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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 21, 2022 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. finland says russia has cut off supplies of natural gas — days after finland announced it was applying to join nato. meanwhile in ukraine, russia intensifies its attacks in the donbas region as its forces capture more territory in the south and east. the senior civil servant sue gray met with the prime minister to discuss publishing photos as part of her inquiry into downing street lockdown parties. joe biden discusses security and north korea's nuclear programme with south korea's president in seoul. today, president yoon suk—yeol and i committed to strengthening our close
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engagement and working together to take on challenges of regional security including addressing the threat posed by the democratic people's republic of korea. as monkeypox spreads worldwide, uk doctors say it could have a "massive impact" on access to sexual health services. polls close in parts of australia as two political veterans battle it out for the country's top job. and could this be the first of record—breaking heatwaves across europe? hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. relations were already difficult after finland applied to join nato, prompted by the war in ukraine.
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now moscow has taken action against its neighbour over energy supplies. russia's energy giant, gazprom has switched off gas deliveries — it says finland is refusing to comply with a demand that it pay for energy in roubles. meanwhile, the british foreign secretary has said she wants to see ukraine's neighbour moldova armed with nato—standard military equipment to guard it against potential russian aggression. in ukraine itself, russian forces are intensifying their battle to capture more territory in the eastern donbas region and they've taken complete control of mariupol. with more on the fate of soldiers captured there, here's our correspondent in ukraine, joe inwood. these reports would take the total number who have surrendered and left the steelworks to 1,730. about 80 of those, we understand, are severely wounded who were evacuated, but the rest have been taken to detention facilities in the donetsk people's republic. couple of questions. what happens to them next? we've heard debates in the russian duma, the parliament, saying that some
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of them, the members of the azov battalion, shouldn't be treated as prisoners of war, but should be treated as war criminals. these are people that the russian state accused of being nazis, something which the ukrainians deny and has been widely discredited. but it does seem that not all of them potentially will be treated according to the geneva conventions. that is going to pose difficult questions for anyone who remains inside. i should say, we don't really have confirmed numbers of this, but it has been said that the leaders of the azov battalion are yet to give themselves up. the united nations and the red cross, we understand, have been involved in monitoring their treatment. the situation and the red cross say they are documenting the locations of these people. but what happens to them, whether they are given over in some sort of prisoner exchange with the ukrainians or whether some of them are put on trial for some charges as yet unknown. it's going to be a really, really important question, the answer to which we'll find out
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in the coming days, weeks, months, even elsewhere in the conflict, we have reports of increased shelling in the donbas. this is the eastern region where the ukrainians are holding out or defending in trenches against russian advances. we've got reports of continued ukrainian counter offenses around kharkiv, the city in the north that they've recently repelled the russians from. and finally, reports of ukrainian shells destroying an alcohol factory inside russian territory, killing one man, a van driver. and we are seeing increasingly these instances of the war finding itself onto russian territory, something the people there were not really expecting and don't seem to be particularly comfortable with. as we're reporting, russia's energy giant, gazprom has witched off gas deliveries to finland for refusing to comply with a demand that it pay for energy in roubles. i spoke to amelinda lindberg from the stockholm environment institute she told us how this would affect the cost of living in finland. now the cost of living in finland. we are approaching su
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the now we are approaching summer and the weather is not as cold and our main energy need is coming during the winter season, the gas supply from russia has been mainly channelled into the heavy industry as well as the heating their —— necessity. as we are approaching summer, the demand for heating is obviously going down and that is actually giving a good opportunity for the government to prepare for the next winter, to secure the energy supply for next time, so we don't see much affect our economic impact that we can tell, this has been stated by the finnish government as well. this is mainly because on top of that taming, the energy portfolio of finland has been quite diverse. haw
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energy portfolio of finland has been quite diverse-— quite diverse. how much work has finland already _ quite diverse. how much work has finland already done _ quite diverse. how much work has finland already done prior - quite diverse. how much work has finland already done prior to - quite diverse. how much work has finland already done prior to the l finland already done prior to the war in ukraine, prior to all of this, to diversify where it gets its energy from to increase its energy security? energy from to increase its energy securi ? , . ~ security? yes, correct, i think the diversity of _ security? yes, correct, i think the diversity of the — security? yes, correct, i think the diversity of the energy _ security? yes, correct, i think the diversity of the energy mix - security? yes, correct, i think the diversity of the energy mix to - diversity of the energy mix to portfolio in finland has been quite great since the last decade. i think we can see that for us, finland has been relying on wood fuel from the forests as well as hydropower, as well as nuclear power. i think we can say that only around 20% of the total energy consumption in the 20 20s is coming from fossils. it's the second day ofjoe biden�*s trip to asia — and follwing a meeting with his south korean counterpart, yoon suk—yeol, in seoul, the two leaders have held a joint news conference. they agreed to expand cooperation on a range of issues from regional
