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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 21, 2022 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: absolute evil — president zelensky condemns a strike on a cultural centre as russia makes gains in eastern ukraine. pharmacists will be allowed to swap hrt medications without the need for a new prescription, to try to ease shortages. the dame deborah effect — bowel cancer charities report a surge in enquiries as the broadcaster and campaigner boosts awareness of the disease. controversy ahead of wimbledon. there will be no ranking points for players this year, following the decision to ban russian and belarusian competitors,
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and it means novak djokovic will lose his number one status. good morning. something of a mixed weekend coming up. i think all of us will see some dry, hopefully sunny weather at some stage, but there are also going to be some showers moving on, particularly to the north and west of the uk. more details for you, as ever, coming up. it is saturday 21 may. our main story: russia has declared victory in its battle to conquer the ukrainian port city of mariupol after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant laid down their weapons. ukraine's president zelensky confirmed the troops had been given permission to surrender and hopes they can be released as part of a prisoner exchange programme. fierce fighting continues in the south and east of ukraine, as simon jones reports. under attack, these pictures released by ukraine's state
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emergency service are said to show a russian missile strike on a cultural centre in the east of the country. president zelensky described the destruction as absolute evil. translation: we are working to ensure that russia is made to pay in one way or another for everything it has destroyed in ukraine — every burned—out house, every ruined school, ruined hospital, every cultural centre it's blown up. at cultural centre it's blown up. at the bond azovstal steelworks in mariupol, russia has declared a complete victory. it says its forces are in control there after the last ukrainian soldiers defending the site surrendered. ukraine says it gave them a clear signal to get out and save their lives. they have been hold up for months, a symbol of the ukrainian resistance. they are now being taken to areas controlled by russia, but their fate longer term is unclear. we russia, but their fate longer term is unclear. ~ . , russia, but their fate longer term is unclear-— is unclear. we are trying to get those soldiers _ is unclear. we are trying to get those soldiers back. _ is unclear. we are trying to get those soldiers back. the - is unclear. we are trying to get - those soldiers back. the agreement was that they will surrender now,
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but eventually we will exchange them in a prisoner swap. it seems that the russian side is reneging on those agreements.— the russian side is reneging on those agreements. the russian side is reneging on those aureements. . , , those agreements. mariupol has been left in ruins by — those agreements. mariupol has been left in ruins by constant _ left in ruins by constant bombardment. few residents remain. photos posted by the ukrainian military official appear to show a city in eastern ukraine has suffered the same fate. russia says what it calls the liberation of luhansk province is nearing completion. people left in towns near the front line are left with a stark choice — should they stay or should they go? translation: i have to help people. there are grandparents, people with disabilities who remain. they have to be pulled out.— to be pulled out. ukraine is preparing _ to be pulled out. ukraine is preparing for _ to be pulled out. ukraine is preparing for more - to be pulled out. ukraine is preparing for more fierce . to be pulled out. ukraine is- preparing for more fierce fighting as russia says it is making advances. the war goes on with no end in sight. we arejoined now byjoe inwood, our correspondent in lviv. joe, what more do we know
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about russian advances in ukraine? yes, what we're seeing is a lot of interconnected events here. as simon was talking about there, the siege of mariupol has really come to an end. that whole area is under russian control, and what we think is that has allowed them to move their forces out of mariupol, because thousands and thousands of men were tied up in guarding the azovstal steelworks. now, this coincides with what we think is a real push the russians are making into the luhansk region. that is one of the two regions that make up the dongas. and they are pushing for a town taken by the russians a week or so ago, and we think what they are trying to do is to move through their two places like konstantin yukka and to encircle the last of the ukrainian defenders. they really
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are dug in, but they are in towns like donetsk and luhansk. the russians have lost lots of men trying to cross the donetsk river, so it seems like what they are trying to do is come and encircle them, and what we could be seeing is them, and what we could be seeing is the beginning of another encirclement in the donbas, just as the one in mariupol has come to an end. pharmacists are to be given more flexibility so they can deal with shortages of hormone replacement therapy medicines. they will be given temporary powers to offer swaps for certain hrt drugs without a new prescription. our health correspondent catherine burns has the details. pharmacists have been struggling to get hold of certain hrt medicines. now they are being given temporary new powers to help make sure women can still control the symptoms of their menopause. normally, if a chemist can't track down medicines on a prescription, the patient has to go back to their gp and ask for something else instead. but now, if
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they can't find four certain hrt treatments, the pharmacist will be able to offer the patient specific suitable alternatives instead. so, instead of a gel, is cream or spray, women could find themselves using a patch instead. this is known as a serious shortage protocol. it is a temporary measure to deal with the immediate shortage. the move has been welcomed by the british menopause society and other experts, at least as an answer to the immediate problem. the at least as an answer to the immediate problem. at least as an answer to the immediate roblem. , , . immediate problem. the issue that i have is this — immediate problem. the issue that i have is this is _ immediate problem. the issue that i have is this is not _ immediate problem. the issue that i have is this is not a _ immediate problem. the issue that i have is this is not a long-term - have is this is not a long—term strategy. this is fabulous for a short issue, but longer term we need to ensure there is no supply issues when it comes to these creams or other types of hrts that we commonly prescribed as nhs doctors. the government — prescribed as nhs doctors. the government is _ prescribed as nhs doctors. the government is dealing with this by learning lessons from the successful vaccines rollout. it has appointed madelyn mcternan from the vaccines task force is hrts czar. one issue
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for her is getting a true sense of how many women are on hrt. nobody knows for certain, but the best estimates are that around ten to 40% of menopausal women take it. that number is only expected to rise. drug shortages are notjust for hrt and nothing new. pharmacists would like a permanent change in the law, allowing more flexibility to deal with these problems in the future. emergency plans are being drawn up to make sure some passenger and freight services can still run if railway workers go on strike this summer. more 40,000 members of the rmt union are being balloted in a dispute over pay and jobs. the union claims, if strike action goes ahead, it could be the biggest rail strike in modern history and bring the uk to a standstill. the government says a fair deal forstaff, passengers and taxpayers is needed. doctors say they're worried that monkey pox could have a significant impact on access to sexual health services. staff at clinics are having
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to isolate if they come into contact with anyone who is infected, and there are fears the pressure on the workforce means some sexually transmitted infections could be missed. 20 cases have now been confirmed in the uk. health officials say the risk to the public remains low. scotland's first minister, nicola sturgeon, has tested positive for coronavirus. she said she was experiencing mild symptoms and would follow scottish government guidance to work from home for the next few days. ms sturgeon also said she hopes to be back out and about later next week. there has been a large increase in online searches for information about bowel cancer in the last two weeks, ever since the author and broadcaster dame deborahjames revealed she is now receiving end—of—life care. both nhs england and bowel cancer charities have reported a surge of visitors to their websites, while dame deborah's fundraising total is now close to £6.5 million. will batchelor has the details. when she was diagnosed with stage
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four bowel cancer in 2016, dame deborahjames wanted to raise awareness of a disease that can thrive due to embarrassment. i’m awareness of a disease that can thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not auoin to thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look — thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at _ thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at you. _ thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at you. a _ thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at you. a crying - thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at you. a crying fit - going to look at you. a crying fit is not what we need right now. she had already — is not what we need right now. she had already achieved that thanks largely to her work on the podcast, you, me and the big c. but her announcement a few days ago she is receiving end—of—life care has supercharge the mission. on the day after what deborah called her final message, nhs england said it saw an extra 82,000 hits to its bowel cancer page last week. the page received an extra 82,000 hits. the charity bowel cancer uk said its webpage crash due to the extra visitors, and other charities, as well, i'm noticing the damp deborah effect. we well, i'm noticing the damp deborah effect. ~ ., well, i'm noticing the damp deborah effect. ~ . ., , ., effect. we are really encouraged that we are _ effect. we are really encouraged that we are seeing _ effect. we are really encouraged that we are seeing an _ effect. we are really encouraged that we are seeing an increase i effect. we are really encouraged| that we are seeing an increase of 25% in terms of the number of
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searches that are coming to our website, specifically about finding out information about bowel cancer. that is a 25% increase on last year, and that really is a direct response to deborahjames speaking out and really raising awareness. it is to deborah james speaking out and really raising awareness.— really raising awareness. it is not 'ust really raising awareness. it is not just awareness _ really raising awareness. it is not just awareness getting _ really raising awareness. it is not just awareness getting a - really raising awareness. it is not just awareness getting a boost, l really raising awareness. it is not| just awareness getting a boost, it is fundraising as well. the bowel babe fund stands at £6.5 million as people in the uk and beyond tried to show their admiration in any way they can. from surprise royal visitors in the garden of her parents was home, the duke of cambridge wanted to hand deliver deborah's dam pollard, two letters of support. never mind the address, the post he knew exactly who this was for. ways to support the fund are growing as well. there is a book, dam deborah's second, about
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living with bowel cancer. there was a rose launched at the chelsea flower show, and there is a shirt. i knew i wanted one element in the collection, and i always use the phrase rebellious hope. for me it is something that i relied on. it gives me that little glimmer of hope to continue on day by day, regardless of what the future looks like. dame deborah may _ of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be — of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be in _ of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be in the _ of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be in the final- of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be in the final stage of her cancerjenny, but her work continues. ——journey. voting is under way in australia's first election in three years, with 17 million people expected to cast a ballot. polls predict a tight race between the current prime minister and labor leader anthony albanese, who is one of the country's longest—serving politicians. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil has spent the day at a polling station near sydney's bondi beach. welcome to the world famous bondi beach. every saturday, surfers,
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swimmers, people walking their dogs, part of this beautiful, quintessential australian lifestyle. but this is not your typical saturday. it is election day, and this is the surf lifesaving club, and it has turned into a polling station today. so let's get closer and find out what is happening. all right, before we get into the politics, let me tell you about the famous democracy sausages. they are a real feature of election day here. they even have their own hashtag in their own twitter account. essentially, voters cast their ballots and then they treat themselves to a barbecue, or a barbie, as they say here. increasingly the election has become a referendum on the character of both party leaders. the prime minister, scott morrison, has been projecting the image of an australian dad, someone you can trust, someone who saw the country through the pandemic. the labour party leader, anthony albanese, is one of the country's most experienced politicians, and he has been urging australians that now is
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time for a change. the two biggest issues for voters here have become the economy and climate change. now, even though the economy has fared fairly well during the pandemic, australians are really worried about the rising cost of living here. and of course, the raising interest rates that happened for the first time in a decade. now, climate change — you would think this is a really big issue and it would be prominent in the campaigns because of what australians have been to in the past three years, these catastrophic bushfires in these floods recently, but it has barely been mentioned by both major parties because it is a politically divisive and contentious issue. by contrast, the independent candidates have made climate action the heart in the centre of their campaigning, and thatis centre of their campaigning, and that is making them a big threat to safe government seats like this one and others in places like melbourne. so in an election as close as this one, the independent candidates may hold the balance of power.
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temperatures in spain could reach their highest level for 20 years today, with some areas expected to hit 42 degrees celsius. the country has been experiencing abnormally hot weather throughout may, with temperatures 10 to 15 degrees above average. guy hedgecoe is in madrid this morning. i think you are an hour ahead of us, so it is probablyjust after seven a.m.. what is it like right now? well, it is relatively cool right now. it isjust well, it is relatively cool right now. it is just after 7am in central madrid. things are very cool, but we are expecting them to heat up a lot after the day, into the afternoon and into the early evening. that's when it gets really hot. it has been down on the south of the country where we have seen these extremely high temperatures throughout this week. as you say, we are expecting to see temperatures reaching possibly as high as a0 or a2 degrees down in some areas in andalusia
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later on. that in itself is not unprecedented, but it is the fact that we are seeing those kinds of temperatures at this time of year, in the middle of may, it really is extremely unusual.— in the middle of may, it really is extremely unusual. guy, how are --eole extremely unusual. guy, how are people adapting _ extremely unusual. guy, how are people adapting to _ extremely unusual. guy, how are people adapting to it? _ extremely unusual. guy, how are people adapting to it? i - extremely unusual. guy, how are people adapting to it? i think- extremely unusual. guy, how are people adapting to it? i think it l people adapting to it? i think it was in august last year they had once again very extreme temperature. how do people react in spain when it gets like this?— gets like this? well, you know, every summer— gets like this? well, you know, every summer - _ gets like this? well, you know, every summer - almost - gets like this? well, you know, every summer - almost every l gets like this? well, you know, - every summer - almost every summer - every summer — almost every summer — we every summer — almost every summer — we get very high temperatures, as you say. people are used to temperatures up in the high 30s or even low a0s injuly and august. so it has been told by the government that people should stay indoors wherever possible, they should make sure they are hydrated, they should wear light clothes stop we have also been told by the government that elderly people, infirm people and particularly the younger children are at highest risk of heat stroke, so they need to stay indoors during those really hot hours during the afternoon and early evening. that is
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our reporter — afternoon and early evening. that is our reporter reporting _ afternoon and early evening. that is our reporter reporting from - afternoon and early evening. that is our reporter reporting from a - our reporter reporting from a slightly cooler time earlier in the day. slightly cooler time earlier in the da . , ., , , day. they would be feeling very hateful because _ day. they would be feeling very hateful because normally - day. they would be feeling very hateful because normally high i hateful because normally high temperatures can be dangerous but we do not have that here this weekend. i think i can guarantee that. spat i think i can guarantee that. spot on. that kind _ i think i can guarantee that. spot on. that kind of— i think i can guarantee that. spot on. that kind of heat _ i think i can guarantee that. spot on. that kind of heat is _ on. that kind of heat is exceptionally dangerous and in the uk we kind to idealise heat waves as being something enjoyable but certainly for spain, over a0 degrees heat is deeply uncomfortable. for the uk this weekend a little mixture. we have some slightly higher temperatures than we have had for the last few days of this week through the weekend we will also see our skies clouding over at times and some showery rain on the way particularly to the north—west. looking clear to start the day but across england and wales with affronts will start to push on
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towards scotland and northern ireland through the day so the figures cloud is building here but some will from the south as well across west and wales and in the second half the day we could get the odd isolated shower here. drifting into cumbria. the driest and brightest further south and east you are. eastern scotland shall hold sunshine in the afternoon generally more cloud was some patchy rain on and off for western scotland and northern ireland and just the mid—teens of 220 or 21 we have long spells of sunshine. if you head out this evening you'll be fine across england and wales, the rain sets in more properly across scotland with 5°99y more properly across scotland with soggy conditions into the small hours particularly across the northern half of western scotland are mild enough night, south breeze and overnight lows of 2—11. the reason we get more established rain for scotland overnight is that centre of low pressure moving to the north of the and it will stay close
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by through sunday so for scotland more solid cloud around on sunday, some as bright as possible in the east and again with some cloud and showers on and off and a thick avail of cloud spreading over the south of england and wales. driest and brightest tomorrow, southern counties of here the highest temperatures. monday coming at us from all angles we have an area of low pressure close by across the continent, with affronts trying to come in from the north on monday thatis come in from the north on monday that is best described as an unsettled day. some changes in terms of our model on timings where we will see the rain but all areas of risk of seeing a shower at some point on monday. probably driest and brightest in the south—eastern areas but you will notice across the temperatures start to slide down with more cloud and outbreaks of rain around. but then sets the tone to take us into the first part of the week ahead. looking mixed and
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certainly we do not have any particular high—temperature is on the way for us at best we may get to the way for us at best we may get to the high teens. that's not terrible. that is fine, it is may. an we will get hotter than average no doubt. thank you quite a lot, susan. 50 than average no doubt. thank you quite a lot, susan.— than average no doubt. thank you quite a lot, susan. so a look now at our quite a lot, susan. so a look now at your saturday _ quite a lot, susan. so a look now at your saturday morning _ quite a lot, susan. so a look now at your saturday morning from - quite a lot, susan. so a look now at your saturday morning from pages | quite a lot, susan. so a look now at. your saturday morning from pages and we will start with the mail. the cost of living crisis leaving —— leading a number of front pages today. this is after a poll conducted the paper says that voters want immediate action to help struggling families. the headline from the mirror— struggling families. the headline from the mirror after— struggling families. the headline from the mirror after the - struggling families. the headline i from the mirror after the chancellor and his wife were named the 222nd richest people in britain on the sunday times rich list. in richest people in britain on the sunday times rich list.- sunday times rich list. in the
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sunday times rich list. in the sunday times _ sunday times rich list. in the sunday times putting - sunday times rich list. in the sunday times putting plans i sunday times rich list. in the . sunday times putting plans lined sunday times rich list. in the - sunday times putting plans lined up to keep supermarket shelves stocked could be the biggest in modern history. could be the biggest in modern histo . , , , could be the biggest in modern histo . , ., history. the express says that the ro al history. the express says that the royal family _ history. the express says that the royal family has _ history. the express says that the royal family has secretly - history. the express says that the royal family has secretly opened l history. the express says that the l royal family has secretly opened its doors to house refugees fleeing the war in ukraine. it also features a picture of dame deborahjames with a rose named in her honour. orfrom us in a moment but right now it is time for all the technology news in click. no, this isn't some kind of sea monster. but an autonomous machine which aims, perhaps, to make working at sea that little bit safer. with an ever—growing demand for renewable and sustainable energy
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sources, the infrastructure that provides that energy is becoming increasingly critical. now, at present, those facilities are often maintained by human divers working in challenging and hazardous conditions. but here at heriot—watt university they're developing underwater robotic solutions to help take the strain. and they've come up with this — the orca autonomous drone. we've got our scanning sonar, a mechanical scanning sonar, that can see all of these structures and items around the vehicle at quite a long distance. we've got an acoustic modem. this means that when we don't use the tether, we can communicate with the robot using sounds underwater. and how does it move around in the water, is it with these propellers that i can see here on either side? there are eight thrusters that are used and it can move it in all six directions. you've got forward,
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backwards, left, right, up, down, then you've got roll, pitch, and turn. oh, wow, so it is pretty manoeuvrable then? yes. all this technology allows the device to work autonomously, planning its own route to fully scan a structure with little human intervention. so the system that we have will continuously explore the unknown areas to see what what comes next on the structure, but we can also suggest positions to it. it takes the images from both cameras, the stereo camera, much like how we perceive depth, and it can use this data do create a 3d model of the structure under the water. these can be viewed by the engineers and the surveyors to detect problems early when they are able to be fixed easily and cost effectively. currently, 80% of the cost of offshore wind is spent on maintenance through manned ships and technicians to do inspection and repair.
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so it's easy to see how this robot could cut costs. but robots may also solve a practical issue as wind power expands. so in the future we are going to have not hundreds, but tens of thousands of wind farms. if you've got 10,000 wind turbines to inspect and if you have one person, one vehicle, you need 10,000 pilots, and you don't have them, they don't exist. we are going to need to replace or change the way we do things so that we can have several pilots monitoring tens or hundreds of those vehicles, so we need small—scale robotics fleets that are able to navigate these large farms and inspect them remotely from shore. what's really fascinating is how autonomous robots like this could allow for further innovation, solving problems like the expansion of wind farms held back by the sheer
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practicalities of people. it's easy to imagine how undersea cables, renewable structures, and even boats could be maintained remotely. so the technology seems to be there, it's now over to the businesses to make sure it's viable. it's notjust under the water where there's innovation, this is a boat with no people on it. also known as an uncrewed surface vessel, which can take to the seas to inspect projects in far—flung locations which are difficult to get to. autonomously operated vehicles like this are really important for the environment because they reduce fuel consumption and they also mean less people need to go offshore to do the on—site inspection.
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this is the erov, it's the electrical remotely operated vehicle. what it's doing is it's launching into the water, it's filled with sensors and cameras and it will look at high definition images, feed all that stuff back via satellite to the guys in aberdeen. by deploying these kinds of vehicles there's a potential to reduce fuel consumption as much as 95% in comparison with conventional ones. autonomous vehicles are marine robots, really. so all of our lives are going towards digital and remote autonomous, so this is nothing different, this isjust the transformation of the offshore marine industry into a fleet of robotic vessels that can collect some really cool, significant data that we need. the firm collects and analyses geological data at land and at sea. we are also looking
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to expand our fleet. this is obviously the fugro orca, which is the first of a fleet of three or four that we expect to have by the end of this year, then we are looking to expand the fleet with larger vessels that are capable of conducting operations in the even more hazardous environment with greater weather endurance limits and also the capacity to be at sea for that much longer. all clear to move off? all good to move off. here in aberdeen, where the control centre is, the team on dry land connect with the technology which is out at sea. the visual data from the cameras. so if we were on a wind farm, as you can see, the wind farm coming up from the sea is actually a big structure underneath and it goes to the seabed and attaches there, we will be looking at fixings
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to the seabed, the metal structure itself, they are all connected with power cables, so we will also inspect power cables making sure they're not damaged by fishermen. the rov also has sensors to make 3d models of the seabed so we can also check around the base of the structures and the pipelines as well. remote and autonomous technologies will play a vital role in the future of the maritime sector. this company hope to expand their fleets in the coming years to play a part in a safer and more sustainable future for essential work that needs to take place out at sea. that was poor shiona all at sea. now, with more and more tech being used above and below the water, have you ever wondered how it affect the creatures that live in it? well, harriet bradshaw has been to see some technology that is trying to find out if new tidal turbines are harming sea life. the challenge ahead... it's absolutely terrifying, yeah,
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because this thing is going to go down and it's going to get plugged in, and it's going to work or it's not going to work. this is about balancing technology with nature. this particular area, we have lost about 85%. so how do we protect them while quenching our thirst for clean energy? tidal has a role, the wind doesn't always blow, the tide always keeps going. perhaps this monitor is the answer. we're at nigg in the north—east of scotland. it's about the length of a bus. crikey. and the blades go around... all underwater as well. all underwater. so vessels pass over the top, we're eight metres underwater, so the tip of the blade. this tidal turbine is being prepared to go in waters with some of the strongest currents in the world. and underwater that power will push these blades around to make renewable energy, but tidal power isn't yet as developed. this has been in the water for about two years, this turbine does get barnacle growth on it and that does become
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food for fish. during slack tide there are fish around these turbines. which would attract these mammals. which would attract predators. and the question is then, as the flow increases and the turbine goes into production and the blades spin faster, do the fish remain, do the predators come back, do we have an impact on those predators, and is it a detrimental impact? and it's crucial to develop these kinds of turbines in a way that doesn't harm these creatures, which are already under threat from other factors. we are certainly seeing that these areas seem to be important for harbour seals around this area and, indeed, we do see animals coming close to the turbines, but it's really that fine scale behaviour that we're interested in. what do animals do when they really come close to the turbines? to answer this unknown, sinking a monitor next to a turbine might be key. so, douglas, this is going to be submerged underwater? can you take us through the technology here? that's right. of course, yeah.
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so the two main sensor technologies we've got are the active sonars we're using for tracking seals, primarily, so they don't make much noise underwater, so these send out a very, very high frequency ping which is too loud for the animals to hear and be disturbed by, and they listen for the echo, and they can build up an image of exactly where the animals are around the turbine. on the other sensor that we've got it is underneath this protective housing here, which is passive hydrophones, which are listening to the sounds the animals make and we use those to pick up the sounds of porpoises and dolphins. john o'groats, it's here that the monitor will be sung underwater and installed on the seabed next to the turbine. it's sam, the ship is out at sea, we're here on land waiting for the signal and that's because there is only a certain number of opportunities for the equipment to be submerged underwater and onto the seabed because of tidal conditions. but there's a delay. the turbine must be installed first,
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but a problem is holding things up. they haven't deployed our equipment yet. it will happen today for sure. but as anyone else worked at sea knows, nothing ever goes according to plan. but the moment finally arrives. remember that umbilical cord? the power cable that also sends data ashore, well, what we're watching here is it being plugged into a subsea hub. this will give the sea mammal monitor power and it is a crucial moment. is it going to connect? is it going to switch on? and after years in the making, its not good news. everything went together, but nothing came to life. but they've not given up. months later they sort out the power supply and bingo. five, six hard years of work, it's underwater, it's working. i could not be happier! that was harriet bradshaw and that is it for the shortcut
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of click for this week. the full—length version is waiting for you on iplayer as usual. and we will be back on dry land next week. yeah, thanks for watching. bye— bye. hello, this is breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. survivors of the manchester arena attack say urgent changes are needed to increase mental health support for people caught up in terrorist atrocities. tomorrow marks the fifth anniversary of the bombing, when 22 people were killed and many more injured. now, a report from survivors against terror says initial help should be available within three weeks and treatment within six, as our north of england
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correspondentjudith moritz reports. this was the night abby quinn grew up. she was 12 years old when she went to see ariana grande and manchester arena. when the bomb went off, she wasn't physically hurt, but five years on she is still living with the impact it has made on her mental health. she finally got therapy for ptsd and anxiety, but only after her mum wrote to their mp, who helped to fast track abby�*s case. mp, who helped to fast track abby's case. , , . ., mp, who helped to fast track abby's case. , ,. ., case. there still such a backlog in mental health _ case. there still such a backlog in mental health services _ case. there still such a backlog in mental health services for - case. there still such a backlog in | mental health services for children anyway, without events like this happening. it'sjust not anyway, without events like this happening. it's just not ok. anyway, without events like this happening. it'sjust not ok. there needs to be a lot more put in place. you can'tjust keep being given 12 month waiting lists and just hope that in 12 months it sort of self
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heels, because itjust doesn't. triage heels, because it 'ust doesn't. now there are heels, because it 'ust doesn't. now there caus— heels, because itjust doesn't. now there are calls for— heels, because itjust doesn't. now there are calls for better mental health support for people caught up in terror attacks, including a maximum weight of three weeks for assessment and six weeks for relevant help. martin was murdered at manchester arena. some of his family struggled to get access to the skilled therapy they needed. his step—father, stuart, a gp, has co—written a new report pushing for improvements. l co-written a new report pushing for improvements-— co-written a new report pushing for imrovements. , ., ., ., improvements. i remember a moment a coule of improvements. i remember a moment a couple of months _ improvements. i remember a moment a couple of months afterwards, _ couple of months afterwards, screaming in the car, saying how ridiculous this is. i have worked in the nhs for 30 years. i know the systems, and yet i am having to pay for private help. ifelt embarrassed, in a way, that as a doctor, the help isn't available. and if i can't get it then there is no hope for anyone else.- no hope for anyone else. those affected by _ no hope for anyone else. those affected by attacks _ no hope for anyone else. those affected by attacks often - no hope for anyone else. those affected by attacks often need l affected by attacks often need ongoing support, but campaigners say
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there is no guarantee they will get long—term care and say a register of survivors would help. though this memorial is dedicated to the 22 people who were murdered at the arena, the attack affected thousands more, and manyi arena, the attack affected thousands more, and many i speak to tell me the anniversary is always a particularly difficult time. and the fifth, this weekend, may well trigger increased anxiety and heightened emotion. some of the manchester survivors' choir performed at the memorial�*s opening. the choir has been a real success story. its members, who have all been affected by the attack in every way is, have found help from mutual experience. just way is, have found help from mutual experience-— way is, have found help from mutual exerience., , ,, ., ., ., experience. just knowing that we had all been there — experience. just knowing that we had all been there on _ experience. just knowing that we had all been there on that _ experience. just knowing that we had all been there on that night - experience. just knowing that we had all been there on that night and - all been there on that night and that we could be there for each other. choir members have talked quite openly that that became their support network, that that was the thing that was giving them a reason to come back into the city to engage in a positive activity. the government _ in a positive activity. the government says - in a positive activity. the
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government says it - in a positive activity. the government says it is - in a positive activity. the government says it is committed to providing swift support for survivors of terrorism and that it will continue to listen to their views to inform the help that is available. we need to talk to mike and find out what is happening in terms of tennis. _, ., _ what is happening in terms of tennis. ., ,, ., tennis. the controversy over wimbledon. _ tennis. the controversy over wimbledon. normally - tennis. the controversy over| wimbledon. normally people tennis. the controversy over - wimbledon. normally people wouldn't think about ranking points, the general public and tennis fans, but for players they do matter. it gets you into tournaments, of course seedings, and so now, because wimbledon have banned russian and belarusian players from taking part this year, tennis authorities have said we think you can't award ranking points this year. that effects novak djokovic, whose birthday it is tomorrow. because of the year he has had, he didn't compete because of the vaccine controversy in australia and he was banking on maintaining the points he won last year at this year's wimbledon. that means he will only
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be 600 points ahead of medvedev and will learn his number one status. it is complicated, but i will try and explain it as best i can. it has been brewing for several weeks now. the row over the decision to ban russian and belarusian players from wimbledon has deepened after those in charge of the women's and men's tennis tours stripped the competition of its ranking points. the all england club has banned those players from taking part in all uk grass court tournaments due to the war in ukraine. the atp and wta say that the ban undermines their principle that players of any nationality should be able to able to compete on their tour, based on merit and without discrimination. the other grass court tournaments, including queens, will still carry ranking points. the atp decision means serbia's novak djokovic, the defending men's champion, will lose his status as the world number one. the world number two, daniil medvedev, who is one of the russians banned from competing at wimbledon, is in paris for the french open, which starts tomorrow. he says he has no plans to take legal action to try to get a place at wimbledon.
