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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 21, 2022 3:00pm-3:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines: celebrations for australia's labor party as it wins the country's general election. it means this man, anthony albanese, is set to form the next government though it's not yet clear whether it will be a majority or minority administration. it says that a single mum who was a pensioner who grew up in public housing, can stand before you tonight as australia's prime minister. i tonight as australia's prime minister. ., tonight as australia's prime minister. . ., , tonight as australia's prime minister. . . , minister. i have always believed in australians — minister. i have always believed in australians and _
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minister. i have always believed in australians and their— minister. i have always believed in australians and theirjudgment - minister. i have always believed in | australians and theirjudgment and i've always been prepared to accept their verdicts. we'll have the latest on what this means for australia — and for the world. also this hour... here, opposition parties demand an explaination from borisjohnson, after he met with the senior civil servant, sue gray, ahead of the publication of her report into lockdown parties at downing street. pharmacists have been given temporary power to make swaps to women's hormone replacement therapy prescriptions, amid ongoing shortages. and could this be the first of record breaking heatwaves across europe?
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hello and welcome to bbc news. australia's general election has been won by the labor party. votes are stil being counted but labor does appear to have fallen short of an overall majority — so it's unclear whether the party's leader, anthony albanese, will seek to form a coalition or rule as a minority government. the australian prime minister, scott morrison, has admitted defeat in the country's general election. however, australia's next prime minister, has just delivered his first speech at labor's party headquarters to thunderous applause and cheers — let's have a listen. (tx sot) ibegin by i begin by alleging... i pay respect to their_ i begin by alleging... i pay respect to their elders past, present and emerging — to their elders past, present and emerging and on behalf of the australian labour party...
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i say to my fellow australians, thank— i say to my fellow australians, thank you _ i say to my fellow australians, thank you for this extraordinary honoun — thank you for this extraordinary honour. tonight the australian people — honour. tonight the australian people have voted for change. i am humbled _ people have voted for change. i am humbled by this fake today and i am honoured _ humbled by this fake today and i am honoured to be given the opportunity to service _ honoured to be given the opportunity to service the 31st by minister of australia — to service the 31st by minister of australia. my labour team will work every _ australia. my labour team will work every day _ australia. my labour team will work every day to bring australians together— every day to bring australians together and i will lead a government where of the people of australia _ government where of the people of australia i— government where of the people of australia. i government as courageous and hard—working and caring _ courageous and hard—working and caring as — courageous and hard—working and caring as the australian people are
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themselves. earliertonight, scott themselves. earlier tonight, scott morrison — themselves. earliertonight, scott morrison called me to congratulate myself _ morrison called me to congratulate myself and the labour party on our victory— myself and the labour party on our victory at _ myself and the labour party on our victory at the election. scots very graciously— victory at the election. scots very graciously wished me well and i thank— graciously wished me well and i thank him — graciously wished me well and i thank him for that and i wish him well _ thank him for that and i wish him well and — thank him for that and i wish him well and i— thank him for that and i wish him well. and i thank him for this service — well. and i thank him for this service that he has given to our country— service that he has given to our country as— service that he has given to our country as prime minister. i also want _ country as prime minister. i also want to— country as prime minister. i also want to acknowledge and thankjenny morrison _ want to acknowledge and thankjenny morrison and their two daughters for their contribution and sacrifice as well _ their contribution and sacrifice as well my— their contribution and sacrifice as well. my fellow australians, it says a lot about — well. my fellow australians, it says a lot about our great country that is son— a lot about our great country that is son of— a lot about our great country that is son of a — a lot about our great country that is son of a single mum who has a disability— is son of a single mum who has a disability pensioner, who grew up in public— disability pensioner, who grew up in public housing down the road... can
