peaking later this year they are hoping it will subside. inflation is an annual leisure so you're comparing prices now with one year ago. you get to a yearfrom here and now with one year ago. you get to a year from here and you've no longer got that big shock price rise in fuel and energy that we've had in the last couple of months. so, it drops out of the equation so it will be quite hard to see this kind of price rise repeated again next year and therefore global causes of inflationary pressure being repeated. the danger lies in the domestication of it, if people say we are seeing these rises in the cost of living, we've got to have much bigger rises in pay. at the moment our pay isn't keeping up, living standards are falling and if we then had double digit rises in wages to match the rise in inflation, that is the danger of a wage price spiral and the bank of england gets more worried. bud wage price spiral and the bank of england gets more worried. and the word stagflation _ england gets more worried. and the
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word stagflation occasionally - england gets more worried. and the word stagflation occasionally creeps| word stagflation occasionally creeps up. i rememberthe word stagflation occasionally creeps up. i remember the last time we were discussing it it drifted away. how real is the prospect of that and explain exactly what it is. stagflation is a compound word combining stagnation, when you don't have any growth in economic activity and inflation when you have rising prices. normally they don't go together. stagnation goes with recession, depression, when economic activity is falling. price rises tend to go with what is regarded as an overheating, when the economy is growing faster than its capacity. at the moment you have both, you have the moment you have both, you have the economy flatlining, hardly growing at all, and you have inflation at the same time. that word was first coined in the 1970s and the situation now is more like the 1970s than what we had for a long time, with one difference. in the 70s, wages often exceed the price rises so living standards were maintained, whereas now we are seeing living standards. haifa
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maintained, whereas now we are seeing living standards. how long did it last in _ seeing living standards. how long did it last in the — seeing living standards. how long did it last in the 70s? _ seeing living standards. how long did it last in the 70s? if _ seeing living standards. how long did it last in the 70s? if you - seeing living standards. how long did it last in the 70s? if you lookl did it last in the 70s? if you look at inflation _ did it last in the 70s? if you look at inflation from _ did it last in the 70s? if you look at inflation from 1970 _ did it last in the 70s? if you look at inflation from 1970 to - did it last in the 70s? if you look at inflation from 1970 to 1980, | did it last in the 70s? if you look at inflation from 1970 to 1980, it was often in double digits throughout that time but because pay rises or higher, living standards didn't necessarily suffer.- didn't necessarily suffer. thank ou. didn't necessarily suffer. thank you- how _ didn't necessarily suffer. thank you- how are — didn't necessarily suffer. thank you. how are people _ didn't necessarily suffer. thank you. how are people coping - didn't necessarily suffer. thank. you. how are people coping with didn't necessarily suffer. thank - you. how are people coping with the large rises in the cost of living? 0ur correspondent coletta smith has been finding out. shopping's like a tenner more sometimes, perweek. itjust gets so much more expensive. bread, i mean, that's gone up. i think the bread that i have has gone up about 50p. kira is 19 and lives in greater manchester on her student loan and wages from her part timejob. but it's not easy. before the student loan in april, i had £17 in my bank left. nothing — no savings, no nothing. when it comes to affording shopping at the moment, how are you making ends meet? i shop less, so, i shop every two weeks now. i try and get a big batch of chicken, and then i'll freeze it all so it don't go out of date. and then, i'll make sure that i kind of split them up and make meals, and maybe make like a batch meal.
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kind of saw people doing this. and kira has another trick too. this is what these are — budget binders. ok, so show me inside, show me inside — i want to see! so, this is long term. she puts physical notes into binder pockets for each type of saving and spending. and if you get change then, if you're spending any of these, you know, tenners, and you get a bit of change, that goes into these these these massive pots? yes. 0k. so if i spend £7 of this, or £7 something, the change will go into these. so the pounds all go into here, and the silver and copper all goes into there. so there's about £60 in there at the minute. so i'll basically wait until they get full, or wait until they get to £100 or £150, and then that will go into my savings in my bank. in castleford, saving is becoming increasingly hard. cheryl and her husband both work full—time, but with their energy bills bouncing up and up, the plan to buy their own family home is feeling more like a pipe dream. i'm constantly turning
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everything off at the switch. every night we turn everything off. we ensure that we use a full dishwasher, full washing machine, like, full load when we're washing. so i'm sort of running out of ideas at the minute, because i am doing everything i can to sort of keep my energy bills as low as possible. but it is a battle, and it seems that there's not really much more i can do at the minute. how does it feel to know that those bills are going up again in the autumn? there's nothing more that i can do. it's almost like i've come to the point where i've accepted that my savings are going to be less going forward, and that'sjust what i've got to do for now. sky high petrol and diesel prices are causing problems for mike and ev. they're making hard choices about how often they can afford to visit their children and grandchildren. the hotel prices have gone up, fuel prices have gone up. and from here, stoke—on—trent, is 195 miles each way.
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that makes it very difficult for us to see our family on a regular basis, because you just can't afford it any more — it's not there. the money's not there. the figures don't add up. as pensioners, everything is negative. there is no... the only positive we've got in life is we're happy. we are happy, yes. those big drivers of inflation — fuel costs. food prices at every shop, and most of all, energy bills — are all continuing to rise, limiting choices, dreams and budgets in every home. coletta smith, bbc news. here with me now is sylvia simpson is chief executive of money buddies, a charity in leeds that offers free, impartial debt and budget advice. thank you forjoining us. what impact is the rising cost of essentials having on the people you work with? thy,
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essentials having on the people you work with? �* ., work with? a huge impact. our main inuuiries work with? a huge impact. our main inquiries at — work with? a huge impact. our main inquiries at the _ work with? a huge impact. our main inquiries at the moment _ work with? a huge impact. our main inquiries at the moment are - work with? a huge impact. our main inquiries at the moment are no - work with? a huge impact. our main| inquiries at the moment are no food. people self disconnecting from their electric and gas, which means they aren't using it, so as to avoid being disconnected because they've not paid the bills. elections. we are actively liaising with landlords in order to stop evictions for people that's coming to work, to see our advisors. we are doing a lot of negotiations and maximising income to try and get people the amount of income they are entitled to from the government, because you would be amazed how many people are not getting what they are actually entitled to.— entitled to. how far can negotiations _ entitled to. how far can negotiations take - entitled to. how far can negotiations take you? | entitled to. how far can i negotiations take you? we entitled to. how far can - negotiations take you? we will entitled to. how far can _ negotiations take you? we will talk about maximising income is but on the point you are making of
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negotiating with landlords where someone cannot afford their bills, obviously that landlord has bills to pay so how far can negotiations take you? pay so how far can negotiations take ou? , . , pay so how far can negotiations take ou? .,., . you? usually, the negotiations that we have with _ you? usually, the negotiations that we have with landlords _ you? usually, the negotiations that we have with landlords tend - you? usually, the negotiations that we have with landlords tend to - you? usually, the negotiations that| we have with landlords tend to work very well because we make arrangements for our clients that are a reasonable arrangement to make so they can give what they can afford towards their rent arrears. that gets them handle their money towards their rent arrears and money they are paid. so, we try to make reasonable arrangements on behalf of our clients and then it works both ways, the bundle gets the money back, the clients pay their rent arrears, so that's how we are doing it. ' . , �* , arrears, so that's how we are doing it. ' . , �*, , ., , it. effectively it's prioritising the roof over _ it. effectively it's prioritising the roof over their _ it. effectively it's prioritising the roof over their head? i it. effectively it's prioritising l the roof over their head? yes. it. effectively it's prioritising i the roof over their head? yes. so, on the the roof overtheir head? yes so, on the maximising income, what are the ways you know can be, the things
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you know can do that that other people perhaps aren't aware of? well, there are online tools that we use such as a programme called turn to us or entitled to which will check what benefits you are entitled to, if you switch jobs or increase your hours it can recheck and tell your hours it can recheck and tell you what you are entitled to. we also help people get money towards their priority debts which could be rent arrears and gas and electric, we apply to trust funds, to try to get some money to pay people steps of. we apply for discretionary housing payment to help people get money towards rent arrears. lots of people might not know to do this themselves. in leeds we apply to yorkshire water to try and get help
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for yorkshire water arrears and water bills and they will also pay towards some other bills for you. there's lots of things that can be done at the public might not actually know about. i will say, we are very, very busy. it actually know about. i will say, we are very. very busy-— are very, very busy. it sounds like ou are are very, very busy. it sounds like you are doing _ are very, very busy. it sounds like you are doing an _ are very, very busy. it sounds like you are doing an absolutely i are very, very busy. it sounds like i you are doing an absolutely amazing job of really doing the absolute best for people who are struggling. it's a lot for people to get their heads around when they are struggling and they need the support of someone else, don't they? so, how much busier are you than normal? well, last month we saw over 100% of the people that we were expecting to see and 93% of those people were brand—new, neverseen see and 93% of those people were brand—new, never seen before people. they had not sought advice before. so, for us this is significant and we work as services where the clients tell us what funding we need
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in order to provide them with the services that they need.- in order to provide them with the services that they need. thank you so much, services that they need. thank you so much. sylvia — services that they need. thank you so much, sylvia from _ services that they need. thank you so much, sylvia from money i services that they need. thank you i so much, sylvia from money buddies. thank you forjoining us with some good advice. you're watching bbc news. ijust i just wanted to ijust wanted to repeat i just wanted to repeat a ijust wanted to repeat a couple of things sylvia said, if you're in need of some support she mentioned two websites that can help you to see ways of maximising your income, they were turn to us and entitled to, i don't have the full address but those were what she said. there's also plenty of support online and if you go to the bbc pages you can also find signposts to support. joining me now is our political correspondent helen catt. increasingly, we are hearing sounds from the government about what it's going to do to deal with this. it
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follows on from having put up taxes and ruled out a windfall tax. so, how is the government feeling the situation as inflation hits 9%? this is the biggest _ situation as inflation hits 9%? try 3 is the biggest topic in westminster without a doubt on all sides and as you said, when you've suddenly got things like inflation spiking at 9%, the highest rate in a0 years, that does then increase the pressure on the government to do more. it will point to things it's already done, for example cutting fuel duty, the £150 council tax rebate, the £200 loan to reduce energy bills which is due to come later in the year and it will point to the fact that this is a global issue, it's not a uk only issue and the chancellor has previously said he can't protect everyone from those price rises. but you've then got labour saying, that's all well and good but it doesn't believe the government is doing enough in everything it could be for example it said it wanted to see the government cancelled the
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national insurance rise which came in last month to pay for the backlog in last month to pay for the backlog in nhs care. there's also this idea, as you said, of the windfall tax which has been bubbling around in westminster for quite which has been bubbling around in westminsterfor quite a which has been bubbling around in westminster for quite a few months. labour have been pushing this heavily for several months, they say it could take £600 off the average bill. that is the idea of taxing the surprise accepts profits of north sea oil and gas companies. —— excess profits. the government didn't want to do that and still says it doesn't want to, it believes it would deter those companies from investing in domestic energy supply which it sees is the way of bringing down bills in the longer term. but in recent weeks there has been a suggestion that's still on the table, the chancellor rishi sunak and business secretary kwasi kwarteng saying if they don't see enough investment from those companies, then it is something they would consider. 0f companies, then it is something they would consider. of course, the important thing about a windfall tax is it's a way of raising money but
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it doesn't tell us anything about what the government would do to then pass that money on two individuals to bring the cost of living down. so, a lot of questions about this idea of a windfall tax or other ways of bringing down the cost of living. the government is also looking at smaller tweaks and things you can do as it goes along things like reducing the frequency of an 80s is one idea. there's certainly a lot of concentration on the cost of living but today's figures really well increase the pressure and i'm sure we're going to get lots of questions about this when the prime minister takes prime minister's questions in three quarters of an hour.— three quarters of an hour. thank ou. the foreign secretary liz truss has said a new law would be introduced to change the post—brexit trade deal for northern ireland, and insisted the bill would be legal under international law. borisjohnson's government agreed the trade deal — which governs how goods enter northern ireland from the rest of the uk — with the european union in 2019 after the brexit vote. but a row over its impact on trade