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security to supply chains. 0n north korea, they said they would step up measures to deter its nuclear capabilities. they remained open to dialogue with pyongyang. mr biden even said he might be willing to meet the north korean leader. here's more of what president biden had to say. today, president yoon and i committed to strenthening our close engagement to work together to take on challenges of regional security, including addressing the threat posed by the democratic people's republic of korea by further strengthening our deterrence posture and working towards a complete denuclearisation of the korean peninsula. 0ur seoul correspondent jean mackenzie was at that news conference. a huge part ofjoe biden�*s coming to asia was really to see both his allies here in asia and also to china that he was very much committed, the us is very much committed, the us is very much committed to playing a role here. when biden came to office, he may clear age i was going to be the
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cornerstone of his foreign policy and, of course, the war in ukraine has pulled his attention away and this is an attempt to say that his focus is back here on this continent. part of the us strategy now is to try and counter what it sees as a growing chinese dominance here in asia. that means working with its partners like south korea and japan on economic projects, and technological projects. yesterday we had biden go to the enormous samsung semiconductor plant where he committed to investing in the semiconductor industry, this is a key industry here in south korea where china is becoming ever more competitive. but it's more than that, biden wants south korea and south korea has committed itself to playing a bigger role, a geopolitical role, in the region, whether that means standing up to china or speaking out in defence of taiwan or even continuing its support in ukraine. more broadly on
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trade, what is coming out of this trip? biden is due to launch a new trade partnership when he goes to japan later this week and that's looking really at securing these critical supply chains, particularly when it comes to semiconductors, when it comes to semiconductors, when it comes to semiconductors, when it comes to batteries, the things that are seen to key to making sure that america and its partners in asia retain or have a competitive edge against china which is becoming dominant in that field. south korea said it is willing tojoin up dominant in that field. south korea said it is willing to join up this partnership and many others are expected to follow. to australia — where polls have closed in the country's first election since 2019. it sees prime minister scott morrison go up against one of the country's longest serving politicians, labor leader anthony albanese. more than 17 million people were enrolled to vote — which is compulsory for over 18s. either party will need to win at least 76 of the 151 seats in the house of representatives, where the prime minister sits —
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to form a majority government. let's take a closer look at the two main candidates. scott morrison has been the prime minister since 2018. he has been taking credit for adopting a tough closed—borders approach to covid—i9, which helped australia achieve one of the lowest death rates globally. anthony albanese is a long—time politician who has served as a member of parliament for more than two decades. he has promised to improve gender equality in the workforce, to make childcare cheaper, and pledged better pay. climate change is an increasing worry for voters — because australia has recently seen some of its worst—ever bushfires and floods. both parties have committed to net zero emissions by 2050 — whilst at the same time — pledging support to australia's coal mining industry. we were hoping to go live to sydney but we've just lost our guest. hopefully we'll be back with john
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michael roy from the australian financial review. i think we might have him back. i understand some of the very earlier results are starting to trickle in. what can you tell us? each side, the government and labour... its very early days. it will certainly change.- its very early days. it will certainl chance. ., ., ., , certainly change. tom, unfortunately the line to sydney is _ certainly change. tom, unfortunately the line to sydney is really _ certainly change. tom, unfortunately the line to sydney is really bad - certainly change. tom, unfortunately the line to sydney is really bad so - the line to sydney is really bad so we're going to leave that conversation for now and establish a better line. apologies for the sound quality, we will have much more on
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the australian elections for you coming up. here in the uk ,it�*s emerged that sue gray — the civil servant who has been investigating lockdown parties in downing street — met the prime minister to discuss whether she should publish photographs of the events. 0pposition party labour has suggested the meeting could damage confidence in the process and there appears to be a difference of opinion now over who initiated the meeting. 0ur political correspondent jonathan blakejoins me. i think the understanding had been that sue gray requested that meeting so what has happened since we last spoke? so what has happened since we last soke? ., ., , so what has happened since we last soke? . , ., ., spoke? that was the version of events we _ spoke? that was the version of events we were _ spoke? that was the version of events we were given - spoke? that was the version of events we were given by - spoke? that was the version of events we were given by a - spoke? that was the version of l events we were given by a senior downing street source last night saying the meeting happened that sue gray's request to discuss the procedure around her her report would be published. such is the inclusion of photos but not the substance of her findings. we've since heard from sue gray's team and
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they have disputed the account of they have disputed the account of the meeting that was given to us with the prime minister. its own understanding that in a conversation with a senior official in number ten, it was suggested sue gray might offer an object on her work to the prime minister and sue gray accepted that position and requested the meeting formally. that might sound like we're getting into the main —— small issues but the reason that detail is important is because it's hugely sensitive for this to emerge that the prime minister met sue gray and of course borisjohnson is one of the primary people who sue gray will be investigating. he's in charge of number ten and at the top of the organisation in government, under which these events were happening during the pandemic.