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stand _ public housing down the road... can stand before — public housing down the road... can stand before you tonight as australia's prime minister. i know it's been a long night. but if we _ i know it's been a long night. but if we can— i know it's been a long night. but if we can dial it down a little bit. every— if we can dial it down a little bit. every parent wants more for the next generation— every parent wants more for the next generation than they had. my mother dreamt _ generation than they had. my mother dreamt of— generation than they had. my mother dreamt of a _ generation than they had. my mother dreamt of a better life for me and i hope _ dreamt of a better life for me and i hope that_ dreamt of a better life for me and i hope that myjourney in life inspires— hope that myjourney in life inspires australians to reach for the stars — inspires australians to reach for the stars i_ inspires australians to reach for the stars. i want australia to continue _ the stars. i want australia to continue to be a country that no matter— continue to be a country that no matter where you live, who you worship, — matter where you live, who you worship, do you love or what your
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last name — worship, do you love or what your last name is, _ worship, do you love or what your last name is, that places no restrictions on yourjourney in life _ restrictions on yourjourney in life my— restrictions on yourjourney in life. my fellow australians, i think they have — life. my fellow australians, i think they have got the name by now. i think— they have got the name by now. i think they— they have got the name by now. i think they have got that. i know at the beginning of the campaign they said people did not know me, but i reckon— said people did not know me, but i reckon they— said people did not know me, but i reckon they have got it. down. no. can we _ reckon they have got it. down. no. can we have — reckon they have got it. down. no. can we have order, please! can we have _ can we have order, please! can we have a _ can we have order, please! can we have a bit— can we have order, please! can we have a bit of— can we have order, please! can we have a bit of order? i intend to run an orderly— have a bit of order? i intend to run an orderly government and it starts here, _ an orderly government and it starts here, so— an orderly government and it starts here, so behave! during this campaign _ here, so behave! during this campaign i have put forward a
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positive, _ campaign i have put forward a positive, clear plan for a better future — positive, clear plan for a better future for — positive, clear plan for a better future for our country. and i have shared _ future for our country. and i have shared the — future for our country. and i have shared the two principles that will drive _ shared the two principles that will drive a _ shared the two principles that will drive a government that i lead. no one left— drive a government that i lead. no one left behind, because we should always— one left behind, because we should always look after the disadvantaged and vulnerable. but also no one held back, _ and vulnerable. but also no one held back, of— and vulnerable. but also no one held back, of course we should always support _ back, of course we should always support aspiration and opportunity. that is— support aspiration and opportunity. that is what my government will do. that is what my government will do. that is— that is what my government will do. that is what. — that is what my government will do. that is what, but the how isjust that is what my government will do. that is what, but the how is just as important — that is what, but the how is just as important. because i want to bring australians — important. because i want to bring australians together. i want to seek our common purpose and promote unity and optimism, not fear and division. it is and optimism, not fear and division. it is what _ and optimism, not fear and division. it is what i _ and optimism, not fear and division. it is what i have sought to do throughout my little life and what i will bring _ throughout my little life and what i will bring to the leadership of our
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country — will bring to the leadership of our country it— will bring to the leadership of our country. it is a show of strength to collaborate — country. it is a show of strength to collaborate and work with people, not weakness. i want to find that common— not weakness. i want to find that common ground, where together, we can plant— common ground, where together, we can plant our— common ground, where together, we can plant our dreams. to unite around — can plant our dreams. to unite around a — can plant our dreams. to unite around a shared love of this country. _ around a shared love of this country, our shared faith in australia's future, our shared values — australia's future, our shared values of— australia's future, our shared values of fairness and opportunity and hard — values of fairness and opportunity and hard work and kindness to those in need _ and i can promise all australians this, _ and i can promise all australians this, no— and i can promise all australians this, no matter how you voted today, the government i lead will respect every— the government i lead will respect every one — the government i lead will respect every one of you, every day. and i will seek— every one of you, every day. and i will seek to — every one of you, every day. and i will seek to get your vote next
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time — will seek to get your vote next time we _ will seek to get your vote next time. we are the greatest country on earth _ time. we are the greatest country on earth but— time. we are the greatest country on earth. but we can have an even better— earth. but we can have an even better future if we seize the opportunities that are right there in front— opportunities that are right there in front of— opportunities that are right there in front of us. the opportunity to shape _ in front of us. the opportunity to shape change rather than be shape by it. shape change rather than be shape by it and _ shape change rather than be shape by it and we _ shape change rather than be shape by it. and we can shape change more effectively — it. and we can shape change more effectively if we seek to unite people — effectively if we seek to unite people on that journey of change. together. — people on that journey of change. together, we can end the climate wars~ _ australia's first prime minister there, anthony albanese. since the declaration was made that he won the australian elections. australia's outgoing prime minister, scott morrison, offered this concession. and so on a night like tonight, it is proper to acknowledge