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has created a block on forming a devolved government in northern ireland. let's speak now to stephen kelly — chief executive of manufacturing ni. thank you forjoining us. what is your view of the protocol and its impact? your view of the protocol and its im act? ., . your view of the protocol and its imact? ., ., ., impact? from a manufacturing perspective. — impact? from a manufacturing perspective. the _ impact? from a manufacturing perspective, the protocol i impact? from a manufacturing perspective, the protocol has i impact? from a manufacturing i perspective, the protocol has been very positive. three quarters of manufacturers are reporting significant growth. we know that because our goods can have unfettered access into the rest of the uk marketplace as well as freely circulating in the eu marketplace, it has meant our exports have grown by 60% last year while the uk's exports to the uk have declined. eu buyers have moved from birmingham to belfast in order to secure that and we are benefiting from it. haifa belfast in order to secure that and we are benefiting from it. how much of an impact — we are benefiting from it. how much of an impact is— we are benefiting from it. how much
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of an impact is that _ we are benefiting from it. how much of an impact is that having _ we are benefiting from it. how much of an impact is that having on - we are benefiting from it. how much of an impact is that having on the i of an impact is that having on the economy in northern ireland? what of an impact is that having on the economy in northern ireland? what we do know is that — economy in northern ireland? what we do know is that inflation, _ do know is that inflation, notoriously, was above the uk average amongst the highest regions of the uk but since the middle of last year we've been consistently below the uk average. we know that research shows our grocery prices are 8% cheaper and we know exports are 8% cheaper and we know exports are growing and on top of that manufacturing jobs are growing at four times the pace of the rest of the uk. there is undoubtedly benefits here for us, whilst at the same time there remain some challenges. as the uk government is keen to legislate to try to move these discussions on a bit, we are clear that's not at her request, we are clear that having conflict with the eu doesn't arrive at the type of agreement and consensus we need in northern ireland and we want to make sure that whatever over the next number of months the tyne is used to productively negotiate between the uk and the eu with the voice of
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northern ireland hurt.— uk and the eu with the voice of northern ireland hurt. what are the challenaes northern ireland hurt. what are the challenges you _ northern ireland hurt. what are the challenges you identify _ northern ireland hurt. what are the challenges you identify and - northern ireland hurt. what are the challenges you identify and you i challenges you identify and you think could be addressed? the expectation — think could be addressed? tia: expectation from the think could be addressed? ti2 expectation from the eu at the time was that when the protocol signed supply change would likely shift to a new supply chain. that has largely been done in a number of areas. we still have about 20% of manufacturers saying their gb suppliers, because of the complexity and publications involved, moving those goods through the sea border. that needs to be improved. there's lots of movement from uk to northern ireland that has no impact on the eu market but are critical for households and businesses in northern ireland so we need to simplify the process, make it more affordable, take away the complexity and make sure that supply chain reopens. and make sure that supply chain reo ens. ., , and make sure that supply chain reoens. . , ' . , and make sure that supply chain reoens. . , , . , ., ., reopens. that is effectively along the lines of _ reopens. that is effectively along the lines of what _ reopens. that is effectively along the lines of what the _ reopens. that is effectively along the lines of what the eu - reopens. that is effectively along the lines of what the eu is i reopens. that is effectively along | the lines of what the eu is talking about when it says that there is scope to look at how to make things
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work more smoothly going forward, potentially stopping the checks on things that stay in northern ireland. ., �* , things that stay in northern ireland. . �*, . things that stay in northern ireland. .. �*, . . . things that stay in northern ireland. . . �* , ireland. that's correct. we've been en . a . ed ireland. that's correct. we've been engaged as — ireland. that's correct. we've been engaged as a _ ireland. that's correct. we've been engaged as a business _ ireland. that's correct. we've been engaged as a business community| ireland. that's correct. we've been i engaged as a business community in northern ireland, with both the eu intensively over the last 18 months. both sides are acutely aware of the challenges and both sides are probably aware of where the landing spots should be on all of this. the challenge has been next to nothing has been done since february this year, as our assembly first fell then went on to the election period. maybe, just maybe, the actions of the uk government yesterday will spark those discussions back into proper life and instead of hurtling towards conflict at some point later on this year, will find a consensus that can see northern ireland beat a great success we know and wanted to be. ., ~' , .,
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officials in ukraine say they're doing "everything possible and impossible" to save the remaining fighters trapped in mariupol�*s azovstal steelworks. soldiers evacuated over the last two days have been taken to a detention facility in russian—controlled territory. ukraine has urged moscow to exchange them for russian prisoners. meanwhile, the prosecutor at the international criminal court has sent its biggest ever team to investigate alleged warcrimes in ukraine. 0ur correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv. there is growing confusion and concern over the fate of the soldiers from soft style, what is the latest?— soldiers from soft style, what is the latest? ~ ~ ., ~ the latest? well, week after week, i've said it looks _ the latest? well, week after week, i've said it looks like _ the latest? well, week after week, i've said it looks like mariupol- i've said it looks like mariupol won't be able to hold for much longer and week after week the fighters have continued to put up a last stand, somehow surviving on the minimal food, last stand, somehow surviving on the minimalfood, water and sanitation
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minimal food, water and sanitation available minimalfood, water and sanitation available in this soviet—era network of tunnels and bomb shelters under this four mile square complex. nevertheless, it does seem like the conclusion is fast approaching. the kremlin claim the remaining fighters, the few hundred soldiers, marines, police officers, they are claiming they have now surrendered. we had heard from the fighters saying they were following orders and we've seen several hundred mostly injured fighters taken away over the past couple of days to russian territory, detention centres. 0ne russian territory, detention centres. one of the russian separatist leaders says that some of the senior ukrainian soldiers remain in those tunnels but it's clear that the fighting seems to have stopped another question for kyiv is what is going to happen to them. this group of people have prevented russia from taking mariupol for the best part of this war, where it has long been
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surrounded. so, vladimir putin is saying international laws will be followed in terms of how they are handled but in the same breath we are hearing that they will, some will face the criminal courts and they are even trying to draw up laws to classify them as war criminals. meanwhile, there are significant developments in the courtroom. today the trial of a russian soldier is starting in kyiv accused of shooting dead a civilian in this war. and we are continuing to learn the horrors of this conflict and will continue to do so in the months and years ahead, frankly. we have been to meet one man who has lost everything. with extraordinary composure and detail, ivan shows me what he has lost. translation: we found my mother dead on the fridge here. _ and then we kept searching. 200 metres away, he found his brother next to his dog.
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then he found his grandmother, covered in bricks. then his one—year—old daughter on a sofa, still breathing. then his wife. then his father. translation: it was a horror. very scary and hard to understand. you hope that someone was still alive, hiding in a basement. all he's left with are memories and pictures. paulina died the same day. ivan lost six of his family. this is the police station where ivan was working when his home was hit. now, ivan isn't interested injustice. in his words, he wants the russians who carried out that attack to die inside ukraine, to send a message. but the police force he works for, says it is working towards holding those russians to account.
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but that is a long way off, if it happens at all. today, ivan has a new police station to go to, and is also being recognised by the head of ukraine's national police. translation: we will remember the heroism and also _ the grief of our people. the most important thing is that police will be close to people, and they will know where to come for help. ivan is given an award for courage. he helped people escape after the russians moved in, even after losing everything. applause. translation: my relatives are upset, crying, especially when we go - to a cemetery and see six graves there. every time you go there, you cry.
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ivan's life has changed forever. so has his country. he himself described this war is pointless and to be honest it's never felt more pointless than when you stand on the rubble that was his home. and when you drive out of kyiv, almost every other building is damaged, not always to that extent but many are. as the russians continue to refocus eastwards, certainly in the kharkiv region, you cannot rule out similar themes happening there. all while the fighting continues. the russians have launched a number of offences in donbas today and peace talks, well, they couldn't feel further away. both sides admitting they are on hold, accusing each other of breaking promises.—
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and a quick reminder — we'll be taking your questions on the war in ukraine, this thursday at 12:30 bst. we'll have guests able to answer questions on all aspects of the war — from whether ukraine really could now win it, nato expansion — and what moscow might do next. you can get in touch on twitter using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — and you can email us on yourquestions@bbc.co.uk. in afghanistan, secret schools are being set up to educate girls — who the taliban are not allowing back into the classroom. the leadership continues to insist girls secondary schools will eventually re—open, but many afghans are losing hope. live now to kabul and our correspondent secunder kermani. what is the situation? well, too man it what is the situation? well, too many it feels — what is the situation? well, too many it feels as _ what is the situation? well, too many it feels as if _ what is the situation? well, too many it feels as if the _ what is the situation? well, too many it feels as if the fragile i many it feels as if the fragile progress that had been made on women's rights over the past two decades is really unravelling and at the heart of that is his continued closure of girls secondary schools. they are only open on a handful of
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provinces in the country. the the taliban insists they will eventually reopen when the right conditions are in place but many are deeply sceptical of that, particularly after the last—minute chaotic reversal we saw in march when on the day that girls secondary schools were meant to resume, the taliban leadership ordered them to close down again. some brave girls i've been speaking to say they are not willing to sit around and wait and see if the the taliban change their policy. they are taking matters into their own hands. hidden away in a residential neighbourhood... ..a small but powerful act of defiance. these teenage girls — like most in the country — have not been allowed back to school by the taliban... ..so they're attending lessons secretly. today's class, trigonometry. for their security, we're not revealing anyone's name or identity.
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are you afraid of what could happen to you? if they arrest me, they beat me... but it's worth it to do that. it's worth it? of course, of course it's worth it. back in march, it seemed girls' schools were finally reopening — but at the last minute, the taliban leadership overruled the decision. for students here, the pain is still raw. translation: on the day we went i to school, they told us it's not i clear if girls will be allowed or not. perhaps they will, later on. it's been two months now and it hasn't happened. it makes me so sad. younger girls have been allowed back to school, but it's not clear when — or if — older girls will be. the taliban say they need to create the correct islamic environment first. taliban officials admit that female education is a sensitive issue for them,
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with some influential hardliners apparently opposed to it. but in private, others within the group have expressed their disappointment at the decision not to allow all girls' schools to reopen. a number of religious scholars linked to the taliban have made public declarations in support of the right of girls to learn. sheikh rahimullah haqqani is an afghan cleric, well respected by the taliban, based in pakistan. on a recent trip to kabul, he met seniorfigures in the group. he's careful not to criticise the continued closure of girls' schools, but has issued a religious decree stating they can and should be educated. translation: there is no | justification in sharia to say female education is not allowed, no justification at all. all the religious books have stated female education is permissible and obligatory because, for example, if a woman gets sick
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in an islamic environment like afghanistan or pakistan, and needs treatment, it's much better if she is treated by a female doctor. boys of all ages are back in the classroom, but the taliban have now formed a committee to debate what to do about girls' secondary schools. for now, it seems, their most hardline elements are the ones deciding what the country's future will look like. secunder kermani, bbc news, kabul. well, when the taliban initially took power last august it seemed as though they were adopting a more flexible attitude that many had feared that they would. in recent weeks and months they seem to be growing increasingly hardline and we saw earlier this month a decree from them that all women should wear the face veil in public and there is
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another crisis still going on here and that is the economic and humanitarian crisis, recent figures say that 19 million people here in afghanistan are facing acute levels or crisis levels of food insecurity and there are real concerns that funding for food assistance is drying up and the situation on the ground for so many ordinary people is going to get even more difficult. thank you very much. sport and for a full round—up, from the bbc sport centre, here's isaac fanin. good morning... it's been another busy morning in english cricket. we get a first look at a new era of test cricket under new head coach brendan mccullum and captain ben stokes, for the series against new zealand... but in that new era, a lot of familiarity as two standout names are recalled — the veteran bowlers james anderson and stuart broad are back after being left out of the series in west indies in march. yorkshire batter harry brook and durham fast bowler matty potts receive maiden call—ups. and matthew mott has
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been named as england's new men's white—ball coach. he had coached australia's women — overseeing their recent dominance which included winning this year's world cup. it's going to be a fight to the finish in the race for the premier league title after liverpool fought back to beat southampton 2—1 at st mary's... the saints went ahead before liverpool struck twice their first goal a superb strike from takumi minamino. joel matip with the winner. jurgen klopp's side are a point behind defending champions manchester city ahead of the final day on sunday. police have arrested a man after sheffield united captain billy sharp was assaulted by a fan at the end of championship playoff semi final against nottingham forrest who won on penalties... sharp was knocked to the ground during a pitch invasion and required stitches. he's taken to social media to thank fans for their support. forrest have apologised and said they will be issuing a lifetime ban and the fa say they will be investigating.