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that's why there is huge sensitivity around this meeting and why we've seen a slightly different version of events are —— emerging. but seen a slightly different version of events are -- emerging.— events are -- emerging. but it's about the _ events are -- emerging. but it's about the process _ events are -- emerging. but it's about the process being - events are -- emerging. but it's about the process being done i about the process being done properly and other parties, labour, other parties at westminster will be positioning themselves around this. it's already controversial and know this detail adds concern. opposition arties this detail adds concern. opposition parties have — this detail adds concern. opposition parties have seized _ this detail adds concern. opposition parties have seized on _ this detail adds concern. opposition parties have seized on this - this detail adds concern. opposition| parties have seized on this meeting, suggesting it has happened in secret and that the prime minister needs to urgently explain why it has happened because labour particularly are suggesting that it could undermine public confidence in the process. the liberal democrats are saying any whiff of a stitch up would be disastrous for the independence and authority of the findings of sue gray's report. she's a senior civil servant, a government official herself, working within whitehall but she was appointed order to
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provide and come to a conclusion about the extent and nature of the lawbreaking and rule breaking through the pandemic in number ten. are we assured us we can be that this long—awaited report will finally be published next week? we are, finally be published next week? - are, we understand the individuals who are expected to be named in the report are being contacted and given an opportunity to respond by sunday evening. soon after that, an opportunity to respond by sunday evening. soon afterthat, i an opportunity to respond by sunday evening. soon after that, i think more lately than that, tuesday or wednesday, we will finally see the contents of sue gray's report. the headlines on bbc news: finland says russia has cut off supplies of natural gas — days after finland announced it was applying to join nato. the senior civil servant, sue gray, met with the prime minister to discuss publishing photos as part of her inquiry into downing street lockdown parties. as monkeypox spreads worldwide, uk doctors say it could have a "massive impact" on access to sexual health services.
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british pharmacists are to be given more flexibility so they can deal with shortages of hormone replacement therapy medicines. they'll be given temporary powers to exchange certain hrt drugs without a new prescription. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns has the details. pharmacists have been struggling to get hold of certain hrt medicines. now, they are being given temporary new powers to help make sure women can still control the symptoms of their menopause. normally, if a chemist can't track down medicines on a prescription, the patient has to go back to their gp and ask for something else instead. but now, if they can't find four certain hrt treatments, the pharmacist will be able to offer the patient specific suitable alternatives instead. so, instead of a gel, cream or spray, women could find themselves using a patch instead.
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this is known as a serious shortage protocol. it is a temporary measure to deal with the immediate shortage. the move has been welcomed by the british menopause society and other experts, at least as an answer to the immediate problem. the issue that i have is that this is not a long—term strategy. this is fabulous for a short issue, but longer—term, we need to ensure there's no supply issues when it comes to 0estrogel, 0vestin, lenzetto — these creams or other types of hrts that we commonly prescribe as nhs doctors. the government is dealing with this by learning lessons from the successful vaccines roll—out. it has appointed madelaine mcternan from the vaccines task force as hrt tsar. one issue for her is getting a true sense of how many women are on hrt. nobody knows for certain, but the best estimates are that around 10—40% of menopausal women take it. that number is only expected to rise. drug shortages are notjust for hrt and nothing new.