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i guess if you ask, there is some room to make on this. but personally, i think as i said, you know, not me taking these decisions. if i can't play, i am not going to go to court for this one. it is the scottish cup final at hampden park this afternoon. any other year, you would put rangers down as big favourites against hearts, but what will be the effect of that penalty shoot—out defeat for rangers in the europa league final on wednesday night? andy burke reports. it is the showpiece event of the scottish football season, and for rangers and hearts, a chance to end a long wait to claim the oldest trophy in world oil. hearts have lost two of the last three scottish cup finals at hampton and haven't won the trophy since 2012, and for
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ranges, the weight is even longer. you have to go back to 2009 for the last time they managed to get their hands on the cup. mice last time they managed to get their hands on the cup.— hands on the cup. nice touch from hallida ! hands on the cup. nice touch from halliday! andy _ hands on the cup. nice touch from halliday! andy halliday _ hands on the cup. nice touch from halliday! andy halliday was - hands on the cup. nice touch from halliday! andy halliday was part . hands on the cup. nice touch from| halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers _ halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers side _ halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers side that _ halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers side that fell - halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers side that fell at - halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers side that fell at the i the rangers side that fell at the final hurdle in 2016. now playing in the mirror own of hearts, he is setting any allegiance to his former club to one side. first setting any allegiance to his former club to one side.— club to one side. first and foremost. _ club to one side. first and foremost, i— club to one side. first and foremost, i am _ club to one side. first and foremost, i am a - club to one side. first and - foremost, i am a professional. club to one side. first and _ foremost, i am a professional. since foremost, iam a professional. since i was young enough to be able to get a bowl, iwill try i was young enough to be able to get a bowl, i will try to win. i don't think that is going to be any different. i think what will be different, certainly after the game, i think a few family members and friends might not speak to me if i do lift the cup, but certainly my sole focus is to try and win this trophy for hearts. the sole focus is to try and win this trophy for hearts.— sole focus is to try and win this trophy for hearts. the big question for ran . es trophy for hearts. the big question for ranges is _ trophy for hearts. the big question for ranges is what _ trophy for hearts. the big question for ranges is what physical- trophy for hearts. the big question for ranges is what physical and - for ranges is what physical and mental toll wednesday night's europa league defeat to frankfurt took on them and how quickly they can recover. ., , , ., recover. some of those guys have -la ed recover. some of those guys have played some _ recover. some of those guys have played some football _ recover. some of those guys have played some football at _ recover. some of those guys have played some football at a - recover. some of those guys have played some football at a very - recover. some of those guys have.
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played some football at a very high level. so it is tough, but yes, if you are the manager, you say look, guys, we have had such an impressive season in terms of getting to the europa cup final, and let's not end on a dampener. if we don't win, we're looking at a disappointing season, which is ridiculous considering we are in the league final. but like i say, as a football player you want to win things. and the loss was really tough for them, but they want to finish the season by winning the scottish cup. ranges beatin: by winning the scottish cup. ranges beating celtic— by winning the scottish cup. ranges beating celtic well _ by winning the scottish cup. ranges beating celtic well hearts _ by winning the scottish cup. ranges beating celtic well hearts defeated i beating celtic well hearts defeated hibbs, and supporters on both sides will feel that their team's efforts this season are deserving of a trophy. but as always, they can only be one winner. it should be a cracker. the wind had dropped and the condition should have been perfect for rory mcilroy to continue his blistering start at the second men's golf major of the year, the us pga championship. that is after up—and—coming american will zalatoris shot
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a brilliant round of 65 at southern hills in oklahoma to get to nine—under—par for the tournament. he has a one—shot lead going into today's third round and is five clear of mcilroy, who could only manage a round of one—over—par. i wouldn't say it was nerves. it was maybe just you are not going to go out and shoot 65 every day. maybe it was a case i wasn't quite as committed or aggressive as i was yesterday. lewis hamilton has hailed what he believes is a breakthrough with his mercedes car after a promising showing in practice for the spanish grand prix. it was ferrari's championship leader, charles leclerc, who dominated both of yesterday's practice sessions in barcelona. but there was improvement for mercedes as lewis hamilton finished third in second practice, just behind his british team mate george russell, with qualifying later today. positive, yes. super happy over the
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progress. so a big thank you to everyone back at the factory for not giving up and for continuing to push. we are not the quickest yet, but i think we are on our way. this is the first time we have driven down the straight without bouncing. we still have some bouncing but it is way better. so yes, starting to eat into a little bit of the potential. exeter�*s hopes of reaching rugby union's premiership play—offs are effectively over after they lost to bristol, but sale could still squeeze in to the top four. they won at wasps, akker van der merwe's second—half try helping them to a 16—7 victory in coventry. ulster secured a top—four finish in the united rugby championship to guarantee a home game in the quarter—finals. they narrowly beat the sharks in belfast. ulster were cruising for most of the game, but they had to hold off a late sharks fightback to win it 2a—21. it wasn't a good night for the welsh sides, as cardiff lost heavily to benneton and ospreys were also beaten by the bulls.
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in rugby league, a first win for leeds rhinos under new coach rohan smith, as they beat wakefield, while toulose remain bottom of the super league table after losing to huddersfield. and salford are running into some form now, two wins on the trot, and they swept aside, castleford by 30—1a, withjoe burgess getting a hat—trick of tries. british sprinter dina asher—smith says her form is light years ahead of where it was when she won two world championship medals in 2019. the 26—year—old is in birmingham for today's diamond league meeting. she had to pull out of last year's olympics with a hamstring injury but says she'll have plenty more chances on the biggest stage. iam i am excited to get started. i feel like it's about to be a really exciting year, hopefully for me, but obviously all the brits. we've got world champs, with the commonwealth games at home and rebut the european championships, and i've got five titles between them that we are going to have to go and retain and
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hopefully add to. so yes, it is the start of a really exciting summer for me, and it feels amazing to be kickstarting that at home. later on the programme we will be crossing live to paula radcliffe. brute crossing live to paula radcliffe. we will have crossing live to paula radcliffe. - will have a look at the weather, and it is glasgow, handel park. slightly overcast with some drizzly rain. many many areas will see a lot of dry weather and our weather watchers are already sending inglorious images of how they are starting their saturday.— starting their saturday. there is -len starting their saturday. there is [en of starting their saturday. there is plenty of sunshine _ starting their saturday. there is plenty of sunshine across - starting their saturday. there is i plenty of sunshine across southern and eastern reaches of the uk. this is the cloud that will bring the rain into western scotland across glasgow. not especially heavy rain
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but grey skies and i think a damp feeling to proceedings as we go through the afternoon. we see the same weather system pushing rain into northern ireland for a time as well. here we are with relatively fine sunshine to the south and east but that could turn hazy as the day plays out. thick cloud across wales and the north—west of england could give us the odd shower with rain, close to glasgow, a little for northern ireland as well. that will peg the temperatures back to 1a or 15. i7 peg the temperatures back to 1a or 15. 17 were sunshine for aberdeen, 20, 21 to norwich and london. out and about this evening, rain setting into western scotland but this time it turns heavier and drifts further eastwards. elsewhere one or two showers for the north—west of england, northern ireland but fine and on the whole temperatures are staying in double figures for more of us overnight. it is mild enough to get sunday under way. low pressure to the north of the uk on
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sunday. again, western scotland northern ireland that will be targeted with the cloud and outbreaks of rain first thing. rain pushing its way further south potentially into the north—west of england and wales through the day as well. more cloud around for much of england and wales on sunday, southern counties of england and east anglia driest and brightest with a little warmer because of the sunshine, 23 perhaps in london. a lot cooler with the cloud and rain, mid—teens across western scotland. and here is monday, well, an area of literature to the south, went to the north, bits and pieces of weather pushing their way across the uk it will be hard to put exact details on the timing of the rain on monday but certainly we are looking at rain and the forecast for the majority of the uk. best chance of staying dry is probably in east anglia in the south—east but no means guaranteed a dry day and because of the cloud and the rain it doesn't cooler as we move into the beginning of the new week. and you never really, in the
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first few days, you never really quite recover the warmth that we will see the far south this weekend. it stays unsettled on monday through with a chance of showers for most of us. ~ .,, ., , ., with a chance of showers for most of us. most of us will get a day with a little sunshine _ us. most of us will get a day with a little sunshine as _ us. most of us will get a day with a little sunshine as well? _ us. most of us will get a day with a little sunshine as well? i _ us. most of us will get a day with a little sunshine as well? i think i little sunshine as well? i think there will _ little sunshine as well? i think there will be _ little sunshine as well? i think there will be some _ little sunshine as well? i think there will be some sunshine i little sunshine as well? i think i there will be some sunshine around as well, _ there will be some sunshine around as well, yes — there will be some sunshine around as well, yes. it isjust one of those umbrella in your bag jobs. good _ those umbrella in your bag jobs. good advice. those umbrella in your bag “obs. good advice.i those umbrella in your bag “obs. good advice. ., ., good advice. time now for the film review. hi. welcome to the film review on bbc news. and to take us through it this week as always, the cinema releases, mark kermode is here. hello. what have you got for us this week? very interesting release, we have benediction, which is the new film
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by terrence davies. we have emergency, the tag line which is, "it's not what it looks like." and it isn't. and we have the innocents, which is a really eerie chiller. so, let's start with benediction, tell us about it. so this is the latest film from terrence davies. terrence davies, i think is a great poet of cinema. he's made films like distanct voices, still lives, long day closes, sunset song. i've always been a fan of his work. this is a film about siegfried sassoon, the war poet, played in his young years by jack lowden. he was a military hero during the first world war, he got the military cross for conspicuous gallantry. and then he famously wrote a soldiers declaration which was published in the presss of the house of commons. he accused his superiors of turning a war of defence and liberation into one of aggression and conquest. here's a clip. i wanted to state my position regarding my conduct of the war.
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it is not your place to question how the war is being prosecuted. i your duty lies in obeying orders. duty? that word covers a multitude of sins. in the face of such slaughter one cannot simply order one's conscience. one could do better than that, one could ignore it. _ that reply was so disgraceful you ought to be in politics. that was impertinent, lieutenant. are you pro—german? no, i'm pro human. we are not here to discuss| humanity, that is religion's sphere of operation. and what of morality? i think it's such a good performance. so the film looks at his life in wartime, after the war in which he surrounded by others and later on his marriage
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in later years he's played by peter capaldi. and by the time he's played by peter capoldi he's basically become very, very embittered and you know, feelings of failure and desolation. and what's interesting about the film is, i think that terrence davis has found in the life of siegfried sassoon a number of elements that chime with his own preconceptions. there is a story about a character who is conflicted about his sexuality and that is something in which terrence davis has addressed indirectly in his films before. there's the issue of religion. siegfried converted to catholicism later in life and terrence davies kind of famously. kind of famously turned his back on the church after feeling abandoned by it. and so what you have is an artist, a poet of the cinema making a film about a poet whose life encompasses these huge political and social changes but at the centre of it it is a really kind of heartbreaking story about somebody who can't be who they are, isn't sure who they are,
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isn't certain that the art they are making is actually as good as it ought to be and seems to be trapped in a situation when they want to change the world, they want to change themselves and they are constantly thwarted. it's like a collage, it flips backwards and forwards in time and we get different actors playing the same characters. as always with terence davis movies, itis beautiful to look at, he is a real poet of cinema. but the best thing about it is, it's a personal film, you can feel the film—maker talking to you through the film. i think that terence davis is one of our great treasures. he makes films like four or five years, he doesn't churn them out. but every time he does, they are worth stopping and watching. if you are a terence davis fan you go, 0k, fine, great it's a terence davis film. if you're not, i think this is a very good way in because it's accessible. people know the story of siegfried sassoon to some extent.
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they know the story, they know the parameters. this is a way of looking at that story. it is emotionally exhausting. it's not a bunch of laughs although there are laughs in it, strangely enough. but i just thought it was... yeah, this is what film poetry looks like and let's have more of this, please. okay. right. let's talk about emergency. so, as i said, tag line, "it's not what it looks like." what it looks like is a frat boy comedy. so two best friends who are set to become the first black members of their college to complete an epic — seven parties in one night, which is my idea of hell, frankly. they have to go back to their house and they discover an unidentified white girl passed out on the floor. one of them wants to call 911, the other one says, "no, we can't do that. if the police turn up, look at us and find her, what will they think?" and so through that logic that only ever works in films, they decide to put her unconscious into their car and take her somewhere else, which at this
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point her sister who realises that she's missing starts tracking her on a mobile phone. so it goes from being a comedy, a kind of animal house frat boy comedy to being something... tense, it's making me feel tense. yeah, fine. so, it's about police brutality, it's about the racism of the white liberal middle classes, it's all those things but he keeps looking like it's a frat boy comedy. the weird thing is, ifound that the comedy and the horror elements worked against each other. there is a sort ofjordan peele—type satire in there somewhere but it was fascinating to discover that this began life as a short film. and you know, sometimes you see a feature and you go, ok, but it was overstretched and then you discover that it was a really successful short film. and you go, ok that would've made sense. i suspect that it would have worked better as a short film. not to say there aren't good things in it. there are. it's in theatres now and on prime video from the 27th. but i felt it didn't succeed overall but it does have some interesting ideas and there is one moment, a loss of innocence moment in it that looks like it's from another
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film because it so well done. but, yeah, elements pulling in different directions, doesn't quite work but in interesting idea. okay. right. let's talk about the innocents. where do you stand on horror films? i like to be frightened by a horror film. ok, i think you'll like this. this is by escal coats, who co—wrote worst person in the world was a huge success. four kids between seven and 11 stumble upon the knowledge that they have telekinetic abilities, their minds are linked and they can move objects with their minds. at first it seems like a lot of fun and then it takes a darker turn. here's a clip.
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now, ifound this really atmospheric. firstly, the english language title evokes the turn of the screw, the innocence, film adaptation, the turn of the screw. the plot, young people with powers is a bit x—men but it's also a bit village of the damned. have you seen the village of the damned? no. it reminds me of stranger things a bit. yes, there is an element of that although it's actually much more properly darkly sinister. i'll tell you why. although the characters are younger, it's an older film. and what i mean by that is, the director has said that as far
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as they are concerned, kids are beyond good and evil. they are not little angels but they are born, and this is a quote, "without any sense of empathy and morals and we have to teach them that." what the film is about is that kind of innately chilling idea of people having powers that they don't know what to do with, at the same time as they are attempting to make sense of the world which is fundamentally really confusing. you know when you're a kid, i'm nearly 60, this is a long time ago, everything was overwhelming, every tiny thing was overwhelming. imagine that in a circumstance in which it turns out that you then have a power that perhaps it's supernatural because for a long part of the film you not sure if it's happening, you not sure whether they arejust imagining all of this. and there is cruelty, there is cruelty in childhood and there is a couple of passages in this, in which that cruelty is in the film. what i thought was really well done about it however, the atmosphere of it makes...
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you're mesmerized watching it, terrific performances by the young cast, incidentally. because they are all playing it completely believably, it's not some great big overblown shrieky melodrama. what it is is a low—key story about kids discovering the world that happens to be amped up by the fact that they have this borderline supernatural power. i mean, there's an argument about telekinesis but... i was really, really engrossed. not least because i spent a lot of the film thinking, "where is this going, how dark is this gonna get, what's it going to turn into?" and the director kept me guessing all the way through. and the kids' performances were really good. it's kind of heartbreaking as well. but it's chilling, and the director was asked, is it a horrorfilm and they said "well, i love horror and so if they say they are frightened by it that i take that as a compliment." i'm a huge horrorfan so i liked it very much.
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it's in cinemas and on digital platforms if you get it chance to see it in the cinema i think it's kind of worth it because it's got a real cinematic feel to it. i think it will work at home as well but it does have a real cinematic feel to it. is it for teens and young adults or is it too scary? it's not that it's too scary. i think it means more the older you are. it's like one of those things, the further you get from childhood the more... if you think about celine's films, they mean a lot to me. i am nearly 60 years old and she makes films about young people who i've got nothing in relation to but i understand the films. you don't look it. less than a minute to tell us about the last bit the quiet girl which is a beautiful irish film that you must go and see, so fabulous. young girl is sent to stay with relatives discovered perhaps for the first time what it's like to be loved and what it's like to be nurtured. it's so gentle and kind and human and beautiful score.
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it'sjust, it's pretty near perfect, actually. i don't know anyone who's seen it who hasn't loved it. that's my best out in cinema. also a quick note for re—issue, robocop. have you seen robocop? no. okay. robocop is back in cinema in a ak restoration. robocop is paul verhooven's breakthrough movie. i remember seeing robocop when it first came out way, way, way back. i was thinking, "i've never seen anything like this before. this is just, wow." and back in cinemas with ak restoration. if you had a chance, go see it. will do. that's it for this week. thank you very much for watching. bye— bye. good morning.
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welcome to breakfast, with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: russia declaires victory in its battle to conquer the ukrainian city of mariupol after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant lay down their weapons. a warning from doctors about the impact of monkeypox on sexual health, as several clinics say it is already affecting services. the dame deborah effect. bowel cancer charities report a surge in enquiries as the broadcaster and campaigner boosts awareness of the disease. controversy ahead of wimbledon. there will be no ranking points for players this year following the decision to ban russian and belarusian competitors, and it means novak djokovic will lose his number one status. it is saturday 21 may. our main story: russia has declared victory in its battle to conquer
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the ukrainian port city of mariupol after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant laid down their weapons. ukraine's president zelensky confirmed the troops had been given permission to surrender and hopes they can be released as part of a prisoner exchange programme. fierce fighting continues in the south and east of ukraine, as simon jones reports. under attack — these pictures released by ukraine's state emergency service are said to show a russian missile strike on a cultural centre in lozova, in the east of the country. president zelensky described the destruction as absolute evil. translation: we are working i to ensure that russia is made to pay in one way or another for everything it has destroyed in ukraine — every burned—out house, every ruined school, ruined hospital, every cultural centre it's blown up. at the bombed azovstal steelworks in mariupol, russia has declared
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a complete victory. it says its forces are in control there after the last ukrainian soldiers defending the site surrendered. ukraine says it gave them a clear signal to get out and save their lives. they had been holed up for months, a symbol of the ukrainian resistance. they are now being taken to areas controlled by russia, but their fate longer term is unclear. we're trying to get those soldiers back. the agreement was that they will surrender now, but eventually we will exchange them in a prisoner swap. it seems that the russian side is reneging on those agreements. mariupol has been left in ruins by constant bombardment. few residents remain. photos posted by a ukrainian military official appear to show a city in eastern ukraine has suffered the same fate. russia says what it calls the liberation of luhansk province is nearing completion.
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people left in towns near the front line are left with a stark choice — should they stay or should they go? translation: i have to help people. there are grandparents, people with disabilities who remain. they have to be pulled out. ukraine is preparing for more fierce fighting, as russia says it is making advances. the war goes on with no end in sight. pharmacists are to be given more flexibility so they can deal with shortages of hormone replacement therapy medicines. they'll be given temporary powers to exchange certain hrt drugs without a new prescription. gps welcomed the move. we need to have short—term measures, which is makin- sure that the which is making sure that the current demand is met, which it has been. i think that is a good thing, but later on, this is not going to be the thing that we need for longer term. the issue that i have is that this is not a long—term strategy.
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this is fabulous for a short issue, but longer—term, we need to ensure there's no supply issues when it comes to oestrogel, ovestin, lenzetto — these creams or other types of hrts that we commonly prescribed as nhs doctors. doctors say they're worried that monkeypox could have a significant impact on access to sexual health services. staff at clinics are having to isolate if they come into contact with anyone who's infected, and there are fears the pressure on the workforce means some sexually—transmitted infections could be missed. 20 cases have now been confirmed in the uk. health officials say the risk to the public remains low. it has emerged that sue gray, the civil servant who has been investigating lockdown parties in downing street, met the prime minister to discuss whether she should publish photographs of the events. labour has suggested the meeting could damage confidence in the process, but a government source said borisjohnson made it clear the decision lay with sue gray. our political correspondent
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jonathan blake is in our london newsroom. this is a sensitive, isn't it, because the suggestion was entirely up because the suggestion was entirely up to sue gray what she does, and then there is a meeting. yes. up to sue gray what she does, and then there is a meeting. yes, we're told the meeting _ then there is a meeting. yes, we're told the meeting happened - then there is a meeting. yes, we're told the meeting happened about i then there is a meeting. yes, we're told the meeting happened about a| told the meeting happened about a month ago and downing street told it was at sue gray's request. as a senior downing street source put it to us, the meeting was held to clarify her intentions around the publication of report once the metropolitan police enquiry investigation had finished. we are told the substance of the report was not discussed at the meeting but the issue of whether photos would be published along with the rest of sue gray's findings was discussed and the prime minister said that that was entirely a matter for her. we understand that some images will be published alongside the rest of sue gray's findings. but as you suggest, some asking questions about what this meeting says about the independence of this process, labour
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saying that the prime minister needs to urgently explain it to ensure the public have confidence in the enquiry, othersuggest public have confidence in the enquiry, other suggest that it has not been an entirely independent process because sue gray is a senior civil servant working within government herself. we expect the report to be published early in the coming week. those who are going to be named have been told and given a warning. they now have an opportunity to respond and they have a deadline of 5pm on sunday to do that. g ., . . a deadline of 5pm on sunday to do that. g ., ., ., ., ~ a deadline of 5pm on sunday to do that. . ., . . . ~' , ., voting is under way in australia's first election in three years, with 17 million people expected to cast a ballot. polls predict a tight race between the current prime minister and labor leader anthony albanese, who is one of the country's longest serving politicians. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is at a polling station near sydney's bondi beach. always good to see you. voting is a serious business, of course, but there is also a lighter side to this, which i know you have been
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observing for us here on breakfast. you know we always liked both sides of the story. you know we always liked both sides of the story-— of the story. yes. look, first of all, i of the story. yes. look, first of all. i am _ of the story. yes. look, first of all, i am actually _ of the story. yes. look, first of all, i am actually on _ of the story. yes. look, first of all, i am actually on the i of the story. yes. look, first ofj all, i am actually on the beach. of the story. yes. look, first of. all, i am actually on the beach. i wouldn't miss bondi beach to cover the elections for you. we are on the beach and all throughout the day surfers, swimmers, people who are walking their dogs have been in and out. this is a really typical saturday here in australia, but of course, unlike your typical saturday, this is also election day. so just across the street from the beach as a polling station. this is actually the surf lifesaving club, which has turned into a polling station, and people have been coming here all throughout the day. the one thing that i missed that i wish i could show you but i am hoping there are pictures of it are the democracy sausages. before i speak to you about the politics, i have to tell you about those. they are just the tastiest tradition of election day here in australia. essentially it is the barbecue culture. you cast your vote and then you treat yourself to
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a sausage. normally it is served on a sausage. normally it is served on a slice of bread, but also a bread roll is available as well if you want to go west coast style. now to the small matter of the politics, and elections. this has been a very contested election. both major party leaders, whether it is the incumbent, the prime minister, scott morrison, orthe incumbent, the prime minister, scott morrison, or the labour leaderfrom morrison, or the labour leader from the morrison, or the labour leaderfrom the opposition, they have both tried to convince australians that they are the right choice. it has essentially been a referendum on their characters. scott morrison trying to sell this image of the typical australian dad, arguing that the liberal national coalition have been the better managers of the economy and the labour leader saying it is time for a change. the economy has been the biggest issue by far. climate change, despite it being a crucial issue, has been absent from both of the major parties' campaigns, because it is such a contentious issue here. the independent candidates, before i go independent candidates, before i go i must tell you, are emerging as the
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big story here of the elections. they have put climate action at the centre of their campaigning, and they have actually captured the imagination of many voters, especially in the seat of wentworth, here, and amongst other seats in sydney and melbourne. they opposing a real threat to normally safe seats for the government, and if it is a close election, and many people say that it close election, and many people say thatitis, close election, and many people say that it is, they actually could be holding the balance of power here. that is interesting. we will see how that all turns out. thank you very much. temperatures in spain could reach their highest level for 20 years today, with some areas expected to hit a2 degrees celsius. the country has been experiencing abnormally hot weather throughout may, with temperatures 10—15 degrees above average. guy hedgecoe is in madrid this morning. spain asa spain as a country that is used to high temperatures. give us a sense
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of what the concerns are about this particular time of year. it is getting hotter much earlier than normal. ., �* , �* getting hotter much earlier than normal. . �* , ~ ., normal. that's right. at the moment here in madrid _ normal. that's right. at the moment here in madrid it _ normal. that's right. at the moment here in madrid it is _ normal. that's right. at the moment here in madrid it is only _ normal. that's right. at the moment here in madrid it is only around i normal. that's right. at the moment here in madrid it is only around 20 i here in madrid it is only around 20 celsius, so it is quite nice here at the moment, but it is going to heat up the moment, but it is going to heat up a lot throughout the day. it has really been down on the south of the country where we have been seeing these extremely high temperatures, in the south—east and in andalusia also in the south. it is down in areas of andalusia that we are expecting to see possibly those temperatures of up to a2 degrees later on today. those sorts of temperatures in themselves are not unprecedented here in spain. you often see those in the summer, but it is the fact we're seeing them right in the middle of may, that is extremely unusual. that has been of great concern. the government has warned that these temperatures can be dangerous, so they have been telling people to stay indoors where possible, avoid strenuous exercise and in particular warning younger
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people and infirm people and older people and infirm people and older people that they should keep out of the heat wherever possible. for people that they should keep out of the heat wherever possible.- the heat wherever possible. for the moment, the heat wherever possible. for the moment. thank— the heat wherever possible. for the moment, thank you. _ in the last couple of weeks, deborahjames has become a dame and raised nearly £6.5 million for research into bowel cancer — the disease for which she is now receiving end—of—life care. her proudest achievement, however, may be the huge amount of awareness she has raised. bowel cancer websites are reporting tens of thousands of extra visits since dame deborah made her announcement, meaning some cases will be caught in time to save lives, as will batchelor reports. when she was diagnosed with stage iv bowel cancer in 2016, deborahjames wanted to raise awareness of a disease that can thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at you. a crying fit is not what we need right now. she had already achieved that, thanks largely to her work on the podcast you, me
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and the big c, but her announcement just 12 days ago that she is receiving end—of—life care has supercharged the mission. on the day after what deborah called herfinal message, nhs england says it saw an extra 82,000 hits to its bowel cancer page last week. the charity bowel cancer uk said its page crashed due to all the extra visitors, and other charities too are noticing the dame deborah effect. we're really encouraged that we're seeing an increase of 25% in terms of the number of searches that are coming to our website, specifically about finding out information about bowel cancer. so that's a 25% increase on last year, and that really is a direct response to deborahjames speaking out and really raising awareness. it is notjust awareness getting a boost, it is fundraising as well.
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the bowelbabe fund stands at £65 million as people in the uk and beyond try to show their admiration in any way they can, from surprise royal visitors in the garden of her parents' home — the duke of cambridge wanted to hand—deliver deborah's damehood — to letters of support. never mind the address, the postie knew exactly who this was for. ways to support the fund are growing too. there is a book, dame deborah's second, on living with bowel cancer and staying positive. there is a rose, launched at the chelsea flower show, and there is a shirt. i knew i wanted one charity element in the collection, and i always use the phrase "rebellious hope". for me, it's something that i suppose i relied on. it gives me that little glimmer of hope to continue to carry on,
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day by day, regardless of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be in the final stage of her cancerjourney, but her work continues. we're joined now by therese grace, whose daughter millie died of bowel cancer last year. you like to be known as tess, don't you? you like to be known as tess, don't ou? , and genevieve edwards, the chief executive of bowel cancer uk, is in south—west london. tess, let's start with you. the obvious and very important thing to say first of all is you have suffered a terrible loss, you and your family. suffered a terrible loss, you and yourfamily. can you suffered a terrible loss, you and your family. can you tell us a bit of what happened in the run up to millie's death. what did you know about her condition? 2325} millie's death. what did you know about her condition?— millie's death. what did you know about her condition? 2020 she had become quite _ about her condition? 2020 she had become quite unwell. _ about her condition? 2020 she had become quite unwell. stomach i about her condition? 2020 she had i become quite unwell. stomach pains, she could feel lumps and bumps in her stomach, she could feel lumps and bumps in herstomach, bleeding she could feel lumps and bumps in her stomach, bleeding from her bottom, blood in her poo, she was
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tired. that was mostlyjanuary, december 2020. tired. that was mostlyjanuary, december2020. before tired. that was mostlyjanuary, december 2020. before then she had had blood in her poo intermittently. she had been to the doctor, she had blood tests, she had still samples taken, she was never tested for bowel cancer. and, you know, iwas told she was too young for that. it is nothing sinister, she is too young for that. so then she went for scans in relation to her stomach, obviously because she was getting these pains, and they found a cyst on her ovaries. injanuary 2020 she should have had an operation to remove the cysts and to flush her fallopian tubes through and that got cancelled because of covid, so from january 2020 back to when her symptoms significantly increased, her stomach was swollen, she could feel these lumps and bumps, tired, not eating, all the symptoms of bowel cancer, really. even though they showed all those lumps and bumps they didn't think it
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was bowel cancer? thea;r lumps and bumps they didn't think it was bowel cancer?— lumps and bumps they didn't think it was bowel cancer? they were thinking other thin . s was bowel cancer? they were thinking other things that _ was bowel cancer? they were thinking other things that you _ was bowel cancer? they were thinking other things that you should _ was bowel cancer? they were thinking other things that you should have i other things that you should have gone for a colonoscopy, but no, wasn't tested for bowel cancer. the december was when she had the operation to remove the cysts on her ovaries and that is when the surgeon found something. even at all than she wasn't tested for it. so december 2020, she got told, she had the operation, she went home, she went back because she was well, they kept her in and that is when they told her she had cancer. on 23 december we went back to see the consultant, which have been a colonoscopy appointment, but we saw the consultant and that's when he said it was stage four bowel cancer, it has spread to her liver and ovaries at that time. for anyone listening. _ ovaries at that time. for anyone listening, what _ ovaries at that time. for anyone listening, what does _ ovaries at that time. for anyone listening, what does that i ovaries at that time. for anyone j listening, what does that mean, stage four?— listening, what does that mean, stauefour? ~ , ., , stage four? well, is treatable but not curable- _ stage four? well, is treatable but not curable. and _ stage four? well, is treatable but not curable. and the _ stage four? well, is treatable but not curable. and the first - stage four? well, is treatable but not curable. and the first thing i not curable. and the first thing millie asked was will i die? and we said, quite possibly. and they said it was very rare for someone your edged her bowel cancer. as a mum...
