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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 22, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak with the latest headlines. deadline day for the report into lockdown breaches in downing street — those named have until 5pm to respond ahead of its long—awaited publication. the ukrainian government says it won't agree to a ceasefire with russia, that involves giving up territory in an apparent hardening of its position. energy company, eon, is warning that unless the government intervenes the number of its customers in fuel poverty could reach 40% by the autumn — ministers say they're looking at all options. it's a very, very significant impact and that's why we've called upon the government to take more action. we do know nned more intervention in october and it has to be very substantial. the annual world health assembly will discuss a rare outbreak of monkeypox when it
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convenes in geneva later. the premier league title race between manchester city and liverpool will be decided today. manchester city play aston villa, liverpool play wolves. good afternoon. the education secretary nadhim zahawi says he doesn't believe boris johnson's meeting with the senior civil servant preparing to publish the �*partygate�* report this week will have had any influence on what's in it. there is still confusion as to who called the meeting between the prime minister and sue gray — said to have taken place last month. she's given civil servants she wants to name in her report until 5pm
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today to respond if they object. our political correspondentjonathan blake has the latest. borisjohnson, the prime minister whose political fate could rest on the findings of a report by the senior civil servant sue gray. weeks ago, the two held a meeting — who called it, what was discussed depends on who you ask. one cabinet minister says the row does not matter — sue gray has complete control over her inquiry and the prime minister would never interfere. i do not know why they had that meeting. all i can say is i do not believe it is material to the outcome of the investigation. let me tell you why. the prime minister always said sue gray can take the report whenever the evidence takes her. sue gray is doing this independently. more than 500 photos have been gathered as evidence by sue gray's team investigating how widely rules were broken on boris johnson's watch.
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some argue it all should be published to show the public inquiry has done itsjob. sue gray makes that decision, sue gray has complete control over this. i've not seen the report. she will publish that report... but you would welcome it? absolutely. it's the right thing to do. labour are leading calls for all evidence to be put out in the open. sir keir starmer is under police investigation himself for possibly breaking lockdown laws, but his supporters say it cannot be compared to what went on in whitehall. the statement he made the other week showed real integrity and leadership. he is a former director of public prosecutions, he takes adherence to the law extremely seriously and if you contrast that to the culture that has been exposed both by what the met has uncovered and what we're likely to see in sue gray's report, you see the culture comes from the top.
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the most senior civil servant — cabinet secretary simon case, had to step back from leading the government inquiry after reports of a christmas party in his office. officials expected to be named in the report have until this evening to challenge its findings, which could delay its publication. if not, it will be released for all to see within days. jonathan blake, bbc news. our political correspondent jonathan blakejoins me now. what jonathan blakejoins me now. everyone is watching moment what everyone is watching at the moment is this five o'clock deadline, what will happen next? officials expected to be named in the report, there are various numbers floating around, from 30 to anywhere upwards or downwards from there, have been given until five o'clock to respond and object if they see fit to the findings relating to them. if there are any
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objections that could hold up the publication process and definitely, because there may be a legal challenge. if not, it will be finalised and published in the coming days. we expect more likely tuesday or wednesday. and that will be then the end of a very long process and the publication of what was intended to be the official, internal government verdict on what has become known as the partygate saga. there are some unknowns about how much evidence will be republished. there is something close to 500 photos and they will be other evidence as well, message exchanges, e—mail chains, how much of that will be in the end labour said it all needs to be published in the report for people to have confidence in this process. there is the detail and the findings themselves. just how damning will they be? it will be uncomfortable reading for the prime minister and
