Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 21, 2022 12:00pm-12:31pm BST

12:00 pm
this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world: finland says russia has cut off supplies of natural gas — days after finland announced it was applying to join nato. meanwhile in ukraine, russia intensifies its attacks in the donbas region as its forces capture more territory in the south and east. opposition parties demand an explaination from the prime minister after he met with the senior civil servant, sue gray, ahead of the publication of her report into lockdown parties at downing street. joe biden is attending a dinner with south korea's president in seoul. he's there to discuss security and north korea's nuclear programme. as monkeypox spreads worldwide, uk doctors say it could have a "massive impact" on access
12:01 pm
to sexual health services. polls close in parts of australia as two political veterans battle it out for the country's top job. and could this be the first of record breaking heatwaves across europe? hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. to australia, where polls have closed in the country's first election since 2019. it sees prime minister scott morrison go up against one of the country's longest serving politicians, labor leader anthony albanese.
12:02 pm
more than 17 million people were enrolled to vote — which is compulsory for over 18s. either party will need to win at least 76 of the 151 seats in the house of representatives — where the prime minister sits — to form a majority government. let's take a closer look at the two main candidates. scott morrison has been the prime minister since 2018. he has been taking credit for adopting a tough closed—borders approach to covid—19, which helped australia achieve one of the lowest death rates globally. anthony albanese is a long—time politician who has served as a member of parliament for more than two decades. he has promised to improve gender equality in the workforce, to make childcare cheaper, and pledged better pay. climate change is an increasing worry for voters — because australia has recently seen some of its worst ever bushfires and floods. both parties have committed to net zero emissions by 2050, whilst at the same time pledging support to australia's coal mining industry. with me
12:03 pm
is our australia correspondent shaimaa khalil at the opposition labor event. phil mercer at the coalition event, both in sydney. we event, both in sydney. are seeing some reports, it prediction we are seeing some reports, just a prediction at this stage from abc in australia saying that the ruling government might not get enough seats to form a government so what is the mood where you are in the opposition camp? the is the mood where you are in the opposition camp?— is the mood where you are in the opposition camp? the mood here is confident, opposition camp? the mood here is confident. it — opposition camp? the mood here is confident, it is _ opposition camp? the mood here is confident, it is upbeat, _ opposition camp? the mood here is confident, it is upbeat, there - opposition camp? the mood here is confident, it is upbeat, there are i confident, it is upbeat, there are tiers that erupt every now and then, when labor win a seat. it's too close to call the overall picture. you mention the magic number of 76 that a party needs to form a majority government. the abc, the national broadcaster, has now projected the governing coalition will not be able to form a majority government. however, the counting
12:04 pm
continues. it's still very, very close and everybody here is projecting for sure that it's going to be a long night ahead. the story emerging from the counting so far as the support and the hedge way that the support and the hedge way that the independent candidates are getting in this election, we were in a seat close to bondi beach area which has been won by an independent candidate. this was normally a safe government seat. support for government, the liberal coalition, the government party, has been shaken in those areas where independents have been contesting. this is symbolic because what you are seeing in a country where politics for women has been seen as a toxic place, you are seeing these
12:05 pm
mainly female independent candidates challenging male candidates mainly from the government's party, but generally here in labor, they are watching, waiting and liking their chances so far even though it's still too close to call.— chances so far even though it's still too close to call. phil, what are they saying _ still too close to call. phil, what are they saying about _ still too close to call. phil, what are they saying about the - still too close to call. phil, what| are they saying about the results still too close to call. phil, what - are they saying about the results so far on the incumbent camp? i are they saying about the results so far on the incumbent camp?- far on the incumbent camp? i don't think they are _ far on the incumbent camp? i don't think they are expecting _ far on the incumbent camp? i don't think they are expecting another. think they are expecting another coronation from the prime minister scott _ coronation from the prime minister scott morrison. they are hoping that they will, _ scott morrison. they are hoping that they will, the governing liberal nationai— they will, the governing liberal national coalition, be able to strip enough _ national coalition, be able to strip enough seats together perhaps with the independents who crossed that magic— the independents who crossed that magic tine — the independents who crossed that magic line of 76 seats. once again, to reaffirm — magic line of 76 seats. once again, to reaffirm the numbers, australia's lower_ to reaffirm the numbers, australia's lower house — to reaffirm the numbers, australia's lower house of parliament comprises 151 seats _ lower house of parliament comprises 151 seats across this vast nation so