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younger adults get tested for bowel cancer every year, which is approximately seven day, seven young people a day, that is not read, is huge. people a day, that is not read, is hue. ~ �* , , . , ., people a day, that is not read, is hue.�* , ,. huge. we're seeing pictures of you and millie, — huge. we're seeing pictures of you and millie, when _ huge. we're seeing pictures of you and millie, when with _ huge. we're seeing pictures of you and millie, when with these i huge. we're seeing pictures of you| and millie, when with these taken? injuly, she had 12 rounds of chemotherapy from january 2020, in january 2020 she was well again and had emergency operation to save her life, she was dying in front of myers in the hospital, the tumour was 18 centimetres in her colon, that was blocking her bowl —— bowel, she had have a stoma fitted. that that was blocking her bowl -- bowel, she had have a stoma fitted.- she had have a stoma fitted. that is the ' elex food _ she had have a stoma fitted. that is the ' elex food waste. _ she had have a stoma fitted. that is the ' elex food waste. an _ she had have a stoma fitted. that is the ' elex food waste. an i - she had have a stoma fitted. that is the ' elex food waste. an i think i the ' elex food waste. an i think once you _ the ' elex food waste. an i think once you have — the ' elex food waste. an i think once you have had _ the ' elex food waste. an i think once you have had one - the ' elex food waste. an i think once you have had one of i the ' elex food waste. an i think once you have had one of those | the ' elex food waste. an i think i once you have had one of those there is no embarrassment about two. she had 12 rounds of chemotherapy, and they said you could have a break until october —— to. i do not they knew that would be her last summer, but they said enjoy your summer. it
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was taken that week at the end of july was taken that week at the end of july and she looked amazing. aha, july and she looked amazing. a couple of things are occurring to me. what is your courage in speaking about it the way you do and anyone listening to you now will think that, the other is it is so important how graphic you are being, how straight you are about the symptoms, about what they are like, because if you get comfort from anything, i assume you get comfort from the thought that somebody listening now might hear what you have said and go eye and hearing it, i am hearing something that i am thinking myself.— thinking myself. yes. and what millie wanted _ thinking myself. yes. and what millie wanted was _ thinking myself. yes. and what millie wanted was for _ thinking myself. yes. and what millie wanted was for people i thinking myself. yes. and whatj millie wanted was for people to thinking myself. yes. and what i millie wanted was for people to be assertive and if they are getting told it could be abs, it is women things, insist on asking for a bowel cancer test. she things, insist on asking for a bowel cancer test-— cancer test. she was saying to herself? -- — cancer test. she was saying to herself? -- ibs. _ cancer test. she was saying to herself? -- 135. if— cancer test. she was saying to herself? -- 135. if you i cancer test. she was saying to herself? -- 135. if you see i cancer test. she was saying to | herself? -- 135. if you see the advert, if— herself? -- 135. if you see the advert. if you _ herself? -- 135. if you see the advert, if you are _ herself? -- 135. if you see the advert, if you are over - herself? -- 135. if you see the advert, if you are over 50, i herself? -- 135. if you see the| advert, if you are over 50, that herself? -- 135. if you see the i advert, if you are over 50, that is old information, that needs to disappear. it can happen at any age.
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let's talk to genevieve as well. genevieve, it is brilliant at seeing the awareness, the awareness that dame deborahjames and her campaigning, and the podcast, adele roberts also radio one extra talking about her bowel cancer. can we make it clear that there are reasons that millie was told this is very unlikely to happen in a young person, 20 odd years old, but, still, if you are in doubt you should push for more of a diagnosis? eye completely agree with us. in 2013 we — eye completely agree with us. in 2013 we launched a campaign called never— 2013 we launched a campaign called never to— 2013 we launched a campaign called never to young really to tackle this issue _ never to young really to tackle this issue. because the majority of people — issue. because the majority of people diagnosed with bowel cancer i over a _ people diagnosed with bowel cancer i overa certain age. people diagnosed with bowel cancer i over a certain age. there people diagnosed with bowel cancer i overa certain age. there is people diagnosed with bowel cancer i over a certain age. there is still 2600 _ over a certain age. there is still 2600 people diagnosed every year under— 2600 people diagnosed every year under the age of 50. and quite often
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what happens is, because it is more rare in_ what happens is, because it is more rare in the _ what happens is, because it is more rare in the under 50s, people go back_ rare in the under 50s, people go back to — rare in the under 50s, people go back to their gps time and time again— back to their gps time and time againlo— back to their gps time and time again to try to get a diagnosis, so what _ again to try to get a diagnosis, so what we _ again to try to get a diagnosis, so what we would love to see is bowel cancer _ what we would love to see is bowel cancer checked first and fast and not last — cancer checked first and fast and not last |s— cancer checked first and fast and not last. , ., . ., cancer checked first and fast and not last. , ., . . . ., cancer checked first and fast and not last. , . . . ., not last. is that changing? what has been the effect _ not last. is that changing? what has been the effect of _ not last. is that changing? what has been the effect of the _ not last. is that changing? what has been the effect of the campaigning i been the effect of the campaigning and the publicity, particularly surrounding dame deborahjones? brute surrounding dame deborahjones? we have seen an unprecedented awareness of bowel— have seen an unprecedented awareness of bowel cancer in recent days, and that is— of bowel cancer in recent days, and that is all— of bowel cancer in recent days, and that is all down to dame deborah who is a patron— that is all down to dame deborah who is a patron of our charity. she is a phenomenal— is a patron of our charity. she is a phenomenal campaigner, absolutely phenomenal. but what we really need to see, _ phenomenal. but what we really need to see, alongside this awareness is when _ to see, alongside this awareness is when people go to their gp that they can really. _ when people go to their gp that they can really, really get action on bowel— can really, really get action on bowel cancer and one of the things that has— bowel cancer and one of the things that has happened during the pandemic, which is really good, is
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that that — pandemic, which is really good, is that that bowel cancer screening test, _ that that bowel cancer screening test, which is something that if you are over— test, which is something that if you are over 60 — test, which is something that if you are over 60 in england or over 50 test, which is something that if you are over 60 in england or over50 in scotland. _ are over 60 in england or over50 in scotland, you may well have had through— scotland, you may well have had through your door, you will have through— through your door, you will have through your door, you will have through your door, you will have through your door, it is that easy to do— through your door, it is that easy to do at— through your door, it is that easy to do at home, it is a little kid that— to do at home, it is a little kid that collect a sample of poo and it looks _ that collect a sample of poo and it looks at _ that collect a sample of poo and it looks at the tiny bits of blood in the poo— looks at the tiny bits of blood in the poo before you even notice it yourself — the poo before you even notice it yourself -- _ the poo before you even notice it yourself. —— kit. you can go to your gp now— yourself. —— kit. you can go to your gp now and — yourself. —— kit. you can go to your gp now and say can we do a test to rule that— gp now and say can we do a test to rule that cancer out, that is different. _ rule that cancer out, that is different, that has changed, but not many— different, that has changed, but not many people know about that because it is not _ many people know about that because it is not yet _ many people know about that because it is not yet widely known. so really. — it is not yet widely known. so really. if _ it is not yet widely known. so really, if you are experiencing any of those _ really, if you are experiencing any of those symptoms, go to your gp and say let's— of those symptoms, go to your gp and say let's rule _ of those symptoms, go to your gp and say let's rule bowel cancer out. gk, say let's rule bowel cancer out. 0k, thank you- — say let's rule bowel cancer out. 0k, thank you- it _ say let's rule bowel cancer out. 0k, thank you- it is _ say let's rule bowel cancer out. ok thank you. it is good practical advice. tess, just the thought about deborah's campaign, for those people who have not been directly affected by a bowel cancer, we are all in awe and we are learning so much more.
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what has it been like for family like who has been through it and knows what that is like? what has it been like seeing her doing what she is doing? lt’s been like seeing her doing what she is doinu? �*, ., ., been like seeing her doing what she isdoinu? �*, . ., �*, is doing? it's amazing. it's absolutely _ is doing? it's amazing. it's absolutely amazing. i is doing? it's amazing. it's absolutely amazing. she i is doing? it's amazing. it'sj absolutely amazing. she is is doing? it's amazing. it's i absolutely amazing. she is really brave stop she is doing it with dignity and she is amazing. yes, she is absolutely amazing. but... deborah and millie, potentially, it was preventable. millie's death was, i think, preventable, was preventable. millie's death was, ithink, preventable, if was preventable. millie's death was, i think, preventable, if it had been tested for she was still be here. and we have got to shut about that. debris shouting about it, i am shouting about it, listen to us —— deborah is. and i know you go to the doctors at different times in your market with different symptoms, the gps need to sit and reflect and think she has been a— five times, let's put it all together, don't if they do, in millie's as she was going to different symptoms at
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different times. l going to different symptoms at different times.— going to different symptoms at different times. . ., ., different times. i am going to were, charlie said — different times. i am going to were, charlie said start _ different times. i am going to were, charlie said start of— different times. i am going to were, charlie said start of this, _ different times. i am going to were, charlie said start of this, you i different times. i am going to were, charlie said start of this, you talk. charlie said start of this, you talk about deborah being really brave, you grieving and you will be forever, but you are here talking about this now and that is the legacy millie has left, isn't it? yes, that is what she wanted. she wanted it to be bowel cancer can happen at any age and she wanted young adults to be assertive and not be fobbed off and not be told its be fobbed off and not be told it's rare in someone your age, no, it's not. seven young adults today is not rare. it's really not. and if this is what we can do, good, if people start listening, people know the symptoms and go and get checked and insist on being checked for bowel cancer, then good.— cancer, then good. good. that is what she wanted. _ cancer, then good. good. that is what she wanted. tess, - cancer, then good. good. that is what she wanted. tess, it i cancer, then good. good. that is what she wanted. tess, it has i cancer, then good. good. that is i what she wanted. tess, it has been a pleasure talking to you. thank you. thank you so much. luck to you. genevieve edwards, chief executive of bowel cancer uk, thank you very
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much. ., . . , of bowel cancer uk, thank you very much. ., .. , ., of bowel cancer uk, thank you very much. ., , ., much. your cats, i did not said before, much. your cats, i did not said before. the — much. your cats, i did not said before, the cat _ much. your cats, i did not said before, the cat has _ much. your cats, i did not said before, the cat has joined i much. your cats, i did not said before, the cat has joined us i much. your cats, i did not said | before, the cat has joined us on much. your cats, i did not said i before, the cat has joined us on the sofa. there we go. the before, the cat has “oined us on the sofa. there we go._ sofa. there we go. the maltco the better. sofa. there we go. the maltco the better- we — sofa. there we go. the maltco the better. we like _ sofa. there we go. the maltco the better. we like everyone. -- i sofa. there we go. the maltco the better. we like everyone. -- the l better. we like everyone. -- the maltco. thank _ better. we like everyone. -- the maltco. thank you. _ here's susan with a look at the weather. that beautiful view there, it might be a little bit less sunny for many of us. , , , , �* ., of us. this is the best we're going to net of us. this is the best we're going to get this — of us. this is the best we're going to get this there _ of us. this is the best we're going to get this there will _ of us. this is the best we're going to get this there will be _ of us. this is the best we're going to get this there will be some i of us. this is the best we're going i to get this there will be some early sunshine around some of our southern and eastern coasts and through the course of both saturday and sunday i think we will see cloud spring to many areas and some of us are going to see some rain. some sunshine to start our day, certainly across these inside of uk, will see breaks in the cloud on and off across england and wales throughout saturday. one or two genevieve edwards showers is getting into wales and the north—west later on. western scotland with some frequent showers, fairly light, but some will get carried eastwards. and more
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solid cloud and bits of rain known —— in northern ireland today. eastern areas and the best of this sunshine will see top temperatures. overnight, habs heavier persistent rain fercu across scotland for a time. cloud drifting south into northern england and wales, bringing light rain. the sunday, generally more solid cloud edging its way south across the uk, bits and pieces of rain for wales, northern england, and a wetter story for western scotland. driest and brightest on sunday. the southern counties of england and east anglia. a little warmer because of the sunshine. we could see up to 23 degrees and the south—east on sunday. thank you very much. we will speak to you later. the high court libel trial between coleen rooney and rebekah vardy has generated a huge amount of interest over the past couple of weeks, but both sides have now had their say and the judgement will come in due course. ros atkins has been looking back at the case that's become known as the wagatha christie trial.
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the wagatha christie liable trial brought footballers, footballers' wise, barristerthe brought footballers, footballers' wise, barrister the high court. and this is what happened. rebekah vardy is at the centre the story, she is married to jamie vardy, leicester city striker, she is suing coleen rooney. at stake is really�*s revelation. this dates back to 2019 the social media post. she claimed that stories were about to be linked to the sun and looking for the source she concluded that it is rebekah vardy�*s account. rebekah vardy has always denied leaking the stories and in time she sued for defamation. in court she said didn't do anything wrong and i wanted to clear my name, notjust for me but for my family and my children. and while there is pressure on both sides, the owners here is on coleen rooney, under english defamation or she has to prove her post was substantially true. on that, here is the lawyer, mark stephens. it is
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substantially true. on that, here is the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence, the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence. you _ the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence, you have _ the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence, you have got _ the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence, you have got to _ the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence, you have got to be i the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not evidence, you have got to be able . the lawyer, mark stephens. it is not| evidence, you have got to be able to prove your suspicions. in that i think is the fundamental weakness of colleen�*s case. in think is the fundamental weakness of colleen's case-— colleen's case. in the income that will be for — colleen's case. in the income that will be for the _ colleen's case. in the income that will be for the judge _ colleen's case. in the income that will be for the judge to _ colleen's case. in the income that will be for the judge to decide. i colleen's case. in the income that. will be for the judge to decide. and across the seven days both women would take this out, rebekah vardy was first and central to the question she faced were a series of what's hot messages between her and her agent, they connected to a story in the sun injanuary 2019 about a car crash coleen rooney had been in. she had posted about it on her private instagram account. after that story ran she tweeted this. and we know that caroline white mentioned this tweeted to rebekah vardy. she messaged this. in another message, rebekah vardy reference the car crash caroline that she would love to link those stories. caroline was found to be not fit to take part in the trial, but in court the whatsapp messages were raised.
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rebekah vardy now seems to have accepted that it is possible that carolyn was behind the leak, but she is saying that if that were the case she did not do it on rebekah vardy�*s instruction with her authorisation. because of that coleen rooney's barrister drew conclusion about caroline white's involvement —— caroline white's involvement —— caroline watt. telling her this. and theissue caroline watt. telling her this. and the issue of the what's hot messages would get more complicated still because in a pre—trial hearing coleen rooney's barrister told the court this. and the loss of if only to this exchange, as described by colin patterson of the bbc.— patterson of the bbc. rebekah vard 's patterson of the bbc. rebekah vardy's agger's _ patterson of the bbc. rebekah vardy's agger's phone - patterson of the bbc. rebekah vardy's agger's phone had - patterson of the bbc. rebekah l vardy's agger's phone had been patterson of the bbc. rebekah - vardy's agger's phone had been lost in the north sea three days after she was asked to handed over for forensic examination. and this is what he said.
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caroline white had lost her phone. we also learned rebekah vardy had lost nine months' were of what's hot messages. she lost nine months' were of what's hot messaues. ,, ., , , , ., messages. she told because she had otentiall messages. she told because she had potentially switched _ messages. she told because she had potentially switched phones - messages. she told because she had potentially switched phones during . potentially switched phones during that time and added that she could neither confirm nor deny that. coleen rooney's lawyer saw it differently, on a line that grab the headlines on day one he told her that you deleted all the messages between you and caroline white and that she had deliberately sought to destroy evidence. rebekah vardy denies this. she did admit leaking a story to the sun. it was about the foot all the danny drinkwater being arrested for drink—driving. here is more on that from a telegraph report on what rebekah vardy had put in this what's hot. she on what rebekah vardy had put in this what's hot.— on what rebekah vardy had put in this what's hot. she said she wanted -a in: for this what's hot. she said she wanted paying for this- _ this what's hot. she said she wanted paying for this. which _ this what's hot. she said she wanted paying for this. which goes _ this what's hot. she said she wanted paying for this. which goes to - this what's hot. she said she wanted paying for this. which goes to the - paying for this. which goes to the heart of the case that you were being paid by the tablets to sell these stories. fin being paid by the tablets to sell these stories.— being paid by the tablets to sell these stories. ., ,.,, , , ., these stories. on a possible demand for payment. — these stories. on a possible demand for payment, rebekah _ these stories. on a possible demand for payment, rebekah vardy - these stories. on a possible demand for payment, rebekah vardy told - these stories. on a possible demand| for payment, rebekah vardy told the court this wasn't a serious comment. she denied ever licking for money. watching all of this was tom pett of
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the independent. she watching all of this was tom pett of the independent.— the independent. she spent ten hours, rebekah _ the independent. she spent ten hours, rebekah vardy, - the independent. she spent ten hours, rebekah vardy, in - the independent. she spent ten hours, rebekah vardy, in the i the independent. she spent ten - hours, rebekah vardy, in the witness box having her what's hot messages read out to her, which are very heavy on long and complicated discussions on how they might sell stories to the sun. msg discussions on how they might sell stories to the sun.— stories to the sun. also watching was coleen _ stories to the sun. also watching was coleen rooney's _ stories to the sun. also watching was coleen rooney's barrister i stories to the sun. also watching i was coleen rooney's barrister who would accuse her of lying under oath. she denied that. as evidence went in today to, the pressure of the examination came into play. both women have talked of the toll this has taken, although some argue this could and should have been avoided, simon boyle sun rose one of the 2019 stories at the centre this saga. i really did feel that they have both had any number of ample opportunities, die doom in both of them, to come to the and discuss the. �* ,., 4' ., them, to come to the and discuss the. �* ~ ., ., , ., the. also know that 'udges have repeatedly h the. also know that 'udges have repeatedly pleaded _ the. also know thatjudges have repeatedly pleaded for - the. also know thatjudges have repeatedly pleaded for them - the. also know thatjudges have repeatedly pleaded for them to | repeatedly pleaded for them to settle the matter out of court. they haven't, though, they have both
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spent an estimated £1 million on legal costs. to a media lawyer it makes no sense for either of them. another woman has taken a backward step on day four was rooney's turn to justify. step on day four was rooney's turn tojustify. she step on day four was rooney's turn to justify. she told step on day four was rooney's turn tojustify. she told because step on day four was rooney's turn to justify. she told because she was surprised by how much interest the social media post because in 2019 and i'm not sure any of us expected to see a trial of this nature, but here it was, and lena rooney faced a significant hurdle, because, as we noted earlier, this trial isn't about suspicions, it is about evidence. about suspicions, it is about evidence-— about suspicions, it is about evidence. , ~ ,, , , evidence. here is mark stephens aaain. evidence. here is mark stephens again. colleen _ evidence. here is mark stephens again. colleen has _ evidence. here is mark stephens again. colleen has to _ evidence. here is mark stephens again. colleen has to be - evidence. here is mark stephens again. colleen has to be able - evidence. here is mark stephens again. colleen has to be able to l again. colleen has to be able to prove it. that is with direct evidence. the problem in this case is it is almost unique in the annals of legal history that it's completely untrammelled by actual evidence. ., , , evidence. coleen rooney was pushed hard on this- — evidence. coleen rooney was pushed hard on this. there _ evidence. coleen rooney was pushed hard on this. there is _ evidence. coleen rooney was pushed hard on this. there is the _ evidence. coleen rooney was pushed hard on this. there is the bbc- hard on this. there is the bbc correspondent. he said so you don't actually have any evidence to link ms vardy to the leaks, do you? and she said yes, i
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do. what you believe isn't in evidence. you might believe that derby county can win the league in two years' time, but that is not awareness. two years' time, but that is not awareness-_ two years' time, but that is not awareness. , _ ., , . ., awareness. the derby county chair ave awareness. the derby county chair gave evidence _ awareness. the derby county chair gave evidence saying _ awareness. the derby county chair gave evidence saying i _ awareness. the derby county chair gave evidence saying i have - awareness. the derby county chair. gave evidence saying i have watched my wife over the last 2.5 years really struggle with everything that has gone on, become a different mother, had a different way. it has been very traumatic for my wife, he said. while we heard from wayne rooney, one person we didn't hear from is simon boyle from the son. he describes the pressure he has been under to say who gave him the story —— sun. me under to say who gave him the story -- sun. ~ ., ., ., ., , -- sun. we went to extraordinary lenuths -- sun. we went to extraordinary lengths and _ -- sun. we went to extraordinary lengths and extraordinary - -- sun. we went to extraordinary | lengths and extraordinary expense -- sun. we went to extraordinary . lengths and extraordinary expense in the high court a week or so ago after being pushed by both sides, actually, to come to court and both hand over some documents and take the witness stand. that is simply not something that we would do. find not something that we would do. and so the source — not something that we would do. and so the source remains a secret, but we have learned plenty about the
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broader interactions between celebrities and the media. the guardian'sjim watterson has live tweeted the whole trail. it guardian's jim watterson has live tweeted the whole trail.— guardian's jim watterson has live tweeted the whole trail. it has been a fairly extraordinary _ tweeted the whole trail. it has been a fairly extraordinary exposure - a fairly extraordinary exposure about howjournalism works. it is rare that you ever want to see how are sausages made and it is not a particularly pleasant sausage in this case. for particularly pleasant sausage in this case. ., ., , ., particularly pleasant sausage in this case. ., . , ., , this case. for many, though, they couldn't look— this case. for many, though, they couldn't look away, _ this case. for many, though, they couldn't look away, and _ this case. for many, though, they couldn't look away, and the - this case. for many, though, they couldn't look away, and the seven days ended in closing arguments. coleen rooney's barrister told us it is what she believed at the time and it is what she believed even more so now. rebecca vardy's barrister argued coleen rooney should pay a substantial award of damages, and other appear to be three possible conclusions for thejudge. {line other appear to be three possible conclusions for the judge.- conclusions for the 'udge. one is that rebecca h conclusions for the judge. one is that rebecca vardy _ conclusions for the judge. one is that rebecca vardy did _ conclusions for the judge. one is that rebecca vardy did them, i conclusions for the judge. one is | that rebecca vardy did them, the other is that one of her team did them at her request, and a third is that one of her team did them of their own initiative. if it is the third then rebecca vardy is ok because it is not her fault, third then rebecca vardy is ok because it is not herfault, if third then rebecca vardy is ok because it is not her fault, if it is the other two, she loses. ih because it is not her fault, if it is the other two, she loses. in the meantime. _ is the other two, she loses. in the meantime. all _ is the other two, she loses. in the meantime, all other _ is the other two, she loses. in the meantime, all other aspects - is the other two, she loses. in the meantime, all other aspects of. is the other two, she loses. in the | meantime, all other aspects of the trial had finished. rebecca vardy
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was there to see the closing arguments, but coleen rooney was not. she had gone on holiday with wayne and the children. the barrister argued it was a long—standing agreement booked on advice that the trail would have finished. thejustice replied, i don't take offence, it is fine. this has not been fine for either rebecca vardy or coleen rooney and after over two years of accusations, seven days of betrayal, and millions of pounds spent, they and all of us are waiting on a verdict. mike isjoining us to mike is joining us to talk through all of the sport and a decision by wimbledon about banning russian players as having a really interesting and fairly complicated repercussion.— interesting and fairly complicated repercussion. absolutely, because the authorities _ repercussion. absolutely, because the authorities in _ repercussion. absolutely, because the authorities in charge _ repercussion. absolutely, because the authorities in charge of - repercussion. absolutely, because the authorities in charge of the - repercussion. absolutely, because. the authorities in charge of the wta have decided that because of the decision by wimbledon they can't award ranking points to players. that matters a lot in terms of world rankings, seedings, getting into tournaments, and it will mean that
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once this year's wimbledon is over, novak shock of it will basically lose the points he has from last year, because the point system is done over a calendar year, he will lose 2000 points, he will not get any for this year and so he will be overtaken as well number one, potentially by daniil medvedev, who is banned, ironically, from playing at wimbledon. you is banned, ironically, from playing at wimbledon.— is banned, ironically, from playing at wimbledon. you take your points from the last— at wimbledon. you take your points from the last calendar _ at wimbledon. you take your points from the last calendar year - at wimbledon. you take your points from the last calendar year for - at wimbledon. you take your points from the last calendar year for the i from the last calendar year for the best 19 tournaments. he got to the final of the us open, but because he will lose those points, he will not get any from this year's wimbledon, the points from last year will be off the board. the row over the decision to ban russian and belarusian players from wimbledon has deepened after those in charge of the women's and men's tennis tours stripped the competition of its ranking points. the all england club, which banned those players from taking part in all uk grass court tournaments due to the war in ukraine, says this response is deeply disappointing and damaging to all players who compete on the tour. but the atp and wta say that the ban undermines their principle that
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players of any nationality should be able to able to compete on their tour, based on merit and without discrimination. the other grass court tournaments, including queens, will still carry ranking points. the atp decision means serbia's novak djokovic, the defending men's champion, will lose his status as the world number one after this year's wimbledon ends. it is the scottish cup final at hampden park this afternoon, and rangers would normally be big favourites against hearts. but this time so much will depend on how rangers are able to put wednesday night behind them, when they lost in the final of the europa league after extra time and a penalty shootout defeat. if you are the manager you say we have had such an incredible season. that's not finished the season on a dampener. if we don't win, we're looking
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at a disappointing season — which is ridiculous considering we're in the europa league final. but like i say, as a football player, you want to win things. they missed out on wednesday night, which was really tough for them, but they want to finish the season by winning the scottish cup. the scottish premiership promotion play—off is finely balanced after an exciting first leg. reece mcalear hit a fantastic free kick, his second goal for inverness caledonian thistle, as they fought back from 2—0 down to level it at 2—2 with stjohnstone. cally thistle finished third in the championship this season, while stjohnstone were second from bottom in the premiership. both sides meet again in the second leg in perth on monday. it is a huge weekend, as well in the english league one, as sunderland and wycombe wanderers face off in the playoff final at wembley later for a place in the championship next season. sunderland boss alex neil says the weight of expectation is actually on the opposition. they can think what they want. the simple fact is, and i spoke about this the other day, we can win the
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championship last year. so if you were to look at both teams, and i am not trying to play us down by any means, we have normally in the majority of cases at press conferences been labelled as all the pressure is on you, the expectation is on you, so that's normal for us. despite calm conditions, rory mclroy dropped off the pace in the second round, at the second men's golf major of the year, the us pga championship. he has fallen some distance behind the up—and—coming american will zalatoris, who shot a brilliant round of 65 at southern hills in oklahoma to get to nine under par for the tournament. so he has a one—shot lead going into the third round today and is five clear of mcilroy, who had that poor second round of one over, which leaves him four under par overall. lewis hamilton is happier with his mercedes car now after a promising showing in practice for the spanish grand prix. it was ferrari's championship leader, charles leclerc, who dominated both of yesterday's practice sessions in barcelona. but there was improvement for mercedes as lewis hamilton finished third in second practice, just behind his british team mate george russell, with
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qualifying later today. with just two months to go before the commonwealth games, all eyes today will be on british sprinter dina asher—smith, who says her form is light years ahead of where it was when she won two world championship medals in 2019. the 26—year—old is in birmingham for today's diamond league meeting. she had to pull out of last year's olympics with a hamstring injury but says she will have plenty more chances on the biggest stage. i'm excited to get started. i feel like it's about to be a really exciting year, hopefully for me, but obviously all the brits. we've got world champs, we've got commonwealth games at home, and we've got the european championships. and i've got five titles between them that we're going to have to go and retain and hopefully add to. so yes, it's the start of a really exciting summer for me, and it feels amazing to be kickstarting that at home. in rugby league, toulose remain bottom of the super league table