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so as we said — it is nottingham forest who are into that play—off final. it finished 3—3 on aggreate after extra—time — forest's hero was goalkeeper brice samba, who saved three spot kicks, the final one from morgan gibbs—white, which sparked those wild celebrations. forest take on huddersfield in the final later this month, for a chance to be back in the top flight for the first time since 1999. it's one of the biggest matches in rangers' history and tens of thousands of fans are in seville to support them ahead of the euopa league final. police expected up to a hundred thousand supporters to travel to the spanish city for the match against eintract frankfurt — who'll bring 50,000 of their own fans. but, the stadium hosting the final can only host just under a3 thousand. this could be one of the great
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moments in their history. they have been to european finals before, but it was 1972 when they last won, this is a day never to forget for rangers fans and that is why when you look around, there are a few eintracht frankfurt fans, but it is a massive day for the club and a massive day for scottish football and if rangers can win it, going forward, it is not just for the glory but also financially, this is incredible. now this will go down as one of the most bizarre and unfortunate sporting injuries of all time. right after making history as the first black african to win a stage of one of cycling's grand tours biniam girmay injured himself on the podium. the 22—year—old was struck in his left eye by the cork from the bottle of prosecco he was opening to celebrate winning the tenth stage of the giro d'italia. he went to hospital where doctors discovered a hemorrhage
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within his eye and recommended he withdraw from the race to avoid it getting worse. i was iwasa i was a bit sad about what happened with the champagne, but when i got back to my hotel, they were happy, but a bit afraid and when it looks 0k, but a bit afraid and when it looks ok, i really enjoyed it, though, i am happy about today. luckily, i i just need some rest to give more power to the eye. that's all the sport for now. six years ago, natasha ednan—laperouse died from a severe allergic reaction after eating a baguette which — unbeknown to her — contained sesame seeds. now, her parents have set up a clinical trial to investigate whether commonly available peanut and milk products, taken under medical supervision, can be used as a treatment
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for people with food allergies. celestina 0lulode reports. natasha was funny, very loving, and she was very brave. she gave me the most loving hugs that really sunk into my soul, and i miss those very much today. the memories of two parents determined their daughter's death won't be in vain. in 2016, natasha ednan—laperouse went into cardiac arrest on a flight after buying a baguette. the 15—year—old knew she had a food allergy and always checked labels — but the bread she ate contained sesame seeds, that were not included in the list of ingredients. she died in a french hospital later that day. since then, her parents have fought successfully to introduce new food—labelling rules. and this is the next stage
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of her parents' tireless campaign. a three—year clinical trial exposing young people to the foods they're allergic to, in the hope they develop greater tolerance. with successful immunotherapy,| you get to a point where the food that you're allergic to doesn't hospitalise you any more. i and that takes so much stress out of families' lives. - it's a momentous moment for us both, actually, as husband and wife and parents of natasha. i think we feel, on one level, quite proud that we've got here. it seems like a long time coming, in some ways. professor hasan arshad hopes the data gathered will help the nhs make savings. we have also introduced a very novel aspect, i i which is to use ordinary available | food as opposed to using a capsule with the peanut powder in — - which is obviously more expensive. hopefully the nhs could implement i this treatment for the thousands i
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of people who suffer from allergy without incurring a huge cost. i although trials like this aren't a cure, natasha's parents say they offer an opportunity their daughter didn't have. knowing there is research into treatments and and i think knowing that there was research happening, treatments and rch happening, looking into solutions and looking into treatments so that she could live a less—stressed life around the food that she was eating, would have been enormous for her. celestina 0lulode, bbc news. joining me now is hasan arshad, professor of allergy and clinical immunology at southampton university. thank you forjoining us. the prospect hear of such a legacy for natasha and you are at the start of it and i am sure for you it is an exciting process to be embarking upon, just explain for us how it differs from immunotherapy as is
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currently available. immunotherapy is available for _ currently available. immunotherapy is available for allergens _ currently available. immunotherapy is available for allergens in - currently available. immunotherapy is available for allergens in the i is available for allergens in the environment like pollen and dust mites, it is not currently available for votes. there has been a number of clinical trials that show that this form of therapy is effective and safe, but it has not yet been implemented for or available for food allergy patients. so we decided to embark on this trial to fill that evidence gap, so that when we have that evidence, the nhs will hopefully take this up and make it available to hundreds of thousands of children who have peanut allergy and are blighted by this within their lives. it and are blighted by this within their lives.— and are blighted by this within their lives. , ,. ., their lives. it sounds like you have every single _ their lives. it sounds like you have every single reason _ their lives. it sounds like you have every single reason to _ their lives. it sounds like you have every single reason to expect i their lives. it sounds like you have every single reason to expect that | every single reason to expect that this will work.—
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this will work. yes. the effectiveness _ this will work. yes. the effectiveness has i this will work. yes. the effectiveness has been| this will work. yes. the _ effectiveness has been demonstrated for this form of therapy for the vast majority of children and young people and they are able to tolerate these votes. the figures are estimated at somewhere between 60 and 80%. in estimated at somewhere between 60 and 80%. , ., ., and 80%. in terms of what will ha en and 80%. in terms of what will happen in _ and 80%. in terms of what will happen in the _ and 80%. in terms of what will happen in the trials, _ and 80%. in terms of what will happen in the trials, and i and 80%. in terms of what will happen in the trials, and very i happen in the trials, and very controlled conditions, people will be given tiny amounts of the thing that could be life—threatening for them. that could be life-threatening for them. , , ., ., , them. indeed. this is done in a very supervised — them. indeed. this is done in a very supervised manner. _ them. indeed. this is done in a very supervised manner. either- them. indeed. this is done in a very supervised manner. either in - them. indeed. this is done in a very supervised manner. either in a i supervised manner. either in a hospital or we introduce another aspect to do at home. that would be under guidance on a zoom link and doses are gradually increased every week while the children continue to consume that dose every day from then on until the next week when
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they increase the dose further and this process can take between 6—8 months to get to the stage where they can tolerate significant amounts of peanut and milk, such that they can go out and eat freely and live a normal life.— that they can go out and eat freely and live a normal life. when you say eat freely and _ and live a normal life. when you say eat freely and live _ and live a normal life. when you say eat freely and live a _ and live a normal life. when you say eat freely and live a normal - and live a normal life. when you say eat freely and live a normal life, i eat freely and live a normal life, without fear of something being contaminated or actually consumed to any sort of level?— any sort of level? they can consume the food to — any sort of level? they can consume the food to a — any sort of level? they can consume the food to a significant _ any sort of level? they can consume the food to a significant level - any sort of level? they can consume the food to a significant level and i the food to a significant level and that varies. some can tolerate... all of them would tolerate at least about ten times the dose they were previously tolerating. you about ten times the dose they were previously tolerating.— previously tolerating. you are at the start of _ previously tolerating. you are at the start of the _ previously tolerating. you are at the start of the process, - previously tolerating. you are at the start of the process, but i the start of the process, but potentially, in our report, it was said that it was not going to eradicate allergies, obviously it will not eradicate people having
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them, but will it protect an allergy in an individual who goes through this process? in in an individual who goes through this process?— this process? in practicalterms, es, but this process? in practicalterms, yes. but the _ this process? in practicalterms, yes, but the only _ this process? in practicalterms, yes, but the only caveat - this process? in practicalterms, yes, but the only caveat there i this process? in practicalterms,| yes, but the only caveat there is, that they need to keep that food in their diet, to keep the tolerance. it has been observed that after inducing tolerance, avoid the food for many months, then sometime it starts to react again. for something like milk and peanut, it should not be a big problem to continue to have it in their diet on a regular basis. it is so interesting to talk to you, great to hear about this research happening and great to hear that this is all coming from something and it is so terrible for that family to hear that the shoots of something very positive in the future are coming. thank you for joining us. the bbc understands a home office deportation flight to jamaica left the uk in the early hours of this morning.
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campaigners say between a and 7 people were onboard. around 50 jamaican nationals with criminal convictions were expected to leave the uk but most were taken off after last minute legal challenges. the home office says its necessary to remove those with no right to be in the uk. with me now is our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell. hello. what happened? how many were on it? exact details _ hello. what happened? how many were on it? exact details have _ hello. what happened? how many were on it? exact details have to _ hello. what happened? how many were on it? exact details have to be - on it? exact details have to be confirmed but we understand between four and seven people did leave the uk forjamaica earlier this morning. these flights are controversial but they do happen on a regular basis, interestingly, up to 50 jamaican nationals were expected to be on this flight, but because of a number of last—minute legal challenges, which has happened so often in this case, they were taken off and there was a protest in london last week by campaigners who have been continuously calling for these
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charter flights to be continuously calling for these charterflights to be banned, because they say that many of these people came to the uk as children, in some cases as young as three years old and they have made lives here, gone on to have children here, and they believe that these flights are unfairly targeting these people. there are also concerns about links to the windrush generation because in some cases, some of these people are descendants from that generation and you may remember what happened in 2018 with the windrush scandal which affected so many caribbean migrants who were unfairly mistreated by the government. the government went on to apologise because of mistakes made by the home office at the time, because of problems with paperwork and that led to caribbean migrants being unfairly detained, deported, losing homes and jobs and there are concerns in that respect as well. going back to what happened this morning, we have asked the home office for more details and the home office for more details and the exact numbers of the people on board, they have given us a statement which says that those with no right to be in the uk, including
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fora no right to be in the uk, including for a national event there should be no doubt that we will do whatever is necessary to remove them. this is what the public rightly expects. sounds like it is an expensive situation on top of everything else, all the legal challenges that are going on. all the legal challenges that are auoin on. , all the legal challenges that are auoin on. . , all the legal challenges that are uuoinon. . . all the legal challenges that are uuoinon. , , going on. yes, this has happened so often in the — going on. yes, this has happened so often in the last _ going on. yes, this has happened so often in the last few _ going on. yes, this has happened so often in the last few years, - going on. yes, this has happened so often in the last few years, these i often in the last few years, these flights happen on a regular basis but the last one was in november last year and we know that four people were on that flight and there are concerns about the environmental impact because these flights are scheduled we know that dozens are expected and then there have been concerns from campaigners saying, well, how can a handful of people be sent back to jamaica, what about the environmental impact? they are controversial, they generate a lot of interest and so far we are not entirely sure how many people were on the flight this morning but we are hoping to get details later. thank you. the lure of making a quick buck has
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always attracted young people to invest in risky assets. but for so—called gen z�*ers, it's the volatility — and the decentralised nature — of digital assets like cryptocurrency and nfts that actually is part of the appeal. but they are unregulated, meaning there's little protection for investors, as our asia business correspondent mariko 0i reports. trading thousands of dollars over a $10 meal. for digital natives, entry into the crypto space is anytime and everywhere. when this 20—year—old decided to get into cryptocurrency trading last year, all he needed was his phone. but if entry was easy, the risks are also high. the volatility of crypto is what makes it attractive. you know, like high risk, high reward kind of thing. me and my best friend were freaking out the other day because the market was, like, plunging. almost a0 to 50%. but, you know, we believe it will go back up. gaming is another gateway. it is the wild, wild west. where players can earn nonrefundable tokens or nfds and crypto currencies.
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a crypto trader himself, this man has built a business introducing novices to gamers in the philippines. people are working, people really only have time to play a game for two or three hours a day. you can essentially lease out your nfds to people from other countries where they actually play the game for you. so it is an exchange of your investment for somebody else's time to play the game. for many, the transition from gaming for fun to gaming for crypto doesn't feel a big leap. and along with app—based trading, entry into this virtual world has real money consequences. but cryptocurrency currencies, and nfts and other digital assets are still in their infancy and they are unregulated, meaning there is little consumer protection. it is also difficult to get financial advice because traditional experts many of them see trading in them as gambling. it is a world that can suck you in. and some of those get hooked end up here.