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pharmacists would like a permanent change in the law allowing more flexibility to deal with these problems in the future. here in the uk, emergency plans are being drawn up to make sure some passenger and freight services can still operate if railway workers go on strike this summer. more than 40,000 members of the rmt union are being balloted in a dispute over pay and jobs. the union claims it could be the "biggest rail strike in modern history". the government says a "fair deal forstaff, passengers and taxpayers" is needed. doctors in the uk say they're worried that monkeypox could have a "massive impact" on access to sexual health services. staff at clinics are having to isolate if they come into contact with anyone who's infected. monkeypox is spread through close contact but isn't usually a sexually transmitted disease. alex sparrowhawk is a member
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of the health improvement team at the terrence higgins trust. most of the recent cases in the uk have been any gay or bisexual men so what is the message that the trust is trying to get out with regards to public health? —— have been in gay or bisexual men. the public health? -- have been in gay or bisexual men.— public health? -- have been in gay or bisexual men. the main symptoms are rashes on — or bisexual men. the main symptoms are rashes on the _ or bisexual men. the main symptoms are rashes on the face _ or bisexual men. the main symptoms are rashes on the face or _ or bisexual men. the main symptoms are rashes on the face or genital - are rashes on the face or genital area and if they find these symptoms, contact a sexual health clinic or iii or the gp via the phone. it's important we are able to triage these cases to lessen the impact on services and people can be assessed and treated appropriately. there are some other symptoms to look out for as well and these include fever, headaches, muscle aches, swollen lymph nodes, so if
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anyone has concerns, to contact for further advice. aha, anyone has concerns, to contact for further advice.— further advice. a bit like in the earlier stages _ further advice. a bit like in the earlier stages of _ further advice. a bit like in the earlier stages of the _ further advice. a bit like in the | earlier stages of the pandemic, people were being advised if you think you might have covid, don't go into a surgery. if you think you have symptoms of monkeypox, don't go into any clinic. before this, how much pressure were staff in sexual health clinics under in terms of the ratios of staff to workload? we know that for the number _ ratios of staff to workload? we know that for the number of _ ratios of staff to workload? we know that for the number of years, - ratios of staff to workload? we know that for the number of years, sexual| that for the number of years, sexual health services have been under pressure. sti rates are increasing in england. we had a slight respite due to the pandemic and less people having six mac, but the general trend is sti is are on the increase and this creates a demand for sexual health services which are not receiving the funding they require
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to run a capacity so these latest developments are a concern. the doctors and nurses are working very hard to mitigate the current situation. we know that staff in those services are wearing appropriate ppe, many are addressing how they contact and receive people in clinics so you might notice changes, you may be set tests to do at home for example, and that so we can handle this current situation. let's return to sydney and the election there — and the political reporter for the australian financial review tom mcilroy. hopefully a better line this time. i was asking you a moment ago about the news of the early results started to trickle in. what can you tell us from those? the
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started to trickle in. what can you tell us from those?— tell us from those? the early results show _ tell us from those? the early results show some _ tell us from those? the early results show some wins - tell us from those? the early results show some wins for l tell us from those? the early - results show some wins for labour, some losses in seats they had expected to keep, as well as the government, and potentially some big losses. we've also seen early progress for independent inner city states challenging members of the government. it looks like we could be contemplating a hung parliament without a working majority for one party. we without a working ma'ority for one -a . ~ , without a working ma'ority for one .a _ . , ., without a working ma'ority for one party. we set out for the viewers previously _ party. we set out for the viewers previously the — party. we set out for the viewers previously the main _ party. we set out for the viewers previously the main points - party. we set out for the viewers previously the main points of- party. we set out for the viewers previously the main points of the campaign from the two big contenders. what is the mood of the voters? what do you think voters in australia have been looking for in a politician in this election? cast australia have been looking for in a politician in this election?— politician in this election? cost of livin: has politician in this election? cost of living has been _ politician in this election? cost of living has been a _ politician in this election? cost of living has been a key _ politician in this election? cost of living has been a key challenge. i living has been a key challenge. inflation is high in australia. wage
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growth has been nonexistent for two years. there is angerfrom the pandemic and i think the dissatisfaction with several politicians in australia is quite real. protest parties could have been driving these results. labour has successfully argued the prime minister can't be trusted. it's a fascinating situation and has led to some pretty angry campaigning. me’ue some pretty angry campaigning. we've been lookin: some pretty angry campaigning. we've been looking over _ some pretty angry campaigning. we've been looking over the _ some pretty angry campaigning. we've been looking over the last _ some pretty angry campaigning. we've been looking over the last couple of days of —— at the issue of the environment and that being a big concern for voters to suggestion that some parts of australia could become uninsurable if people want to live there in the near future. become uninsurable if people want to live there in the nearfuture. to what extent are mr morrison and