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after losing to huddersfield. salford are running into some form now — two wins on the trot as they swept aside castleford by 30—14, withjoe burgess getting a hat—trick of tries. there was a first win too for leeds rhinos under new coach rohan smith, as they beat wakefield. there was a lovely moment before that match as a a seven—year—old rugby enthusiast from ukraine delivered the match ball. dima turupanov represents kyiv rhinos in his home country but settled in west yorkshire with his mum and sister following the outbreak of war. dima received as massive welcome by the fans as he ran onto the pitch with the match ball before the game. good running. i was going to say, tood turn good running. i was going to say, good turn of _ good running. i was going to say, good turn of pace _ good running. i was going to say, good turn of pace there. - good running. i was going to say, good turn of pace there. his - good running. i was going to say, good turn of pace there. his dad l good running. i was going to say, i good turn of pace there. his dad has sta ed in good turn of pace there. his dad has stayed in ukraine _ good turn of pace there. his dad has stayed in ukraine as _ good turn of pace there. his dad has stayed in ukraine as part _ good turn of pace there. his dad has stayed in ukraine as part of- good turn of pace there. his dad has stayed in ukraine as part of the i stayed in ukraine as part of the defence efforts in the war against russia. ., ., , . defence efforts in the war against russia. . . it defence efforts in the war against russia._ it was i defence efforts in the war against russia._ it was part| russia. fantastic day. it was part of a set of _ russia. fantastic day. it was part of a set of a _ russia. fantastic day. it was part
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of a set of a few— russia. fantastic day. it was part of a set of a few years _ russia. fantastic day. it was part of a set of a few years ago i russia. fantastic day. it was part of a set of a few years ago when | of a set of a few years ago when leeds and other rugby league clubs tried to establish the game wider in places like ukraine. doctors are warning that an outbreak of monkeypox could have a serious impact on access to sexual health services. clinics in london, where most of the uk's 20 confirmed cases were identified, have already stopped seeng people who don't have an appointment. so what do we know about the outbreak so far? around 80 cases have been reported in 11 countries, including here in the uk. cases are rare outside central and west africa. symptoms are usually mild. they include a fever, headache and swollen lymph nodes, with most people recovering within a few weeks. the advice here in the uk is that the risk to the public remains low. we are nowjoined by dr claire dewsnap, who is the president of the british association for sexual health and hiv. thank you very much, dewsnap, for
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joining us this morning. what are your concerns about the potential spread of monkeypox?— your concerns about the potential spread of monkeypox? well, we know that it is a high _ spread of monkeypox? well, we know that it is a high consequence - spread of monkeypox? well, we know that it is a high consequence of- that it is a high consequence of infectious disease, and that is partly because it is an infection thatis partly because it is an infection that is passed simply from contact from other people who have it, and what we have to do now is get on top of contacts so we can limit the period of exposures for people in the general population. 50 for example, the people that have already been diagnosed with infection, we would have already spoken to them about who their local contacts could be, what venues they have been to, and therefore we can contact those people in contact tracing notification sense and advise them about isolating and possibly give them postexposure prophylaxis if needed. that will reduce the spread of the infection. but obviously at this moment in time we have only had these issues for a
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week. we're still trying to get on top of all of those cases. can you tell me why _ top of all of those cases. can you tell me why we — top of all of those cases. can you tell me why we have _ top of all of those cases. can you tell me why we have seen - tell me why we have seen restrictions in sexual health clinics? ~ , restrictions in sexual health clinics? , ., , clinics? well, it is really important _ clinics? well, it is really important that - clinics? well, it is really important that we i clinics? well, it is really important that we talk l clinics? well, it is really i important that we talk about clinics? well, it is really - important that we talk about this. other partners in the sector have been calling for a long time for increased funding for sexual health services. over the last ten years there has been a significant decrease in funding through the public health budget, and that has seen a direct effect on staffing levels. that means that we have less capacity to see people. we used to be able to see people within 48 hours of them contacting us. it is really important, because it cuts down the window where people have an infection, they don't know they have an infection and therefore they can pass it onto other people. so the speedin pass it onto other people. so the speed in which we see people is really critical, and monkeypox coming along shows us that more than ever before. so we need adequate so we can adequately staff, with the experts that we need and the
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appropriately trained staff and clinics, so we can show people can get in quickly and therefore reduce the risk of infection of other people. the risk of infection of other -eo . le. the risk of infection of other --eole. ., , �* , people. indeed. it hasn't been described _ people. indeed. it hasn't been described as _ people. indeed. it hasn't been described as a _ people. indeed. it hasn't been described as a sexually - people. indeed. it hasn't been i described as a sexually transmitted disease, has it, though, monkeypox? no, it is behaving oddly. the experts who know a lot more about monkeypox than i do, who study this disease in africa, where it is mostly seen, are scratching their heads a bit at the moment about why it is particularly presenting in this way. we haven't got to the bottom of that. we know it can be transmitted through sex because that is close contact, and it is transmitted through close contact, but it doesn't currently meet the criteria for being an sti. but we are watching, waiting, looking at the data and trying to track the patterns and look at people's networks and see what is happening. can we be clear, because people will be concerned, with 20 identified cases in the uk, precautions are being taken already, as we have
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discussed. if someone presents with these symptoms, what are they look like? what should they do? so these symptoms, what are they look like? what should they do?- like? what should they do? so they do look unusual. _ like? what should they do? so they do look unusual. they _ like? what should they do? so they do look unusual. they look- like? what should they do? so they do look unusual. they look a i like? what should they do? so they do look unusual. they look a little l do look unusual. they look a little bit like chickenpox, which is a big blistering lesion. so they are bumpy and they can be on any part of the skin. they commonly start on the mouth. they also occur on the genitals, but they can also occur anywhere else on the body. so if you see a rash that looks like chickenpox but generally they are slightly bigger, then you probably should contact somebody either out of hours nhs one—on—one, is where we are directing people, or otherwise contact your sexual health clinic —— 111. contact your sexual health clinic -- 111. ., , , ., ~ contact your sexual health clinic -- 111. doctor dewsnap, thank you very much for your— 111. doctor dewsnap, thank you very much for your time _ 111. doctor dewsnap, thank you very much for your time with _ 111. doctor dewsnap, thank you very much for your time with us - 111. doctor dewsnap, thank you very much for your time with us this i much for your time with us this morning. here is susan with a
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look at the weather. good morning, we have some reasonable weather to start the can. the cloud has started polling —— piling into the north—west of scotland. the sun is trying to break through the clouds there. i think for western scotland and northern ireland, this weekend, seeing more cloud and there will be some rain. elsewhere, outbreaks of rain tending to come in more scattered showers. the reason for the more solid cloud to the north and west is an area of low pressure that is trying to push on. we have high pressure to the south and i think, for much of southern and eastern england the high will manage to keep things dry for the next 48 hours, a little bit of a north—south within the weather. saturday, cloud passes across england and wales comigel give the odd showerfor england england and wales comigel give the odd shower for england and wales this afternoon, overall, a lot of dry and fine weather and quite warm, high teens to the low 20s the temperatures. more cloud for northern ireland in western scotland with some rain on and off. eastern
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scotland could pick up a few showers, up to 17 possible in aberdeen. some more persistent rain will push across scotland overnight, perhaps not that much getting through to the east, but it is still looking pretty soggy in the west, also for the northern isles. cloud drifting further south into northern england and wales. patches of mist and fog across central and eastern england, a mild night across the board, temperatures widely in double figures. into sunday, high pressure still clinging on there to the south—east of the uk, but low pressure becoming slightly more established further north, thatjust means a bit of a breezy day to the far north—west of the uk, they could allow for western scotland, perhaps more persistent rain. it looks like it will sit far enough north of northern ireland to mean a fuchsia aria outbreaks here and there. more cloud pushing down into england and wales. it really will be staying there and the south—east that kid there and the south—east that kid the sunniest of this goes through sunday afternoon and see the highest temperatures. by monday, this area
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of low pressure drifting up from the continent, getting quite close to the south—east of england could mainly see some pungea showers arriving here. further north, we have weather fronts trying to drift south. the story for monday basically is no matter where you are, don't be too surprised if you don't get caught in the odd downpour. there will be some turnaround, yes, but generally a more mixed picture for everyone on monday. as a result of that, it will be a little bit cooler as well, temperatures up to 17 are best. that sets the tone for the week ahead. most of us think temperatures mid to high teens, so perhaps a little bit damp on average value for the time of year. —— down. there will be some sunny spells, but shall is never too far away either. that is the way things are looking for the weekend and on into next week.— and on into next week. thank you very much- _ it's time now for newswatch, with samira ahmed. hello, and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. why did the bbc go to
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court over broadcasting an investigation into the abusive behaviour of an m15 agent? and in this day and age, is it right for editors to make headline news out of a footballer coming out as gay? first, for some people, the eurovision song contest is the highlight of their television—watching year and they will have been among the millions glued to their screens last saturday night. others would do almost anything to avoid four hours of kitsch, pop, soaring power ballads and a whole lot of sequins. if the latter group were watching bbc news on sunday, they may have found there was no escape. ukraine says it hopes to be able to host eurovision song contest next year after the country's emotional triumph in last night's final in italy. the country's entry, the kalush orchestra, flew to the top of the leaderboard after winning the popular vote. sam ryder of the uk finished second, but topped the jury votes with his song space man.
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this year, more than most, eurovision had a political dimension with that victory by ukraine's kalush orchestra being widely seen as a symbolic show of public support for the country. and that, coupled with an unusually successful night for the uk — who came second in the competition — explains why it featured prominently on bbc news on sunday. but for some viewers, the amount of attention devoted to it was still notjustified. stuart gordon e—mailed: on monday, the footballer jake daniels made a name for himself — and not for any exploits on the pitch, as sports editor dan roan reported.
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some will be surprised that in this day and age, a player revealing their sexuality has made so many headlines. but others believe this is truly a historic moment forfootball, despite the issues that it continues to confront. jake daniels' statement and the media coverage of it was widely applauded, with stigma base tweeting: but, as dan roan suggested, others questioned whether the publicity around his coming out was appropriate or helpful. here's tris bianconero:
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well, we put those points to bbc news, and they told us: bbc two's politics live on tuesday featured as a guest the leader of the reclaim party, actor laurence fox. one of the subjects under discussion — culture wars. the implementation of all of this — of gender theory, of critical race theory in our schools and institutions — is appalling, and actually... why is it appalling? because you don't — because children are not racists and you don't teach a child, you don't teach a child — and you certainly don't say to the most
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disadvantaged and underprivileged portion of society, which happened to be young, white, working—class people, that they are in some way privileged. and that's what wokery and class wars and culture wars are all about. it's — it's all about division. it has nothing to do with unity. anthea eastoe watching that and contacted us with this question: well, bbc news told us that politics live features politicians representing the various political parties and a wide range of other guests with varying perspectives. they added:
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for some time, bbc news has been investigating the activities of an agent working for m15 who used his status to abuse and terrorise his partner, before moving abroad to continue intelligence work while under investigation. evidence shows that he is a right—wing extremist with a violent past. but, as daniel de simone reported on thursday, the path to getting that evidence shown on air has not been easy. the government took us to the high court, first trying to stop this story ever being broadcast, and then seeking to dramatically limit what we could report. they failed, but we've been legally prevented from naming the agent because of a risk to him, despite the threat he poses. so, why did the bbc — unlike the government — consider the broadcasting of this horrific story to be in the public interest?
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barrie philpott had some concerns, writing: well, let's find out more about this from ed campbell, who's investigations editor for bbc news. ed, thanks for coming on newswatch. can you talk us through the process, then, of how the government tried to prevent you running the story? sure. so, with all our stories where we allege that some wrongdoing has taken place, we offer a right of reply to the person or the organisation concerned. and in this case, we offered a right to reply to m15 and we told them the details of the story — not the whole story, but the details of everything that we proposed to say in the story — and asked them to respond. essentially, when they did respond, it was to say that they were not going to allow the story to go out
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and they were going to bring an injunction against us, unless we agreed to effectively hold the story. we had some discussions behind the scenes which i can't really go into but essentially, we came to the point where we decided we had to run the story, we felt it was in the public interest to name the person responsible and identify them and at that point, an injunction was taken out against us. 50, clearly the government felt that there wasn't a public interest in broadcasting the story. why do you insist there is? well, i think it's a question of what the balance of the public interest is. so the government felt that the public interest weighed on national security and the potential threat to the agent concerned. we felt that the public interest was served by identifying the man concerned, who had used his status as an m15 agent to terrorise and coerce his partner and to carry out a violent attack. and we felt in the light, particularly, of the wayne
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couzens case, that this was so serious... we should say this is the police officer who murdered sarah everard. correct — and used his status as a police officer to trick her into his custody. we felt the way this man was acting was so serious and the abuse of his position so serious that it was in the public interest to warn people everywhere — particularly women and children — of who he was, what he was doing and what his modus operandi was. the court ruled that you're not allowed to name this m15 agent because it might endanger him and it might endanger other agents — is that right, and do you still disagree? so, i believe what they are arguing is essentially firstly that he could be endangered by being named — and we disputed that, but we accept the ruling of the court that they — they went on that side. they also made a wider argument about national security, which is effectively that to name him would
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indicate to other agents — and these are effectively informants working for m15, informing on terrorist groups and suchlike — that the bbc might come along and name them and that they would then stop working for m15. we would never normally try and identify a state agent in this way but we felt in this case, there was an exceptional public interest in doing so. to make the decision to challenge the government and go to court over this must have been a big decision for the bbc news to make. sure, and it was their decision to take us to court and it was our decision to defend our position and to fight that, and that's a scary thing. it involves a lot of time, it involves a lot of money, unfortunately, and it's always very difficult to know where it will end. so, you go into court sort of knowing what your position is and during the proceedings, you often feel, "we mightjust "completely lose this". there was a scenario in which we would have never been able to tell any kind of story about this man whatsoever. we would've liked to be able to identify him. we weren't able to do that, and we accept that. but when you go to court, there is jeopardy and you don't know how it's going to end up
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and we are pleased that we've been able to tell a story that we think is firmly in the public interest. so, is this story a one—off, or is there a wider issue behind this investigation? the truth is, with an organisation like m15, we simply don't know. there is no public scrutiny of this organisation in the sense that there is public scrutiny of — there are committees and such that look into them but there's no public right to know about their activities. and it's clear why that is — because their activities are carried out in secret — but we simply don't know. we've scratched off a tiny corner on a picture and seen what's underneath it but the picture is much bigger. we don't know what the rest of it is. ed campbell, thank you so much. and thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news, on tv, radio, online and social media, e—mail newswatch. or you can find us on twitter.
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you can call us. and do you have a look at previous interviews on our website. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. russia declaires victory in its battle to control the ukrainian city of mariupol — after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant lay down their weapons. pharmacists will be allowed to swap hrt medications without the need for a new prescription to try to ease shortages. the 'dame deborah' effect — bowel cancer charities report a surge in enquiries — as the broadcaster and campaigner
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boosts awareness of the disease. a huge day at hampden — its the scottish cup final, with hearts hoping to ensure rangers miss out on another trophy, just days after their europa league final defeat. good morning. something of a mixed weekend coming up, all others will see some dry and hopefully sunny weather but there will also be showers moving in, especially to the north and west of the uk. more coming up. more coming up. (sunrise sting) good morning. it's saturday the 21st of may. our main story. russia has declared victory in its battle to conquer the ukrainian port city of mariupol — after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant laid down their weapons. ukraine's president zelensky confirmed the troops had been given permission to surrender — and hopes they can be released as part of a prisoner exchange programme. fierce fighting continues in the south and east of ukraine.
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we'rejoined now byjoe inwood, our correspondent in lviv. joe, what more do we know about russian advances in ukraine? russia claiming victory here? yes, absolutely and _ russia claiming victory here? yes, absolutely and i _ russia claiming victory here? yes, absolutely and i think— russia claiming victory here? use: absolutely and i think they will take this as a victory, it is something we have been pushing for a person is the star of the invasion. president zelensky told the soldiers they could lay down their weapons. ukrainians are also painting this as a success, not the final fall of mariupol but the way it failed, it took more than 80 days for the soldiers to put down their weapons and in that time thousands of russian troops were brought into this fight and were not able to take part in the battle elsewhere. this is something the ukrainians did not want to happen but they knew it probably would. president zelensky said there was no way militarily of breaking the siege and at some point the soldiers would have to put down
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their weapons but they have done after such a long time, the russians were sucked in. we have seen a renewed push elsewhere. 22 groups fighting around mariupol have now been freed up and they are able to take part in the attack on the rest of the donbas. heavy artillery has broken through some ukrainian lines and they will try and end circle defenders and sometimes to create another encirclement, just as the encirclement of mariupol has come to an end, they will china achieve that on a grander scale, taking the entire donbas region. —— they will try and achieve that. entire donbas region. -- they will try and achieve that.— pharmacists are to be given more flexibility so they can deal with shortages of hormone replacement therapy medicines. they'll be given temporary powers to exchange certain hrt drugs without a new prescription. gps welcomed the move. we need to have short—term measures, which is making sure
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that the current demand is met, which it has been. i think that's a good thing. but later on, this is not going to be the thing that we need for longer term. the issue that i have is that this is not a long—term strategy. this is fabulous for a short term issue, but longer—term, we need to ensure there's no supply issues when it comes to oestrogel, ovestin, lenzetto — these creams or other types of hrts that we commonly prescribe as nhs doctors. doctors say they're worried that monkeypox could have a massive impact on access to sexual health services. staff at clinics are having to isolate if they come into contact with anyone who's infected — and there are fears the pressure on the workforce means some sexually—transmitted infections could be missed. our health reporter, philippa roxby reports. many of the cases have been in
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homosexual men. they have been advised to contact the clinic. monkeypox is not normally sexually—transmitted but it can be passed on by close skin contact. the british is for sexual health says staff working on sexual health clinics were already under significant pressure and monkeypox was making it worse. it said some were happy to see patients with symptoms in separate spaces to guard against spread. i am symptoms in separate spaces to guard against spread-— against spread. i am not concerned with people — against spread. i am not concerned with people being _ against spread. i am not concerned with people being identified - against spread. i am not concerned with people being identified with i with people being identified with monkeypox, generally has limited effect on patients but i am concerned we will be able to maintain access to people for sexual health services as well as preventing people having to isolate from services. in preventing people having to isolate from services.— preventing people having to isolate from services. ., ., from services. in london where most cases had been _ from services. in london where most cases had been found, _ from services. in london where most cases had been found, clinics - from services. in london where most cases had been found, clinics and i cases had been found, clinics and stop people walking in altogether. that could lead to fewer people being able to access sexual health
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services. some staff have already received a smallpox vaccine to help protect them against monkeypox. the uk is now stocking up on more doses. it's emerged that sue gray — the civil servant who has been investigating lockdown parties in downing street — met the prime minister to discuss whether she should publish photographs of the events. labour has suggested the meeting could damage confidence in the process — but a government source said borisjohnson made it clear the decision lay with sue gray. our political correspondent jonathan blake is in our london newsroom. jonathan, what more can you tell us about what went on? the meeting is sensitive because the impression given is sue gray as the person who decides what should be put into her report, it is no one else's business. we
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put into her report, it is no one else's business.— put into her report, it is no one else's business. we are told this meetint else's business. we are told this meeting took— else's business. we are told this meeting took place _ else's business. we are told this meeting took place one - else's business. we are told this meeting took place one month l else's business. we are told this i meeting took place one month ago at the request of sue gray. number ten are framing this as something she instigated and a meeting at which the process and procedure of publishing her report was public —— was discussed but not the substance. the issue whether photos should be published along with the report as documentary evidence was discussed. the prime minister we are told said it would be a matter for sue gray herself. we understand now that likely will be photographic evidence published along with the report. it has raised questions about the independence of the process. labour are saying the prime minister needs to urgently explain the meeting to ensure public confidence in the report. others say this is not a genuinely independent process as sue gray is a senior official working in
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government. expect the report be published in the coming days, tuesday and wednesday look likely and those expected to be named in a tab and contacted and given until sunday evening to respond. thank ou. thank you. there's been a large increase in online searches for information about bowel cancer in the last two weeks — ever since the author and broadcaster dame deborahjames revealed she is now receiving end—of—life care. both nhs england and bowel cancer charities have reported a surge of visitors to their websites, while dame deborah's fundraising total is now close to six and a half million pounds. will batchelor has the details. when she was diagnosed with stage iv bowel cancer in 2016, deborahjames wanted to raise awareness of a disease that can thrive due to embarrassment. i'm not going to look at you. a crying fit is not what we need right now. she had already achieved that, thanks largely to her work on the podcast you, me and the big c, but her announcementjust 12 days ago that she is receiving end—of—life care has supercharged the mission.
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on the day after what deborah called herfinal message, nhs england says it saw an extra 82,000 hits to its bowel cancer page last week. the charity bowel cancer uk said its page crashed due to all the extra visitors, and other charities too are noticing the dame deborah effect. we're really encouraged that we're seeing an increase of 25% in terms of the number of searches that are coming to our website, specifically about finding out information about bowel cancer. so that's a 25% increase on last year, and that really is a direct response to deborah james speaking out and really raising awareness. it is notjust awareness getting a boost, it is fundraising too. the bowelbabe fund stands
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at £6.5 million as people around the uk and beyond try to show their admiration in any way they can, from surprise royal visitors in the garden of her parents' home — the duke of cambridge wanted to hand—deliver deborah's damehood — to letters of support. never mind the address, the postie knew exactly who this was for. ways to support the fund are growing too. there is a book, dame deborah's second, on living with bowel cancer and staying positive. there is a rose, launched at the chelsea flower show, and there is a shirt. i knew i wanted one charity element in the collection, and i always use the phrase "rebellious hope". for me, it's something that i suppose i relied on. it gives me that little glimmer of hope to continue to carry on, day by day, regardless of what the future looks like. dame deborah may be in the final stage of her cancerjourney, but her work continues.
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temperatures in spain could reach their highest level for 20 years today — with some areas expected to hit 42 degrees celsius. the country has been experiencing abnormally hot weather throughout may, with temperatures 10 to 15 degrees above average. guy hedgecoe is in madrid this morning. guy, how are they coping? it is slightly cooler in madrid, parts of spain will be areas of concern? , parts of spain will be areas of concern?— parts of spain will be areas of concern? , ~ ., , concern? yes, here in madrid it is 22 degrees _ concern? yes, here in madrid it is 22 degrees so _ concern? yes, here in madrid it is 22 degrees so comfortable. i concern? yes, here in madrid it is 22 degrees so comfortable. we i concern? yes, here in madrid it is| 22 degrees so comfortable. we are told it will heat up to 36 degrees later on today. down in the south, where we have seen is extremely high temperatures over the last few days. today we are told in some areas of
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andalusia temperatures could reach the low 40s. you might expect those temperatures injuly or august but what is unusual about this heatwave as we are seeing those temperatures now in mid—may. that is almost unprecedented. the government has activated its national plan for high temperatures and warning people to remain indoors where possible in the areas where there are high temperatures and also the fire services are on high alert due to the risk of wildfires around the country. the risk of wildfires around the count . ., .. the risk of wildfires around the count . ., ~ i. the risk of wildfires around the count . . ~' ,, , the risk of wildfires around the count . ., ~ i. , . , country. thank you very much. it is 12 minutes — country. thank you very much. it is 12 minutes past _ country. thank you very much. it is 12 minutes past eight. _ survivors of the manchester arena attack say urgent changes are needed to increase mental health support for people caught up in terrorist atrocities. tomorrow marks the fifth anniversary of the bombing, when 22 people were killed and many more injured. now a report from 'survivors against terror�* says initial help should be available within three weeks, and treatment within six — as our north of england
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correspondentjudith moritz reports. this was the night abi quinn grew up. she was 12 years old when she went to see ariana grande in manchester arena. when the bomb went off she wasn't physically hurt, but five years on, she is still living with the impact it has made on her mental health. she finally got therapy for ptsd and anxiety, but only after her mum wrote to their mp, who helped to fast—track abi's case. there's still such a backlog in mental health services, for children anyway, without events like this happening. it's just not ok. there needs to be a lot more put in place. you can'tjust keep being given 12—month waiting lists and just hope that in 12 months it sort of self—heals, because it just doesn't. now there are calls for better mental health support for people caught up in terror attacks, including a maximum wait of three weeks for assessment and six weeks for relevant help.
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martyn hett was murdered at manchester arena. some of his family struggled to get access to the skilled therapy they needed. his step—father stuart, a gp, has co—written a new report pushing for improvements. i remember a moment a couple of months afterwards, screaming in the car, saying how ridiculous this is. i have worked in the nhs for 30 years, i know the systems, and yet i'm having to pay for private help. i felt embarrassed, in a way, that as a doctor the help isn't available — and if i can't get it then there's no hope for anyone else. those affected by attacks often need ongoing support, but campaigners say there is no guarantee they will get long—term care, and say a register of survivors would help. though this memorial is dedicated to the 22 people who were murdered at the arena,
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the attack affected thousands more. and many i speak to tell me the anniversary is always a particularly difficult time, and the fifth, this weekend, may well trigger increased anxiety and heightened emotion. some of the manchester survivors choir performed at the memorial�*s opening. the choir has been a real success story. its members, who have all been affected by the attack in various ways, have found help from mutual experience. just knowing that we had all been there on that night and everything had changed on that one night _ and everything had changed on that one night. and that we could be there for each other. choir members have talked quite openly that that became their support network, that that was the thing that was giving them a reason to come back into the city to engage in a positive activity. the government says it is committed to providing swift support for survivors of terrorism and that it will continue to listen to their views to inform the help that is available.