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this therapist says young and in particular male clients get addicted to the buzz. you have the ability to watch bitcoin going up, down and basically this process, this roller—coaster ride of "whoo" the highs, "boom", the lows. and it's available on your phone 2a/7. that addictive process is there at any point and you can be hooked in constantly. for kelvin, his loss was also financial. after making more than six figures by trading crypto in 2017, he lost half a million in the following year when prices plunged. i think i almost went into depression. a lot of youngsters nowadays, theyjustjump in. my advice to them is don't be like me. don't be greedy or big headed. despite cautionary tales, many young traders are still following in his footsteps in the hope of making a quick buck.
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claude monet's le grand canal et—santa maria della salute — has gone under the hammer for £a5 million pounds making it the most valuable view of italy by any artist sold the piece hasjoined a series of monet masterworks that have sold for more than a0 million pounds in consecutive sales at sotheby�*s auction house in new york. also up for sale last night was pablo picasso's portait of marie—therese walter which sold for sa million pounds. stay with us here on bbc news as wejoin our colleagues at politics live for coverage of borisjohnson facing keir starmer at prime minister's questions. if you want any more on the stories today, check out the website and our app today, check out the website and our app and you can get in touch with me directly on twitter. as we wait for
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prime minister's questions to start at midday, we willjoin our quality —— michael colleagues at politics life. russia has been threatening to do, you on the brink of apocalypse already — you on the brink of apocalypse alread . �* ., ., , you on the brink of apocalypse alread. �* ., ., , ., ., already. i'm going to pause for a moment and _ already. i'm going to pause for a moment and welcome _ already. i'm going to pause for a moment and welcome viewers . already. i'm going to pause for a i moment and welcome viewers from already. i'm going to pause for a - moment and welcome viewers from bbc news channel to politics lie. we have pm coming up injust under ten minutes' time. it'll be the first time borisjohnson a space keir starmer since there elections and i'm just going to continue the conversation we were having which is about scotland restating its position to rejoin nato but also the status of its nuclear deterrent. i will introduce our guest laura faris, author and academic and patrick flynn. continue what you are saying about when it comes to getting rid of those nuclear weapons what is the snp position? i was auoin to
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what is the snp position? i was going to pick — what is the snp position? i was going to pick up _ what is the snp position? i was going to pick up on _ what is the snp position? i was going to pick up on a _ what is the snp position? i was going to pick up on a point i what is the snp position? i was going to pick up on a point dalia made _ going to pick up on a point dalia made about choices tied up of nuclear— made about choices tied up of nuclear weapons as well. they are outrageously expensive, money won't spend _ outrageously expensive, money won't spend on— outrageously expensive, money won't spend on a — outrageously expensive, money won't spend on a number of different ways, you could _ spend on a number of different ways, you could spend it on conventional defence. _ you could spend it on conventional defence, on schools and houses and all the _ defence, on schools and houses and all the other things we were talking about— all the other things we were talking about earlier, public services needing _ about earlier, public services needing investment, those are the choices— needing investment, those are the choices which accessibility tie this up choices which accessibility tie this up in _ choices which accessibility tie this up in a _ choices which accessibility tie this up in a new— choices which accessibility tie this up in a new generation of nuclear weapons — up in a new generation of nuclear weapons that's going to continue sucking _ weapons that's going to continue sucking the budgets of the uk for many, _ sucking the budgets of the uk for many, many decades to come. that's a failure to understand _ many, many decades to come. that's a failure to understand what _ many, many decades to come. that's a failure to understand what nuclear- failure to understand what nuclear technological expertise involves. it's not just technological expertise involves. it's notjust about... i went to the atomic weapons establishment a month ago and it was an extraordinary array of scientific brilliance. some of the work they are doing there will go towards nuclear power stations which are a critical part of our battle on climate change and getting us off fossil fuels, of our battle on climate change and getting us off fossilfuels, some of our battle on climate change and getting us off fossil fuels, some of the expertise they are delivering, some of their knowledge of geopolitics, was like nothing i've ever really seen. what i didn't realise is that every single nuclear
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weapon the uk produces is accommodated on a scottish produced submarine so the snp saying we will get rid of the nuclear submarines is saying we will disarm the united kingdom and the united kingdom has to make a decision whether now, as i say, the most dangerous moments since the end of the cold war, the scottish people might need to make a decision, they want to live in a country that has no nuclear weapons and takes us completely reduces our defences. , ., , ., , , defences. there should be an issue for the scottish _ defences. there should be an issue for the scottish people _ defences. there should be an issue for the scottish people to _ defences. there should be an issue for the scottish people to decide. l for the scottish people to decide. and the _ for the scottish people to decide. and the english people and the welsh people _ and the english people and the welsh people and _ and the english people and the welsh people and northern _ and the english people and the welsh people and northern irish. _ and the english people and the welsh people and northern irish. thril- people and northern irish. civil socie in people and northern irish. society in scotland, the people and northern irishm society in scotland, the people of scotland — society in scotland, the people of scotland have long protested against nuclear— scotland have long protested against nuclear weapons being based in our country _ nuclear weapons being based in our country. because we don't think they make _ country. because we don't think they make a _ country. because we don't think they make a safe — country. because we don't think they make a safe and make us a target. why vote _ make a safe and make us a target. why vote for independence in 2014? why vote for independence in 201a? glasgow did and i'm pleased we did and in _ glasgow did and i'm pleased we did and in 2014, for many people, yes, we didn't— and in 2014, for many people, yes, we didn't make the case, but since then we _ we didn't make the case, but since then we have seen brexit, all of the things— then we have seen brexit, all of the things that — then we have seen brexit, all of the things that have happened in the world. _ things that have happened in the world, and we've seen the uk government failing to stand up for the living — government failing to stand up for the living standards of the people
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in scotland by failing to act in the cost of— in scotland by failing to act in the cost of living crisis. people in scotland _ cost of living crisis. people in scotland not seeing the benefits of the union — scotland not seeing the benefits of the union and more and more on the doorsteps— the union and more and more on the doorsteps people who did not vote yes in— doorsteps people who did not vote yes in 2014... but doorsteps people who did not vote yes in 2014- - -_ doorsteps people who did not vote yes in 2014. .. but why are people so scared of a — yes in 2014. .. but why are people so scared of a scottish... _ yes in 2014. .. but why are people so scared of a scottish... could - yes in 2014. .. but why are people so scared of a scottish... could you i yes in 2014. .. but why are people so scared of a scottish... could you dol scared of a scottish... could you do doda scared of a scottish... could you do dodgy deal — scared of a scottish... could you do dodgy deal with _ scared of a scottish... could you do dodgy deal with keir _ scared of a scottish... could you do dodgy deal with keir starmer i scared of a scottish... could you do dodgy deal with keir starmer in - scared of a scottish... could you do dodgy deal with keir starmer in a l dodgy deal with keir starmer in a coalition— dodgy deal with keir starmer in a coalition rainbow, _ dodgy deal with keir starmer in a coalition rainbow, how— dodgy deal with keir starmer in a coalition rainbow, how can - dodgy deal with keir starmer in a coalition rainbow, how can you i coalition rainbow, how can you deliver— coalition rainbow, how can you deliver these _ coalition rainbow, how can you deliver these regular- coalition rainbow, how can you - deliver these regular referendums on cessation. _ deliver these regular referendums on cessation. then— deliver these regular referendums on cessation, then the _ deliver these regular referendums on cessation, then the rest _ deliver these regular referendums on cessation, then the rest of— deliver these regular referendums on cessation, then the rest of the - deliver these regular referendums on cessation, then the rest of the uk, i cessation, then the rest of the uk, the uk _ cessation, then the rest of the uk, the uk government— cessation, then the rest of the uk, the uk government now— cessation, then the rest of the uk, the uk government now has - cessation, then the rest of the uk, the uk government now has to- cessation, then the rest of the uk, i the uk government now has to think about— the uk government now has to think about transferring _ the uk government now has to think about transferring our— the uk government now has to think about transferring our technology. about transferring our technology for an _ about transferring our technology for an independent _ about transferring our technology for an independent deterrent - about transferring our technology for an independent deterrent and i about transferring our technology. for an independent deterrent and all those _ for an independent deterrent and all those high-tech— for an independent deterrent and all those high—tech high—paid _ for an independent deterrent and all those high—tech high—paid jobs- for an independent deterrent and all} those high—tech high—paid jobs away from scottahd~ — those high—tech high—paid jobs away from scotland. it's— those high—tech high—paid jobs away from scotland. it's not— those high—tech high—paid jobs away from scotland. it's not a _ those high—tech high—paid jobs away from scotland. it's not a viable - from scotland. it's not a viable tong-term _ from scotland. it's not a viable long—term risk— from scotland. it's not a viable long—term risk that _ from scotland. it's not a viable long—term risk that a - from scotland. it's not a viable . long—term risk that a responsible from scotland. it's not a viable - long—term risk that a responsible uk goverhmeht— long—term risk that a responsible uk government should _ long—term risk that a responsible uk government should be _ long—term risk that a responsible uk government should be taking - long—term risk that a responsible uk government should be taking a - long—term risk that a responsible uk government should be taking a toll. | government should be taking a toll. what we're — government should be taking a toll. what we're trying _ government should be taking a toll. what we're trying to _ government should be taking a toll. what we're trying to say— government should be taking a toll. what we're trying to say there - government should be taking a toll. | what we're trying to say there about why you think they are so scared? i guess that's my question, if you feel so comfortable in the will of the scottish people, then does it matter to you that there would be another referendum? what i want to say is we got into this really
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bizarre scenario where we believe that flooding the world with nuclear weapons makes us less likely to have a nuclear war. weapons makes us less likely to have a nuclearwar. in weapons makes us less likely to have a nuclear war. in fact it's the exact opposite. we a nuclear war. in fact it's the exact opposite.— a nuclear war. in fact it's the exact opposite. a nuclear war. in fact it's the exacto osite. ~ . . , exact opposite. we have a test ban treaty- -- we _ exact opposite. we have a test ban treaty... we should _ exact opposite. we have a test ban treaty... we should be _ exact opposite. we have a test ban treaty... we should be starting - exact opposite. we have a test ban treaty... we should be starting to i treaty... we should be starting to think about _ treaty... we should be starting to think about what _ treaty... we should be starting to think about what the _ treaty... we should be starting to think about what the pathway - treaty... we should be starting to - think about what the pathway towards a nuclearfree think about what the pathway towards a nuclear free world could think about what the pathway towards a nuclearfree world could look like. can it happen tomorrow? of course not, but the first step on to thatis course not, but the first step on to that is leaders like nicola sturgeon beginning to normalise the idea that a nuclearfree beginning to normalise the idea that a nuclear free world beginning to normalise the idea that a nuclearfree world is possible. that is a bold start. bi; a nuclear free world is possible. that is a bold start.— that is a bold start. by 'oining nato? i that is a bold start. by 'oining nato? | don't * that is a bold start. by 'oining nato? i don't agree _ that is a bold start. by joining nato? i don't agree she - that is a bold start. by joining| nato? i don't agree she should that is a bold start. by joining - nato? i don't agree she should join nato? i don't agree she should 'oin nato? i don't agree she should 'oin nato for nato? i don't agree she should 'oin nate for that — nato? i don't agree she should 'oin nato for that exact i nato? i don't agree she should 'oin nato for that exact reason. i nato? i don't agree she should join nato for that exact reason. that's i nato for that exact reason. that's clearly stated _ nato for that exact reason. that's clearly stated by _ nato for that exact reason. that's clearly stated by you. _ nato for that exact reason. that's clearly stated by you. let's - nato for that exact reason. that's clearly stated by you. let's talk i nato for that exact reason. that's| clearly stated by you. let's talk to vicky young, because as i said we got five minutes before we have prime minister's questions. hello to you. before we talk about the questions from keir starmer, a piece of news, the tory mp who has been released on bail after being
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arrested on suspicion of sexual assault and rate, i know you can say very much about it, but perhaps you could bring it up—to—date? yes very much about it, but perhaps you could bring it up-to-date?_ could bring it up-to-date? yes this was an update _ could bring it up-to-date? yes this was an update from _ could bring it up-to-date? yes this was an update from the _ could bring it up-to-date? yes this l was an update from the metropolitan police today. as you say, the man has been released on bail after initially being arrested on suspicion of indecent assault, sexual assault, suspicion of indecent assault, sexualassault, rate, suspicion of indecent assault, sexual assault, rate, abuse of position of trust, and misconduct in public office. now these offences are alleged to have taken place between 2002—9. they were reported to the police injanuary 2020. now the mp has not been named, but conservative party whips to say the people in charge of discipline within the party have asked him to stay away from the parliamentary state while all of this is investigated and it has prompted the unions among others to call for a change in the rules are saying in some circumstances mps should be banned from the parliamentary estate and that is a pre—coming from the
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union to represent many commons staff, so that is now an investigation which is ongoing. thank you very much for that. let's go into the chamber come into the house of commons. you can see mps gathering there. for borisjohnson and keir starmer, the leader of the opposition. and the questions he will post a borisjohnson. i suppose cost of living is the most obvious area for keir starmer to prosecute the prime minister on.— area for keir starmer to prosecute the prime minister on. yes, i think so, the prime minister on. yes, i think so. especially _ the prime minister on. yes, i think so, especially today, _ the prime minister on. yes, i think so, especially today, with - the prime minister on. yes, i think so, especially today, with that - so, especially today, with that latest news on inflation which was expected but nevertheless extremely shocking and i think it is posing a real dilemma and a real challenge to the government over all of this. now, they have hinted that they are going to come back with more help, a couple of weeks ago the last pmqs, borisjohnson couple of weeks ago the last pmqs, boris johnson talked couple of weeks ago the last pmqs, borisjohnson talked about moore being said quite soon, which caused a bit of a there about to be an emergency budget which was dampened down by the treasury, but i think there is no doubt speaking to people
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in whitehall where there are ministers, advisers, they all expect something to be coming. what we don't know is exactly what it is, and when that is going to happen but certainly when it comes to the idea of a windfall tax, something put forward by the opposition parties, having initially sounding very cold about the whole idea, actually now it sounds much more as if the government is leaning towards that. i think the interesting thing for people looking at all of this will be how much might it raise? a windfall tax on the energy companies. how much will it raise and crucially who would it be directed at? i think that is the big political question if you like about how this conservative government targets to help its going to give. it has offered some already, but if there was to be a new amount of money raised, where would it go? would it be uprating benefits for example? would it be pushed more broadly towards people because of course everybody is seeing this increase in their bills but i think