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the functioning of our democracy. i have always believed in australians and theirjudgment and i have always been prepared to accept their verdicts. and tonight, they have delivered their verdict and i congratulate anthony albanese and the labor party and i wish him and his government all the very best. tom mcilroy, political reporterfor the australian financial review in sydney sent us this update from the labor event. it's looking like labor could get there to form a majority government, they are still a few seats short, although the momentum is very much with anthony albanese. there is little prospect of a formal coalition involving a labor government. both sides during the election campaign completely ruled out forming deals with the minor parties or independents. more likely is a governing agreement that would seek cooperation to pass a budget bills and keep
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the parliament moving shaimaa khalil has the latest reaction from sydney. labor could well be in, are in in some form or another. anthony albanese is the next prime minister and he will be forming a government of some sort. we do not know if it will be a majority or minority government where he has to form a coalition. the likely allies are going to be those teal independents we have been hearing about, mainly women candidates that have defeated and ousted male government candidates in supposedly and traditionallly safe government seats. they are the big story to come out of this election. scott morrison hasjust conceded this election, he said it was a humbling night and he has accepted australia's verdict. but here, this is a jubilant night. it is a hopeful night and many have been telling me they were waiting for this day for nine years now. but there is going to be change that needs to happen.
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many here are saying climate is a big issue for them and that the government, the previous government now we can call it, just hasn't done enough. labor have been quite silent at climate action during their campaigning but i think now that they are in a position to form a government, you will see they will be talking more freely about it. we will actually find out what plans they have, especially if they will team up with teal candidates who will put climate action at the heart of their policies. we are expecting anthony albanese the new prime minister to come in any moment. if he does, we will turn to him. he has urged australians throughout the campaign that now is time for a change. the people have listened, now he has to deliver. there needs to be a change in climate policies but there it needs to be a change in australian politics itself especially when it comes to women. it is very symbolic how well
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the female independent candidates have done and it is symbolic they have defeated male candidates in a country where politics is seen as a toxic environment for women. so i think we won't only see political change, but i think you'll start to see hopefully a change in the environment of politics and how it is done here in australia. the new prime minister has come out and address the crowds. that is anthony albanese. opposition parties are demanding that the prime minister explains a meeting with the senior civil servant sue gray over her report into parties held in downing street during lockdown. it's emerged the pair met several weeks ago — but there are conflicting accounts of what was discussed. i asked our political correspondent
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jonathan blake about what we know about this meeting. last night, downing street confirmed this meeting had taken place, and we were told by a senior source in number 10 that it was arranged at the request of sue gray and it was called to discuss practical and process issues, such as whether photographs would be published as evidence when her report is published in the coming days, as we expect. a spokesman for the sue gray investigation has disputed that account and it seems as far as that side is concerned, photographs were not discussed and that a senior official in number 10 initially suggested that sue gray might like to update the prime minister on the progress of her report. she then later formally requested the meeting. now this matters because there is huge sensitivity around borisjohnson meeting in private the senior civil servant tasked
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with investigating him and all those working under him in downing street and across whitehall in government, for breaking lockdown rules during the pandemic. there is a lot riding on this report, not least boris johnson's authority and some would say his position as prime minister, so it needs to be seen to be as independent as possible. downing street are stressing that today, the prime minister did not request the meeting and he has not tried to influence the process in anyway and it is rightly for sue gray to decide that it is all done independently. they are at pains to try and stop any suggestions that sue gray was summoned to meet the prime minister or that he or anyone else in number 10 is trying to influence this report. that is also why there are calls from opposition parties for an explanation. despite all of that, the confusion, the report is still expected to be released as billed or question marks over that?