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we're joined now by doctor stuart murray, who you just saw in that film. his stepson martyn hett died in the attack, and he co—wrote the 'survivors against terror�* report. good morning. how are you at the moment, — good morning. how are you at the moment, five years, how are you and how a _ moment, five years, how are you and how a family? — moment, five years, how are you and how a family? | moment, five years, how are you and how a family?— how a family? i am still pinching m self, it how a family? i am still pinching myself, it still— how a family? i am still pinching myself, it still seems _ how a family? i am still pinching myself, it still seems surreal, i how a family? i am still pinching i myself, it still seems surreal, you wake up and think additionally happen? i will wake up one day and i will be back there and life will be as it was. we will be back there and life will be as it was. ~ ., .. will be back there and life will be as it was. . . ~ ., as it was. we talk about the situation — as it was. we talk about the situation with _ as it was. we talk about the situation with mental- as it was. we talk about the i situation with mental health support. uri doctor so you are coming at this from two different angles, your personal experience and watch ucl in everyday practice. for you personally, how have you been helped over the past few years? for
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me, the helped over the past few years? fr?" me, the support we have had from everybody, messages from people around the world, acts of kindness and support, gifts, flowers from people who you would not expect it from. there is so much of that coming in that it almost cancels out, you have to remain yourself that this small 1% of badness and most of the world is full of kindness. most of the world is full of kindness-— most of the world is full of kindness. what help do you personally _ kindness. what help do you personally need? _ kindness. what help do you personally need? i - kindness. what help do you personally need? i think- kindness. what help do you personally need? i think is| kindness. what help do you | personally need? i think is a kindness. what help do you - personally need? i think is a family ttoin personally need? i think is a family going through _ personally need? i think is a family going through events _ personally need? i think is a family going through events such - personally need? i think is a family going through events such as i personally need? i think is a family going through events such as a i going through events such as a terror attack and living through that brings psychological and impact your mental well—being in ways that people still do not understand. it is not counsellors and therapists,
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they don't understand what we are going through, i think there is more than needs to be done. to teach and train them. ., than needs to be done. to teach and train them-— train them. you are a doctor, your da 'ob train them. you are a doctor, your day job is — train them. you are a doctor, your day job is making _ train them. you are a doctor, your day job is making people - train them. you are a doctor, your day job is making people better, i dayjob is making people better, helping people and itjumps out at me reading what you have said, i think it wasjust me reading what you have said, i think it was just in the immediate aftermath, sitting in your car and you are saying to yourself in relation to getting help, finding someone for your family to talk to to help, you are going, i am a doctor and even i cannot get to anyone who can help us. the frustration of that moment? yes, i remember — frustration of that moment? yes, i remember sitting _ frustration of that moment? yes, i remember sitting in _ frustration of that moment? yes, i remember sitting in a _ frustration of that moment? yes, i remember sitting in a car- frustration of that moment? yes, i remember sitting in a car shouting | remember sitting in a car shouting and screaming how ridiculous this is as a gps 30 years, if i am struggling and have to pay privately to get help, how other people might be struggling so there are huge gaps
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that exist still despite the recurrence of terror attacks. people cannot get the help and support they need which is why we are saying there needs to be changes and there needs to be things there to support, there needs to be a guarantee if you need a specific treatment, he can get that within six weeks. i can only imagine — get that within six weeks. i can only imagine how— get that within six weeks. i can only imagine how frustrating i get that within six weeks. i can only imagine how frustrating it is. you know how ourjob works, we ask the government for the response. the home office has given a statement regarding funding. they said we are committed to providing comprehensive and swift support to domestic victims of terrorist attacks. the support involves 24/7 helplines to make sure the victims of access to what they need. we are investing an additional 2.3 billion a year to mental health services from
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2023-2024. you mental health services from 2023—2024. you hear that and that appears to be on message but what the reality that you have detailed from your own experience and other people, seems a very different thing? people, seems a very different thin ? ., , , people, seems a very different thin? ., , , ., thing? reality is when you go throuth thing? reality is when you go through something _ thing? reality is when you go through something like i thing? reality is when you go through something like this, | thing? reality is when you go i through something like this, you thing? reality is when you go - through something like this, you may be triage to speak to somebody but your throwback into the nhs services and the long wait that exists so we are saying when you go through an event like terrorist attack, it is an attack on the state and on all of us. it is a war that is waged on the country, we did not has to go through this. there is a writer for the government to protect us and keep it secure. you the government to protect us and keep it secure-— keep it secure. you can hear the idea you're _ keep it secure. you can hear the idea you're building _ keep it secure. you can hear the idea you're building but - keep it secure. you can hear the idea you're building but in i keep it secure. you can hear the l idea you're building but in practice what is that? is it a department, a certain number of people, what is
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that that tangibly could provide what you're talking about, given that you never know when something like this can strike?— like this can strike? exactly, so as it is at the — like this can strike? exactly, so as it is at the moment, _ like this can strike? exactly, so as it is at the moment, we _ like this can strike? exactly, so as it is at the moment, we wait i like this can strike? exactly, so as it is at the moment, we wait for l like this can strike? exactly, so as it is at the moment, we wait for it| it is at the moment, we wait for it to happen and then restart to plan the service. the manchester hub was stopped about and created after it happened and it took eight weeks to setups already you have a delay of treatment for people so we are asking that when people prepare a plan for an emergency attack, that mental health is considered an something is in place to be able to spring into action. has a something is in place to be able to spring into action.— spring into action. as a gp, when someone comes _ spring into action. as a gp, when someone comes to _ spring into action. as a gp, when someone comes to you _ spring into action. as a gp, when someone comes to you obviouslyi spring into action. as a gp, when i someone comes to you obviously not just related to terrorism, when they are afraid further mental health, what frustrations do you experience having gone through this yourself,
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saying i cannot help you today, i can refer you, but what do you think? it can refer you, but what do you think? , ., , can refer you, but what do you think? , . , , ., ., think? it is ideally frustration. yes, think? it is ideally frustration. yes. there _ think? it is ideally frustration. yes, there are _ think? it is ideally frustration. yes, there are zero, - think? it is ideally frustration. yes, there are zero, and i - think? it is ideally frustration. yes, there are zero, and i am | yes, there are zero, and i am pleased to hear the government has committed to provide more health in general and we accept there are weights that will happen when something goes wrong but in this example, we are asking for something like the military would have, there is an acknowledgement that in certain situations it will be recognised and we will try and get help quicker for you. recognised and we will try and get help quickerfor you. fin recognised and we will try and get help quicker for you. fin a recognised and we will try and get help quicker for you. on a personal note, help quicker for you. on a personal note. how — help quicker for you. on a personal note, how weird _ help quicker for you. on a personal note, how weird your _ help quicker for you. on a personal note, how weird your family - help quicker for you. on a personal note, how weird your family be - note, how weird your family be marking this weekend? this weekend we be having — marking this weekend? this weekend we be having a _ marking this weekend? this weekend we be having a party. _ marking this weekend? this weekend we be having a party, there _ marking this weekend? this weekend we be having a party, there will- marking this weekend? this weekend we be having a party, there will be i we be having a party, there will be martin's dad and step mum, we are a
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modern blended family, there will be all his friends and we will raise a toast. , , ., ., toast. give us the nature of the -a . toast. give us the nature of the partv- he _ toast. give us the nature of the partv- he was _ toast. give us the nature of the partv- he was a _ toast. give us the nature of the party. he was a big _ toast. give us the nature of the party. he was a big character, i party. he was a big character, wasn't he? — party. he was a big character, wasn't he? there _ party. he was a big character, wasn't he? there will- party. he was a big character, wasn't he? there will be - party. he was a big character, - wasn't he? there will be prosecco, len of wasn't he? there will be prosecco, plenty of vodka _ wasn't he? there will be prosecco, plenty of vodka and _ wasn't he? there will be prosecco, plenty of vodka and diet _ wasn't he? there will be prosecco, plenty of vodka and diet corks - wasn't he? there will be prosecco, plenty of vodka and diet corks and | plenty of vodka and diet corks and his mum will be making abu fair. i think coronation street paid tribute last night — think coronation street paid tribute last niuht. �* . ., ., ., last night. again, another an amazin: last night. again, another an amazing act _ last night. again, another an amazing act of— last night. again, another an amazing act of kindness - last night. again, another an amazing act of kindness that| last night. again, another an - amazing act of kindness that after all this time they still remember the victims and what happened and remember that martin was a big coronation street fan. did you watch it last night? yes, we did and it brought a tear to my eyeful helen was there at the vigil afterwards. she came along to the funeral, along with many other of the casts. thank
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ou for with many other of the casts. thank you for coming _ with many other of the casts. thank you for coming to _ with many other of the casts. thank you for coming to talk _ with many other of the casts. thank you for coming to talk to _ with many other of the casts. thank you for coming to talk to us - with many other of the casts. thank you for coming to talk to us today. | you for coming to talk to us today. i hope your party, it sounds like you know exactly what you need to do and i hope your weekend goes exactly as you wish, thank you so much for coming. as you wish, thank you so much for cominu. . .. as you wish, thank you so much for cominu. ., ~ i. as you wish, thank you so much for cominu. . ,, ,, ., ~ i. as you wish, thank you so much for. coming-_ time coming. thank you. thank you. time now has 20 — coming. thank you. thank you. time now has 20 past _ coming. thank you. thank you. time now has 20 past eight. _ coming. thank you. thank you. time now has 20 past eight. some - coming. thank you. thank you. time now has 20 past eight. some of- coming. thank you. thank you. time now has 20 past eight. some of us i now has 20 past eight. some of us have enjoyed weather of late, it will become milder, ? have enjoyed weather of late, it will become milder,? is that have enjoyed weather of late, it will become milder, ? is that right. briefly, warm and across some parts of the uk but into next week temperatures will slide down below—average. it has been clouding over since we have been on a, quite a bank of cloud to the west. you can see the sunshine to chip through a chink in the clouds but for much of western side of the uk, thicker cloud and some rain at times as well. let us get a better idea of
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the picture. high—pressure to the south will keep southern and eastern counties of england try, low pressure to the north—west, feeding on that cloud. there will be outbreaks of rain to come for northern ireland and western scotland and a few showers drifting into the west of wales and across northern england. some of the cloud that thickened up further south will break for the afternoon and there should be more sunshine. temperatures could get up to 21 degrees. further north, 14—16 more widely. some persistent rain will sweep over scotland overnight, stretching as far north as the northern isles, more scattered in the east of scotland. paget impossible for northern ireland and northern england. a mild night, temperatures in double figures. clear in the south and east of the uk, the high pressure means we
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should get sunshine early doors on sunday. elsewhere the slow feeds in cloud south and eastwards with outbreaks of rain. probably western scotland one of the wettest places in the uk. some filters down into northern ireland and the chance of showers for northern england and wales. top temperatures where we have the best sunshine, up to 23 degrees for the south—east of england. the south—east might be in line for some showers, even heavy ones on monday as low gets close. we have fronts try to push south across the uk, just about anywhere on monday likely to see outbreaks of rain. dry and sunny intervals in between but it is a very unsettled story and it gets cooler as well thanks to the rain. moving closer to
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south—east england and anglia. we never recover the highs of the weekend. london has 21, 23, but the high teens at the best. the story remains unsettled across the uk by the early part of next week. thank you very much. if you've been out to post a letter recently you might have noticed your post box looking more colourful — and cosy — than usual. it has been happening for a while now. it has been happening for a while now. post box toppers are the new form of "yarn—bombing" — in which knitters and crochet fanatics use their skills to spruce up their local area. they are ingenious. mairead smyth is in stockport to tell us more. what is the story behind this? that
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is not her, that is the knitted queen. is not her, that is the knitted cueen. , . ., , is not her, that is the knitted cueen. , _, , , queen. yes, welcome, this is spectacular- _ queen. yes, welcome, this is spectacular. it _ queen. yes, welcome, this is spectacular. it has _ queen. yes, welcome, this is spectacular. it has been - queen. yes, welcome, this is. spectacular. it has been created queen. yes, welcome, this is- spectacular. it has been created by the women's institute and you can see the corgis with the queen on top, and it is part of this huge phenomenon happening across the country for the queensjubilee, country for the queens jubilee, netted by volunteers who live locally. there are many around this part of manchester and it is all part of manchester and it is all part of manchester and it is all part of celebrating thejubilee celebrations which will start next week in schools and community centres and run into the people's pageant in london. they are marking what the queen has done with flowers and colour, it will be interesting to find out what the queen thinks of these postbox toppers which are napping up these postbox toppers which are popping up across the country. many more in this part of manchester and
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other parts of the country. we are keen to get your pictures. we have some sense in already. if you have some sense in already. if you have some in your local area that you would like us to join the programme later, please e—mail it into breakfast. send it in this morning. i will be backjust before ten o'clock when i will meet the people behind this post box topper. thank ou ve behind this post box topper. thank you very much- _ behind this post box topper. thank you very much. you _ behind this post box topper. thank you very much. you have - behind this post box topper. thank you very much. you have been - you very much. you have been mistaken for a post box topper, charlie? ~ . , . ., , charlie? what depicted in one? yes, we will have — charlie? what depicted in one? yes, we will have a _ charlie? what depicted in one? yes, we will have a look— charlie? what depicted in one? yes, we will have a look at _ charlie? what depicted in one? yes, we will have a look at that _ charlie? what depicted in one? yes, we will have a look at that later. - yes, we will have a look at that later. if your post box has been topped, we'd love to see a picture. you can tweet it to us using the hashtag bbc breakfast or email bbcbreakfast at bbc dot co dot uk. don't forget to say where you saw it. we'll show as many as we can later. strange beast and wondrous
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landscapes, heavily structures, discover the science of big and small. .. ., ., , discover the science of big and small. ., ., , ., , , ., small. each one of these dots is a calax , small. each one of these dots is a galaxy. secrets — small. each one of these dots is a galaxy, secrets of _ small. each one of these dots is a galaxy, secrets of size _ small. each one of these dots is a galaxy, secrets of size continues l galaxy, secrets of size continues monday— galaxy, secrets of size continues monday at nine on bbc and iplayer. hello, this is breakfast with
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charlie stayt and naga munchetty. the time is a 30. there have been developments when it comes to the war on ukraine. russian forces are claiming victory and the paucity of mar pulp. as we've been hearing this morning, russian forces are claiming victory in the ukrainian port city of mariupol — after a siege which lasted more than two months. the donbas region — which includes mariupol — is now the key focus for russia. the kremlin says that what it calls "the liberation" of luhansk province is nearing completion, and it's intensifying its attacks on neighbouring donetsk. jeremy bowenjoins us now from dnipro. give us your sense, we describe some of what the kremlin is calling the successes and directories, but is actually happening?— successes and directories, but is actually happening? from what we are heafina actually happening? from what we are hearing from — actually happening? from what we are hearing from our— actually happening? from what we are hearing from our own _ actually happening? from what we are hearing from our own connections -
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hearing from our own connections with ukrainian troops who are fighting in the donbas area, the russians have moved forward. in official communiques from the ukrainian general staff they have said the same thing. it is a matter of miles, there is not on major breakthrough, but the word i have been using is a ukrainian defences are creaking. they haven't broken but they have had to retreat, they have blown bridges to try to slow down the russian advance, so when this particular area, luhansk, the north—eastern part of the donbas area, that is the area in which they area, that is the area in which they are really prioritising and this morning what we were hearing from people who are there from the military side of people who were there is the russians are doing more air strikes, there is the russians are doing more airstrikes, more there is the russians are doing more air strikes, more selling and really trying to ramp up the firepower to break those ukrainian defences, because yesterday in moscow the
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russian defence minister said that shortly luhansk would beat100% on their hands. you shortly luhansk would beat 100% on their hands. ., ., ,. , their hands. you are describing their hands. you are describing their russians _ their hands. you are describing their russians using _ their hands. you are describing their russians using more - their hands. you are describing| their russians using more heavy weaponry. we are hearing a lot about ukraine's requests and demands for weaponry from outside to help in those situations. are they tangibly able to repel any of the heavy bombardments from the russians? thea;a bombardments from the russians? they are firina bombardments from the russians? they are firing back- — bombardments from the russians? iue are firing back. the bombardments from the russians? i“ue are firing back. the war bombardments from the russians? i“ue1: are firing back. the war there in the last few weeks has really been artillery battle. they are hammering each other with their artillery. i am not clear because ukrainians keep am not clear because ukrainians keep a lid on a lot of this, the degree to which those very sophisticated 155 millilitre howitzers which they have mostly go from the us but also
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from canada have actually been deployed and are being used, because it wasn't long ago when the american said they were training ukrainian soldiers in poland to operate them, soldiers in poland to operate them, so at the moment it may well be that they don't yet have that firepower in place. i they don't yet have that firepower in lace. .. they don't yet have that firepower in lace. ~ ., they don't yet have that firepower in lace. ~ . ., in place. i think am hearing the warnin: in place. i think am hearing the warning sirens _ in place. i think am hearing the warning sirens going _ in place. i think am hearing the warning sirens going off - in place. i think am hearing the warning sirens going off where | in place. i think am hearing the . warning sirens going off where you are now. . , ., , are now. yeah, there is a siren somewhere — are now. yeah, there is a siren somewhere here _ are now. yeah, there is a siren somewhere here in _ are now. yeah, there is a siren somewhere here in the - are now. yeah, there is a siren somewhere here in the city, i are now. yeah, there is a siren l somewhere here in the city, but are now. yeah, there is a siren - somewhere here in the city, but this area the dnipro has been up to now, life has been going on a relatively normal way as far as it can be normal way as far as it can be normal when i wore is going on sol think we can keep talking. flan normal when i wore is going on sol think we can keep talking. can i normal when i wore is going on so i think we can keep talking. can i get a thouuht think we can keep talking. can i get a thought from _ think we can keep talking. can i get a thought from you, _ think we can keep talking. can i get a thought from you, something - think we can keep talking. can i get| a thought from you, something that had been felled internationally quite a lot, the first russian soldier who has been brought in front of a court in connection with the murder of a civilian in ukraine,
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it is a significant moment, isn't it? it it is a significant moment, isn't it? , ,, . ,, ., , it is a significant moment, isn't it? it is. since the russians pulled back from around _ it? it is. since the russians pulled back from around the _ it? it is. since the russians pulled back from around the capital- it? it is. since the russians pulled back from around the capital kyiv| it? it is. since the russians pulled i back from around the capital kyiv at the end of march, they have managed from under the rubble and in mass graves i think they have disinterred about a thousand bodies of civilians who may well have been killed in, shot out of hand, or of ukrainian prisoners, so the case against this young man, 21 years old, is that he was in some kind of a vehicle, in a car i think, and what his lawyer has said is he could see that man and he was on his phone outside his house, so be man's defence is that he was
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told to do with antiracism automatic weapon and put about —— he raised his automatic weapon. he put four bullets in him. thejustification was he could be giving away his position but you could say why not take the phone off him. he faces potentially a life sentence, though he may well be involved in a prisoner swap at a future date, and i think essentially his defence is the old one of it was only following orders and that is something which i doubt the court will accept. goad orders and that is something which i doubt the court will accept.- doubt the court will accept. good to seak to doubt the court will accept. good to speak to iron _ time to talk about mike and the sport. i know all sports people are highly trained and mega fit and all of the competition, but when you look at the emotional and physical roller—coaster that rangers has been through in the last few days with the europa league final and that
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massive disappointment when it went to penalties, out of the get back up ready to do battle again? aha, lat to penalties, out of the get back up ready to do battle again?— ready to do battle again? a lot of footballers _ ready to do battle again? a lot of footballers would _ ready to do battle again? a lot of footballers would say _ ready to do battle again? a lot of footballers would say it _ ready to do battle again? a lot of footballers would say it is - ready to do battle again? a lot of footballers would say it is a - footballers would say it is a perfect chance to bounce back, the massive chance to win trophy and make up for the disappointment, but hearts will be thinking, this could be a little chance to cause a bit of an upset, let's capitalise on the rangers hangover. it is fascinating to see which way this one will go. rangers are hoping to win the world's oldest football trophy for the 34th time, and any other year you would be massive big favourites against hearts, who did finish third in the league, but will some kind of hangover from wednesday night hinder rangers chances and give the edinburgh side hope? andy burke reports. it is the showpiece event of the scottish football season, and for rangers and hearts, a chance to end a long wait to claim the oldest trophy in football. hearts have lost two of the last three scottish cup finals at hampden and haven't won the trophy since 2012.
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and for rangers, the wait is even longer. you have to go back to 2009 for the last time they managed to get their hands on the cup. nice touch from halliday! andy halliday was part of the rangers side that fell at the final hurdle in 2016. now playing in the maroon of hearts, he is setting any allegiance to his former club to one side. first and foremost, i'm a professional. since i was young, old enough to be able to kick a ball, i'll try to win. i don't think that's going to be any different. i think what will be different — certainly after the game, i think a few family members and friends might not speak to me if i do lift the cup. but certainly my sole focus is to try and win this trophy for hearts. the big question for rangers is what physical and mental toll wednesday night's europa league defeat to frankfurt took on them and how quickly they can recover. some of those guys have played some football at a very high level,
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so it's tough. but yes, if you're the manager you say, look, guys, we've had such an impressive season in terms of getting to the europa cup final, and let's not end on a dampener. if we don't win, we're looking at a disappointing season — which is ridiculous considering we're in the league final. but like i say, as a football player, you want to win things. and the loss was really tough for them, but they want to finish the season by winning the scottish cup. rangers beating celtic while hearts defeated hibbs, and supporters on both sides will feel that their team's efforts this season are deserving of a trophy. but as always, there can only be one winner. you can fold a build—up on bbc scotland heralds a day. next to the controversy surrounding this year's wimbledon. the organisers have described the decision by those in charge
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of the women's and men's tennis tours to strip this year's tournament of its ranking points as deeply disapointing and damaging to all players who compete on the tour. the decision not to award ranking points is in response to wimbledon banning russian and belarusian players this year due to the war in ukraine. the atp and wta says the ban undermines their principle that players of any nationality should be able to able to compete on their tour based on merit and without discrimination. the decision means serbia's novak djokovic — the defending men's champion — will lose his status as the world number one after this year's wimbledon ends. no two days ever seem the same when it comes to golf. despite calm conditions, rory mclroy dropped off the pace, in the second round at the second men's golf major of the year, the us pga championship. he's fallen some distance behind the up and coming american will zalatoris, who shot a brilliant round of 65 at southern hills in oklahoma, to get to nine—under par, for the tournament. so he has a one shot lead going into the third round today, and is five clear of mcilroy,
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who had that poor second round of one—over which leaves him four—under par overall. i wouldn't say it was nerves. it was maybe just you're not going to go out and shoot 65 every day. maybe it was a case where i wasn't quite as committed or aggressive as i was yesterday. exeter�*s hopes of reaching rugby union's premiership play—offs are effectively over after they lost to bristol. but sale could still squeeze in to the top four. they won at wasps — akker van der merver�*s second—half try helping them to a 16—7 victory in coventry. ulster secured a top four finish in the united rugby championship, to guarantee a home game in the quarterfinals. they narrowly beat the sharks in belfast. ulster were cruising for most of the game, but they had to hold off a late sharks fightback to win it 24—21. it wasn't a good night for the welsh sides, as cardiff lost heavily to benneton, and ospreys were also beaten by the bulls. in rugby league, toulose remain bottom of the super league table after losing to huddersfield. salford are running into some form now, two wins on the trot,
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as they swept aside castleford by 30 points to 1a with joe burgess getting a hat trick of tries. there was a first win too for leeds rhinos, under new coach rohan smith, as they beat wakefield. there was a lovely moment before that match as an a seven—year—old rugby enthusiast from ukraine delivered the match ball. dima turupanov represents keev rhinos in his home country, but settled in west yorkshire with his mum and sister following the outbreak of war. dima received a massive welcome by the fans, as he ran onto the pitch with the match ball before the game. lovely moment as his father does remain in ukraine as part of this defence effort.— remain in ukraine as part of this defence effort. there could be no creater defence effort. there could be no greater contrast. _ defence effort. there could be no greater contrast. fantastic - defence effort. there could be no i greater contrast. fantastic moment, young lad running onto the pitch and all the celebration, and what we will talk about now... for different
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incidents, pitch _ will talk about now... for different incidents, pitch invasions, - will talk about now... for different incidents, pitch invasions, players| incidents, pitch invasions, players and fans. brought to a head with patrick vieira the crystal manager when he appeared to be taunted and then kicked out at the fun. the sheffield united captain head—butted by billy sharp... nigel clough said something had to be done after an incident at northampton. the play—off semifinal, swindon players apparently verbally and physically abused. it has come to a head and we'll talk about it more. something needs to be — we'll talk about it more. something needs to be done. _ we'll talk about it more. something needs to be done. the _ we'll talk about it more. something needs to be done. the afl- we'll talk about it more. something needs to be done. the afl are i needs to be done. the afl are lookin: needs to be done. the afl are looking at _ needs to be done. the afl are looking at plans _ needs to be done. the afl are looking at plans to _ needs to be done. the afl are looking at plans to reduce i needs to be done. the afl are i looking at plans to reduce capacity. we can talk to mark palios. what was your own experience with fans and pitch invasions? i
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your own experience with fans and pitch invasions?— pitch invasions? i played at the hirhest pitch invasions? i played at the highest level _ pitch invasions? i played at the highest level of _ pitch invasions? i played at the highest level of hooliganism i pitch invasions? i played at the | highest level of hooliganism and there _ highest level of hooliganism and there were — highest level of hooliganism and there were pitch _ highest level of hooliganism and there were pitch invasions- highest level of hooliganism and there were pitch invasions in- highest level of hooliganism and there were pitch invasions in the 70s _ there were pitch invasions in the 70s i_ there were pitch invasions in the 70s i never— there were pitch invasions in the 70s. i never felt— there were pitch invasions in the 70s. i never felt threatened i there were pitch invasions in the 70s. i never felt threatened at l there were pitch invasions in the l 70s. i never felt threatened at all. that is_ 70s. i never felt threatened at all. that is the — 70s. i never felt threatened at all. that is the major— 70s. i never felt threatened at all. that is the major difference - 70s. i never felt threatened at all. i that is the major difference between what we _ that is the major difference between what we see — that is the major difference between what we see today _ that is the major difference between what we see today and _ that is the major difference between what we see today and the _ that is the major difference between what we see today and the past. i. what we see today and the past. i was attacked _ what we see today and the past. i was attacked off— what we see today and the past. i was attacked off the _ what we see today and the past. i was attacked off the pitch - what we see today and the past. i was attacked off the pitch but i what we see today and the past. i| was attacked off the pitch but that was attacked off the pitch but that was fans _ was attacked off the pitch but that was fans at — was attacked off the pitch but that was fans at watford, _ was attacked off the pitch but that was fans at watford, it _ was attacked off the pitch but that was fans at watford, it wasn't i was attacked off the pitch but that was fans at watford, it wasn't our| was fans at watford, it wasn't our own fans — was fans at watford, it wasn't our own fans that _ was fans at watford, it wasn't our own fans that people _ was fans at watford, it wasn't our own fans that people don't - was fans at watford, it wasn't our i own fans that people don't make... what _ own fans that people don't make... what you _ own fans that people don't make... what you think _ own fans that people don't make... what you think has _ own fans that people don't make... what you think has changed? - own fans that people don't make... what you think has changed? was i what you think has changed? was there more respect for the pitch? that is the word chris wilder used earlier— that is the word chris wilder used earlier this — that is the word chris wilder used earlier this week. _ that is the word chris wilder used earlier this week. there _ that is the word chris wilder used earlier this week. there was - that is the word chris wilder used earlier this week. there was a i earlier this week. there was a respect — earlier this week. there was a respect. there _ earlier this week. there was a respect. there was _ earlier this week. there was a respect. there was no - earlier this week. there was a respect. there was no real- earlier this week. there was al respect. there was no real fear earlier this week. there was a i respect. there was no real fear you would _ respect. there was no real fear you would get _ respect. there was no real fear you would get assaulted. _ respect. there was no real fear you would get assaulted. i— respect. there was no real fear you would get assaulted. i am - respect. there was no real fear you would get assaulted. i am not i respect. there was no real fear you would get assaulted. i am not a i would get assaulted. i am not a social— would get assaulted. i am not a social scientist— would get assaulted. i am not a social scientist but— would get assaulted. i am not a social scientist but people - would get assaulted. i am not a social scientist but people can. would get assaulted. i am not a i social scientist but people can look at it and _ social scientist but people can look at it and they— social scientist but people can look at it and they will _ social scientist but people can look at it and they will say _ social scientist but people can look at it and they will say it _ social scientist but people can look at it and they will say it is - at it and they will say it is post—pandemic. - at it and they will say it is i post—pandemic. unfortunately at it and they will say it is _ post—pandemic. unfortunately because post— pandemic. unfortunately because football _ post— pandemic. unfortunately because football is _ post—pandemic. unfortunately because football is a _ post—pandemic. unfortunately because football is a passionate _ post—pandemic. unfortunately because football is a passionate tribal— football is a passionate tribal thing —