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others given what sue gray said when her draft report was published earlier in the year, failures and leadership and judgment. but the level of detail laid bare in this report when it comes, will be crucialfor report when it comes, will be crucial for borisjohnson. report when it comes, will be crucialfor borisjohnson. i5 report when it comes, will be crucial for boris johnson. is there an investigation _ crucial for boris johnson. is there an investigation coming - crucial for boris johnson. is there an investigation coming off - crucial for boris johnson. is there an investigation coming off the l crucial for boris johnson. is there i an investigation coming off the back of this and is dependent on the findings of the report? it is an investigation by the house of privileges committee? the investigation by the house of privileges committee? the sue gray re ort will privileges committee? the sue gray report will be _ privileges committee? the sue gray report will be important, _ privileges committee? the sue gray report will be important, but - privileges committee? the sue gray report will be important, but it - report will be important, but it will not be the last word on this. the privilege committee made up of a group of cross—party mps will be investigating whether borisjohnson knowingly misled the house of commons, when he said all the rules had been followed, no rules had been broken in downing street throughout. that, if you like, is the ultimate test for the prime minister. because it is in the ministerial code, the rules in which government ministers have to abide by. if they have
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knowingly lied to parliament, they will be expected to resign and that will be expected to resign and that will be expected to resign and that will be something very difficult for borisjohnson who has survived all of the criticism that has come his way so far, partygate, getting a fixed penalty notice, that will be the ultimate test for him. mps in his party, both his critics and supporters concede if that were found to be the case, he wouldn't have any other option.— have any other option. labour are sa in: we have any other option. labour are saying we want — have any other option. labour are saying we want to _ have any other option. labour are saying we want to see _ have any other option. labour are saying we want to see all- have any other option. labour are saying we want to see all the - saying we want to see all the evidence, looking at that very quickly, there have been reports that sue gray, who has had a tough time getting hold of the evidence, in terms of the level of cooperation from the witnesses as well, have you had a feeling of how difficult those challenges have been for her? he: remit has been pretty challenges have been for her? h2 remit has been pretty much wide really. she has been given broad terms of reference for this inquiry and has been able to, it seems, speak to whoever she has needed to
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and had access to, what she has needed to reach the conclusions in her report. there may, when it comes some conclusions in their which suggests it's been difficult to get to the bottom of what happened and when. some of the people she will have been investigating may have left their post in the duration of this inquiry, or left previously, so that could complicate things as well. but certainly, there has been a huge amount for her and her team to sift through. a huge amount for her and her team to sift through-— to sift through. jonathan blake, thank ou to sift through. jonathan blake, thank you very _ to sift through. jonathan blake, thank you very much _ to sift through. jonathan blake, thank you very much indeed, i to sift through. jonathan blake, . thank you very much indeed, thank you. you are watching bbc news. the ukrainian government says it won't agree to any ceasefire or peace deal with moscow, that would involve giving up terrority. a senior adviser to president zelensky says making any concessions would backfire, because russia would only escalate attacks in the future. joe inwood is in kyiv. just take us through what has been
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said and the likelihood of a diplomatic resolution to all of this? , ., ., , diplomatic resolution to all of this? ., ., this? everyone has always said that di - loma this? everyone has always said that diplomacy is _ this? everyone has always said that diplomacy is the — this? everyone has always said that diplomacy is the eventual _ this? everyone has always said that diplomacy is the eventual way - this? everyone has always said that diplomacy is the eventual way out | this? everyone has always said that| diplomacy is the eventual way out of this conflict. but what we are hearing more and more, and in a way, this shouldn't be surprising, is that all sides think that is a long way off, we're not going to get any diplomatic solution until both sides can find common ground and given the distance between them, i think sides now accept there is a lot of fighting to take place before negotiations can begin. at the moment, that fighting is concentrated in the eastern region known as the donbas. explosion. in the donbas, diplomacy feels a distant prospect. russian forces are advancing towards the strategic city of severodonetsk, trying to encircle the ukrainian defenders. heavy artillery and overwhelming force which eventually won them the ruins of mariupol, still their tactic. a senior adviser to ukraine's president says only force of arms will end this conflict.