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no, we are as sure us we can be it is expected in the next few days. those who are expected to be named in the report have been contacted and given a chance to respond or take issue with what has been said about them and their conduct in the report, they have a deadline of five o'clock on sunday evening to do that. once that passes, it is up to sue gray and her team to publish the report. but we are expecting it beofre the end of next week. depending on what is in the report, what are the likely consequences, the outcomes of sue gray's report? it depends on what is in it as you suggest. we know from her draft findings that she has identified failures of leadership and judgment in downing street and the events that happened should not have been allowed to happen in the way that they did and to the extent that they did. as she put it in her draft findings
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that was published injanuary. we have had since then the met police investigation which has issued dozens and dozens of fines, and only one for the prime minister himself, and that has taken some of the heat out of sue gray will publish in her report. but there will be detail in there and it will be uncomfortable reading at the very least for boris johnson and others in government. how damning it is? we willjust have to see what it comes out west but there is political pressure on borisjohnson, is it there with the intensity back when these revelations first came out and sue gray was first tasked with compiling this report? perhaps not. of course, sir keir starmer now facing a police investigation over his own conduct during lockdown. so, that is all context to be borne in mind when we see the outcome of this report in the coming days. the headlines on bbc news... celebrations for australia's labor party as it wins the country's general election.
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here, opposition parties demand an explaination from borisjohnson, after he met with the senior civil servant, sue gray, ahead at downing street. pharmacists have been given temporary power to make swaps to women's hormone replacement therapy prescriptions, amid ongoing shortages. turning to the war in ukraine now, and russian troops are intensifying their attacks in the country's eastern donbas region. the uk's foreign secretary liz truss has said she wants modern weapons to be sent to moldova to prevent it being attacked by russian forces. the country lies on the border with ukraine and there are concerns it could become russia's next target. ms truss said that vladimir putin had been "clear" about his ambitions to create a greater russia, and moldova's security was at risk as a result.
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richard galpin reports. the russian armed forces and now intensifying attacks in the eastern donbas region of ukraine. and they've made advances after heavy bombardment of ukrainian positions. and now there are concerns the russians could turn their attention to another country, moldova, which used to be part of the soviet union. it's not a member of nato, so isn't protected from russian aggression. it lies between romania and ukraine, and within it is the russian backed separatist region of transnistria. a month ago, there was a series of explosions in the area raising concerns the war could widen. today the british foreign secretary liz truss made clear there is a serious threat where she says russia are trying to restore what is described as greater russia. in another move indicating how far russia will go
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in destabilising countries, it has now been revealed that moscow has cut gas supplies to finland, the country, one of several, now hoping tojoin nato. meanwhile, president biden currently on a visit to south korea has spoken of the need for a global response to the war, started by the kremlin. putin's war against ukraine isn't just a matter for europe, it's an attack on democracy and the core international principles of sovereignty and territorial integrity. and the republic of korea and the united states of america are standing together, part of a global response with our allies and partners around the world. this morning, moscow announced that president biden, us secretary of state blinken and cia chief william burns, have all been banned from entering russia. richard galpin, bbc news.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre, here's olly. a lot of action taking place in scotland? we're about fifteen minutes into the the scottish cup final between rangers and hearts at hampden park. rangers have made 5 changes to the side that lost to eintracht frankfurt in the europa league final on wednesday night. a lot of questions about how rangers would respond after that defeat on wednesday. it is goalless at the moment in hampden.