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what is clear is that the kind of intervention we saw with covid, that huge amount of help, hundreds of billions of pounds, it's not going to be on that level and the chancellor made it very clear again to date he's not going to protect everybody against all of this rise in prices. we everybody against all of this rise in rices. ~ ., ., ., , in prices. we are going to see you here in the _ in prices. we are going to see you here in the studio _ in prices. we are going to see you here in the studio after _ in prices. we are going to see you here in the studio after prime - here in the studio after prime minister's questions. for some post—match analysis. as i say, i think the speaker will no doubt be introducing pmqs in a moment. laura, on the issue of timing, it sounds as if the chancellor is going to come back at some stage before the summer and do something. what would your preference be? i do and do something. what would your preference be?— preference be? i do think he is auoin to preference be? i do think he is going to do — preference be? i do think he is going to do that. _ preference be? i do think he is going to do that. i'm _ preference be? i do think he is going to do that. i'm a - preference be? i do think he is - going to do that. i'm a backbencher not privy to anything. sol... i've said already that i'm open to a windfall tax. i also do think actually i'd like to see something
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done more on the national living wage. it was increased to £9 50 and i think is a case to go further on that. and i also, as i say, i think you're probably more involved in some of the discrete issues, child care, i think it's a huge cost for lots and lots of families certainly gets raised with me a lot and that's something i will be pushing him on later today. something i will be pushing him on later toda . ~ something i will be pushing him on iatertoday-— later today. alison, with that for ou later today. alison, with that for you satisfy _ later today. alison, with that for you satisfy your _ later today. alison, with that for you satisfy your concern? - later today. alison, with that for you satisfy your concern? rishi i you satisfy your concern? rishi sunak comes back and does something around a windfall tax, more targeted help for those on the lowest incomes, and that to some extent they would look again in the autumn when they could be another rise in the energy price cap, would that be enough? mi the energy price cap, would that be enouuh? �* ., , enough? all of the measures the government _ enough? all of the measures the government had _ enough? all of the measures the government had taken _ enough? all of the measures the government had taken so - enough? all of the measures the government had taken so far - enough? all of the measures the | government had taken so far have been _ government had taken so far have been half— government had taken so far have been half measures, not quite enough — been half measures, not quite enouah. �* ., , been half measures, not quite enou.h_ �* ., , ~' ., enough. but would those be? i know i'm speculating _ enough. but would those be? i know i'm speculating but _ enough. but would those be? i know i'm speculating but it _ enough. but would those be? i know i'm speculating but it looks - enough. but would those be? i know i'm speculating but it looks like - i'm speculating but it looks like that. ., , i'm speculating but it looks like that. ., i'm speculating but it looks like that. . . i'm speculating but it looks like that. ., ., ., i'm speculating but it looks like that. . , ., ., ., ., that. there was a headline about an increased discount _ that. there was a headline about an increased discount which _ that. there was a headline about an increased discount which does - that. there was a headline about an increased discount which does help| increased discount which does help people _ increased discount which does help people who are in fuel poverty. the
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chief executive of scottishpower said £1000 on bills for people who are on— said £1000 on bills for people who are on prepayment metres, a huge concern — are on prepayment metres, a huge concern because they have to feed the metre — concern because they have to feed the metre right now and seeing increased — the metre right now and seeing increased costs right now. they can't _ increased costs right now. they can't wait _ increased costs right now. they can't wait. we increased costs right now. they can't wait-— increased costs right now. they can'twait. ., ., ., , can't wait. we have to wait because the rime can't wait. we have to wait because the prime ministers— i know members across the house will want to join i know members across the house will want tojoin me in offering best wishes to rangers for this evenings match in seville. this morning i had meetings with ministerial colleagues and in addition to my duties in this house i shall have further such meetings later today. the latest state of ageing _ meetings later today. the latest state of ageing report _ meetings later today. the latest state of ageing report reveals i meetings later today. the latest l state of ageing report reveals that last year in this country 9000 people over the age of 60 died because of their homes were too cold. will the prime minister give a guarantee that that figure will be lower and not higher this time next
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year? i lower and not higher this time next ear? ~ , , lower and not higher this time next ear? ~' , , .,, , year? i think everybody has every s math year? i think everybody has every sympathy with — year? i think everybody has every sympathy with people _ year? i think everybody has every sympathy with people who - year? i think everybody has every sympathy with people who are . year? i think everybody has every i sympathy with people who are facing difficulties with the cost of heating, and that is why the government has stepped up with an extra £9.i government has stepped up with an extra £9.1 billion in addition to what we are doing with the cold weather payments and the warm homes allowance, and we will continue to support people throughout the after—shocks of covid, just as we did throughout the pandemic. after-shocks of covid, just as we did throughout the pandemic. figures re eat -- did throughout the pandemic. figures repeat -- released _ did throughout the pandemic. figures repeat -- released from _ did throughout the pandemic. figures repeat -- released from the - repeat —— released from the department for education show last year, once again, lib dems run at sutton council became the highest reject of children applying for education, health and care assessments in the country. nearly half our children were rejected compared to the national average of just 23%. can the prime minister outlined how this review will help children and their families get access to the education that they deserve? , ., ., ~
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deserve? yes, indeed and i thank him ve much deserve? yes, indeed and i thank him very much for— deserve? yes, indeed and i thank him very much for his _ deserve? yes, indeed and i thank him very much for his campaign, - deserve? yes, indeed and i thank him very much for his campaign, and - deserve? yes, indeed and i thank him very much for his campaign, and he i very much for his campaign, and he is completely right, and that is why we have a send review and we will ensure that send children and young people can get access to the right support, at the right place at the right time across the country. i too send my best _ right time across the country. i too send my best wishes _ right time across the country. i too send my best wishes to _ right time across the country. i for: send my best wishes to rangers. it's quite an extraordinary story in the last few years that football club. a one—off tax on huge oil and tax profits would raise billions of pounds cutting energy bills across the country. the chancellor rightly says there are two camps on this. you are eitherfor says there are two camps on this. you are either for it or you are against it. but which camped as the chancellor put himself in? he says, neither. well, i'm in favour of it. the question for the prime minister
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is, is he for it, is he against it, or is he sitting on the fence like his chancellor? i’m or is he sitting on the fence like his chancellor?— or is he sitting on the fence like his chancellor? i'm 'ust reminding the house that _ his chancellor? i'm 'ust reminding the house that the _ his chancellor? i'm just reminding the house that the right - his chancellor? i'm just reminding i the house that the right honourable gentleman struggled to define what a's woman —— what a woman was, and he could make his mind up on that point, mr speaker. heaven help us. look, this government is not in principle in favour of higher taxation. of course not. but what we want to do. they love it, mr speaker, they love putting up taxes. labour put up taxes. what we want to do is take a sensible approach, governed by the impact on investment and jobs. and that is the test of a
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strong economy. it is by having a strong economy. it is by having a strong economy. it is by having a strong economy that we will be able to look after people as we have done during covid and as we will do in the after—shocks of covid and i'm proud to say that this week it was revealed that unemployment has come down to the lowest level since 1974, when i was ten years old. i don't know how old he was, but i was ten years old. know how old he was, but i was ten ears old. ., ., .,, ~ years old. hang on, last week, he said we will have a look at it. - said we will have a look at it. yesterday he voted against it. anyone picking up the papers today would think they are for it, but now he says he is against it again. clear as mud. to be fair, it's not like the rest of his cabinet know what they think either. the same day the chancellor said it was something he was looking at, thejustice secretary said it would be
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disastrous. the business secretary called it a bad idea, but also said he would consider a spanish—style windfall tax. one minute they are rolling it in, the next they are ruling it out. when will he stop the hokey coty and just back labour's plan for a windfall tax to cut household bills? —— hokey coty. the household bills? -- hokey coty. the labour plans— household bills? —— hokey coty. the labour plans are always and everywhere to raise taxes on business. i rememberthem business. i remember them campaigning business. i rememberthem campaigning in 2019 on the biggest taxes for business that this country has ever seen. that is their instinct. this country and the world faces problems in the cost of energy, driven partly by covid and partly by putin's war of choice in ukraine. and we know, and we always knew there would be a short—term
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cost in weaning ourselves off putin's hydrocarbons and in sanctioning the russians. everybody in this house voted for those sanctions. we knew that it would be tough, but ijust want sanctions. we knew that it would be tough, but i just want to tell the right honourable gentleman that giving in, not sticking the course, would ultimately be the far greater economic risk. and yes of course we will look at measures, all the measures that we need to take to get people through to the other side. but the only reason we can do that is because we took the tough decisions that were necessary during the pandemic, which would not have been possible if we had listened to him. he been possible if we had listened to him. , ., , �* ., , him. he 'ust doesn't get it, does he? he him. he just doesn't get it, does he? he doesn't _ him. he just doesn't get it, does he? he doesn't actually - him. he just doesn't get it, does i he? he doesn't actually understand what working families are going through in this country. struggling
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about how they will pay their bills, and whilst he did as, british households are slapped with an extra £53 million on their energy bills every single day. meanwhile, every single day, north sea oil and gas giants raking £32 million in unexpected profits. doesn't he see that every single day he delays his inevitable u—turn. he's going to do it. he's choosing to let people struggle when they don't need to. he says that this government has no sympathy for people who are struggling and working. let me tell you, it is precisely, let me tell you, it is precisely, let me tell you what we are already doing. we are already spending £22 billion in helping people with the cost of living in any way we can, but the
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reason why we can do that is because we took the tough decisions to get this country through covid, to make sure we came out of a lockdown in the way that was necessary and to have a strong economy with robust employment growth. and we will continue, and he talks about cutting taxes, injuly, we will have the biggest tax cut for ten years, £330 cuts for 30 million people who are paying national insurance contributions. and the reason we can do that is because we have a strong and robust economy. i'm going to look at all measures in future to support, of course i am, but the only reason we can do that, the only reason our companies are in such robust health is because of the decisions this government has taken. still pretending the economy is booming, still has his head in the sand in the middle of an economic
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crisis. the prime minister keep saying more help is coming. but we've heard it all before. may the 13th, he stood there and said we will do more right now. a week has passed and there has been nothing. on april the 19th he stood there and said, we will do more as soon as we can. a month has passed. and still, nothing. the chancellor said wait until the autumn. at least he's honest. that the plan is to do nothing. but doesn't the prime minister realise that working people across the country can't afford to wait while he vacillates. it's time to make his mind up. i wait while he vacillates. it's time to make his mind up.— wait while he vacillates. it's time to make his mind up. i will tell you what's happened — to make his mind up. i will tell you what's happened in _ to make his mind up. i will tell you what's happened in the _ to make his mind up. i will tell you what's happened in the last - to make his mind up. i will tell you| what's happened in the last month. we've got 300,000 more people off welfare and into work on our way to work programme, and it is because we get people into work that those families, those people are £6,000 per year better off. it is by
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getting people into work that we fix the long term problems of this economy. his answer, in addition to putting up taxes, his answer is to borrow more. we heard it from the shadow chancellor this morning. she says she wants to borrow almost another 30 billion to pounds. and that means more pressure on interest rates. it means more pressure on mortgages. it means pressure on every family, man, woman and child in this country. that is labour economic policy and why there has never been a labour government that has left office with unemployment lower than when it came in. that is the reality. fin lower than when it came in. that is the reality-— the reality. on the day when inflation went _ the reality. on the day when inflation went to _ the reality. on the day when inflation went to 9%, - the reality. on the day when inflation went to 9%, the - the reality. on the day when - inflation went to 9%, the highest for 40 years, i think the watching public, the least they can expect is a prime minister who concentrates on the cost of living crisis. clearly he just cannot make his the cost of living crisis. clearly hejust cannot make his mind up, so let's have a look at who is for it and who is against it. on one side, the chair of tesco, the chair of
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john lewis, the chair of the treasury select committee, the chair of the education select committee, lord haig, lord browne, the old ceo of bp, all supporting a windfall tax. even the current boss of bp says it would not discourage investment. and on the other side, the memberfor north east somerset. when he is not sticking notes on peoples desks like some overgrown prefect, is dead set against it. when is he finally going to get a grip, stand up for the people of britain, and get on the right side of the argument?— britain, and get on the right side of the argument? nothing could be more transparent _ of the argument? nothing could be more transparent from _ of the argument? nothing could be more transparent from this - of the argument? nothing could be l more transparent from this exchange than they lust to raise taxes. we don't relish it. we don't want to do it. of course we don't want to do it. of course we don't want to do it. we believe injobs and we
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believe in investment and in growth, and as it happens, the oil companies concerned are on track to invest about £70 billion into our economy over the next few years and are already taxed at a rate of 40%. what we want to see is investment in the long term energy provision of our country, which they have signally failed to do, by the way, cancelling our nuclear power investment. the people who are suffering from high energy prices in this country today have previous labour government is to blame for that mistake, and of course, we will look at all sensible measures, but we will be driven by considerations of growth, investment and employment, and i willjust remind you mr speaker that unemployment and has now hit a record low, for 50 years, and employment is now i think half a million people more now in paid employment than there were before the pandemic began.