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football is a passionate tribal thing and _ football is a passionate tribal thing and because _ football is a passionate tribal thing and because it - football is a passionate tribal thing and because it has i thing and because it has high-profile _ thing and because it has high—profile it— thing and because it has high—profile it is- thing and because it has high—profile it is often. thing and because it has i high—profile it is often seen thing and because it has - high—profile it is often seen as a platform — high—profile it is often seen as a platform for— high—profile it is often seen as a platform for things _ high—profile it is often seen as a platform for things like - high—profile it is often seen as a l platform for things like ourselves. you said _ platform for things like ourselves. you said you — platform for things like ourselves. you said you played _ platform for things like ourselves. you said you played at _ platform for things like ourselves. you said you played at the - platform for things like ourselves. you said you played at the heightl platform for things like ourselves. i you said you played at the height of football hooliganism and we are calling these pitch invasions inappropriate behaviour. this is hooliganism, isn't it? it is inappropriate behaviour. this is hooliganism, isn't it?— hooliganism, isn't it? it is and aeneral hooliganism, isn't it? it is and general hooliganism - hooliganism, isn't it? it is and general hooliganism around . hooliganism, isn't it? it is and i general hooliganism around the hooliganism, isn't it? it is and - general hooliganism around the game has increased — general hooliganism around the game has increased and _ general hooliganism around the game has increased and anecdotally- general hooliganism around the game has increased and anecdotally we i has increased and anecdotally we have seen — has increased and anecdotally we have seen that _ has increased and anecdotally we have seen that post—pandemic. has increased and anecdotally wei have seen that post—pandemic but has increased and anecdotally we i have seen that post—pandemic but it has been _ have seen that post—pandemic but it has been hacked _ have seen that post—pandemic but it has been hacked by— have seen that post—pandemic but it has been hacked by the _ have seen that post—pandemic but it has been hacked by the data - have seen that post—pandemic but it has been hacked by the data so i have seen that post—pandemic but it has been hacked by the data so the| has been hacked by the data so the number— has been hacked by the data so the number of— has been hacked by the data so the number of arrests— has been hacked by the data so the number of arrests have _ has been hacked by the data so the number of arrests have increased l has been hacked by the data so the l number of arrests have increased but this is— number of arrests have increased but this is very— number of arrests have increased but this is very specific _ number of arrests have increased but this is very specific and _ number of arrests have increased but this is very specific and this _ number of arrests have increased but this is very specific and this is - this is very specific and this is one _ this is very specific and this is one of— this is very specific and this is one of the _ this is very specific and this is one of the examples - this is very specific and this is one of the examples where i this is very specific and this is. one of the examples where the this is very specific and this is - one of the examples where the whole thin- one of the examples where the whole thing is _ one of the examples where the whole thing is exacerbated _ one of the examples where the whole thing is exacerbated by— one of the examples where the whole thing is exacerbated by social- one of the examples where the whole thing is exacerbated by social media i thing is exacerbated by social media which _ thing is exacerbated by social media which means— thing is exacerbated by social media which means you _ thing is exacerbated by social media which means you can _ thing is exacerbated by social media which means you can raise - thing is exacerbated by social media which means you can raise a - thing is exacerbated by social media which means you can raise a posse i which means you can raise a posse very quickly— which means you can raise a posse very quickly around _ which means you can raise a posse very quickly around the _ which means you can raise a posse very quickly around the concept i which means you can raise a possel very quickly around the concept and idea and _ very quickly around the concept and idea and i_ very quickly around the concept and idea and i think— very quickly around the concept and idea and i think we _ very quickly around the concept and idea and i think we are _ very quickly around the concept and idea and i think we are seeing - very quickly around the concept and idea and i think we are seeing that. j idea and i think we are seeing that. is the _ idea and i think we are seeing that. is the game — idea and i think we are seeing that. is the game and _ idea and i think we are seeing that. is the game and clubs _ idea and i think we are seeing that. is the game and clubs and - idea and i think we are seeing that. is the game and clubs and your- is the game and clubs and your chairman of tranmere rovers somehow complicit in this? on the one hand, so you get to the end of the season and the club has done well and you have, maybe we are part of this, wonderful scenes of celebrations on the pitch. correcting if i am wrong but going on the pitch at any point
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is illegal. are we all somehow complicit in the problem? you would probably be very careful in damming your own fans if you had an amazing victory and they went on the pitch, i suspect you as chairman, i am not trying to put you on the spot, you probably wouldn't go on there and say i want everyone to face charges. absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what _ absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is — absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is to — absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is to be _ absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is to be done, _ absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is to be done, which- absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is to be done, which is- absolutely. you wouldn't. in terms of what is to be done, which is the| of what is to be done, which is the real question. _ of what is to be done, which is the real question, excepting _ of what is to be done, which is the real question, excepting where i of what is to be done, which is thej real question, excepting where we are, i_ real question, excepting where we are, i think— real question, excepting where we are, ithinkyou— real question, excepting where we are, i think you have _ real question, excepting where we are, i think you have to— real question, excepting where we are, i think you have to accept i real question, excepting where we | are, i think you have to accept that if you _ are, i think you have to accept that if you are _ are, i think you have to accept that if you are saying _ are, i think you have to accept that if you are saying this _ are, i think you have to accept that if you are saying this is _ are, i think you have to accept that if you are saying this is the - if you are saying this is the majority— if you are saying this is the majority are _ if you are saying this is the majority are not _ if you are saying this is the majority are not really- if you are saying this is the majority are not really at l if you are saying this is the i majority are not really at fault if you are saying this is the - majority are not really at fault and it is exuberant _ majority are not really at fault and it is exuberant people _ majority are not really at fault and | it is exuberant people celebrating, what it— it is exuberant people celebrating, what it doesm _ it is exuberant people celebrating, what it does... [it— it is exuberant people celebrating, what it does... [it is _ it is exuberant people celebrating, what it does. . ._ yes, . what it does... it is illegal. yes, but the issue _ what it does... it is illegal. yes, but the issue of _ what it does... it is illegal. yes, but the issue of how _ what it does... it is illegal. yes, but the issue of how you - what it does... it is illegal. yes, but the issue of how you solve l what it does... it is illegal. yes, i but the issue of how you solve this is very— but the issue of how you solve this is very difficult _ but the issue of how you solve this is very difficult because _ but the issue of how you solve this is very difficult because you - but the issue of how you solve this is very difficult because you can i is very difficult because you can stop— is very difficult because you can stop a _ is very difficult because you can stop a mass— is very difficult because you can stop a mass invasion. _ is very difficult because you can stop a mass invasion. it- is very difficult because you can stop a mass invasion. it is- is very difficult because you can stop a mass invasion. it is veryl stop a mass invasion. it is very difficult — stop a mass invasion. it is very difficult to _ stop a mass invasion. it is very difficult to ban _
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stop a mass invasion. it is very difficult to ban everybody- stop a mass invasion. it is very difficult to ban everybody and i stop a mass invasion. it is very. difficult to ban everybody and put everybody — difficult to ban everybody and put everybody through _ difficult to ban everybody and put everybody through the _ difficult to ban everybody and put everybody through the courts. ifi difficult to ban everybody and put i everybody through the courts. if you accept _ everybody through the courts. if you accept that — everybody through the courts. if you accept that it — everybody through the courts. if you accept that it is _ everybody through the courts. if you accept that it is difficult _ everybody through the courts. if you accept that it is difficult to _ accept that it is difficult to police _ accept that it is difficult to police and _ accept that it is difficult to police and that _ accept that it is difficult to police and that gives i accept that it is difficult to| police and that gives cover accept that it is difficult to i police and that gives cover for individuals— police and that gives cover for individuals because _ police and that gives cover for individuals because you - police and that gives cover for individuals because you can i police and that gives cover for. individuals because you can deal with individuals _ individuals because you can deal with individuals very— individuals because you can deal with individuals very easy - individuals because you can deal with individuals very easy with i with individuals very easy with cctv. — with individuals very easy with cctv. you _ with individuals very easy with cctv, you have _ with individuals very easy with cctv, you have to _ with individuals very easy with cctv, you have to somehow l with individuals very easy with l cctv, you have to somehow get with individuals very easy with i cctv, you have to somehow get to with individuals very easy with - cctv, you have to somehow get to the position— cctv, you have to somehow get to the position where — cctv, you have to somehow get to the position where society _ cctv, you have to somehow get to the position where society got _ cctv, you have to somehow get to the position where society got with - position where society got with drink-driving _ position where society got with drink—driving. [— position where society got with drink-driving.— drink-driving. i appreciate the oint drink-driving. i appreciate the point you're — drink-driving. i appreciate the point you're making, - drink-driving. i appreciate the point you're making, but i drink-driving. i appreciate the | point you're making, but those individuals you talk about do with under the mask of the masses, so one lease of the other. if under the mask of the masses, so one lease of the other.— lease of the other. if you then look at what your— lease of the other. if you then look at what your sections _ lease of the other. if you then look at what your sections are, - lease of the other. if you then look at what your sections are, you i lease of the other. if you then look| at what your sections are, you have to perhaps — at what your sections are, you have to perhaps get _ at what your sections are, you have to perhaps get to— at what your sections are, you have to perhaps get to the _ at what your sections are, you have to perhaps get to the point - at what your sections are, you have to perhaps get to the point where l to perhaps get to the point where your sections _ to perhaps get to the point where your sections affect _ to perhaps get to the point where your sections affect the _ to perhaps get to the point where your sections affect the mass i to perhaps get to the point where your sections affect the mass and they accept— your sections affect the mass and they accept the _ your sections affect the mass and they accept the fast _ your sections affect the mass and they accept the fast that - your sections affect the mass and they accept the fast that they- they accept the fast that they shouldn't— they accept the fast that they shouldn't be _ they accept the fast that they shouldn't be coming - they accept the fast that they shouldn't be coming onto i they accept the fast that they shouldn't be coming onto the they accept the fast that they- shouldn't be coming onto the pitch. you're _ shouldn't be coming onto the pitch. you're then— shouldn't be coming onto the pitch. you're then starting _ shouldn't be coming onto the pitch. you're then starting to _ shouldn't be coming onto the pitch. you're then starting to look - shouldn't be coming onto the pitch. you're then starting to look at i you're then starting to look at reducing — you're then starting to look at reducing crowds, _ you're then starting to look at reducing crowds, possibly- you're then starting to look at i reducing crowds, possibly putting covers _ reducing crowds, possibly putting covers in — reducing crowds, possibly putting covers in the _ reducing crowds, possibly putting covers in the seats _ reducing crowds, possibly putting covers in the seats adjacent - reducing crowds, possibly putting covers in the seats adjacent to i reducing crowds, possibly putting i covers in the seats adjacent to the pitch _ covers in the seats adjacent to the pitch itself— covers in the seats adjacent to the pitch itself which _ covers in the seats adjacent to the pitch itself which makes _ covers in the seats adjacent to the pitch itself which makes it - pitch itself which makes it difficult _ pitch itself which makes it difficult to _ pitch itself which makes it difficult to get _ pitch itself which makes it difficult to get across, i pitch itself which makes it difficult to get across, but pitch itself which makes it i difficult to get across, but the practical— difficult to get across, but the practical difficulty— difficult to get across, but the practical difficulty is _ difficult to get across, but the practical difficulty is you - difficult to get across, but the practical difficulty is you will l practical difficulty is you will have — practical difficulty is you will have sold _ practical difficulty is you will have sold season _ practical difficulty is you will have sold season tickets i
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practical difficulty is you will . have sold season tickets there practical difficulty is you will - have sold season tickets there and you're _ have sold season tickets there and you're starting _ have sold season tickets there and you're starting to _ have sold season tickets there and you're starting to disadvantage i you're starting to disadvantage certain— you're starting to disadvantage certain sections— you're starting to disadvantage certain sections of— you're starting to disadvantage certain sections of your - you're starting to disadvantage i certain sections of your community. all those _ certain sections of your community. all those things _ certain sections of your community. all those things need _ certain sections of your community. all those things need to _ certain sections of your community. all those things need to be - all those things need to be considered _ all those things need to be considered but _ all those things need to be considered but ultimately i all those things need to be i considered but ultimately the all those things need to be - considered but ultimately the final sanction— considered but ultimately the final sanction if— considered but ultimately the final sanction if you _ considered but ultimately the final sanction if you want _ considered but ultimately the final sanction if you want to _ considered but ultimately the final sanction if you want to get - considered but ultimately the final sanction if you want to get what ii sanction if you want to get what i would _ sanction if you want to get what i would get — sanction if you want to get what i would get to— sanction if you want to get what i would get to a _ sanction if you want to get what i would get to a sociological - sanction if you want to get what ii would get to a sociological change on the _ would get to a sociological change on the terraces _ would get to a sociological change on the terraces is _ would get to a sociological change on the terraces is to _ would get to a sociological change on the terraces is to get _ would get to a sociological change on the terraces is to get to - would get to a sociological change on the terraces is to get to a - would get to a sociological change on the terraces is to get to a point that action — on the terraces is to get to a point that action and _ on the terraces is to get to a point that action and you _ on the terraces is to get to a point that action and you step _ on the terraces is to get to a point that action and you step it - on the terraces is to get to a point that action and you step it up i on the terraces is to get to a point that action and you step it up and| that action and you step it up and if you _ that action and you step it up and if you get— that action and you step it up and if you get to _ that action and you step it up and if you get to there, _ that action and you step it up and if you get to there, people - that action and you step it up and if you get to there, people will i if you get to there, people will say. _ if you get to there, people will say, this— if you get to there, people will say, this is— if you get to there, people will say, this isjust _ if you get to there, people will say, this isjust not _ if you get to there, people willl say, this isjust not acceptable. you _ say, this isjust not acceptable. you have — say, this isjust not acceptable. you have to _ say, this isjust not acceptable. you have to get _ say, this isjust not acceptable. you have to get into _ say, this isjust not acceptable. you have to get into the - say, this isjust not acceptable. you have to get into the minds| say, this isjust not acceptable. . you have to get into the minds of the masses — you have to get into the minds of the masses and _ you have to get into the minds of the masses and change _ you have to get into the minds of the masses and change that. i you have to get into the minds of the masses and change that. so. you have to get into the minds of the masses and change that. so the idea is a crowd _ the masses and change that. so the idea is a crowd stops _ the masses and change that. so the idea is a crowd stops the _ idea is a crowd stops the individuals. there is a copycat going on this week as well? i individuals. there is a copycat going on this week as well? i think that comes — going on this week as well? i think that comes through _ going on this week as well? i think that comes through social - going on this week as well? i think that comes through social media i going on this week as well? i think. that comes through social media but to take _ that comes through social media but to take charlie's _ that comes through social media but to take charlie's point _ that comes through social media but to take charlie's point it _ that comes through social media but to take charlie's point it is _ that comes through social media but to take charlie's point it is the - to take charlie's point it is the production— to take charlie's point it is the production aid _ to take charlie's point it is the production aid rituals - to take charlie's point it is the production aid rituals get - to take charlie's point it is the production aid rituals get that| production aid rituals get that perpetrate _ production aid rituals get that perpetrate these _ production aid rituals get that perpetrate these things - production aid rituals get that . perpetrate these things through masses — perpetrate these things through masses coming _ perpetrate these things through masses coming on _ perpetrate these things through masses coming on so _ perpetrate these things through masses coming on so if- perpetrate these things through masses coming on so if you - perpetrate these things through| masses coming on so if you stop perpetrate these things through i masses coming on so if you stop at you can _ masses coming on so if you stop at you can isolate _ masses coming on so if you stop at you can isolate those _ masses coming on so if you stop at you can isolate those people - masses coming on so if you stop at you can isolate those people and l you can isolate those people and deal with — you can isolate those people and deal with those _ you can isolate those people and deal with those people. - you can isolate those people and deal with those people. you - you can isolate those people and deal with those people. you have worked at the _ deal with those people. you have worked at the top _ deal with those people. you have worked at the top of _ deal with those people. you have worked at the top of the - deal with those people. you have worked at the top of the fa, - deal with those people. you have| worked at the top of the fa, chief executive, di think they take it seriously or is there a danger that people at the top go it is a bad week. i people at the top go it is a bad week. ., �* ~' people at the top go it is a bad week. ., �* ~ . . . week. i don't think that at all. if
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ou look week. i don't think that at all. if you look at _ week. i don't think that at all. if you look at where _ week. i don't think that at all. if you look at where this _ week. i don't think that at all. if you look at where this could - you look at where this could possibly— you look at where this could possibly go. _ you look at where this could possibly go. at _ you look at where this could possibly go, at the - you look at where this could possibly go, at the end - you look at where this could possibly go, at the end of l you look at where this could i possibly go, at the end of the you look at where this could - possibly go, at the end of the day i am an_ possibly go, at the end of the day i am an emptoyer_ possibly go, at the end of the day i am an employer of— possibly go, at the end of the day i am an employer of the _ possibly go, at the end of the day i am an employer of the players, - possibly go, at the end of the day i am an employer of the players, ofl possibly go, at the end of the day i i am an employer of the players, of my stuff, _ am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and _ am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and as— am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and as an — am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and as an employer— am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and as an employer i— am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and as an employer i want- am an employer of the players, of my stuff, and as an employer i want to i stuff, and as an employer i want to make _ stuff, and as an employer i want to make my— stuff, and as an employer i want to make my workplace _ stuff, and as an employer i want to make my workplace as _ stuff, and as an employer i want to make my workplace as safe - stuff, and as an employer i want to make my workplace as safe as - make my workplace as safe as possible — make my workplace as safe as possible so _ make my workplace as safe as possible so from _ make my workplace as safe as possible so from the - make my workplace as safe as possible so from the club - possible so from the club perspective _ possible so from the club perspective they - possible so from the club perspective they want - possible so from the club. perspective they want fans possible so from the club - perspective they want fans to enjoy themselves— perspective they want fans to enjoy themselves at _ perspective they want fans to enjoy themselves at different _ perspective they want fans to enjoy themselves at different crimes - perspective they want fans to enjoy themselves at different crimes and| themselves at different crimes and that his _ themselves at different crimes and that his pick— themselves at different crimes and that his pick of— themselves at different crimes and that his pick of the _ themselves at different crimes and that his pick of the rule _ themselves at different crimes and that his pick of the rule of- themselves at different crimes and that his pick of the rule of law- that his pick of the rule of law stretches— that his pick of the rule of law stretches to _ that his pick of the rule of law stretches to the _ that his pick of the rule of law stretches to the pitch. - that his pick of the rule of law stretches to the pitch. look. that his pick of the rule of law| stretches to the pitch. look at that his pick of the rule of law- stretches to the pitch. look at the pfa and _ stretches to the pitch. look at the pfa and the — stretches to the pitch. look at the pfa and the managers _ stretches to the pitch. look at the i pfa and the managers association, ultimately— pfa and the managers association, ultimately there's— pfa and the managers association, ultimately there's action _ pfa and the managers association, ultimately there's action would - pfa and the managers association, ultimately there's action would be i ultimately there's action would be actually— ultimately there's action would be actually it— ultimately there's action would be actually it you _ ultimately there's action would be actually if you can _ ultimately there's action would be actually if you can protect - ultimately there's action would be actually if you can protect our- actually if you can protect our members we are not- actually if you can protect our members we are not going i actually if you can protect our members we are not going to actually if you can protect our- members we are not going to play. it is a massive — members we are not going to play. it is a massive issue _ members we are not going to play. it is a massive issue for— members we are not going to play. it is a massive issue for the _ members we are not going to play. it is a massive issue for the game. - members we are not going to play. it is a massive issue for the game. i- is a massive issue for the game. i think— is a massive issue for the game. i think it _ is a massive issue for the game. i think it has — is a massive issue for the game. i think it has come _ is a massive issue for the game. i think it has come through- is a massive issue for the game. i| think it has come through because is a massive issue for the game. i. think it has come through because of this particular— think it has come through because of this particular copycat _ think it has come through because of this particular copycat element - this particular copycat element where — this particular copycat element where peopie _ this particular copycat element where people have _ this particular copycat element where people have started - this particular copycat element where people have started to i this particular copycat element - where people have started to target a player— where people have started to target a player and — where people have started to target a player and there _ where people have started to target a player and there is _ where people have started to target a player and there is a _ where people have started to target a player and there is a lack- where people have started to target a player and there is a lack of- a player and there is a lack of respect — a player and there is a lack of respect that _ a player and there is a lack of respect that was _ a player and there is a lack of respect that was once - a player and there is a lack of respect that was once there l a player and there is a lack of. respect that was once there on a player and there is a lack of- respect that was once there on the pitch _ respect that was once there on the itch. , . respect that was once there on the itch. , , ., , x' respect that was once there on the itch. , ., , ,., . �*, pitch. just to pick up on charlie's oint pitch. just to pick up on charlie's point when _ pitch. just to pick up on charlie's point when people _ pitch. just to pick up on charlie's point when people were - pitch. just to pick up on charlie's point when people were allowed | pitch. just to pick up on charlie's i point when people were allowed on the pitch if you're salivating, and it is ok, shouldn't it be made more specific that there is absolutely, it is illegal, but people are ignoring it and when they are separating, shouldn't it be we will invite you onto because to sell right if we went and that is the
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only time, this is a special moment, so that it still is ingrained in the bands and the atmosphere around the club that it is never 0k to be on that term. it club that it is never 0k to be on that term-— club that it is never 0k to be on that term. , , , , ., that term. it is ok with permission. but permission _ that term. it is ok with permission. but permission isn't _ that term. it is ok with permission. but permission isn't granted - that term. it is ok with permission. but permission isn't granted when i but permission isn't granted when you celebrate but it has to be almost specific.— you celebrate but it has to be almost specific. what she is the announcements _ almost specific. what she is the announcements at _ almost specific. what she is the announcements at grounds, - almost specific. what she is the announcements at grounds, the almost specific. what she is the - announcements at grounds, the pounds will do _ announcements at grounds, the pounds will do a _ announcements at grounds, the pounds will do a lap— announcements at grounds, the pounds will do a lap of— announcements at grounds, the pounds will do a lap of honour, _ announcements at grounds, the pounds will do a lap of honour, that— announcements at grounds, the pounds will do a lap of honour, that is- will do a lap of honour, that is what — will do a lap of honour, that is what that— will do a lap of honour, that is what that is, _ will do a lap of honour, that is what that is, for— will do a lap of honour, that is what that is, for the _ will do a lap of honour, that is what that is, for the fans, - will do a lap of honour, that is what that is, for the fans, but| will do a lap of honour, that is- what that is, for the fans, but the whole _ what that is, for the fans, but the whole thing — what that is, for the fans, but the whole thing respect, _ what that is, for the fans, but the whole thing respect, but - what that is, for the fans, but the whole thing respect, but people l what that is, for the fans, but the - whole thing respect, but people have been caught— whole thing respect, but people have been caught out _ whole thing respect, but people have been caught out by— whole thing respect, but people have been caught out by this. _ whole thing respect, but people have been caught out by this. there - whole thing respect, but people have been caught out by this. there will. been caught out by this. there will been caught out by this. there will be a been caught out by this. there will he a positive — been caught out by this. there will be a positive response _ been caught out by this. there will be a positive response from - been caught out by this. there will be a positive response from the i be a positive response from the authorities. _ be a positive response from the authorities, and _ be a positive response from the authorities, and i— be a positive response from the authorities, and i don't- be a positive response from the authorities, and i don't think. be a positive response from the i authorities, and i don't think they will say— authorities, and i don't think they will say that — authorities, and i don't think they will say that is _ authorities, and i don't think they will say that is another— authorities, and i don't think they will say that is another bad - authorities, and i don't think they will say that is another bad day. authorities, and i don't think they will say that is another bad day at the office — will say that is another bad day at the office i— will say that is another bad day at the office. i think— will say that is another bad day at the office. i think they— will say that is another bad day at the office. i think they accept - will say that is another bad day at the office. i think they accept this is a disturbing _ the office. i think they accept this is a disturbing trend _ the office. i think they accept this is a disturbing trend that - the office. i think they accept this is a disturbing trend that has - is a disturbing trend that has occurred _ is a disturbing trend that has occurred and _ is a disturbing trend that has occurred and they— is a disturbing trend that has occurred and they will- is a disturbing trend that has occurred and they will have i is a disturbing trend that hasl occurred and they will have to is a disturbing trend that has - occurred and they will have to deal with it _ occurred and they will have to deal with it if _ occurred and they will have to deal with it if you — occurred and they will have to deal with it if you go— occurred and they will have to deal with it. if you go back— occurred and they will have to deal with it. if you go back to— occurred and they will have to deal with it. if you go back to 2004 - occurred and they will have to deal. with it. if you go back to 2004 when england _ with it. if you go back to 2004 when england were — with it. if you go back to 2004 when england were in— with it. if you go back to 2004 when england were in european _ with it. if you go back to 2004 when england were in european shoppingl england were in european shopping tips and _ england were in european shopping tips and i_ england were in european shopping tips and i was— england were in european shopping tips and i was there, _ england were in european shopping tips and i was there, what - england were in european shopping tips and i was there, what was - tips and i was there, what was recognised _ tips and i was there, what was recognised is _ tips and i was there, what was recognised is we _ tips and i was there, what was recognised is we had - tips and i was there, what was recognised is we had in - tips and i was there, what was recognised is we had in this. tips and i was there, what was - recognised is we had in this country because _ recognised is we had in this country because of— recognised is we had in this country because of the _ recognised is we had in this country because of the circumstances - recognised is we had in this country
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because of the circumstances of- because of the circumstances of puritanism _ because of the circumstances of puritanism we _ because of the circumstances of puritanism we had _ because of the circumstances of puritanism we had controlled i because of the circumstances of- puritanism we had controlled pretty well and _ puritanism we had controlled pretty well and there — puritanism we had controlled pretty well and there are _ puritanism we had controlled pretty well and there are three _ puritanism we had controlled pretty well and there are three basic- well and there are three basic things. — well and there are three basic things. one _ well and there are three basic things, one part— well and there are three basic things, one part of— well and there are three basic things, one part of that - well and there are three basic things, one part of that was l well and there are three basic. things, one part of that was were iaws _ things, one part of that was were laws introduced _ things, one part of that was were laws introduced and _ things, one part of that was were laws introduced and he _ things, one part of that was were laws introduced and he had - things, one part of that was were laws introduced and he had to . things, one part of that was were laws introduced and he had to doj laws introduced and he had to do that, _ laws introduced and he had to do that, there — laws introduced and he had to do that, there has _ laws introduced and he had to do that, there has to— laws introduced and he had to do that, there has to be _ laws introduced and he had to do that, there has to be a _ laws introduced and he had to do that, there has to be a proper. that, there has to be a proper sanction. _ that, there has to be a proper sanction, proper— that, there has to be a proper sanction, proper penalty- that, there has to be a proper sanction, proper penalty for. sanction, proper penalty for transgression. _ sanction, proper penalty for transgression. there - sanction, proper penalty for transgression. there was i sanction, proper penalty for| transgression. there was an sanction, proper penalty for- transgression. there was an tells us that poiicing — transgression. there was an tells us that policing and _ transgression. there was an tells us that policing and low— transgression. there was an tells us that policing and low policing - transgression. there was an tells us that policing and low policing as - that policing and low policing as weii~ _ that policing and low policing as weii~ that — that policing and low policing as well. that intelligence - that policing and low policing as well. that intelligence led - well. that intelligence led poiicing _ well. that intelligence led poiicing it— well. that intelligence led olicin: . . . well. that intelligence led olicin: . , , . policing. it is interesting we are heafina policing. it is interesting we are hearing your — policing. it is interesting we are hearing your thoughts. - policing. it is interesting we are hearing your thoughts. it - policing. it is interesting we are hearing your thoughts. it was i policing. it is interesting we are . hearing your thoughts. it was great as albright, the sad thing. this should be a moment when you consolidate and not be problems yet talk about nothing else. thanks for chatting to us. the new netflix drama heart—stopper only started four weeks ago, but it's gone down so well — with both critics and viewers — that it's already been commissioned for two more series. it's about a pair of boys — charlie and nick — who meet at school and fall in love. let's take a look. i was thinking. what if i came out?