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translation: russia sells nothing but war. | it's only interested in expansion. today, it attacks ukraine. tomorrow it could attack any other country on the perimeter — georgia, moldova and so on. there is no otherformula but to subdue russia today through an end to the war on ukraine's terms. but for the last few days at least, it is the russians who've been getting their way. in the south of the country, the occupation administration there was keen to show off the hydropower dam they now control. and water has played a role in the build up to this conflict. for eight years, the annexed crimean peninsula was denied an important supply of it. russia's invasion has got it flowing again. translation: the north crimea canal, the part of it that supplies _ water to crimea has been
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blocked for years. but since the beginning of march we've been supplying water to crimea. here in the capital, despite russian gains on the battlefield, the mood remains defiant. now, that is in no small part due to the horrors that have emerged from areas retaken from the russians. places like irpin, where two thirds of buildings were destroyed. or moshun, once a village, now a wasteland. back in the donbass, even amid the horror, people seem to find a moment to reflect and maybe pray for a peace that seems as far away as ever. and in the last couple of hours we have heard the parliament here has approved an extra 90 days of martial law, that's the rules and
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regulations it this country has been run by for the duration of this conflict. that represents the feelings in ukraine about how this is going. i think most people would expect this to be lasting a lot longer than 90 days. we are going to need to wait until one side has an overwhelming, decisive advantage on the battlefield before a negotiated settlement comes about. i think both sides feel that could be them that has the advantage, but i don't think it will be any time soon. jae has the advantage, but i don't think it will be any time soon.— it will be any time soon. joe inwood in k iv, it will be any time soon. joe inwood in kyiv. thank— it will be any time soon. joe inwood in kyiv, thank you _ it will be any time soon. joe inwood in kyiv, thank you very _ it will be any time soon. joe inwood in kyiv, thank you very much. - the boss of one of the uk's biggest energy companies, e.on, has called on the government to take "very substantial action" to help households struggling with bills — after revealing that 20 % of its customers are now in fuel poverty. michael lewis told the bbc�*s sunday morning programme recent price increases had led toi million
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of the firms accounts being in arrears. this is unprecedented. in my 30 years in the energy industry and have never seen prices increase at this rate. i5 have never seen prices increase at this rate. , ., ., ,, ., this rate. is it all about russia and ukraine? _ this rate. is it all about russia and ukraine? it— this rate. is it all about russia and ukraine? it is— this rate. is it all about russia i and ukraine? it is predominantly about that, _ and ukraine? it is predominantly about that, yes. _ and ukraine? it is predominantly about that, yes. gas _ and ukraine? it is predominantly about that, yes. gas price i and ukraine? it is predominantly about that, yes. gas price has i and ukraine? it is predominantly. about that, yes. gas price has gone up about that, yes. gas price has gone up significantly, the gas price also drives the electricity price because the gas generation sets the price. it is unprecedented and we don't know what will happen in october. what we do know is we are seeing a significant number of people in fuel poverty, that is to say more than 10% of their disposable income spent on energy. that has risen to 20% and in october, our model suggests that could rise to 40% if the government doesn't intervene in some way. what we know is around abouti million of our 8 million accounts that are already in some kind of arrears, not all of that turns into bad that,
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some people are just late all of that turns into bad that, some people arejust late payers. but we expect that number to increase by around 50% in october when the price rises again. it is a very, very significant impact and thatis very, very significant impact and that is why we have called upon the government to take more action. we do need more intervention in october and it has to be very substantial. here with me is our business reporter, simon browning. simon, you have been taking to what he had to say, what struck you the most? ., ., ., most? you heard the word, significant _ most? you heard the word, significant intervention, i most? you heard the word, - significant intervention, government help and poverty. these are big comments coming from michael lewis, he said the word intervention for times, calling on the government to help his customers, 20% of those are facing fuel poverty. the expectation that could rise to 40% in october when the price cap increases again up when the price cap increases again up to potentially nearly £3000. these are significant comments and there is no doubt there is a call on there is no doubt there is a call on the government to help with customers in the cost of living