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he's on the side of excess profits for oil and gas companies and we are on the side of working people and there you it. but it clearly does not like me pushing him on this but the reason i keep coming back to this subject and why it's so frustrating that he hasn't acted is because so many people are living through this nightmare and they feel totally abandoned by their government. this week i spoke to phoenix honeywell, a rare kidney condition means phoenix has to do dialysis from home 10pm till 7pm five days a week. just so he can take his daughter rosie to school. his dialysis is life—saving so he can't turn it off. so even though his wife, who is a midwife in the nhs, works extra shifts during the winter they had to turn their central heating off and phoenix skips meals to make ends meet. but
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their energy bill has still doubled. phoenix says he feels like he's being priced out of existence. and it's notjust him. millions of our disabled, elderly and vulnerable neighbours are at the sharp end of this crisis. they simply can't afford to live with dignity. the decisions we make here matter. the cost of indecision is enormous. people across the country need action now. the plans are already there, the prime minister please stop the delay, work with us to put them in place, do it for households which face bills they can't afford, but do it for phoenix, who simply can't afford to wait. i but do it for phoenix, who simply can't afford to wait.— can't afford to wait. i would be crateful can't afford to wait. i would be grateful if _ can't afford to wait. i would be grateful if you _ can't afford to wait. i would be grateful if you send _ can't afford to wait. i would be grateful if you send the - can't afford to wait. i would be grateful if you send the details can't afford to wait. i would be i grateful if you send the details of the sad because the nhs does cover the sad because the nhs does cover the costs of those who are on
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dialysis, mr speaker, but by the way of course they voted against the vital investment in the nhs that this country needs and ijust remind him and the house of the key point. none of this is possible, the investment in the nhs is impossible, the 22 billion we've already put in is impossible, the further investment will put in is impossible without the strong economy that this government has delivered. and it's because we took the tough decisions i have mentioned that we have record low unemployment, a record low for the last 50 years. and this queen's speech we have been debating is about putting in the infrastructure, the skills, the technology that will build the platform for growth and jobs in this country and that is what this government is committed to doing and that is the best way out of economic problems. i thought it was fantastic as to see her majesty the queen open crossrail. 72,000
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jobs already delivered, 90 billion it will produce for the whole of the uk economy, and let mejust ask it will produce for the whole of the uk economy, and let me just ask the right honourable gentleman who was the mayor of london when crossrail was started to be built? and who was the prime minister who completed it? the big things done, mr speaker. there has never been a labour government that left office with unemployment lower than when they began. mr unemployment lower than when they bean. ~ began. mr speaker, as the prime minister knows, _ began. mr speaker, as the prime minister knows, thanks for - began. mr speaker, as the prime i minister knows, thanks for visiting us in leyland a couple of weeks ago. i see crime and anti—social behaviour is a big issue for people locally and part of that problem is that the local police, when response calls are required, having to come in from preston or chorley. now lancashire has got 314 more police thanks to this government, does the prime minister agreed with me that we need to use some of those to get
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leyland police response open and will you work with me and the fabulous local police and crime commissioner to make that happen? i thank my honourable friend, she a terrific campaignerfor thank my honourable friend, she a terrific campaigner for her constituency. what we are doing is recruiting more police officers, 300 more in lancashire, and 13,576 more across the whole of the country and of course, i would be very happy to arrange the relevant meetings so we can continue to drive neighbourhood crime already done 33%, drive it down even further.— crime already done 33%, drive it down even further. thank you, mr seaker. down even further. thank you, mr speaker- i'm _ down even further. thank you, mr speaker. i'm sure _ down even further. thank you, mr speaker. i'm sure the _ down even further. thank you, mr speaker. i'm sure the whole - down even further. thank you, mr| speaker. i'm sure the whole house will want tojoin me in speaker. i'm sure the whole house will want to join me in wishing glasgow rangers football club all the best in the final tonight. it's a on the best in the final tonight. it's a joy to see scottish clubs get to the finals of european competitions. mr speaker, people didn't need to
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see this morning as official statistics to know that we are experiencing the highest inflation in 40 years. they know it because they are living with it. families can't afford food. they can't pay their bills. and we only at the beginning. and, as always under the tories, the poorest are the most. for months, people have been crying out for support but month after month a distracted downing street has failed to lift a finger to help. does the prime minister still supported chancellors insulting statement that acting now in this cost of living emergency would just be silly? mr cost of living emergency would 'ust be sill? ~ .«i cost of living emergency would 'ust besill? ~ , be silly? mr speaker, i support the chancellor's _ be silly? mr speaker, i support the chancellor's work _ be silly? mr speaker, i support the chancellor's work in _ be silly? mr speaker, i support the chancellor's work in lifting - be silly? mr speaker, i support the chancellor's work in lifting the - chancellor's work in lifting the living wage by a record amount, by making sure people on universal credit payer thousand pounds less in tax, by making sure we are putting
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£22 billion into supporting it with the cost of living, 9.1 billion already to help people with the cost of energy and above all, i support what he has done to deliver a strong economic foundation which makes all that possible. my economic foundation which makes all that possible-— that possible. my goodness, talk about an aesop _ that possible. my goodness, talk about an aesop fable. _ that possible. my goodness, talk about an aesop fable. every - that possible. my goodness, talk about an aesop fable. every day| about an aesop fable. every day this prime minister remains out of touch, people remain out of pocket and by the way, prime minister, £20 a week was taken out of people's... he's confirmed it would be silly to intervene. the tories only response to this cost of living crisis has been insults and inaction. the tory backbencher who thinks people, poor people just need cooking lessons, the tory minister who thinks people should just get a better paid job. and the chancellor who thinks it would be silly to act now. this is
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the cost of living crisis from westminster. forweeks, the cost of living crisis from westminster. for weeks, the prime minister has been briefing that it's the treasury who are to blame for blocking financial support for struggling families. well, prime minister, it's time to stop sniping from the sidelines. if this chancellor won't deliver an emergency budget, it's time for the prime minister to sack the treasury, to sack the chancellor and to put somebody else in office. mr speaker, i think the right — somebody else in office. mr speaker, i think the right honourable _ i think the right honourable gentleman should understand that i want to get back to the crucial point, we've been to covid, facing a spike in global energy prices which has been greatly exacerbated by what putin is doing in ukraine, but to deal with it of course what we are doing is putting billions and billions already, 9.1 billion into supporting people with a cost of energy, cut fuel duty by a record
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sum, helping elderly people in all sorts of ways not least through local councils, another £1 billion, but of course mr speaker everybody in the country knows that we are not through this yet and everybody can see that. they all know that the government is going to do more, but also they know the only reason we can do that is because we have a strong economy with massively high employment and that is the crucial thing and it would not have been possible if we had listened to the members opposite. the possible if we had listened to the members opposite.— possible if we had listened to the members opposite. the prime minister will be aware — members opposite. the prime minister will be aware of — members opposite. the prime minister will be aware of my _ members opposite. the prime minister will be aware of my campaign - members opposite. the prime minister will be aware of my campaign to - members opposite. the prime minister will be aware of my campaign to have i will be aware of my campaign to have digitally altered images carry a label. last week was mental health awareness week and there are 1.25 million people with eating disorders, 1 million people using steroids, 84 members of this house from seven parties signed my open letter to companies to pledge not to alter their images in their adverts. when the prime minister support that pledge and, for those who aren't
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taking that pledge, where he vowed to make sure that we consider labelling digitally altered images where body proportions are affected? i thank my honourable friend for his fantastic campaign and he and i have talked about it at length. i do think there is clearly a risk to mental health as young people are given unrealistic expectations about how they should look because of the stuff that they see. the kitemark suggestion that he has brought forward is extremely useful. and i will make sure we follow it up as part of our mental health plan. can i 'oin part of our mental health plan. can lioin other— part of our mental health plan. can i join other new _ part of our mental health plan. can ijoin other new fans of rangers and wish them good luck in seville tonight. mr speaker, british farmers are the best in the world, they could play a big part in how families and pensioners put food on the table during the cost of living emergency. but from caithness to
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cumbria, from shropshire to devon, farmers own input costs are spiralling upwards. animalfeed up 60%, mr speaker, fertiliser prices more than doubled. yet, instead of helping britons own food producers, the government is slashing the support payments that farmers rely on, sometimes up to 50% of their income, even before a new scheme is income, even before a new scheme is in place. so will the prime minister meet of farming leaders and myself to understand the extreme challenges they are facing so our farmers can do their bit to help families and pensioners afford to put food on the table during this economic crisis? i
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thank the right honourable gentleman. i can tell him, yes, i do recognise the challenges farmers are facing the cost of their inputs, fuel and fertiliser and that's why we are working so hard to abate those costs but what we have also got to do, notjust cutting duty, but everything else we can do to ensure that we fix the energy crisis, but what we are also doing is championing uk food and farming which has fantastic export markets around the world and now has 73 trade deals to exploit in a world avid for delicious hell some nutritious uk food and drink. i would be very happy to organise the relevant meeting with the right honourable gentleman.- relevant meeting with the right honourable gentleman. thank you, mr seaker. honourable gentleman. thank you, mr speaker- my — honourable gentleman. thank you, mr speaker- my right _ honourable gentleman. thank you, mr speaker. my right honourable - honourable gentleman. thank you, mr speaker. my right honourable friend i speaker. my right honourable friend join me in thanking my constituents in hertford and stortford who are
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offering help and refuge to ukrainians suffering from and fleeing the russian invasion? and can he set out how his visit to sweden and finland ensured closer cooperation with our allies to secure the long—term security of europe as my constituents are rightly concerned about ongoing russian aggression? i rightly concerned about ongoing russian aggression?— rightly concerned about ongoing russian aggression? i thank him very much and i want _ russian aggression? i thank him very much and i want to _ russian aggression? i thank him very much and i want to thank— russian aggression? i thank him very much and i want to thank a _ much and i want to thank a constituent is very much for what they are doing to help ukrainians fleeing war and aggression. and i know members up and down the country have constituents who have been incredibly generous. we can all be proud of the uk effort. yes, mr speaker, it's true the uk signed historic declarations of the other day with sweden and finland. to reinforce our security, our mutual security, and fortify europe's defences. i think it has been a massive step change in our cooperation, a thoroughly good
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thing, and has been driven by in the cases of both sweden and finland, by the people themselves who see the logic of nato membership. thank you, mr speaker- — logic of nato membership. thank you, mr speaker- the _ logic of nato membership. thank you, mr speaker. the home _ logic of nato membership. thank you, mr speaker. the home office - logic of nato membership. thank you, mr speaker. the home office others l mr speaker. the home office others regularly take six months to respond to letters to ministers. immigration cases have waited years to hear anything at all but instead of putting resources into fixing this unacceptable problem, the prime minister is choosing to fire thousands of civil servants and his ministers wander around whitehall putting post—it notes on desks he thinks look to empty. when the prime minister personally look into this issue and instruct his ministers and civil servants to give our constituents their attention they deserve? i constituents their attention they deserve? ., ~ constituents their attention they deserve? . ~ , . , deserve? i thank him very much but i have to say —