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you really want to? i i was thinking. what if i came out? you really want to?— you really want to? i really wanted to. i you really want to? i really wanted to- i know — you really want to? i really wanted to- i know i — you really want to? i really wanted to. i knowi have _ you really want to? i really wanted to. i knowi have been _ you really want to? i really wanted to. i knowi have been pretty- you really want to? i really wanted | to. i knowi have been pretty unsure to. i know i have been pretty unsure of everything for a while, but i'm definitely bisexual stop i don't to have to stick around pretending we are platonic bffs. i am not saying i want to have a public announcement or anything, want to have a public announcement oranything, but want to have a public announcement or anything, but i want to tell the people who matter and i want you to be able to tell people, too. oh, my god, i like you so much. and i love liking you. i like charlie and a romantic way, notjust liking you. i like charlie and a romantic way, not just a friend liking you. i like charlie and a romantic way, notjust a friend way! what? i never thought this would happen to me. me
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what? i never thought this would happen to me— we're joined now by the tv critic scott bryan and by molly houghton, of the proud trust, which works with young lgbt+ people. good morning. scott, you have not been backwards in coming forwards about how much you have love this programme and as a tv critic are you allowed to beat this much of a fan. i have tried to withhold myself over the last week's was this show has had near universal acclaim because it is incredibly grounded and for normally well cast and acted but it also taps into such a thing that has been lacking in tv, particularly young lgbtq+ representation, talking about storylines that they have been talking about first love crushes, experiences, but also tapping into homophobia and transphobia and doing
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it and it really grounded way and this is a form of tv that i was really needing when i was 14. by, really needing when i was 14. a couple of things occurred to me, one is sometimes hear a damn around an issue, and there might be a sense that it issue, and there might be a sense thatitis issue, and there might be a sense that it is an issue that is first and foremost, but also always important thing is the drama and characters work and that is the avenue to making something good, isn't it? the issue has to come secondary anyway, important as it is. ., , secondary anyway, important as it is. , . , secondary anyway, important as it is. . , . , is. the way it weaves it in really naturally and — is. the way it weaves it in really naturally and really _ is. the way it weaves it in really | naturally and really realistically, i think normally with teen dramas it can be incredibly high stakes, and even though these are big decisions in their lives with regarding to love and navigating that important part of their life, it is still feeling very standard in the setup, that it is. it is in terms of having somebody on tv knowing what it is like to go through those things
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because when i was in school ice raised quite a lot of homophobia, i was the only lgbtq+ person that was out at that time and i think it was having somebody on tv navigating those issues, finding it hard but also having somebody on tv subtly saying i know what it is like, you will get through it and it'll be fine but also it happens to so many more people than might think. by, lot more people than might think. a lot of nodding- — more people than might think. a lot of nodding. molly, _ more people than might think. a lot of nodding. molly, you know this, don't you? it of nodding. molly, you know this, don't you?— don't you? it is something we say with lgbt0+ _ don't you? it is something we say with lgbtq+ people _ don't you? it is something we say with lgbtq+ people as _ don't you? it is something we say with lgbtq+ people as long - don't you? it is something we say with lgbtq+ people as long as i don't you? it is something we say - with lgbtq+ people as long as lgbtq+ youn- with lgbtq+ people as long as lgbtq+ young people, so much feedback from the show— young people, so much feedback from the show is _ young people, so much feedback from the show is that for the first time young _ the show is that for the first time young people are seeing themselves on screen _ young people are seeing themselves on screen anyway but looks and feels authentic _ on screen anyway but looks and feels authentic. ~' ., _ , , authentic. like scott says, it is not this high-stakes _ authentic. like scott says, it is not this high-stakes drama, i authentic. like scott says, it is not this high-stakes drama, a | not this high—stakes drama, a massive roller—coaster, just reflective. massive roller-coaster, 'ust reflectivai massive roller-coaster, 'ust reflective. just a classic teen story and — reflective. just a classic teen story and it _ reflective. just a classic teen story and it happens - reflective. just a classic teen story and it happens at - reflective. just a classic teen story and it happens at the l reflective. just a classic teen - story and it happens at the centre of the _ story and it happens at the centre of the story are two boys or two
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girls _ of the story are two boys or two girls or— of the story are two boys or two girls or a — of the story are two boys or two girls ora trans of the story are two boys or two girls or a trans young girl. often these things _ girls or a trans young girl. often these things are _ girls or a trans young girl. often these things are made - girls or a trans young girl. often these things are made into - these things are made into tragedies, there will be a suicide or a negative element to this. in this case i am not saying it is all joyful, of course there is life and the trauma of being a teenager, but i think what is refreshing with this is it doesn't mean if you're in that part of society, that your life is all drama, and so abnormal. the issues that _ all drama, and so abnormal. the issues that the _ all drama, and so abnormal. the issues that the characters go through— issues that the characters go through is not because they are lgbt, _ through is not because they are lgbt, it — through is not because they are lgbt, it is _ through is not because they are lgbt, it is an additional part of their— lgbt, it is an additional part of their identity. when hell moves skills— their identity. when hell moves skills she — their identity. when hell moves skills she struggles to fit in and to make — skills she struggles to fit in and to make friends, but that is not because — to make friends, but that is not because she is trans, but she is the new girl— because she is trans, but she is the new girl at— because she is trans, but she is the new girl at school and anyone can resonate — new girl at school and anyone can resonate with that in that situation.— resonate with that in that situation. ., , ., , situation. scott, you definitely won't remember _ situation. scott, you definitely won't remember first - situation. scott, you definitely won't remember first hand, i situation. scott, you definitely won't remember first hand, if| situation. scott, you definitely i won't remember first hand, if you think about soaps in relation to gay
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issues as it was then and the brookside case, quite a lot of our audience will grab that, 30 years ago, you think 30 years has passed and now we are saying there is a drama which is normal and a lot of time has passed to get to a place where things have been normalised rather than being alex ordinary thing. i rather than being alex ordinary thin. ~ ., . rather than being alex ordinary thin. ~ . , ., rather than being alex ordinary thin. ~ . , . , thing. i think that is what is so emotional. — thing. i think that is what is so emotional, where _ thing. i think that is what is so emotional, where you - thing. i think that is what is so emotional, where you see - thing. i think that is what is so i emotional, where you see these thing. i think that is what is so - emotional, where you see these shows and watch them, like heart—stopper, you go this is phenomenal and fantastic, where was this year when i was 11, went through that crucial age. i'm not downplaying the buttons of lgbtq+ characters in all genres, they have been there, but more in prime—time, more foradults, but they have been there, but more in prime—time, more for adults, but i remember when i was 13 was the case between two characters in coronation street and this was being shown before the watershed and even though that was seen to be a ground—breaking moment for lgbtq+ representation that an immediate
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representative how can we show this at a time when kids could be watching, and the impact of that on me made me feel that my life was somehow debatable and that me kissing another guy would be somehow controversial so that leads to an impact that would be something moving the dial forward to where we are now, and some things are emotional but is weight of notjust seeing this show renewed but also seeing this show renewed but also seeing jack daniels, and site young professional footballer, seeing jack daniels, and site young professionalfootballer, yasmin being cast in doctor who, the impact that gives on young lgbtq+ people having those role models and representing the culture, so profound. representing the culture, so profound-— representing the culture, so rofound. , ., ~ ., profound. molly, you work for the roud profound. molly, you work for the proud trust. _ profound. molly, you work for the proud trust, they _ profound. molly, you work for the proud trust, they work _ profound. molly, you work for the proud trust, they work with - profound. molly, you work for the proud trust, they work with young lgbtq+ people, what have the people involved in the trust said to you in terms of what is programme has done for them. we terms of what is programme has done for them. ~ . , ., . for them. we have seen how much the show resonates _ for them. we have seen how much the show resonates with _ for them. we have seen how much the show resonates with young _ for them. we have seen how much the show resonates with young people. i for them. we have seen how much the| show resonates with young people. we do a lot— show resonates with young people. we do a lot of— show resonates with young people. we do a lot of work with groups and schools — do a lot of work with groups and schools and our groups in schools alliance _ schools and our groups in schools alliance this week was themed around heart stopper and all the feedback
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was around how the young people of the show— was around how the young people of the show so much because i have seen themselves— the show so much because i have seen themselves on screen and the fact that it _ themselves on screen and the fact that it was — themselves on screen and the fact that it wasjust themselves on screen and the fact that it was just a generally happy tv show. — that it was just a generally happy tv show, they won't see themselves in some _ tv show, they won't see themselves in some tragic story or it was a big mental— in some tragic story or it was a big mental health storyline, theyjust were _ mental health storyline, theyjust were allowed to exist and able to show— were allowed to exist and able to show and — were allowed to exist and able to show and use that to maybe come out to their— show and use that to maybe come out to their parents, particularly mountainous where it comes out to his mother, — mountainous where it comes out to his mother, played tacitly by olivia colman. _ his mother, played tacitly by olivia colman. it — his mother, played tacitly by olivia colman, it is so fantastic and so many— colman, it is so fantastic and so many young people are now taking that clip _ many young people are now taking that clip and using that to show their parents and use that as a moment of their own coming out, and that have _ moment of their own coming out, and that have an— moment of their own coming out, and that have an impact on people is so. i that have an impact on people is so. i suspect— that have an impact on people is so. i suspect among all the other stuff there are people who are saying you talk about it with the enthusiasm you have, might haven't looked at it already and might think they will have a look. it already and might think they will have a look-— already and might think they will have a look. , ., . . . have a look. it is so worth a watch. and there — have a look. it is so worth a watch. and there are _ have a look. it is so worth a watch. and there are two _ have a look. it is so worth a watch. and there are two more _ have a look. it is so worth a watch. and there are two more series - and there are two more series coming! scott and molly, thank you so much. the headlines and just a
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moment. good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. let us start to think again. right
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back to the _ let us start to think again. right back to the beginning. _ good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. russia declares victory in its battle to control the ukrainian city of mariupol — after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant lay down their weapons. pharmacists will be allowed to swap hrt medications without the need for a new prescription to try to ease shortages. a warning from doctors about the impact of monkeypox on sexual health as several clinics say it's already affecting services. will it be heartbreak again for rangers in a major cup final? this time its the scottish cup at hampden park, and it's hearts hoping to make sure rangers miss out on another trophy. and has your local postbox been
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given a knitted make—over for the queen's jubilee? we'll be looking at this woolly phenomenon good morning, a mixed weekend coming up. all of us will see some dry and hopefully sunny weather at some stage but there will also be showers moving in, particularly to the north and west of the uk. more details coming up. it's saturday the 2ist of may. our main story. russia has declared victory in its battle to conquer the ukrainian port city of mariupol — after the last fighters defending the azovstal steel plant laid down their weapons. ukraine's president zelensky confirmed the troops had been given permission to surrender — and hopes they can be released as part of a prisoner exchange programme. fierce fighting continues in the south and east of ukraine. we'rejoined now byjoe inwood, our correspondent in lviv. joe, what more do we know about russian advances in ukraine?
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what we have had over the last 20 for hours, the final fighters at the azovstal of steelworks have put down their weapons and come out in what was thought to be a negotiated surrender. they have been resisting for the couple of weeks but have run out of food, ammunition and water and were told by president zelensky it was time for them to give up the fight to save their lives. we understand some have been taken to prison camps and some to hospitals but there is uncertainty about what will happen to those who are in the as of battalion, the controversial unit of the national guard which is heated by the russians and especially the leaders of that who put up fierce resistance. the consequence of the resistance was thousands of russian troops were held at this place for the entirety of the war and unable to join the
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battle for the east of the country, the region cold the donbas. but they are now free and we are seeing a really significant russian pooch. the full wet of the russian military is coming into this one small area of eastern ukraine and are breaking through the defences of a town and try and encircle the ukrainian forces in a couple of cities. they will not take them straightaway but they are pushing all their might and as one siege comes to an end, it seems like they're to create another eastern ukraine. blot seems like they're to create another eastern ukraine.— eastern ukraine. not for the first time, ou eastern ukraine. not for the first time. you have _ eastern ukraine. not for the first time, you have sirens— eastern ukraine. not for the first time, you have sirens going - eastern ukraine. not for the first time, you have sirens going in i eastern ukraine. not for the first. time, you have sirens going in the background and jeremie boga had sirens going in dnipro. i assume everything is fine there, joe? yes.
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it is everything is fine there, joe? yes. it is worth — everything is fine there, joe? yes. it is worth explaining, _ everything is fine there, joe? yes. it is worth explaining, we - everything is fine there, joe? is; it is worth explaining, we have sirens quite often and we take them seriously but it depends how you react, depending on where you are in the country. in the far west there have been attacks in lviv but essentially they take place on the outskirts of the city. the city has not been hit, the target infrastructure and military bases so we react differently here in lviv than we do in dnipro for example. we take it seriously but we have other forms of intelligence coming in, it is notjust the sirens, we have local people who give information as well. we are told this is one you take seriously and others where you make a balanced judgment about what action to take. make a balanced 'udgment about what action to take.— thank you very much. pharmacists are to be given more flexibility so they can deal with shortages
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of hormone replacement therapy medicines. they'll be given temporary powers to exchange certain hrt drugs without a new prescription. our health correspondent catherine burns has the details. pharmacists have been struggling to get hold of certain hrt medicines. now, they are being given temporary new powers to help make sure women can still control the symptoms of their menopause. normally, if a chemist can't track down medicines on a prescription, the patient has to go back to their gp and ask for something else instead. but now, if they can't find four certain hrt treatments, the pharmacist will be able to offer the patient specific suitable alternatives instead. so, instead of a gel, cream or spray, women could find themselves using a patch instead. this is known as a serious shortage protocol. it is a temporary measure to deal with the immediate shortage. the move has been welcomed by the british menopause society and other experts, at least as an answer to the immediate problem. the issue that i have is that this is not a long—term strategy.
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this is fabulous for a shorterm issue, but longer—term, we need to ensure there's no supply issues when it comes to oestrogel, ovestin, lenzetto — these creams or other types of hrts that we commonly prescribe as nhs doctors. the government is dealing with this by learning lessons from the successful vaccines roll—out. it has appointed madelaine mcternan from the vaccines task force as hrt tsar. one issue for her is getting a true sense of how many women are on hrt. nobody knows for certain, but the best estimates are that around io—40% of menopausal women take it. that number is only expected to rise. drug shortages are notjust for hrt and nothing new. pharmacists would like a permanent change in the law allowing more flexibility to deal with these problems in the future. it's emerged that sue gray — the civil servant who has been
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you investigating lockdown parties in downing street — met the prime minister to discuss whether she should publish photographs of the events. labour has suggested the meeting could damage confidence in the process — but a government source said borisjohnson made it clear the decision lay with sue gray. our political correspondent jonathan blake are is in our london newsroom. good morning. this issue of trust around the _ good morning. this issue of trust around the report _ good morning. this issue of trust around the report is _ good morning. this issue of trust around the report is quite - around the report is quite significant because even when sue gray was appointed, the fact she is a civil servant was raised. yes. gray was appointed, the fact she is a civil servant was raised.— a civil servant was raised. yes, she is a senior— a civil servant was raised. yes, she is a senior government _ a civil servant was raised. yes, she is a senior government official- is a senior government official herself so there is a limit to how independent this process can be but she was put forward as someone who would be as independent as possible and investigate all this thoroughly and investigate all this thoroughly and free from influence from number ten or anyone else in government. 50 thatis ten or anyone else in government. 50 that is why labour or others are calling for an explanation to this
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meeting, shouting stitch up the level democrats are saying. —— the liberal democrats. downing street are framing it as something which happened at the request of sue gray and that the substance of the report was not discussed, it was more about procedure about how it would be published after the investigation was concluded. we expected on tuesday or wednesday and the officials expected to be named have been told, about 30 people, and they have been given a deadline of sunday evening to respond.— evening to respond. thank you very much. thank you very much. emergency plans are being drawn up to make sure some passenger and freight services can still operate if railway workers go on strike this summer. more than 40,000 members of the rmt union are being balloted in a dispute over pay and jobs. the union claims it could be the "biggest rail strike in modern history". the government says a "fair deal forstaff, passengers
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and taxpayers" is needed. scotland's first minister nicola sturgeon has tested positive for coronavirus. she said she was experiencing "mild symptoms" and would follow scottish government guidance to work from home for the next few days — and she hopes to be out and about later next week. australian voters have been casting their ballots in the country's first election in three years. polls predict a tight race between the current prime minister — and labour leader anthony albanese, who is one of the country's longest serving politicians. our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil is at a polling station in sydney. shaimaa, polling day in australia can have a carnival atmosphere — but the contest is keenly fought. we saw you out front with a beach behind her earlier in the program. this is an important day for australia.— this is an important day for australia. , , . australia. this is a very important da , the australia. this is a very important day. the first _ australia. this is a very important
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day, the first federal _ australia. this is a very important day, the first federal election - day, the first federal election since 2019. i am in central sydney and voting hasjust since 2019. i am in central sydney and voting has just stopped. last—minute voters were are served in and counting will begin when they have finished. that's far eastern australia, a couple of hours more for western australia. it has been a tightly contested race and has been a test of character for both leaders, the incumbent scott morrison, the man you can trust, the average australian, the man who saw australia through the pandemic. speaking to voters, this image of trust has eroded especially during the national does australia has been through in the last three years, the bushfires and the unprecedented floods, and many will say he was not there when they needed him. anthony
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albanese is australia's most experienced politicians and he says it is now time for a change. the economy has been changed —— has been important and also climate change. it is such a politically divisive issue and this is where the independent candidates come common epic climate action at the centre of their campaigning which makes them a real threat the government. the independence might hold the balance of power in this election. thank independence might hold the balance of power in this election.— of power in this election. thank you very much- — thank you very much. temperatures in spain could reach their highest level for 20 years today — with some areas expected to hit 42 degrees celsius. the country has been experiencing abnormally hot weather throughout may, with temperatures ten to 15 degrees above average. guy hedgecoe is in madrid this morning. often we go to you through story and
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we comment on how envious we are of the sunshine behind you but in midget, i no, it is not as hot as other parts of the country, we must be clear with these temperatures were talking about danger to life. that is right. i am in the park in the centre of madrid which is shaded. it is about 23 celsius here, relatively moderate temperatures but it is down in the south of the country in andalusia where we expect to see extremely high temperatures later on today, possibly surpassing 40 degrees. that area of spain in the summer might see those temperatures, that would not be extraordinary but the extraordinary thing is we are seeing these very high—temperature is at this time of year. so the government is advising people of high risk to remain indoors because of the risk to their
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health and also to mention down in cordoba where there will be high temperatures, local government has opened up a special shelter for homeless people to get out of the heatin homeless people to get out of the heat in the very hot hours of the day. heat in the very hot hours of the da . . .. heat in the very hot hours of the da . ., ~' , ., , heat in the very hot hours of the da . . «i , ., , . heat in the very hot hours of the day. thank you very much reporting from madrid- _ day. thank you very much reporting from madrid. it _ day. thank you very much reporting from madrid. it is _ day. thank you very much reporting from madrid. it is 14 _ day. thank you very much reporting from madrid. it is 14 minutes - day. thank you very much reporting from madrid. it is 14 minutes past l from madrid. it is 14 minutes past nine. we have been talking about weather in spain but there has also been extreme weather in germany. susan has been looking at as well. good morning. they are kind of connected. you can see footage of this tornado, look at the power of that wind, that was a giant thunderstorm that developed in a line across germany and back into the netherlands. you get that kind of power where you have a really big contrast and
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temperature, we call them here masses, big blocks of air commodore hot here across continental europe and cooler air trying to dig down from the polls to develop these super cell thunderstorms. a tornado is an upshot of a draft within this giant thunderstorm and the power is intense, as intense as anything you would cn association with a hurricane. would cn association with a hurricane-— would cn association with a hurricane. . ,, , ., , . would cn association with a hurricane. ., ~' , . hurricane. thank you very much. the heat that we — hurricane. thank you very much. the heat that we saw _ hurricane. thank you very much. the heat that we saw across _ hurricane. thank you very much. the heat that we saw across spain, - hurricane. thank you very much. the heat that we saw across spain, it - heat that we saw across spain, it looks like we could see record temperatures in france in the next 48 hours. that heat will also go across the balkans, a heads up for anyone looking at that part of the world. closer to home, anyone looking at that part of the world. closerto home, it anyone looking at that part of the world. closer to home, it is beautiful in cornwall this morning. quite a bit of cloud on the horizon, the son trying to push through. this is reflective of the skies in many
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parts of the uk today, cloud trying to push on, especially for the north and west and a few outbreaks of rain. the same story on sunday. this is a satellite picture, clear skies and be seen and cloud pushing across from the west. not much rain across england and wales, perhaps your charity for northern england and wales this afternoon. more cloud for northern ireland through the afternoon bringing outbreaks of rain which will spread into western scotland. it looks like the cloud we saw earlier in the central and eastern areas will break to allow sunshine this afternoon, temperatures possibly up to 21, more persistent rain overnight from scotland, stretching to the northern isles by dawn. rain into northern england and wales by the end of the
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night. a mild night, temperatures in double figures. for sunday, fairly similar. this high pressure slopes off further east. this low pressure, something cooler heading into spain, for us low pressure to the north. warmer area under this high—pressure first sunday in the south—east. elsewhere it is fresher with more cloud. some warmth on the brighter spells. again on sunday, we will have more persistent rain across western scotland. start of the week, this area of low pressure pushes up from the continent will start to break the heat across france and could send heavy thunderstorms to the far south—east of the uk. elsewhere weather front sinking south could see rain anywhere on monday. brighterspells south could see rain anywhere on monday. brighter spells between
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downpours but cooler conditions for oliver's at the beginning of the new week. i oliver's at the beginning of the new week. . . , ., ., ., . week. i am glad you got our weather, i thou~ht week. i am glad you got our weather, i thought you — week. i am glad you got our weather, i thought you were _ week. i am glad you got our weather, i thought you were just _ week. i am glad you got our weather, i thought you were just giving - week. i am glad you got our weather, i thought you were just giving us - week. i am glad you got our weather, i thought you were just giving us an i i thought you were just giving us an update, apologies for that. it is interesting the way these weather systems are linking.— systems are linking. there are knock-on _ systems are linking. there are knock-on effects _ systems are linking. there are knock-on effects across - systems are linking. there are knock-on effects across a - systems are linking. there are j knock-on effects across a long knock—on effects across a long distance, yes, absolutely. thank you for explaining that. it's time now to catch up with dr chris smith and professor linda bauld, who became our regular morning to you both. how i read toda ? morning to you both. how i read today? in _ morning to you both. how i read today? in fine _ morning to you both. how i read today? in fine form, _ morning to you both. how i read today? in fine form, how- morning to you both. how i read today? in fine form, how are - morning to you both. how i read i today? in fine form, how are you? morning to you both. how i read - today? in fine form, how are you? we are today? in fine form, how are you? are going nicely today? in fine form, how are you? - are going nicely thank you. today? in fine form, how are you? we are going nicely thank you. linda - today? in fine form, how are you? we are going nicely thank you. linda is i are going nicely thank you. linda is 'ust are going nicely thank you. linda is just reconnecting _ are going nicely thank you. linda is just reconnecting her— are going nicely thank you. linda is just reconnecting her camera. i i thought we were i thought we were going i thought we were going to i thought we were going to do i thought we were going to do it i thought we were going to do it old i thought we were going to do it old school with the telephone. chris, we
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have been talking about monkeypox is weak and in a nutshell my question to you, if you were watching our programme this morning and listening to doctor chris smith, should people be worried about monkeypox? actually i am sort of reassured _ be worried about monkeypox? actually i am sort of reassured the _ be worried about monkeypox? actually i am sort of reassured the system i be worried about monkeypox? actually i am sort of reassured the system is i i am sort of reassured the system is working because we have picked this up. it is worth that we have a huge outbreak and then find out afterwards what's going on. the fact the system is on to it and investigations are in place to follow—up find out who has got it and where they are and how it is spreading, this is reassuring that we have this information. obviously any infectious disease spreading we have to take seriously. we have to investigate but thankfully this investigation —— this virus for the vast majority of people is mild. we are dealing with the west african variant of monkeypox which is a relative of smallpox but in humans
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it is very mild and the risk of severe disease is a few percent. most people will have a chill —— trivial illness which they will get through after a few weeks. [30 trivial illness which they will get through after a few weeks. do you want to pick— through after a few weeks. do you want to pick up — through after a few weeks. do you want to pick up some _ through after a few weeks. do you want to pick up some of _ through after a few weeks. do you want to pick up some of the - through after a few weeks. do you want to pick up some of the basic| want to pick up some of the basic questions about monkeypox? i do want to pick up some of the basic questions about monkeypox? i do not think people — questions about monkeypox? i do not think people should _ questions about monkeypox? i do not think people should be _ questions about monkeypox? i do not think people should be alarmed. i think people should be alarmed. coming — think people should be alarmed. coming out of the pandemic, we are very aware _ coming out of the pandemic, we are very aware of different viruses and the public— very aware of different viruses and the public understand some of the epidemiology of things. so because it is making the headlines but as chris— it is making the headlines but as chris says. — it is making the headlines but as chris says, this is a virus we have known _ chris says, this is a virus we have known about— chris says, this is a virus we have known about since the 1960s. we know it is a _ known about since the 1960s. we know it is a virus— known about since the 1960s. we know it is a virus that comes from animals— it is a virus that comes from animals and finds a reservoir in humans — animals and finds a reservoir in humans but it is different from the sars _ humans but it is different from the sars virus — humans but it is different from the sars virus we have been dealing with _ sars virus we have been dealing with. firstly, it presents quite differently. we know with covert asymptomatic transmission was common
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but monkeypox, although symptoms take longer to develop, it might start— take longer to develop, it might start with — take longer to develop, it might start with a fever but then a rash so it— start with a fever but then a rash so it is— start with a fever but then a rash so it is much more visible. we also know— so it is much more visible. we also know we _ so it is much more visible. we also know we have a vaccine which comes from _ know we have a vaccine which comes from the _ know we have a vaccine which comes from the same vaccine for smallpox. colleagues _ from the same vaccine for smallpox. colleagues are doing intensive contact — colleagues are doing intensive contact tracing which everyone understands and perhaps ring vaccination which means vaccinating contacts _ vaccination which means vaccinating contacts to — vaccination which means vaccinating contacts to make sure it does not spread _ contacts to make sure it does not spread we — contacts to make sure it does not spread. we are being vigilant and i am sure— spread. we are being vigilant and i am sure we— spread. we are being vigilant and i am sure we will find out more about people _ am sure we will find out more about people should not be concerned. going _ people should not be concerned. going back to the pandemic, this has helped us know about diseases, we are at that time of year when boosters are being talked about. who will be established to have a covid booster? ., ., . . booster? from the 'oint we have had
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trelimina booster? from the joint we have had preliminary guidance _ booster? from the joint we have had preliminary guidance relating - booster? from the joint we have had preliminary guidance relating to i booster? from the joint we have had preliminary guidance relating to the l preliminary guidance relating to the autumn. ——joint preliminary guidance relating to the autumn. —— joint can. preliminary guidance relating to the autumn. ——joint can. it preliminary guidance relating to the autumn. —— joint can. it will allow the nhs to plan, or individuals over 65 and those who are immunosuppressed. they will be cold forward again in the autumn. many of them had our spring booster. the reason the committee is concerned about the autumn as we head into the winter, the viruses can circulate more easily. also the campaign last autumn provided good protection against disease, especially for older people regarding omicron. so continually regarding —— reviewing the data. flan continually regarding -- reviewing the data. ., , ., , . continually regarding -- reviewing the data. . , ., , . , the data. can you explain, chris, oteole the data. can you explain, chris, people will _ the data. can you explain, chris, people will think _ the data. can you explain, chris, people will think i _ the data. can you explain, chris,
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people will think i took - the data. can you explain, chris, people will think i took the i the data. can you explain, chris, i people will think i took the vaccine and now i have had the boosters, if other people need boosters then when will i need a booster if i am not in the vulnerable category? locate willi need a booster ifi am not in the vulnerable category?- the vulnerable category? we are learnint the vulnerable category? we are learning all— the vulnerable category? we are learning all the _ the vulnerable category? we are learning all the time _ the vulnerable category? we are learning all the time but - the vulnerable category? we are learning all the time but one i the vulnerable category? we are i learning all the time but one thing about— learning all the time but one thing about this — learning all the time but one thing about this coronavirus is the immunity— about this coronavirus is the immunity that either catching the infection— immunity that either catching the infection confers or the vaccine converts— infection confers or the vaccine converts is— infection confers or the vaccine converts is not that long—lived. for some _ converts is not that long—lived. for some things — converts is not that long—lived. for some things like measles, if you catch— some things like measles, if you catch it — some things like measles, if you catch it you _ some things like measles, if you catch it you have immunity that last a long _ catch it you have immunity that last a long time — catch it you have immunity that last a long time. other viruses are not like that— a long time. other viruses are not like that and the one that causes covid-19 — like that and the one that causes covid-19 is — like that and the one that causes covid—i9 is the same. because that is our— covid—i9 is the same. because that is our loss— covid—i9 is the same. because that is our loss of— covid—i9 is the same. because that is our loss of immunity over the time _ is our loss of immunity over the time because the immune systems take their eye _ time because the immune systems take their eye mac off the ball, because their eye mac off the ball, because the body— their eye mac off the ball, because the body does not keep meeting that threat _ the body does not keep meeting that threat it— the body does not keep meeting that threat it deep is your response to that threat— threat it deep is your response to that threat so it gets smaller and smaller— that threat so it gets smaller and smaller by the same time the virus is changing — smaller by the same time the virus is changing so the immune response
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might— is changing so the immune response might be _ is changing so the immune response might be less focused and good at recognising what they virus looks like now — recognising what they virus looks like now. it means come the autumn there _ like now. it means come the autumn there will— like now. it means come the autumn there will be — like now. it means come the autumn there will be a group of people who have an _ there will be a group of people who have an immune response has dropped away and _ have an immune response has dropped away and that tends to happen is we -et away and that tends to happen is we get older— away and that tends to happen is we get older and also the virus has shifted — get older and also the virus has shifted a — get older and also the virus has shifted a bit which means a slightly weaker— shifted a bit which means a slightly weaker immune response which is less well focused in a more vulnerable person— well focused in a more vulnerable person could spell a greater risk of having _ person could spell a greater risk of having a _ person could spell a greater risk of having a more severe disease so it is all— having a more severe disease so it is all about— having a more severe disease so it is all about balance and prop abilities _ is all about balance and prop abilities and the risk to individuals. the greatest risk group are those _ individuals. the greatest risk group are those who have pre—existing health— are those who have pre—existing health conditions. this is a safeguard but everyone can catch this infection but as you get older or more _ this infection but as you get older or more enfeebled you're more likely to have _ or more enfeebled you're more likely to have severe infections or make sense _ to have severe infections or make sense to — to have severe infections or make sense to prioritise those people first with — sense to prioritise those people first with vaccination and then follow—up with other people, topping
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up follow—up with other people, topping up with— follow—up with other people, topping up with their immunity if they need it. up with their immunity if they need it and _ up with their immunity if they need it and that — up with their immunity if they need it. and that is another thing we are learning _ it. and that is another thing we are learning all— it. and that is another thing we are learning all the time, how does the average _ learning all the time, how does the average person change here is not in average person change here is not in a risk— average person change here is not in a risk group? — average person change here is not in a risk group? is there vaccination sufficient — a risk group? is there vaccination sufficient or— a risk group? is there vaccination sufficient or will we need to top them _ sufficient or will we need to top them up — sufficient or will we need to top them up as well? can sufficient or will we need to top them up as well?— sufficient or will we need to top them up as well? can i go back to lessons learned _ them up as well? can i go back to lessons learned from _ them up as well? can i go back to lessons learned from covid-19, i lessons learned from covid—i9, specifically contact tracing in relation to monkeypox. lessons have been learned, with your public—health hat on, have we got significantly better at dealing with something as and when it happens, is this the first test in a way? i this the first test in a way? i think that is to we have learned a lot through the pandemic and we're looking _ lot through the pandemic and we're looking ahead to for future shocks and seeing a virus like monkeypox having _ and seeing a virus like monkeypox having some unusual cases around the world _ having some unusual cases around the world as _ having some unusual cases around the world as a _ having some unusual cases around the world as a way to highlight how systems— world as a way to highlight how systems are ramping up. we have learned _ systems are ramping up. we have learned from the pandemic some key
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components, firstly an early warning system _ components, firstly an early warning system so _ components, firstly an early warning system so we have genomic sequencing which is _ system so we have genomic sequencing which is developed beyond what was earlier— which is developed beyond what was earlier so— which is developed beyond what was earlier so we can do that sequence of virus _ earlier so we can do that sequence of virus and — earlier so we can do that sequence of virus and samples from people infected — of virus and samples from people infected. secondly we have the epidemiology so countries share information and all the systems are well in _ information and all the systems are well in place now. that public health — well in place now. that public health response, she said, which has been better— health response, she said, which has been better worse in some countries. contact _ been better worse in some countries. contact tracing we have all used and now countries recognise the importance of continuing to invest in infrastructure so i hope that although— in infrastructure so i hope that although we are concerned about new variants _ although we are concerned about new variants and _ although we are concerned about new variants and the spill—over from viruses — variants and the spill—over from viruses into— variants and the spill—over from viruses into humans we can continue our global— viruses into humans we can continue our global response which will put us into— our global response which will put us into a _ our global response which will put us into a better position of how we plan for— us into a better position of how we plan for the — us into a better position of how we plan for the future and how we protect — plan for the future and how we protect populations notjust in the uk but _ protect populations notjust in the uk but around the world.- protect populations notjust in the uk but around the world. thank you both very much _ uk but around the world. thank you both very much for _ uk but around the world. thank you both very much for your— uk but around the world. thank you both very much for your time - uk but around the world. thank you both very much for your time this i both very much for your time this morning. we'll see you in a
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fortnight, have a good couple of weeks. you're watching breakfast. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt tebbutt takes over in the saturday kitchen. he always has delightful concoctions coming up. he always has delightful concoctions comint-u. ., ., , ., he always has delightful concoctions comint-u. ., ., , . coming up. concoctions, do you mean recites? i coming up. concoctions, do you mean recipes? l was — coming up. concoctions, do you mean recipes? i was thinking _ coming up. concoctions, do you mean recipes? i was thinking more - coming up. concoctions, do you mean recipes? i was thinking more about i recipes? i was thinking more about all ai recipes? i was thinking more about all al suppose- _ recipes? i was thinking more about all ai suppose. we _ recipes? i was thinking more about all ai suppose. we do _ recipes? i was thinking more about all ai suppose. we do have - all ai suppose. we do have concoctions, _ all ai suppose. we do have concoctions, you're - all ai suppose. we do have i concoctions, you're absolutely right. i concoctions, you're absolutely ritht. . . concoctions, you're absolutely rit ht. ., . it concoctions, you're absolutely right-_ it is - concoctions, you're absolutely right._ it is the i right. i was right. it is the wonderful— right. i was right. it is the wonderful fearne - right. i was right. it is the wonderful fearne cotton i right. i was right. it is the i wonderful fearne cotton this morning. wonderful fearne cotton this mornint. ., . . , morning. how are you? i am very well. morning. how are you? i am very well- there — morning. how are you? i am very well. there will _ morning. how are you? i am very well. there will be _ morning. how are you? i am very well. there will be food, - morning. how are you? i am very well. there will be food, wine, i morning. how are you? i am very i well. there will be food, wine, how can i_ well. there will be food, wine, how can i not _ well. there will be food, wine, how can i not be — well. there will be food, wine, how can i not be happy? fist well. there will be food, wine, how can i riot be happy?— can i not be happy? at the end of the show food _ can i not be happy? at the end of the show food heaven _ can i not be happy? at the end of the show food heaven or - can i not be happy? at the end of the show food heaven or food i can i not be happy? at the end of- the show food heaven or food health. food heaven, a nice vegan burger or peanut _ food heaven, a nice vegan burger or peanut butter. you
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food heaven, a nice vegan burger or peanut butter-— peanut butter. you shop in healthy cho s? peanut butter. you shop in healthy chops? -- — peanut butter. you shop in healthy chops? -- mck _ peanut butter. you shop in healthy chops? -- mck health _ peanut butter. you shop in healthy chops? -- mck health food - peanut butter. you shop in healthy chops? -- mck health food shops. | peanut butter. you shop in healthy| chops? -- mck health food shops. i chops? —— mck health food shops. i don't like mushrooms and i don't like coriander.— like coriander. ken, nice to have ou like coriander. ken, nice to have you back. _ like coriander. ken, nice to have you back. first — like coriander. ken, nice to have you back, first time _ like coriander. ken, nice to have you back, first time for - like coriander. ken, nice to have you back, first time for two i like coriander. ken, nice to have| you back, first time for two years in the flesh, how are you? i am fine. what do you have for us? i am fine. what do you have for us? i am auoin to fine. what do you have for us? i am going to do — fine. what do you have for us? i am going to do a _ fine. what do you have for us? i am going to do a pork _ fine. what do you have for us? i am going to do a pork dish which is delicious, — going to do a pork dish which is delicious, just _ going to do a pork dish which is delicious, just very— going to do a pork dish which is delicious, just very convivial- going to do a pork dish which is| delicious, just very convivial but going to do a pork dish which is i delicious, just very convivial but i will make — delicious, just very convivial but i will make something _ delicious, just very convivial but i will make something special- delicious, just very convivial but i will make something special for. will make something special for fearne — will make something special for fearne cotton. _ will make something special for fearne cotton.— will make something special for fearne cotton. what have you got cominu fearne cotton. what have you got coming no? _ fearne cotton. what have you got coming up? we — fearne cotton. what have you got coming up? we have _ fearne cotton. what have you got coming up? we have a _ fearne cotton. what have you got coming up? we have a special- fearne cotton. what have you got| coming up? we have a specialwith manuo coming up? we have a specialwith mango and — coming up? we have a specialwith mango and a _ coming up? we have a specialwith mango and a prawn _ coming up? we have a specialwith mango and a prawn curry. - coming up? we have a specialwith mango and a prawn curry. i - coming up? we have a specialwith mango and a prawn curry. i am - coming up? we have a specialwith mango and a prawn curry. i am an | mango and a prawn curry. i am an awkward vegan. _ mango and a prawn curry. i am an awkward vegan, i _ mango and a prawn curry. i am an awkward vegan, i am _ mango and a prawn curry. i am an awkward vegan, i am sorry. - mango and a prawn curry. i am an l awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing awkward about _ awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing awkward about it. _ awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing awkward about it. what _ awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing awkward about it. what have - awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing awkward about it. what have you i awkward vegan, i am sorry. nothing i awkward about it. what have you got? i have everything. _ awkward about it. what have you got?