12:06 pm
the magic— 151 seats across this vast nation so the magic number to form a majority governrnent— the magic number to form a majority government is a 76 seats. various projections — government is a 76 seats. various projections from experts here in australia — projections from experts here in australia are suggesting that scott morrison, — australia are suggesting that scott morrison, centre—right coalition, won't _ morrison, centre—right coalition, won't get — morrison, centre—right coalition, won't get anywhere near 76 seats, neither— won't get anywhere near 76 seats, neither will_ won't get anywhere near 76 seats, neither will the labour party, so that brings into play those independents and other minor parties so what _ independents and other minor parties so what this means is that we expect about— so what this means is that we expect about a _ so what this means is that we expect about a third of australian voters to have _ about a third of australian voters to have turned their backs on the two major— to have turned their backs on the two major parties which is why those independents and minor parties appear— independents and minor parties appear to — independents and minor parties appear to be doing so well and i think— appear to be doing so well and i think the — appear to be doing so well and i think the big fear in this room, this is— think the big fear in this room, this is liberal party headquarters i’ilht this is liberal party headquarters right in— this is liberal party headquarters right in the centre of australia's biggest — right in the centre of australia's biggest city, the fear is that this election— biggest city, the fear is that this election has been a referendum on scott _ election has been a referendum on scott morrison. according to opinion polls running up to the election, he has been _
12:07 pm
polls running up to the election, he has been unpopular because of his handling _ has been unpopular because of his handling of natural disasters and the next — handling of natural disasters and the next couple of hours should show us which _ the next couple of hours should show us which direction australia is heading — us which direction australia is heading but the last time there was a hung _ heading but the last time there was a hung parliament in this country was well— a hung parliament in this country was well over a decade ago and that did lead _ was well over a decade ago and that did lead to _ was well over a decade ago and that did lead to some fragile leadership in this— did lead to some fragile leadership in this country so an lot depends now on— in this country so an lot depends now on what happens here in the next few hours _ now on what happens here in the next few hours and quite possibly the next few — few hours and quite possibly the next few days.— next few days. one brief final question. _ next few days. one brief final question. if— next few days. one brief final question, if we _ next few days. one brief final question, if we are _ next few days. one brief final question, if we are talking . next few days. one brief final. question, if we are talking about the realms of coalitions, pacts being made, who do you think those independent candidates would sit comfortably with, mr morrison or with mr anthony albanese? the independent — with mr anthony albanese? tue: independent candidates, with mr anthony albanese? tte: independent candidates, unlike with mr anthony albanese? t“t2 independent candidates, unlike the two major parties, have had climate action, climate policy at the heart of their campaigning. neither of the major parties have come near climate action, especially phasing out
12:08 pm
fossil fuels and i think this is really interesting because it tells australia's story in terms of its environmental perils, the fact this is a country that since the last election has seen one natural disaster after another, the bushfires and the recent catastrophic floods, this is a country at the of climate change but also our country very wedded to fossil fuels still economically and labor have learned a hard lesson that if you campaign heavily on phasing out fossil fuels, that if you campaign heavily on phasing out fossilfuels, you lose the election so they've been steering clear. having said that, i find it very, very hard to picture an independent candidate forming a coalition with the government when they have criticised it so much for not doing enough on climate change so i think with what phil is saying, how close it has become, how unpopular scott morrison is, the
12:09 pm
independent candidates in general may actually hold the balance of power here. it's the second day ofjoe biden's trip to asia — and following a meeting with his south korean counterpart, yoon suk—yeol, in seoul, the two leaders have held a joint news conference. they agreed to expand cooperation on a range of issues from regional security to supply chains. on north korea, they said they would step up measures to deter its nuclear capabilities. they remained open to dialogue with pyongyang, however, and mr biden even said he might be willing to meet the north korean leader. here's more of what president biden had to say. today, president yoon and i committed to strenthening our close engagement to work together to take on challenges of regional security, including addressing the threat posed by the democratic people's republic of korea by further strengthening our deterrence posture and working towards a complete denuclearisation of
12:10 pm