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crisis. he talked about some of the suggestions the government could do, in terms of helping with the warm homes discount increasing universal credit payments and he also said the government needs to tax those with the broader shoulders. there was no discussion about the windfall tax and again the question came back again to government intervention and the need to do that. later on the sunday morning programme, jo coburn asked him directly by some of the comments mr lewis had made, he said the chancellor will make decisions in the short term and he will deliver help and he will go even further. the government has helped and provided help with energy bills, and provided help with energy bills, a £22 billion package but they are under pressure to provide more and those comments will add to that. {lilia those comments will add to that. 0k, thank ou those comments will add to that. 0k, thank you very _ those comments will add to that. 0k, thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news. those named in the sue gray report have until five o'clock tonight to
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respond ahead of its long—awaited publication. the ukrainian government says it will not agree to a ceasefire with russia that involves giving up its territory, in an apparent hardening of its position. energy company, e.on is warning that unless the government intervenes, the number of its customers in fuel poverty could reach 40% by the autumn. ministers say they are looking at all the options. a uk government medical adviser says cases of monkeypox are rising in the uk on a daily basis. speaking on �*sunday morning', susan hopkins said the chance of a widespread outbreak was low, and the illness is typically mild among adults. the latest number of confirmed cases in the uk is 20. clearly this is a new and infectious disease spreading in our community that we haven't seen in our communities before. we will need to
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learn a lot about it both here and in other countries over the coming weeks. we do know from reports from africa, where this disease has circulated in outbreaks over many years, there are certain individuals much more at risk from severe disease, particularly immunosuppressed individuals and young children. in adults, we think it is relatively mild, but we will learn more. the risk to the general population remains extremely low at the moment and people need to be alert to it, we want clinicians to be alert to it and send the test if they are concerned. from the point of view of the general population, the important things we talk about regular, if you are feeling unwell, stay at home and avoid contact with others. if you develop a rash, seek medical care either by calling a gt or a sexual health clinic, whichever is more convenient. but what we're saying is, if you have got symptoms, avoid close contact with others and medical attention. paul hunter is a professor of experimental medicine at the university of east
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anglia. good afternoon, professor. what is concerning you the most about this reported outbreak? the concerning you the most about this reported outbreak?— reported outbreak? the issue is it is spreading _ reported outbreak? the issue is it is spreading between _ reported outbreak? the issue is it is spreading between people i reported outbreak? the issue is it is spreading between people in i reported outbreak? the issue is it| is spreading between people in the uk which we haven't seen in the west before to any great extent. it is something that does spread person to person in africa, even the west african variant, which we have, but generally not that effectively. usually it dies out after two or three generations of infections. how rapidly it is spreading in this country is difficult to ascertain at the moment, but it is something that is likely we are going to be able to bring in control in a matter of weeks or months, rather than it becoming another covid with large
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numbers being affected. like becoming another covid with large numbers being affected.— numbers being affected. like you said, it doesn't _ numbers being affected. like you said, it doesn't spread _ numbers being affected. like you said, it doesn't spread easily i said, it doesn't spread easily amongst people, but it is not the first time it has appeared in the uk, we had small outbreaks in 2018, 2019, 2021 as well?— uk, we had small outbreaks in 2018, 2019, 2021 as well? people can bring the infection — 2019, 2021 as well? people can bring the infection into _ 2019, 2021 as well? people can bring the infection into the _ 2019, 2021 as well? people can bring the infection into the country, - 2019, 2021 as well? people can bring the infection into the country, so i the infection into the country, so usually you have been able to identify the fact there is some link with africa. there was an outbreak in america in 2003 that was associated with imported mammals from africa that then infected prairie dogs. a number of the infections we have seen in the past have been contact with animals, but this one, we are seeing increasing person—to—person spread. it this one, we are seeing increasing person-to-person spread.- this one, we are seeing increasing person-to-person spread. it has been described as — person-to-person spread. it has been described as a — person-to-person spread. it has been described as a typical— person-to-person spread. it has been described as a typical transmission i described as a typical transmission and it is spread through the community. the concern obviously is