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i have everything. i — awkward about it. what have you got? i have everything, i have _ awkward about it. what have you got? i have everything, i have some - awkward about it. what have you got? i have everything, i have some air, - i have everything, i have some air, some _ i have everything, i have some air, some pink— i have everything, i have some air, some pink wine, i have whisky for world _ some pink wine, i have whisky for world whisky day, for those concoctions, especially for nag and charlie _ concoctions, especially for nag and charlie. . t, , concoctions, especially for nag and charlie. ., , , . i, , concoctions, especially for nag and charlie. ., , , . ., , ., charlie. that was especially for me, ou don't charlie. that was especially for me, you don't need _ charlie. that was especially for me, you don't need to _ charlie. that was especially for me, you don't need to enjoy _ charlie. that was especially for me, you don't need to enjoy it. - charlie. that was especially for me, you don't need to enjoy it. of- you don't need to enjoy it. of course, at the appropriate time, matthew. i course, at the appropriate time, matthew. . , course, at the appropriate time, matthew. ., , ., ., course, at the appropriate time, matthew. ., ., course, at the appropriate time, matthew. ., , ., ., ., matthew. i was about to say that. that is me _ matthew. i was about to say that. that is me all _ matthew. i was about to say that. that is me all over. _ matthew. i was about to say that. that is me all over. take - matthew. i was about to say that. that is me all over. take care. . matthew. i was about to say that. i that is me all over. take care. how are you doing, mike? did i hearyou slurping? hat are you doing, mike? did i hear you slurinu? ., ., .,, are you doing, mike? did i hear you slurinu? ., ., ., , ., are you doing, mike? did i hear you slurinu? ., ., .,, ., , are you doing, mike? did i hear you slurinu? ., ., .,, ., h, slurping? not that noise, that is a different noise. _ slurping? not that noise, that is a different noise. different - slurping? not that noise, that is a different noise. different liquids. l
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the scottish cup final this afternoon, with rangers up against hearts at hampden. the big question, for many, will be, how rangers react to that heartbreaking penalty shoot—out defeat in the europa league final on wednesday. it is the showpiece event in the scottish football calendar. the scottish cup final this afternoon, with rangers up against hearts at hampden. the big question, for many, will be, how rangers react to that heartbreaking penalty shoot—out defeat in the europa league final on wednesday. let's go live to glasgow, already there is our reporterjane dougall. hi jane, what's the feeling amongst fans and players still licking hi, jane, what's the feeling amongst fans and players still licking those wounds. will they be jaded? you can see the sun and it will not be as warm as it was in seville and the rangers players will be
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mentally, emotionally, physically exhausted and it will be very difficult to pick themselves up after that devastating loss on wednesday but it wasn'tjust playing 120 minutes of football, the stress of the penalties and the seeding heatin of the penalties and the seeding heat in seville and the travel back stop the seeding —— searing. they are experienced footballers with a very experienced manager who was a former player himself and they will have known for quite a while they have known for quite a while they have the scottish cup final on the state so they will have some plans to prepare themselves for this. also rangers just missed out on winning the domestic league to their bitter rivals celtic and on wednesday they just missed out on winning the europa cup and they will not want to just miss out on winning the scottish cup today so they will be determined to finish their season lifting a trophy and will want to do
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it for the fans as well, those fans who have travelled all the way to seville by hook or by crook and was so well—behaved, there was not one arrest in seville of rangers fan even although there were thousands of them. ,, ., ., ., _, of them. if you are the manager you see we have — of them. if you are the manager you see we have had _ of them. if you are the manager you see we have had such _ of them. if you are the manager you see we have had such an _ of them. if you are the manager you see we have had such an incredible. see we have had such an incredible season_ see we have had such an incredible season in— see we have had such an incredible season in terms of getting to the europa _ season in terms of getting to the europa league final and the scottish cup final— europa league final and the scottish cup final so lets not end the season on a real— cup final so lets not end the season on a real dampener because if they don't _ on a real dampener because if they don't win— on a real dampener because if they don't win on— on a real dampener because if they don't win on saturday you're looking at it being _ don't win on saturday you're looking at it being disappointing season which _ at it being disappointing season which is — at it being disappointing season which is ridiculous considering we were _ which is ridiculous considering we were in— which is ridiculous considering we were in the — which is ridiculous considering we were in the europa cup final but you want _ were in the europa cup final but you want to— were in the europa cup final but you want to win — were in the europa cup final but you want to win things. they missed out on wednesday night which was really tough _ on wednesday night which was really tough for— on wednesday night which was really tough for them so they will want to win the _ tough for them so they will want to win the scottish cup.— win the scottish cup. since i was four years _ win the scottish cup. since i was four years old — win the scottish cup. since i was four years old i _ win the scottish cup. since i was four years old i have _ win the scottish cup. since i was four years old i have always - win the scottish cup. since i was| four years old i have always been competitive and even of playing against my grandmother i always try to win. i think it will be different after the games, a few family members and friends might not speak to me if we don't lift the cup but
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my focus is to try to when this trophy for hearts. —— win. hearts did finish third in the league —will they be worried by the fact that they've lost four times on the trot to rangers? the last time the two sides met was lettered last weekend in the final game of the season which rangers won ljy game of the season which rangers won by three goals to one but a great deal has happened since then and i think hearts will be hoping for some heavy legged rangers players but despite that loss and other losses hearts have had a tremendous season finishing in third place behind the old firm and behind the manager who has only been in the club to years were promoted from the championship and at the first time of asking and
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made it to the scottish cup final so would be quite a tribute for him to be able to lift a piece of silverware because of the way he has managed to turn the team around and got success. hearts last won this trophy in 2012 but for rangers it was even longer before that, 2009 is the last time the one the scottish cup so i think both teams will be desperate to get the names on the trophy and have both saw that their allocation for hamden so we are guaranteed a great atmosphere. fingers crossed we are going to get a great atmosphere as well. ——hampden. there'll be no ranking points given to players at this year's wimbledon, and the organisers, have described the decision, by those in charge of the women's
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and men's tennis tours, to strip the competition of ranking points, as deeply disapointing and damaging to all players who compete on the tour. the decision,not to award ranking points, and damaging to all players who compete on the tour. the decision,not to award ranking points, is in response to wimbledon, banning russian and belarussian players, this year due to the war in ukraine. the atp and wta says the ban undermines their principle, that players of any nationality, should be able to able to compete, on their tour, based on merit and without discrimination. the decision means novak djokovic — the defending men's champion — will lose his status as the world number one after this year's wimbledon ends. rory mcllroy will be looking to bounce back from his disapointing second round at the us pga championship. after leading after the first round, he's now fallen some distance behind, american will zalatoris, who shot a brilliant round of 65 at southern hills in oklahoma, to get to nine under par, for the tournament. so he has a one shot lead going into today, and is five clear of mcllroy, who had that poor second round. of one over, which leaves him
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who had that poor second round. four under par overall. who had that poor second round. i wouldn't say it was nerves. who had that poor second round. it was maybe just you're not going to go out and shoot 65 every day. maybe it was a case where i wasn't quite as committed or aggressive as i was yesterday. lewis hamilton is happier with his mercedes car now, after a promising showing in practice, for the spanish grand prix. it was ferrari's championship leader charles leclerc, who dominated both of yesterday's practice sessions in barcelona. but there was improvement for mercedes, as lewis hamilton, finished third in second practice, just behind his british team mate george russell with qualifying later today. positive, super happy with the progress so a big, big, big thank you to everyone for not giving up and continuing to push. we are not the quickest but i think we are on our way. as the first time i have driven down the strip without bouncing. we still have some bouncing. we still have some bouncing but it is way better so starting to eke into a bit of the potential now.
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at quarter past one on the bbc it is the diamond league meeting. we will be talking about that in a moment. dina asher—smith says that she is in her best form at the moment. now the weather. we will see cloud spreading on but not necessarily bearing rain which is what we see in cornwall here. to the north and west of the uk i think
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that cloud will tend to be at reign because we will see weather fronts are trying to push away in here. for western scotland and northern ireland and some saudi bursts of rain to come and perhaps showers out of the thicker cloud across england and wales. the cloud will come and go elsewhere and i think we could see things lightening across the midlands and eastern england after the cloud has drifted on this morning. the temperatures in the best of the sunshine 20 degrees to 21 degrees. thicker cloud across western scotland and northern ireland will hold us back somewhere in the mid teens but aberdeen looking at some where in the mid teens and a few showers pitching east across scotland. the weather fronts push and more persistent rain to western scotland overnight and stretch as far north as the northern isles by dawn and thicker cloud in northern england and wales for tomorrow morning was a few outbreaks of rain. i'm old enough night with temperatures widely in double figures. clearskies temperatures widely in double figures. clear skies to south and
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east could leave us with mist and fog first thing on sunday and it looks like it should stay fine here as high pressurejust about looks like it should stay fine here as high pressure just about clings on at low pressure comes on to the north—west of the uk and will again favour northern and western areas and seeing some outbreaks of rain were thicker cloud. perhaps not too much in england and wales but west of scotland once again more persistent that downpours along with northern ireland. a little bit cooler than we have the rain that it could be somewhat warm up to the far south—east for norwich in london, a couple of degrees up on today. by monday this area of low pressure coming up from the continent, the slow straddling fronts from the north, it is not a complete guess but there is some rain in the forecast but exactly what time you see it and where will be subject to how we see these two areas of low pressure coming together but i think showers are longer spells of rain for all areas on monday. driest and brightest potentially towards the south—west but we could get some
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thunderstorms here and it is cooler, just 17 degrees for norwich in london by monday. that sets the tone to take us into the other part of the new week. a little bit fresher and it will be through the week, temperatures perhaps slightly below average and the chance of rain for many of us in the first few days of the week ahead. relatively this weekend looking quite right with brighter spells. it's famous for exploring a galaxy far, far away — but the millennium falcon was actually built much closer to home. the star wars craft was the last
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ship to be constructed at the royal pembroke dockyard, in south wales, in 1979. a new exhibition tells the story — and aled scourfield went to have a look. it was a project so secret it was codenamed the magic roundabout, but it was also the worst—kept secret in pembroke dock. geoff waterhouse was part of a team that built the falcon. i wasn't allowed to say anything. but of course, when i went home and said to my wife, my two boys then were nine and ii. you're not to say anything outside the house. no, no. they went to school the following morning and they told the whole school.
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the engineers at marken fabrications normally worked for the petrochemical industry, but in the spring of 1979, they were building the fastest hunk ofjunk in the galaxy, otherwise known as the millennium falcon. it was later painstakingly moved from the western hangar to elstree studios for the filming of the empire strikes back and the scenes of the frozen planet hoth. malcolm stiles helped put it back together and met a famous star on his visit to elstree. i met carrie fisher. i spoke to herfor a bit. she was learning their lines, you know, on a a0 gallon drum. and i spoke to her about thejob and all that. now a new permanent exhibition here at the pembroke dock heritage centre tells a story of the last ship ever to be built in the royal dockyard. just like the original plan to build the millennium falcon here in pembroke dock. there's been a fair bit of secrecy about this exhibition, but some of us have been lucky enough to get in and have a sneak peek. can i see your id? you don't need to see my id. to know that it actually
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travelled the roads of west wales and the people that are involved still live here and they love and they're so proud of the fact that it was involved. i think it's got to be told and it's got to be told pembrokeshire—born general manager of lucasfilm, the company behind the star wars franchise owned by disney, has given her seal of approval to the exhibition in pembroke dock because they are actually built by buying credible craftspeople. that's what comes over on the screen. that's why people are able to dive into this world and lose themselves in this world. the exhibition will open to the public on monday and will tell the story of how a spaceship built in pembroke dock made it to a galaxy far, far away. alex schofield, bbc news. some of the world's best athletes are competing in birmingham today in a meeting which,
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is also a bit of a test event for this summer's commonwealth games in the city. it isa it is a diamond league it will be their first opportunity, to try out the track, which is part of the £72 million redevelopment of the alexander stadium.
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what better way to test a £72 million redevelopment of your stadium than to get the world's best athletes to compete on it? i'm really excited and i'm feeling very fit and sharp. two olympic champions and a tokyo bronze medallist would seem ideally placed to judge if the new alexander stadium has what it takes. awesome. it's just beautiful. there are a lot of athletics fans here in birmingham, so that should help a lot in helping us to really fast at times know with all the support and the vibe that will be here. so that's something else that we're looking forward to. work began less than three years ago on transforming a tired looking stadium into one fit for hosting a major championships. the builders will finish on time and on budget, but the diamond league meeting will allow the organisers to discover any problems that need fixing and that won'tjust involve
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the experience in the stadium, but getting here in the first place. there'll be no parking on site with an emphasis on public transport. what we're really looking to be able to do is, first of all, make sure that all the flows around the stadium work. and what i mean by that is how our spectators will move, our athletes will move, media broadcast, etc. we're encouraging everybody to use public transport. so for this event, we're not testing everything, but we are testing some of our shuttles, park and ride and city centre shuttles. so for everybody who's going to be coming to the event, that's how we'd encourage them to get here. the stadium is intended to provide a legacy beyond the game for athletics in birmingham, a chance to inspire a generation of young people in the west midlands to follow in the footsteps of current stars like dina asher—smith, who's hoping to race here for many years to come. i think it's something that we should be proud of, and we're such a big track and field nation as well. we've got such a big impact across the globe. yeah, i mean, sorry. i keep looking around the stadium because it truly is beautiful, but i think that is really important for the legacy as well, to just have stadiums that everybody�*s excited to come to. the diamond league is the first big chance for the city's home
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of athletics to show off its new sparkle. audrey dias, bbc news. we can speak now to the, former european and commonwealth long distance champion paula radcliffe, who is at the alexander stadium this morning. have you had a run around the track? i have had a little run around the track and it feels good to me. but we walked in this morning and it feels amazing and i feel it builds up feels amazing and i feel it builds up the excitement coming up to the commonwealth games and it's great having the commonwealth games in this country and people can really get behind the athletes and bring the best out of themselves and this likes it will absolutely do that. how important is it for the home nations athletes to have this chance to try the track two months before the commonwealth games? it is really im ortant, the commonwealth games? it is really important. iust — the commonwealth games? it is really important, just things _ the commonwealth games? it is really important, just things like _ the commonwealth games? it is really important, just things like where - important, just things like where you will stay the night before and travelling into the stadium and seeing the layout from the track to the new stadium and feeling what the new track feels like and what it feels like for the stadium around because it has changed and it has changed the way that the wind will
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come into the stadium because of the amount of stands and when those are full and full of a home crowd cheering for you i think that will be great. cheering for you i think that will be areat. , ., ., , ., be great. one star who will be on show is dina _ be great. one star who will be on show is dina asher-smith - be great. one star who will be on show is dina asher-smith who i be great. one star who will be on | show is dina asher-smith who we be great. one star who will be on - show is dina asher-smith who we saw show is dina asher—smith who we saw in the report by audrey and she is saying and what could be our medal laden yearfor her, saying and what could be our medal laden year for her, trying to put that disappointment behind, she could be in the best form of her life. ~ ., ., life. we have got returning medallists _ life. we have got returning medallists from _ life. we have got returning medallists from tokyo - life. we have got returning medallists from tokyo as l life. we have got returning i medallists from tokyo as well life. we have got returning _ medallists from tokyo as well coming out today to race for pretty much the first time this season for laura muir and josh kerr and it is really important that they get a chance because it is a long and important season with three championships and
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managing that to get the best out of yourself and each of those championships will be a tough thing. good morning. ithought championships will be a tough thing. good morning. i thought when the bell went off they are all your instincts were going to kick off and it running. instincts were going to kick off and it runninu. . ~ .,' instincts were going to kick off and it runnin. ., ~ .,' .,, ., , it running. take off the last lap. when the athletes _ it running. take off the last lap. when the athletes come - it running. take off the last lap. i when the athletes come together, presumably the keep an eye on each other from a distance about times and theirtraining. other from a distance about times and their training. how often do you get a situation where you get to meeting like this and suddenly you 90, meeting like this and suddenly you go, i didn't know much about him or her and they are pretty good? it can absolutely happen _ her and they are pretty good? it can absolutely happen with _ her and they are pretty good? it can absolutely happen with athletes just breaking through and everybody is a little bit different but i would say most athletes would study the form of their big rivals and how they are coming out and racing coming into the season but it can happen somebody can just comment. laura
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muir key men big injury and was not able to race indoors so nobody really knows what kind form she is sent but i think she will be releasing really well. —— nobody knows what kind of form she is actually end. —— laura muir came in with a big injury. it looks for a while like she was in star trek we got there and we could hear what she was saying. it is pretty
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fabulous if i turn this round you will get a sense of the detail put into this topper. we have the autocue and the laptops and this bit here, on the table in the centre here, on the table in the centre here you can see there is even a mini version of this topper, as it were. it all gets a bit surreal. the detail is absolutely... i will say thank you to jane. this is near a
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postbox —— this is on a postbox near where i live and these were the outfits we were wheeling when we were presenting talking about toppers. that is quite an extraordinary resemblance, it really is. what about you, charlie? i think they have captured charlize here. ——charlie's hair. i had not heard the phrase yarn—bombing. before. let's see if you spotted in the wild. —— lets see
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a few of them spotted in the wild. thank you for sending in the pictures. they are all themed on the jubilee. mairead smyth is in stockport with some yarn—bombers who have been busy with the crochet hook. this poster box topper in heaton
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moor is one of eight in the area. i am joined by joined by lindsey loughtman. i started seeing pictures of these on facebook and i did not tell anyone and then i did not make a base for it and my friend suze said shall we make some and put them around the neighbourhood and i said i am already doing it and we did a christmas one with christmas trees and snowmen and there was one in spring and now we have got a jubilee one. this isjust the base. and this is what it becomes. you are one of the people behind this particular post box topper, it's very
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impressive.— post box topper, it's very impressive. post box topper, it's very imressive. ., ~ , . impressive. thank you very much indeed. impressive. thank you very much indeed- four— impressive. thank you very much indeed. four of _ impressive. thank you very much indeed. four of us _ impressive. thank you very much indeed. four of us took _ impressive. thank you very much indeed. four of us took on - impressive. thank you very much indeed. four of us took on the i indeed. four of us took on the challenge from the wia, linda kate and myself. —— wi. we couldn't have done it without the others who all contributed bits and pieces. this one is the queen's canopy and we have the golden carriage and a castle and a garden party —— we have windsor castle and a garden party and all the items have been recycled, we have not got anything new, and we have been blown away by the response, it has been absolutely wonderful and great fun to do. kate. wonderful and great fun to do. kate, who netted the _ wonderful and great fun to do. kate, who netted the queen _ wonderful and great fun to do. kate, who netted the queen and _ wonderful and great fun to do. kate, who netted the queen and the crowd is on holiday but a special mention. suejohnston, you are the president of the heaton wi. you must be very
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proud of the work. it of the heaton wi. you must be very proud of the work.— proud of the work. it has been a true collaborative _ proud of the work. it has been a true collaborative effort - proud of the work. it has been a true collaborative effort and i true collaborative effort and amazing to get the feedback from the community. we have had so many messages on facebook saying thank you for brightening up the neighbourhood and even this morning people are stopping, taking photographs, and we know there are thousands of other projects around the country and we just think it is a wonderful tribute to her majesty. wonderful as we build up towards those big jubilee celebrations that people in every part of the country can have a real sense of celebration.— can have a real sense of celebration. , ~ , celebration. yes, i think it is brin . inc celebration. yes, i think it is bringing the _ celebration. yes, i think it is bringing the community i celebration. yes, i think it is| bringing the community spirit celebration. yes, i think it is i bringing the community spirit back that we all felt during the horrible time of covid when you would speak to people that you did not know and now i think it is getting people excited. ., ., ., ., excited. you have eight in heaton moor and greater _ excited. you have eight in heaton moor and greater manchester. i excited. you have eight in heaton| moor and greater manchester. we excited. you have eight in heaton i moor and greater manchester. we must
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sa that we moor and greater manchester. we must say that we have — moor and greater manchester. we must say that we have heaton _ moor and greater manchester. we must say that we have heaton chapel, - say that we have heaton chapel, heaton mersey, heaton moor and heaton mersey, heaton moor and heaton norris. if heaton mersey, heaton moor and heaton norris.— heaton norris. if you fancy a walk over the weekend _ heaton norris. if you fancy a walk over the weekend you _ heaton norris. if you fancy a walk over the weekend you could i heaton norris. if you fancy a walk over the weekend you could all. heaton norris. if you fancy a walk i over the weekend you could all eight of those post toppers, a bit of a topper trail. among absolutely. essentially the whole thing is about creating colour, celebration and community. in tasket. you might have some of these around your area. if you do, send your pictures then. it would be brilliant to see them and itjust would be brilliant to see them and it just shows would be brilliant to see them and itjust shows if would be brilliant to see them and it just shows if you would be brilliant to see them and itjust shows if you put would be brilliant to see them and it just shows if you put all that work together you can come up to something like this. have you had any hints and tips about whether you would be able to do this? i'm just not hearing you, sorry. that is perfect because i would not want to answer the question. some tips on how you can do it, let's see.-
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how you can do it, let's see. there are lovely — how you can do it, let's see. there are lovely videos _ how you can do it, let's see. there are lovely videos on _ how you can do it, let's see. there are lovely videos on youtube i how you can do it, let's see. there are lovely videos on youtube if i how you can do it, let's see. there | are lovely videos on youtube if you want to start crocheting and it is easier to crossi these because it is donein easier to crossi these because it is done in circle and netting a straight lines, join your local wi and ask them to teach you how to crochet and look online. if and ask them to teach you how to crochet and look online.— and ask them to teach you how to crochet and look online. if you live locall , crochet and look online. if you live locally. the _ crochet and look online. if you live locally. the last — crochet and look online. if you live locally, the last post _ crochet and look online. if you live locally, the last post if _ crochet and look online. if you live locally, the last post if you - crochet and look online. if you live locally, the last post if you live i locally, the last post if you live locally, the last post if you live locally is half past 11. i want to see some of your pictures, thank you for sending them in. emma sent this crown topper in. this was in ruddington, in nottinghamshire. another royal theme from kate in west wickham.
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this bucket and spade was spotted by jackie on the mumbles, in swansea — the welsh flag gives that away. and he was one themed on univision —— eurovision.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. finland says russia has cut off supplies of natural gas — days after finland announced it was applying to join nato. meanwhile in ukraine, russia intensifies its attacks in the donbas region as its forces capture more territory in the south and east. the senior civil servant, sue gray, met with the prime minister to discuss publishing photos as part of her inquiry into downing street lockdown parties. joe biden discusses security and north korea's nuclear programme with south korea's president in seoul. with south korea's president in seoul. today, president yoon and i committed to strengthening a close engagement and work together to take on challenges to regional security,
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including addressing the threat posed by the democratic people's republic of korea.

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