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deserve? i thank him very much but i have to say that _ deserve? i thank him very much but i have to say that i _ deserve? i thank him very much but i have to say that i must _ deserve? i thank him very much but i have to say that i must respectfully l have to say that i must respectfully disagree with the implication that for the civil service they are working from home and it's every bit as productive as being in the office. i simply don't accept that. i do think that we will become more productive and more efficient if on the whole we find ways to get back to our desks. the whole we find ways to get back to our desks-— the whole we find ways to get back to our desks. ., ,, i. ~ ,,, ., ,, to our desks. thank you, mr speaker. followin: to our desks. thank you, mr speaker. following my — to our desks. thank you, mr speaker. following my campaign _ to our desks. thank you, mr speaker. following my campaign a _ to our desks. thank you, mr speaker. following my campaign a local - following my campaign a local primary school is being granted 350 grand for improvement works by durham county council. the only time this has happened is now, after labour lost control of the council, for the first time in over 100 years last year. the school, leading a primary school and concept juniors in north west durham also going to be applying for the condition improvement fund, so can i urge my honourable friend to ensure that those cases are taken as seriously as possible and would he more broadly agree with me the education
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is a cornerstone of levelling up and ensuring more good jobs are available locally in county durham too? it's more thanjust available locally in county durham too? it's more than just a available locally in county durham too? it's more thanjust a place available locally in county durham too? it's more than just a place to bring friends for a social evening of beer and takeaway curry and an even better place to live, work and bring up a family. i have a real problem and some people — i have a real problem and some people are _ i have a real problem and some people are not going to get in and we have _ people are not going to get in and we have seen the time now and we are only on— we have seen the time now and we are only on question 16 so i want everyone _ only on question 16 so i want everyone to help each other so we can speed — everyone to help each other so we can speed up and get a few more in. i can speed up and get a few more in. liust_ can speed up and get a few more in. liust want— can speed up and get a few more in. liust want to — can speed up and get a few more in. ijust want to thank my honourable i just want to thank my honourable friend who is a massive champion for his constituency of north west durham and i'm delighted that he has been a supporter of county durham as a city of culture, culture in its widest interpretation, and i support him in everything he does. i’m widest interpretation, and i support him in everything he does.— him in everything he does. i'm sure the prime minister _ him in everything he does. i'm sure the prime minister knows _ him in everything he does. i'm sure the prime minister knows that - him in everything he does. i'm sure the prime minister knows that this | the prime minister knows that this is dementia awareness week and i'm proud that the dementia research institute now calls wales home. in
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2019 the tory manifesto promised to double funding for dementia research but the researchers are still waiting for this money. so, can the prime minister tell me in this dementia action week when the dementia moonshot will be delivered? we intend fully to deliver the dementia moonshot but never forget. this was the party that voted against £13 billion a year extra for the nhs. i know i'm not alone in meat —— dealing with many constituents with delays to renewing their passports and driving licence and there have been of family reunions in jeopardy and drivers nearly having a job offer was withdrawn because of delays to withdrawals —— renewals. can my right honourable friend assure me that everything is being donein assure me that everything is being done in government to address this problem so we can get people back on the road and away for the holidays? i am told that driving licences are
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now being issued faster than they were. no delays in successful online driving licence applications and that customers should receive their licence within a few days and if i misinformed about that, i trust my honourable friend will let me know. prime minister, food prices are going up, rents are going up, energy costs are going up, every day i've got more and more constituents coming to me to say that they thought the day would never come. things just cost too much. at the same time, people are anchored to the minimum wage, working two, three, four, fivejobs on low the minimum wage, working two, three, four, five jobs on low wages with in work benefits and theyjust can't afford it. at the same time we have the honourable lady saying that to survive they should take on more hours and get a betterjob. does the prime minister agreed with his minister or agree with me that we should have an emergency budget? i
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accept that, of course, there are economic pressures on our country economic pressures on oui’ country now economic pressures on our country now caused by the fact is we mentioned but that is why we have already increased the living wage by £1000 per yearfor those on it and already increased universal credit by £1000 a year and all of the other measures, billions and billions of tax we are putting into supporting incomes, but the reason we can do thatis incomes, but the reason we can do that is because we have strong economic fundamentals and i don't know when he was born, but unemployment is the lowest it has been since 1974. and that is giving us the foundation to take our country forward. the airedale hos - ital country forward. the airedale hospital recently _ country forward. the airedale hospital recently submitted l country forward. the airedale | hospital recently submitted its country forward. the airedale - hospital recently submitted its bid to be one of the government's new hospitals on this is because the airedale has an extremely high structural risk profile with 83% of the building being constructed from aerated concrete. there are several wards due to structural risks that are closed and it is now 20 years
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beyond its life expectancy, so can the prime minister personally assure me that we will be able to deliver a new airedale hospital which is fit for the future?— new airedale hospital which is fit for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure _ for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure on — for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure on me _ for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure on me to _ for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure on me to dish - for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure on me to dish out - for the future? well, there's a lot of pressure on me to dish out yet| of pressure on me to dish out yet another hospital from this dispatch box but i can tell him that we are reviewing all applications for the next eight hospitals in our new programme, the biggest in a generation, and only possible because we have a strong economy and he is a doughty campaigner for because we have a strong economy and he is a doughty campaignerfor his constituents and we will make a final decision later this year. fin final decision later this year. on the 26th of february, a private charter flight to moscow was allowed to take off from inverness airport, an apparent breach of a uk ban on flights of that nature which had come into effect on midnight the day before. air traffic control transcripts published in the press have revealed that despite being informed of the intended flight, no attempt was made by the uk
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government or its agencies to prevent the plane from taking off. will the prime minister to commit to informing the house at the earliest opportunity who was travelling on that flight, white despite being informed in advance that the flight was no attempt made by the uk government to keep the plane on the ground and what will the prime minister personally do to try to prevent any similar breaches of sanctions from happening in the future? i sanctions from happening in the future? ., ~ , sanctions from happening in the future? . ~ , . ., future? i thank him very much and i will make sure _ future? i thank him very much and i will make sure the _ future? i thank him very much and i will make sure the sooner— future? i thank him very much and i will make sure the sooner we - future? i thank him very much and i will make sure the sooner we can i future? i thank him very much and i i will make sure the sooner we can get some information and i don't know the answer to his question but as soon as we get some information i will make sure the house is properly informed. ., will make sure the house is properly informed. . , ~ informed. earlier this week the ”lannin informed. earlier this week the planning inspectorate - informed. earlier this week the planning inspectorate waved i informed. earlier this week the - planning inspectorate waved through a decision by labour councillors to build a massive logistics hub in south warrington. the plans are contrary to national policy, entirely in the green belt and have been approved despite more than 1000 letters of objection. does the prime minister agree with me that listening to local communities and
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protecting our precious green belt must be at the heart of planning policy? and will he meet with me to see how local residents can have their voices heard?— see how local residents can have their voices heard? local residents could have — their voices heard? local residents could have no _ their voices heard? local residents could have no more _ their voices heard? local residents could have no more powerful- their voices heard? local residents could have no more powerfulvoicej could have no more powerful voice than that of my honourable friend. the house will have heard him loud and clear and i know the department of levelling up will have heard him loud and clear and i will make sure that he gets the relevant meeting. no bullying and no harassment. no leaking, no misuse of taxpayers money and no actual or perceived conflicts of interest. the precious principles of public life enshrined in this document must be honoured at all times. those, mr speaker, other minster�*s own words from the ministerial code. so can the prime minister tell me on a scale of one to ten, how is he doing with keeping those principles? i to ten, how is he doing with keeping those principles?— those principles? i think ten out of ten. what those principles? i think ten out of ten- what we _ those principles? i think ten out of ten. what we believe _ those principles? i think ten out of ten. what we believe in _ those principles? i think ten out of
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ten. what we believe in this - ten. what we believe in this government in adhering to the principles of the ministerial code, and by the way, and it's an important point because there is a lot of attacks on mps on what goes on in this place and it's always worth stressing that the vast majority of people who work in the house of commons, members of parliament, are doing a very good job and working very hard and are not misbehaving. taste job and working very hard and are not misbehaving.— job and working very hard and are not misbehaving. we have welcomed as lum not misbehaving. we have welcomed asylum seekers _ not misbehaving. we have welcomed asylum seekers from _ not misbehaving. we have welcomed asylum seekers from all _ not misbehaving. we have welcomed asylum seekers from all parts - not misbehaving. we have welcomed asylum seekers from all parts of - not misbehaving. we have welcomed asylum seekers from all parts of the | asylum seekers from all parts of the world including syria and the ukraine, but the government plans just announced from the 31st of may to the start of what will be up to 1500 non—detained, younger, single males from different parts of the world, asylum seekers, in a base that will be the centre of a small rural village of 600 people,
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children, all the way through to elderly residents. of his legs without streetlights, without police presence —— a village without streetlights. it will devastate the community and devastate house prices which will plummet in the residence of that village will not feel safe to leave their homes alone. will my right honourable friend please, on behalf of the community, please stop these plans?— these plans? i thank him very much, and i know— these plans? i thank him very much, and i know that _ these plans? i thank him very much, and i know that my _ these plans? i thank him very much, and i know that my right _ these plans? i thank him very much, j and i know that my right honourable friend of the home secretary is engaging with him and with others locally about the use of the site and i hear loud and clear what he has had to say and i am the recipient of many of his intercessions on this matter and i understand the strength of feeling in his constituency, and i'm sure that there will be further meetings between him and the home office about what we can do.
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some mps will leave after prime minister's questions. we're going to stay with the house of commons as there is due to be a ministerial statement on foreign national offender removal flights. tom pursglove is the minister forjustice and tackling illegal migration..... we do not currently know how many people were on it, it is suggested between four and seven and there were around 50 jamaican nationals with criminal convictions who had been expected to leave the uk but most of them were taken off after last—minute legal challenges. the home office says it is necessary to remove those with no right to be in the uk but these deportation flights are controversial. let us listen in...