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anthony albanese addressing those concerns in their campaigns? me’ue concerns in their campaigns? we've seen elements _ concerns in their campaigns? we've seen elements of— concerns in their campaigns? we've seen elements of it, _ concerns in their campaigns? we've seen elements of it, particularly - seen elements of it, particularly from independent candidates who had been calling for greater climate change plans. australia has had... there is a serious coral bleaching going on in the great barrier reef and bushfires and other natural disasters. this and bushfires and other natural disasters. �* , ., , disasters. as we look at the broader international — disasters. as we look at the broader international picture, _ disasters. as we look at the broader international picture, joe _ disasters. as we look at the broader international picture, joe biden - disasters. as we look at the broader international picture, joe biden is i international picture, joe biden is visiting asia to build on relationships with allies there. depending on who wins this election, what could that mean for relationships with the rest of the world? i relationships with the rest of the world? ., , . ,., world? i would expect some continuity — world? i would expect some continuity in _ world? i would expect some continuity in australian - world? i would expect some i continuity in australian foreign policy. the two parties are quite
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close together but in the immediate, the winner of the election will be on a plane on monday to tokyo for a summit withjoe biden and the leaders of india and japan. the prime minister went to a meeting with austria's most important allies —— would go. scott morrison would welcome the opportunity to meet those leaders again. there isn't much difference in foreign policy between the major parties. in germany, at least a0 people have been injured after a tornado swept through the western city of paderborn on friday. as you can see from these pictures, the high winds uprooted trees, and tore roofs from houses. officials are advising people to stay at home as the stormy weather is set to continue. meteorologists say it was caused by hot air coming from africa meeting relatively cooler air moving
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down from northern europe. an astronaut capsule developed by boeing has successfully docked with the international space station. the company hopes that the starliner�*s test flight will prove to nasa that it can safely transport crews to and from the space station after its first demonstration flight failed in 2019, nearly resulting in the loss of a shuttle. now it's time for a look at the weather with susan powell. hello. rather mixed fare being served up by our weather for this weekend. to the north and west of the uk there will be more cloud around with outbreaks of rain at times. the further south and east you are, the greater your chances of staying dry and seeing some sunshine and that is because of the proximity to this area of high pressure across the continent. and the low pressure towards the north—west will feed on the thickening cloud and the rain through the afternoon
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for western scotland. sometimes across northern ireland, a few showers drifting east into scotland. the odd one i think for northern england and wales as well. southern counties of england and east anglia probably with the clearest skies will get the highest temperatures, up into the low 20s. through the evening and overnight, more persistent rain pushes into western scotland and by the end of the night extending up towards the northern isles. we will see some showery outbreaks heading into the east as well, perhaps some drizzly rain for northern ireland and northern england as well. a mild night, temperatures widely in double figures. and then for sunday daytime, this area of low pressure getting closer to the north of the uk. this high retreating further towards the continent but still having an influence on the far south—east of the uk. east anglia and southern counties of england are looking at a dry day on sunday with some decent spells of sunshine and some warmth. elsewhere, more cloud around and still some rain, particularly targeting western
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scotland. temperatures widely across the northern half of uk, in the mid—teens, for east anglia and the south—east, 21, 22 or maybe even 23. for the south—east of england however, monday could bring the prospect of some heavy, even thundery showers as a low pressure gets close by from the continent. and for the north, we've got a weather front ready to drift south across the uk. so one way or another it looks like rain for the majority of the uk at some stage on monday. likely to be in showery outbreaks. there will be some brighter and sunnier intervals in between times but temperatures edging down somewhat, just 17 in the south—east. we never quite recover those highs of the weekend as we go into the early days of the week ahead. high teens at best, and our weather picture stays pretty unsettled.
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hello this is bbc news, the headlines. finland says russia has cut off supplies of natural gas — days after finland announced it was applying to join nato. meanwhile in ukraine, russia intensifies its attacks in the donbas region as its forces capture more territory in the south and east. the senior civil servant, sue gray, met with the prime minister to discuss publishing photos as part of her inquiry into downing street lockdown parties.

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