the korean peninsula. our seoul correspondent jean mackenzie was at that news conference. a huge part ofjoe biden's coming to asia was really to see both his allies here in asia and also to china that he was very much committed, the us is very much committed to playing a role here. when biden came to office, he made clear asia was going to be the cornerstone of his foreign policy and, of course, the war in ukraine has pulled his attention away and this is an attempt to say that his focus is back here on this continent. part of the us strategy now is to try and counter what it sees as a growing chinese dominance here in asia. that means working with its partners like south korea and japan on economic projects, on technological projects. yesterday we had biden go to the enormous samsung semiconductor plant where he committed to investing in the semiconductor industry, this is a key industry here in south korea where china
12:11 pm
is becoming ever more competitive. but it's more than that, biden wants south korea — and south korea has committed itself — to playing a bigger role, a geopolitical role, in the region, whether that means standing up to china or speaking out in defence of taiwan or even continuing its support in ukraine. more broadly on trade, what is coming out of this trip? biden is due to launch a new trade partnership when he goes to japan later this week and that's looking really at securing these critical supply chains, particularly when it comes to semiconductors, when it comes to batteries, the things that are seen to key to making sure that america and its partners in asia retain or have a competitive edge against china which is seen as becoming dominant in that field. south korea said it is willing to join up this partnership and many others
12:12 pm
are expected to follow. here in the uk, it's emerged that sue gray — the civil servant who has been investigating lockdown parties in downing street — met the prime minister to discuss whether she should publish photographs of the events. opposition party labour has suggested the meeting could damage confidence in the process and there appears to be a difference of opinion now over who initiated the meeting jonathan blake explained more. the version of events we were given by a senior downing street source last night saying the meeting happened at sue gray's request and was to discuss the procedure around her her report would be published, such as the inclusion of photos but not the substance of her findings. we've since heard from sue gray's team and they have disputed the account of the meeting that was given to us with the prime minister. it's our understanding that
12:13 pm
in a conversation with a senior official in number 10, it was suggested sue gray might offer an object on her work to the prime minister and sue gray accepted that position and requested the meeting formally. that might sound like we're getting into the minutaie but the reason that detail is important is because it's hugely sensitive for this to emerge, that the prime minister met sue gray and, of course, borisjohnson is one of the primary people who sue gray will be investigating. of course, he's in charge of number 10 and at the top of the organisation in government, under which these events were happening during the pandemic. that's why there is huge sensitivity around this meeting and why we've seen this slightly different version of events emerging.
12:14 pm
neither side disputes that it happened or that the substance of her report was not discussed. but it's about the process being done properly and other parties, labour and other parties at westminster will be positioning themselves around this. it's already controversial and now this detail adds concern. opposition parties have seized on this meeting, suggesting it has happened in secret and that the prime minister needs to urgently explain why it has happened because labour particularly are suggesting that it could undermine public confidence in the process. the liberal democrats are saying any whiff of a stitch—up would be disastrous for the independence and authority of the findings of sue gray's report. she's a senior civil servant, a government official herself, working within whitehall, but she was appointed order to provide and come to a conclusion about the extent and nature of the lawbreaking and rule
12:15 pm
breaking throughout the pandemic in number ten and other government buildings. are we assured us we can be that this long—awaited report will finally be published next week? we are, we understand the individuals who are expected to be named in the report are being contacted and given an opportunity to respond by sunday evening. soon after that, i think more lately than that, tuesday or wednesday, we will finally see the contents of sue gray's report. the headlines on bbc news: finland says russia has cut off supplies of natural gas — days after finland announced it was applying to join nato. opposition parties demand an explaination from the prime minister after he met with the senior civil servant, sue gray, ahead of the publication of her report into lockdown parties at downing street. as monkeypox spreads worldwide, uk doctors say it could have a "massive impact" on access to sexual health services. relations were already difficult after finland applied to join nato prompted by the war in ukraine.
12:16 pm
now moscow has taken action against its neighbour over energy supplies. russia's energy giant, gazprom, has switched off gas deliveries — it says finland is refusing to comply with a demand that it pay for energy in roubles. meanwhile, the british foreign secretary has said she wants to see ukraine's neighbour, moldova, armed with nato standard military equipment, to guard it against potential russian aggression. in ukraine itself, russian forces are intensifying their battle to capture more territory in the eastern donbas region — and they've taken complete control of mariupol. with more on the fate of soldiers captured there, here's our correspondent in ukraine, joe inwood. these reports would take the total number who have surrendered and left the azovstal steelworks to 1,730. about 80 of those, we understand, are severely wounded who were evacuated, but the rest have been taken to detention facilities in the donetsk people's republic. couple of questions — what happens to them next?