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those who are most vulnerable, in adults it is a mild disease unless you are compromised. that concern, as well as pregnant women is for children and children do touch each other. there is a lot of contact amongst them, so what should we be doing there? the amongst them, so what should we be doing there?— doing there? the key thing is diagnosing — doing there? the key thing is diagnosing the _ doing there? the key thing is diagnosing the infection i doing there? the key thing isj diagnosing the infection early enough. this is an infection that you don't become infectious until at least a week or two after you have contracted the infection. you can actually give the vaccine after contact with a case and is still effective, at least if you get it within the first three or four days. it is a disease that if we work hard at identifying cases, identifying contacts of cases, we should be able to then vaccinate those contacts and hopefully bring the epidemic to an end fairly soon. but it does depend
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on actually being able to identify cases as early as you can. iloathed on actually being able to identify cases as early as you can. what they make-up president _ cases as early as you can. what they make-up president biden _ cases as early as you can. what they make-up president biden saying i make—up president biden saying people should be concerned about it? how concerned are you? certainly, when any new emergent virus start spreading in a new country, in a new population, there is, you have to be concerned, you have to investigate it properly. i think the balance of evidence at the moment, looking at previous outbreaks, looking at outbreaks in west africa, it is not going to spread to large proportions of the population, but there are certainly sections of the population that are at more risk and the evidence is that predominantly, but not exclusively spreading in men who have sex with men. it is something we need to investigate and put effort into helping that subpopulation to get diagnosed and
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vaccinated early when appropriate. 0k, vaccinated early when appropriate. ok, we have run out of time, thank you very much indeed. events are being held to mark the fifth anniversary of the manchester arena bombing. 22 people died when a suicide bomber blew himself up outside an ariana grande concert on 22 may 2017. the names of the victims were read out at commemorations at victoria station, which is next to the arena, and at manchester cathedral. here in the uk — more than £75,000 has been raised for an 11—year—old boy who had to have his finger amputated after being injured while reportedly escaping bullies. raheem bailey's mother, shantal, said her son had experienced racial and physical abuse at his secondary school in south wales, as rebecca john reports. 11—year—old raheem in happier times. his mother, shantal bailey, says he was attacked by a group of children at school
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in abertillery on tuesday, who kicked him while he was on the floor. this is raheem in hospital later that day. his mother says he caught his finger and seriously injured it while climbing a school fence to escape the ordeal. and after six hours of surgery, it had to be amputated. shantal bailey and her four children moved to abertillery last year. she says raheem has received racist abuse at school at abertillery learning community, and has also been bullied because he is small for his age. he is now recovering from the surgery, but is struggling to understand what has happened, sometimes thinking it was a bad dream. ms bailey says she hasn't been contacted by the school. abertillery learning community says it is working closely with gwent police and the local authority to establish the full details of the incident. it says:
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the welsh government has also responded, saying that it condemns bullying and racial harassment in any form and expects allegations and incidents of bullying and racism to be fully investigated by schools, with appropriate action taken. since the incident, shantal bailey has set up a fundraising page to raise money for a prosthetic fingerfor raheem. it has already exceeded its £10,000 target many times over. rebecca john with that report. it's the final round of matches in the english premier league today. and for the the first time in 10 years — the title, top four and relegation are all still to be fully decided. manchester city hold a one—point advantage at the top of the table over liverpool. city host aston villa, knowing a win would make liverpool's
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result at home to wolves academic and seal a second consecutive league title and a fourth during their spanish manager — pep gaurdiola's six—season reign. let's cross to our sports correspondentr, andy swiss, who's at the etihad stadium — home of manchester city. a big day for many reasons? that is riaht, a big day for many reasons? that is riuht, it a big day for many reasons? that is riaht, it is a big day for many reasons? that is right. it is a — a big day for many reasons? that is right, it is a huge _ a big day for many reasons? that is right, it is a huge day _ a big day for many reasons? that is right, it is a huge day as _ a big day for many reasons? that is right, it is a huge day as the - right, it is a huge day as the premier league title race goes right down to the wire. as you say it is very much in manchester city's hand. they know if they beat aston villa this afternoon they will be the champions. the majority of the fans are arriving in pretty confident mood because city have been so consistent in the premier league this season. they had a bit of a wobble last weekend, david 2—0 against west ham before coming back