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there's also a big match at wembley, the first of the play—off finals. league one sunderland or wycombe wanderers will make it into the championship... 20 minutes gone, it's 1—0 to sunderland, elliot embleton with the goal. sunderland were a premier league side five years ago, but had back to back relegations. wycombe only dropped out of the championship last season. the second diamond league atheltics event of the year is underway at the new alexander stadium in birmingham — which will be used at this summers commonwealth games. and one of britain's brightest hopes at those games, dina asher—smith won the women's 100 meters — beating shericka jackson by a hundreth of a second! daryll neeta was third. no elaine thompson—herah, the olympic champion pulled out as a precaution after feeling some discomfort in training. this is my first hundred of the
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season, it is a long season. and it was good, it was a strong field. i could have done a few things differently if i was picky but you know the first one is a bit... i am very happy with that time and happy to win in this temperature and this field as well. it is good. britain's laura muir opened her season with victory in the women's isoom, holding off australian jessica hull in second. fellow britjemma reekie finished in fifth. lam iamso i am so happy. couldn't wish for more. _ i am so happy. couldn't wish for more. my— i am so happy. couldn't wish for more, my first race on uk soil this summer~ — more, my first race on uk soil this summer~ i— more, my first race on uk soil this summer. i am more, my first race on uk soil this summer. lam happy more, my first race on uk soil this summer. i am happy i am here. more, my first race on uk soil this summer. lam happy i am here. i summer. iam happy i am here. i didn't— summer. iam happy i am here. i didn't think— summer. lam happy i am here. i didntthinki— summer. lam happy i am here. i didn't think i would be here. then training _ didn't think i would be here. then training since january. cannot afford — training since january. cannot afford to— training since january. cannot afford to taper right now with the summer— afford to taper right now with the summer ahead. afford to taper right now with the summerahead. not 100% afford to taper right now with the summer ahead. not 100% quite yet but i am happy _ in the men's
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ioom, canada's aaron brown took victory in. yohan blake finished second and jerome blake third. nethaneel mitchell—blake was the highest finishing brit in fifth. trayvon bromell and zarnell hughes were both disqualified for false starts. and british world record holder sophie hahn triumphed in the t38100m race. in rugby league's superleague hull kr were beaten 20 points to 8 by catalans dragons. the french side scored 3 tries to just the one for the robins at craven park. their third came from the club's top try scorer fouad yaha. hull kr have lost their last four games. rory mcilroy says he's still in contention at the us pga championship despite slipping from the top of the leaderboard. he's fifth at the halfway stage, five strokes behind the american will zalatoris. he fired a bogey—free round of 65 to lead the second mens major of the year on 9 under par.
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play is underway, but the leaders won't resume until this evening. still and hearts in the scottish cup final. another date for you in the next hour. premier league clubs could face a ban on having gambling sponsors on their shirts after the proposal was included in a draft white paper according to bbc sport's sources. half of the premier league's 20 teams have betting firms on their shirts, with the government set to update gambling laws next month. let's get more now from kieran maguire who's a specialist in sports finance at liverpool university. thank you forjoining us this afternoon on bbc news. how much with this cost them? this
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afternoon on bbc news. how much with this cost them?— this cost them? as far as the football clubs _ this cost them? as far as the football clubs are _ this cost them? as far as the j football clubs are concerned, this cost them? as far as the | football clubs are concerned, i think you are normally looking at a deal worth 8 million — £9 million in the premier league, ian addition the efl which covers the second, third and fourth years, they are covered by sky bet. clubs in the championship, where we intend to see a significant number of gambling companies, they are earning around half a million to £750,000 a year from front of shirt deals. what half a million to £750,000 a year from front of shirt deals. what do ou make from front of shirt deals. what do you make of _ from front of shirt deals. what do you make of this _ from front of shirt deals. what do you make of this policy? - from front of shirt deals. what do you make of this policy? if - from front of shirt deals. what do you make of this policy? if you i from front of shirt deals. what do | you make of this policy? if you talk to commercial _ you make of this policy? if you talk to commercial directors _ you make of this policy? if you talk to commercial directors of- you make of this policy? if you talk to commercial directors of premierj to commercial directors of premier league clubs, they admit the gambling industry is not the only deal in town that tends to be the one that is paying the best. if only front of shirt sponsorship is ceased, then i don't think the large gambling companies in the uk will be too distressed. if we take a look at