12:17 pm
we've heard debates in the russian duma, the parliament, saying that some of them, the members of the azov battalion, shouldn't be treated as prisoners of war, but should be treated as war criminals. these are people that the russian state accused of being nazis, something which the ukrainians deny and has been widely discredited. but it does seem that not all of them potentially will be treated according to the geneva conventions. that is going to pose difficult questions for anyone who remains inside. i should say, we don't really have confirmed numbers of this, but it has been said that the leaders of the azov battalion are yet to give themselves up. the united nations and the red cross, we understand, have been involved in monitoring their treatment. the situation and the red cross say they are documenting the locations of these people. but what happens to them, whether they are given over in some sort of prisoner exchange with the ukrainians or whether some of them are put on trial for some charges as yet unknown. it's going to be a really, really important question, the answer to which we'll find out in the coming days,
12:18 pm
weeks, months even. elsewhere in the conflict, we have reports of increased shelling in the donbas. this is the eastern region where the ukrainians are holding out or defending in trenches against russian advances. we've got reports of continued ukrainian counter—offences around kharkiv, the city in the north that they've recently repelled the russians from. and finally, reports of ukrainian shells destroying an alcohol factory inside russian territory, killing one man, a van driver. and we are seeing increasingly these instances of the war finding itself onto russian territory, something the people there were not really expecting and don't seem to be particularly comfortable with. this weekend, parts of spain could reach the highest temperatures recorded for 20 years. the country has been experiencing abnormally hot weather for may, as temperatures climbed to between 10 and 15 degrees celsius above average. the risk of wildfires has now been set at "very high" causing the government to activate
12:19 pm
an emergency plan for excess temperatures. our reporter guy hedgecoe told us how rare this is. i'm ina i'm in a park in central madrid, there is a bit of shade here and it's 26 celsius at the moment which is pretty moderate but it's going to increase, the temperature is going to increase throughout the day into the mid 30s. but it's in the south of the country in andalusia in particular where we are expecting to see extremely high temperatures, possibly hitting the low 40s. those kind of temperatures in southern spain are not that unusual in the summer months. what is extremely unusual list to see those kinds of temperatures at this time of year in mid—may and that, the experts tell us, is almost unprecedented. we very rarely see that and that is the big concern here and why the government has triggered its national plan to try and protect people from the heat and to try and avoid the risk of wildfires as well.
12:20 pm
let's speak to pablo resco sanchez, senior policy advisor at coag which is a national farming union in spain. thank you forjoining us. obviously spain gets very hot but not this hot this early in the year. what impact is this having on farming and agriculture?— is this having on farming and agriculture? is this having on farming and auriculture? . ., . agriculture? thanks for having me. when ou agriculture? thanks for having me. when you want _ agriculture? thanks for having me. when you want to _ agriculture? thanks for having me. when you want to measure - agriculture? thanks for having me. when you want to measure the - agriculture? thanks for having me. . when you want to measure the effects of this heatwave, you have to take into account first the intensity of it, in this case the temperature, the time, the time extension, how long it is going to take, how long it's going to last, and the third and most important... the two factors are more or less clear, it's 15 degrees above normal which is not
12:21 pm
so high because in summer we're used to this of weather, but as your colleague mentioned, we are in may and many plants are in the most sensitive stage. we have identified two main sectors which is the olive sector, trees which are blooming. if you come to spain and you are allergic to all of pollen, they are blooming right now —— olive pollen. this heatwave will damage the flowers, we do not know how much because we are still in the heatwave so we will have to wait, and that will have special consequences because spain is the biggest olive oil producer in the world, around
12:22 pm
40% of the olive oil in the world is produced here. this heatwave may dry the plants or the greens. in this case, we are not alone, france and india are experiencing hot weather as well. india has already partially banned exports. the united states and canada are also experiencing drought periods which will have consequences for their harvests. we don't know yet what will happen with russia and ukraine.— russia and ukraine. picking up on the situation _ russia and ukraine. picking up on the situation with _ russia and ukraine. picking up on the situation with cereals, - russia and ukraine. picking up on the situation with cereals, there l russia and ukraine. picking up on| the situation with cereals, there is uncertainty caused by the war in ukraine so if we add to that the difficulty with the harvest in places like spain, that really is a big issue that people need to be watching out for, isn't it? qt
12:23 pm
watching out for, isn't it? of course. it's watching out for, isn't it? qt course. it's in the news, watching out for, isn't it? t>t course. it's in the news, it's everywhere, food concerns are rising all over the world. government, international institutions and the european commission are very aware and very concerned about what's going to happen in the next months, and the next harvest, because we are talking about food security, we already know what happens from the previous crisis at the beginning of 2011 or 2007, so it's a major issue. if it's going to get hotter more regularly in spain and other countries, what are spanish farmers trying to do to adapt to those changing conditions? thea;r trying to do to adapt to those changing conditions? they are trying to ada t. changing conditions? they are trying to adapt- we — changing conditions? they are trying to adapt. we have _ changing conditions? they are trying to adapt. we have released - to adapt. we have released information about the possible consequences about this heatwave,
12:24 pm
because spain is one of the hotspots considered by the ipcc so especially in our sector we are very concerned of the possible consequences. there was a rise of 2 degrees in 2015 which is more likely now than ever. if we continue on the path of emissions we are currently on, we will see wheat diminished by 40% in yield.