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to draw 22. they are at home come up against aston villa who are in 14th place in the premier league table and on the face of it, don't have a huge amount to playful. interestingly, aston villa are managed by steven gerrard, former liverpool captain, liverpool legend and you suspect he would like to get the result that could give his former team the title. as i say, city are the red—hot favourites and they have only lost once in the premier league since october, which give you a sense of how good they have been. this will be their fourth premier league title in the last five seasons, it will confirm their status as the dominant force in football when it comes to the premier league. but they know they will not be taking anything for granted just yet. strange things can happen on the final day of the season. the fans will remember what happened in 2012 when >> jeff: went happened in 2012 when >>jeff: went into the final day happened in 2012 when >> jeff: went into the final day as the favourites, but they had to rely on an injury time goal from the favourites, but they had to rely
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on an injury time goalfrom sergio aguero to give them the title. 50 aguero to give them the title. so they will be taking anything for granted here, but fans are very confident they can clinch another premier league title. andy swiss, thank you very much indeed. australia's new prime minister anthony albanese will be sworn in tomorrow despite his labour party still not having an outright majority in parliament. postal votes are still being counted to determine the outcome in some seats. a short while ago our correspondent shaima khalil told us about the challenges mr albanese will face. australians have woken up to a new leadership but also to a huge shift in the political landscape of their country. this was a bruising defeat for scott morrison and his governing liberal national coalition. with voters, especially women, turning their backs on them. the independent candidates did really well in this election, and this is an indication of how frustrated voters have become with the two major party politics. the new leader, anthony albanese,
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wasted no time in saying that climate action, climate policies, are going to take centre stage for his government. in his acceptance speech, he said that australia could be a renewable energy superpower. it could be a leader in that field. and whether or not he forms a majority or minority government with a coalition, he will have to work with green mps and independents who have put climate action at the centre of theircampaigning. but this is not going to be an easy task. remember, australia is a country that has been on the frontline of climate disasters, whether that be the bush fires of 2019—202, or the catastrophic floods that happened a couple of 2019—2020, or the catastrophic floods that happened a couple of months ago. but it is also a country that is still very much economically wedded to fossil fuels. so to convince people, especially in the mining industry in regional australia, that have been economically dependent on this industry, is going to be difficult, but anthony albanese has called for change,
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has called for safe change, and i think it was a message for those areas as well that this is not going to happen overnight, there is going to be a plan to phase out fossil fuels. shaima khalil reporting. now it's time for a look at the weather with helen willetts. good afternoon, the sunshine is set to continue across southern and eastern areas, but further north and west we have high pressure and further rain will continue to full, particularly across north—west highlands into the northern and western isles. to the south that is brighter but that could be sharp showers as we could see interspersed with sunny spells across northern ireland and england. cloudy across western england and wales but the lion's share of the sunshine is further south and east. patchy cloud coming through this evening and overnight we could see rain. it is going to be mild overnight, nine to 13 celsius for the most part. it
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looks as if it will be a brighter day across the north of scotland tomorrow. the far north keeps the rain but it will be showering for northern ireland and there is the risk of this rain coming into southern and eastern parts of the uk and there is uncertainty as to how far north and west it will come. but they will be showers around, cooler tomorrow and breezy, too. hello, this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines. deadline day for the report into lockdown breaches in downing street — those named have until 5pm to respond ahead of its long awaited publication. the ukrainian government says it won't agree to a ceasefire with russia, that involves giving up territory — in an apparent hardening of its position. energy company, eon, is warning that unless the government intervenes the number of its customers in fuel poverty could reach a0 percent by the autumn — ministers say they're looking at all options.
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it's a very, very significant impact and that's why we've

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