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william hill, coral, they do not finance individual clubs. can it be stopped in conjunction with advertising, that is where the major amounts of money paid by the gambling industry itself. in amounts of money paid by the gambling industry itself. in terms of a shirt, gambling industry itself. in terms of a shirt. and — gambling industry itself. in terms of a shirt, and a _ gambling industry itself. in terms of a shirt, and a brand _ gambling industry itself. in terms of a shirt, and a brand splashed l of a shirt, and a brand splashed across a football shirt, does that p? it across a football shirt, does that p? , ,., , across a football shirt, does that p? , , , ., , p? it must pay because otherwise the auamblin p? it must pay because otherwise the gambling companies _ p? it must pay because otherwise the gambling companies would _ p? it must pay because otherwise the gambling companies would not - p? it must pay because otherwise the gambling companies would not do - p? it must pay because otherwise the gambling companies would not do it. | gambling companies would not do it. the use plenty of algorithms. what they are seeking is normalisation of they are seeking is normalisation of the gambling industry, trying to legitimise the industry in terms of association with football which is seen as a healthy activity. it has certainly been very successful in the premier league in particular as far as the gambling industry is concerned. to give it sums gail, if we go back last year and take one of
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the largest gambling companies, it total revenues were from wages were £65 billion. that compares to £5 billion being generated by their premier league itself. one company is 13 times larger than the premier league. is 13 times larger than the premier leaaue. ,, , , , ., league. shirts, is this the easy our soft option- — league. shirts, is this the easy our soft option. what _ league. shirts, is this the easy our soft option. what about _ league. shirts, is this the easy our soft option. what about league - soft option. what about league sponsorship, what about club partnerships, could we see a band going that far? i partnerships, could we see a band going that far?— going that far? i think that if it is auoin going that far? i think that if it is going to _ going that far? i think that if it is going to be _ going that far? i think that if it is going to be front _ going that far? i think that if it is going to be front of- going that far? i think that if it is going to be front of shirt - is going to be front of shirt sponsorship that would go hand in hand with an encouragement or a prohibition of league sponsorship because what is the point in referring to the efl as the sky bet championship if you cannot have individual names of other gambling companies france of shirts. i think it would have be part of a comprehensive review and addressing theissues comprehensive review and addressing the issues in relation to gambling and its collateral impact as far as
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football is concerned.— football is concerned. thank you very much- _ this weekend, parts of spain could reach the highest temperatures recorded for 20 years. the country has been experiencing abnormally hot weather for may, as temperatures climbed to betwen ten and 15 degrees celsius above average. the risk of wildfires has now been set at "very high" causing the government to activate an emergency plan for excess temperatures. steven keates, is a meteorologist at the met office. thank you for speaking to as here as bbc news. how significant is the weather we are seeing right now in spain? weather we are seeing right now in sain? , ., ., weather we are seeing right now in sain? ., , spain? good afternoon. pretty significant _ spain? good afternoon. pretty significant it _ spain? good afternoon. pretty significant it has _ spain? good afternoon. pretty significant it has to _ spain? good afternoon. pretty significant it has to be - spain? good afternoon. pretty significant it has to be said. in| significant it has to be said. in these temperatures if they occur in july, they would not make the headline. but to get it in mid—may
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is pretty unusual. looking at temperatures yesterday, reached 42.3 degrees. it is shy of... high temperatures and very warm overnight as well compared to daytime temperatures. hot day and warm nights and as you say you end up with some wildfires as well. flan nights and as you say you end up with some wildfires as well. can we look ahead to _ with some wildfires as well. can we look ahead to what _ with some wildfires as well. can we look ahead to what this _ with some wildfires as well. can we look ahead to what this will - with some wildfires as well. can we look ahead to what this will mean l look ahead to what this will mean for the rest of the summer season? we cannot predict that far in advance based on one event. if we get this sort of temperature at this time of year, injuly and august when temperatures can go into the middle or upper 40s in parts of southern europe including inland spain, certainly be aware that those temperatures are possible to get again. temperatures are possible to get aaain. ~ ., , , temperatures are possible to get aaain. ~ . , , , temperatures are possible to get auain.~ . , , , again. what is this telling us about our weather _ again. what is this telling us about our weather patterns, _ again. what is this telling us about our weather patterns, there - again. what is this telling us about our weather patterns, there are i again. what is this telling us about our weather patterns, there are a l our weather patterns, there are a number of global circulation
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patterns that drives our weather. because this is

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