12:25 pm
there is a very competitive system of instruments, horticultural instruments, and irrigation is expanding with some requirements. short uses of water. but it still a problem because it is a moderate warming climate change but if we reach severe conditions, the adaptation may be limited so those are big concerns.— are big concerns. pablo from the national farming _ are big concerns. pablo from the national farming union - are big concerns. pablo from the nationalfarming union in - are big concerns. pablo from the nationalfarming union in spain, j nationalfarming union in spain, thank you very much. an astronaut capsule developed
12:26 pm
by boeing has successfully docked with the international space station. the company hopes that the starliner�*s test flight will prove to nasa that it can safely transport crews to and from the space station after its first demonstration flight failed in 2019 — nearly resulting in the loss of a shuttle. now, in football, rangers will look to finish the season with a trophy when they face hearts in the scottish cup final at hampden park this afternoon let's talk to our sports reporterjoe lynskey who is at the stadium in glasgow. it's a few days after rangers played in the europa league so how are they feeling going into this game? yes. feeling going into this game? yes, welcome to _ feeling going into this game? yes, welcome to hampden, _ feeling going into this game? t2: welcome to hampden, the home of scottish football where we are just over two and a half hours away from this 137 scottish cup final. it's such an interesting one for glasgow rangers, taking on heart of midlothian, the edinburgh club. less
12:27 pm
than 72 hours after rangers played in that europa league final on wednesday night in seville, the blistering temperatures in southern spain, they played all the way through to extra time, eventually losing to eintracht frankfurt in penalties and losing the opportunity to win their first european silverware for 50 years. the question today at hamden, less than three days later, is whether they will be drained and exhausted from that or more determined than ever to bounce back and win some silverware in this season, an important moment for rangers because it could be they finnish losers today and without a trophy for the season which would be disappointing for them. if they win, they finish with some silverware, they've also reached the european final and the manager will have something to build on going forward something to build on going forward so lots to look out for in this match today at hampden. what has
12:28 pm
hearts' match today at hampden. what has hearts' campaign — match today at hampden. what has hearts' campaign so _ match today at hampden. what has hearts' campaign so far _ match today at hampden. what has hearts' campaign so far told - match today at hampden. what has hearts' campaign so far told us - match today at hampden. what has hearts' campaign so far told us how they will play today?— they will play today? hearts at an interesting club, _ they will play today? hearts at an interesting club, they _ they will play today? hearts at an interesting club, they have - they will play today? hearts at an interesting club, they have won i they will play today? hearts at an i interesting club, they have won the scottish cup more recently than rangers, back in 2012. we talk about rangers, back in 2012. we talk about rangers having gone all the way down to the fourth tier of scottish football and back—up, well, hearts have had quite an interesting more recent story of redemption because they were relegated in 2020, the coronavirus season... tannoy speaks over dialogue i always have so much respect for our correspondence trying to talk
12:29 pm
over tannoy announcements! hello. well, the weather serving up quite mixed fare across the uk in the days ahead. this weekend, often a lot of cloud to the north and west of the uk and it will bear some showers. the further south and east you are, the greater your chances of staying dry and seeing some sunshine. this afternoon, cloud thickening for northern ireland and western scotland. some rain here. the odd shower for northern england and western wales. sunshine in the southeast could get us up to 21 degrees in london. through the evening and overnight, more persistent rain sweeping across scotland, particularly the west seeing some heavier downpours and then patchy rain by the end of the night pushing into northern england and west and wales. mild night, temperatures for the majority in double figures. for sunday, again, it's cloud drifting in from the north and west, bearing some showery outbreaks of rain, perhaps something a little bit heavier for the western coast of scotland.
12:30 pm
it looks like southern counties of england, though, and east anglia should remain fine with some

39 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on