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this loan, effectively, to help with bills but that is all getting lost in the attack on the government about not doing enough and it was interesting today that boris johnson was saying that everybody knows that the government is going to do more and then the british people have shown repeatedly that they want an immigration system that is firm and fair. our new plan for immigration, under pine that underpinned by the is the first major reform of the system in decades. with that act now low, we are getting on with the job and operationalising the plan, it is this conservative government which is delivering on the will of the british people. making our streets safer is our priority. that is why we introduced the new police crime sentencing and courts act, giving the police the powers they need to crack down on violent criminals. it is also why, despite the challenges of covid, we stepped up the removal of covid, we stepped up the removal of criminals who have no right to be here. since january 2019, over
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here. sincejanuary 2019, over 10,000 offenders have been removed from the uk. in the last month alone, flights have left to albania, romania, poland and lithuania and now also this morning to jamaica. i expect that flight will land now also this morning to jamaica. i expect that flight will [and whilst i am on my feet. mr speaker, it was under a labour government that the uk borders act 2007 was introduced and passed requiring a deportation order to be made where a national had been convicted of an offence in the uk and sentenced to 12 months or more unless an exception applies. we apply that law. it is labour mps that now howl time and time again, imploring us to halt the removal of dangerous foreign criminals from our streets, with letters, questions to parliament and campaigns on twitter. we have even seen members of the shadow cabinet defending criminals, with no consideration for the victims or loved ones. too often, opposition mps are ignoring the law of either majority and by extension,
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standing on the side of criminals, including paedophiles, murderers and rapists. let me set out some facts, let me set out some facts of the flight that departed this morning. because i know this has been of real interest to many members of this house. firstly, the offences committed by the individuals on the flight include rape of a minor, sexual assault against children, firearms offences, dealing and importing controlled drugs and other violent crimes like actual bodily harm. between them they had a combined total of 58 convictions for 127 offences. these are extremely serious offences which have a real and lasting impact on victims and communities. they are not minor matters, as some would have you believe. secondly, this flight to jamaica makes upjust1% of believe. secondly, this flight to jamaica makes up just 1% of the total enforced returns in the year ending september 2021, criminals who have no right to be in the uk are regularly removed to countries
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across the world and we will continue to do so to keep our citizens safe. safety is non—negotiable. however, mr speaker, many more criminals could have left the uk today. what we have seen over the uk today. what we have seen over the last 24 are is more last—minute plans facilitated by specialist immigration law firms, as well as representations from members of parliament to stop this flight from leaving. it is no surprise that they voted against our borders act, precisely because it seeks to address the merry—go—round of last—minute claims to speed up the removal of dangerous criminals. we saw the benches opposite fight tooth and nail to prevent that act from becoming law and votes have consequences. convicted criminals guilty of heinous crimes including manslaughter, rape, robbery, child sex offences, drug offences, and persistent offenders remain in our country, who, had this bill be passed more quickly, with opposition support, might have been removed
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from the uk today. they remain here and it is a stain on our country that they do. i can assure the british people that we are taking action to address this and things are changing as we get on and deliver our reforms. mr speaker, i make no apology for removing criminals who have abused our hospitality, broken our laws, and have no right to be here. i make no apology for doing everything in my power to make our streets safer and being on the side of actual victims, we stand with the british people, it is time that the opposition benches tried that as well.— tried that as well. shadow minister ste - hen tried that as well. shadow minister stephen kinnock. _ tried that as well. shadow minister stephen kinnock. thank _ tried that as well. shadow minister stephen kinnock. thank you. - tried that as well. shadow minister stephen kinnock. thank you. the i stephen kinnock. thank you. the first duty of _ stephen kinnock. thank you. the first duty of the _ stephen kinnock. thank you. the first duty of the british _ stephen kinnock. thank you. the i first duty of the british government is to keep the british people say. the home office has a responsibility to make sure that rules are fairly enforced, but ministers are failing to do so and they are blaming everyone else for their failings.
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the home office must deport dangerous foreign criminals who have no right to be in our country. and who should be returned to the country of their citizenship, which is precisely why the last labour government introduced stronger laws to this effect. the home office also has a responsibility to get its deportation decisions right. as the government itself has admitted, the windrush scandal, during the windrush scandal, during the windrush scandal, during the windrush scandal, the home office made grave errors in both detention and deportation decisions. mr speaker, the home office is currently failing on all counts. we are committed to the principles of an immigration system which is firm, fair and well managed, first and foremost, it is deeply troubling that a number of expert reports over recent years have pointed to how home office failure to have resulted in fewerforeign home office failure to have resulted in fewer foreign criminals being deported than should be the case.
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indeed, in 2015, the chief inspector for borders and immigration stated that one in three failure is to deport foreign criminals was a result of home office failure. fast forward to 2022 and the last immigration figures show that the home office is still failing miserably in this regard. under the current prime minister and home secretary, there has been a stark decline in foreign national offenders being returned and deported. in the year ending september 2021, there were 2732 foreign national offenders returned from the uk, 20% fewer than the previous year and 47% fewer than in 2019, the year before the pandemic began. fora national 2019, the year before the pandemic began. for a national offenders returns had already fallen to 5128 in 2019, even more staggering is the fact that according to a report the home office had to release six out of every ten detainees that the apartment wanted to deport because
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they simply could not expect my this was happening. the pac also raised concerns that earlier and better quality legal advice would make it more likely that decisions were accurate and robust, rather than being overturned due to poor decisions later in the process, because the minister will know that the windrush report identified low quality decision—making and irrational approach to individuals and the follow—up report stated that there were many examples where the department has made no progress at all on this matter. the level of sheer incompetence is not only a threat to our security, it ultimately erodes the confidence of the british public and foreign nationals alike, because the system fails to fulfil those basic crucial principles of being firm, fair and well—managed. the minister refers to rape but this government has presided over rape prosecutions that have fallen to a shameful 1.3%. the
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home office needs to get this right, but the minister's statement was long on bluff and bluster but contains absolutely no substance whatsoever. perhaps it could therefore answer the following questions, how many foreign offenders have absconded in the last 12 months? what steps have been taken to learn the lessons of the windrush scandal, to ensure that this shameful episode is never repeated? does the home office actually have a plan that will address the current shambolic nature of the deportation system? the british people deserve better than this. ratherthan british people deserve better than this. rather than coming to the dispatch box to engage in a frankly rather childish and petulant rant, based on the blame game, and finger pointing, the minister should instead be coming to this chamber, to set out what the government is actually going to do to fix this broken system. stephen kinnock
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responding to the government and that statement on the latest deportation flight that left this morning to jamaica. six years ago, natasha ednan—laperouse died from a severe allergic reaction after eating a baguette which — unbeknown to her — contained sesame seeds. now, her parents have set up a clinical trial to investigate whether commonly available peanut and milk products, taken under medical supervision, can be used as a treatment for people with food allergies. celestina olulode reports. natasha was funny, very loving, and she was very brave. she gave me the most loving hugs that really sunk into my soul, and i miss those very much today. the memories of two parents determined their daughter's death won't be in vain. in 2016, natasha ednan—laperouse went into cardiac arrest on a flight
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after buying a baguette. the 15—year—old knew she had a food allergy and always checked labels — but the bread she ate contained sesame seeds, that were not included in the list of ingredients. she died in a french hospital later that day. since then, her parents have fought successfully to introduce new food—labelling rules. and this is the next stage of her parents' tireless campaign. a three—year clinical trial exposing young people to the foods they're allergic to, in the hope they develop greater tolerance. with successful immunotherapy,| you get to a point where the food that you're allergic to doesn't hospitalise you any more. - and that takes so much stress out of families' lives. - it's a momentous moment for us both, actually, as husband and wife and parents of natasha. i think we feel, on one level, quite proud that we've got here. it seems like a long time
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coming, in some ways. professor hasan arshad hopes the data gathered will help the nhs make savings. we have also introduced a very novel aspect, - i which is to use ordinary available | food as opposed to using a capsule with the peanut powder in — - which is obviously more expensive. hopefully the nhs could implement i this treatment for the thousands i of people who suffer from allergy without incurring a huge cost. - although trials like this aren't a cure, natasha's parents say they offer an opportunity their daughter didn't have. and i think knowing that there was research happening, looking into solutions and looking into treatments so that she could live a less—stressed life around the food that she was eating, would have been enormous for her. celestina olulode, bbc news.
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earlier i spoke to professor hasan arshad, the chief investigator leading the trial — he told me why it was important to conduct it. immunotherapy is available for allergens in the environment like pollen and dust mites, it is not currently available for foods. there has been a number of clinical trials that show that this form of therapy is effective and safe, but it has not yet been implemented for or available for food allergy patients. so we decided to embark on this trial to fill that evidence gap, so that when we have that evidence, the nhs will hopefully take this up and make it available to hundreds of thousands of children who have peanut and milk allergies and are blighted by this within their lives.
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it sounds like you have every single reason to expect that this will work. yes. the effectiveness has been demonstrated for this form of therapy for the vast majority of children and young people and they are able to tolerate these foods. the figures are estimated at somewhere between 60 and 80%. in terms of what will happen in the trials, in very controlled conditions, people will be given tiny amounts of the thing that could be life—threatening for them. indeed. this is done in a very supervised manner. either in a hospital or we introduce another aspect to do at home. that would be under guidance on a zoom link and doses are gradually increased every week
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while the children continue to consume that dose every day from then on until the next week when they increase the dose further and this process can take between 6—8 months to get to the stage where they can tolerate significant amounts of peanut and milk, such that they can go out and eat freely and live a normal life. when you say eat freely and live a normal life, without fear of something being contaminated or actually consumed to any sort of level? they can consume the food to a significant level and that varies. some can tolerate... all of them would tolerate at least about ten times the dose they were previously tolerating. you are at the start of the process,
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but potentially, in our report, it was said that it was not going to eradicate allergies, obviously it will not eradicate people having them, but will it protect an allergy in an individual who goes through this process? in practical terms, yes, but the only caveat there is, that they need to keep that food in their diet, to keep the tolerance. it has been observed that after inducing tolerance, avoid the food for many months, then sometime it starts to react again. for something like milk and peanut, it should not be a big problem to continue to have it in their diet on a regular basis. now it's time for a look at the weather with tomasz shafernaker. hello. the bright or sunny weather early
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in the day will give way to rain clouds and storms later on today and into this evening. some of the storms could be quite torrential, possibly leading to flash flooding, especially in the south—east of england. you can see on the satellite picture, the storm clouds gathering just to the south, northern ireland is also in for a band of heavy rain, sweeping in from the atlantic across ireland. the storms in the south will first reach south—western england and wales, i think. these are the temperatures late afternoon, into the 20s across the bulk of england, elsewhere it is the high teens. let us have a look at the forecast, then, as we head into this evening. there is that band of thundery rain in northern ireland and here are the scattered, thundery showers across england and wales. we think that they will really gather in pace and also intensity across the south—east and east anglia. this is where we are likely to see the heaviest of the rain, 20—40 millimetres of rain in the short space of time, maybe two or three hours and that is certainly a potential for flash flooding,
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we have been warned. the forecast by the end of the night shows a much quieter spell of weather, with temperatures between ten and 14 degrees. so, that takes us into thursday, i think bright or sunny right from the word go, almost, almost, there could be some cloud in east anglia and the south—east which should eventually clear away and apart from a few showers and more of a breeze in the far north west of the uk, it is a mostly sunny day. really very pleasant, with temperatures in the high teens or the low 20s across the bulk of england. now, the end of the week shows weather fronts close by, it is going to be a different sort of day, certainly a lot more cloud about, a lot on friday. these storms here in the south—east could also clip us, they might be a little bit further away, but there is certainly the chance of that, but i think we are confident for a fairly breezy day, with sunny spells, showers and it is going to be cooler, between 15 and 19 degrees, i think, for most of us.
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let us have a look at the summary, then, for the weekend and i think overall, with high—pressure building, across england and wales, it is looking dry and quite bright, a shower or two in the north west.
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prices are rising at their fastest rate for 40 years. uk inflation is now at 9%. higher food and fuel prices, driven by the war in ukraine, are pushing the cost of living up for millions of households. with your bills going up and whatnot, you're noticing you've got less money every week, you know, expendable cash every week out of your wages, you know. your gas has gone up, your electric�*s gone up, everything's gone up. we'll bring you the details and what it all means for you. in the ukrainian capital, one man tells us he's lost his wife, mum, dad, brother, grandmother, his one year old daughter and his dog, after a shell hit his home. here, some ukrainian refugees who were offered a place to stay by uk families are being asked to leave the homes
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