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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 23, 2022 4:00am-4:31am BST

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this is bbc news. welcome if you're watching here in the uk or around the globe. i'm david eades. our top stories: president biden holds a meeting with emperor naruhito during his first visit to japan since taking office as the us seeks to bolster its regional influence against a dominant china. we report on howjapan is boosting its own military, amid fears of chinese aggression towards taiwan. if china did try to invade taiwan, despite all of the impressive naval power on display here in tokyo bay, it is not clear at all whether the united states and its japanese allies now have the ability to stop them. i will well and truly serve the commonwealth of australia, her land and her people in the office of prime
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minister. anthony albanese becomes australia's 31st prime minister before heading to tokyo for talks with president biden, and the other world leaders. thousands of kilos of powdered baby milk arrives in the united states to help relieve a critical shortage of infant formula. how to keep a lid on china's ambitions in the pacific — that is the key issue confronting president biden as he has arrived injapan for his first visit to asia since becoming president. it's also his first summit with america's asian allies since the russian invasion of ukraine. in tokyo, he will hold talks with the prime ministers of japan, india and australia.
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the fallout from ukraine appears set to dominate discussions, but much of the focus will be on china's territorial intentions, in particular its claim on taiwan. many analysts believe china's massive military gives it the wherewithal to invade taiwan, and to hold off the us and its allies if they try to intervene. our correspondent, rupert wingfield—hayes filed this report from tokyo. this is something that hadn't been seen for more than 70 years, a fighterjet landing on board a japanese aircraft carrier. the jet is american butjapan has a0 of them on order. this is a sleek new mogami class stealth frigate being commissioned last month. it's the first of 22. japan is quietly abandoning seven decades of pacifism, and the reason is simple — china.
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after ukraine, japan's former prime minister shinzo abe is warning that a chinese invasion of taiwan could be next. translation: a taiwan - emergency is our emergency, forjapan and for the us—japan alliance. president xi jingping should not make any mistake in recognising this. taiwan is a vibrant and boisterous democracy. butjust like ukraine, is claimed by a much bigger, more powerful neighbour. i think whoever is in power in china, be it xijinping, or whomever comes after him, it is baked into the cake inside the communist party that china must get taiwan back. it's impossible to see any leaders stepping back from that position, and if they did step back from that position, they'd be out of a job. just south of tokyo, ships of the us seventh fleet
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lie at anchor next to those of its japanese ally. for decades, these ships have a guaranteed american domination of the western pacific, but not any more. russia's invasion of ukraine has highlighted two very uncomfortable truths for the united states and its allies here in asia. the first is that when china says it is determined to reunify taiwan, by force if necessary, it actually means it. the second is that if china did try and invade taiwan, despite all of the impressive naval power on display here in tokyo bay, it is not clear at all whether the united states, and its japanese allies, now have the ability to stop them. china's current military build—up is unprecedented in peacetime. many of these new weapons are designed specifically to defeat any attempt by the us orjapan to intervene in the taiwan strait.
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between now and 2030, if there is an assessment that china will have significant conventional military advantages in this period. so this is the period that everybody is most concerned that china will have conventional military advantage. and could be tempted to use it. as they meet in tokyo this week, the challenge for the us and its allies is how do they make it clear to president xi jinping that despite his newly acquired military might, using force to take taiwan would be just as much a disasterfor him as invading ukraine has been for president putin? rupert wingfield—hayes, bbc news, in tokyo. we bbc news, in tokyo. mentioned concerns about china we mentioned concerns about china and its approach to taiwan stop. earlier i spoke to barry pavel, senior vice president and director of the scowcroft
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center for strategy and security at the atlantic council and asked him if he thought an invasion on taiwan would happen. no, i don't. no time in the near term. xijinping has his hands full with an economy that is not growing nearly at the rate that his entire population has come to expect, with a covid lockdown that is creating unprecedented protests, with a strategic alliance with russia which just invaded a much smaller country and is utterly failing, and xi needs things as stable as possible for the november party congress where he hopes to be anointed president for life. he needs stability and calmness. there is not a chance he will invade taiwan anytime this year. ok, but even that time frame is interesting because this is not something that's just sprung up overnight, is it? it has been on xijinping's agenda as an issue for a good while now and i wonder, were china to do something
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in let's say the next two years, as long as perhaps joe biden is still president, would the us intervene? because that is a huge question that needs answering. yes, and so one certainly cannot rule out a chinese invasion. i personally think a military heavy invasion at this point, after what we have seen in ukraine is very unlikely but you can't rule it out and the us would undoubtedly come to the defence of taiwan with its allies, including japan because if it did not, if taiwan was lost, it would give the chinese leadership a new strategic advantage from which the united states and its allies would have a very, very hard time recovering. we are just looking at some pictures, i think we can bring them to you now, of president biden and emperor naruhito in conversation a little bit earlier, just a few minutes ago, i think. i think we have got those pictures for you somewhere... as we wait to see if we have,
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it is an interesting perspective, isn't it? seeing japan building its military might, presumably that is entirely built around china's own military growth, isn't it? yes, and so japan is very wary ofjapan, has been for a very long time. it is slowly moving toward a much stronger leadership role. the us is encouraging this. it will soon go beyond the enshrined i% of gdp for defence spending and looking towards 2% like nato. it is talking about counter—attack capabilities which could include pre—emption of metal sites and command and control. it is really being encouraged in this because the united states needs allies in both the indo—pacific as well as europe to up their roles, to up their capabilities so that together we can all seek to deter china and russia. just a few hours ago,
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australia's labor party leader, anthony albanese, was sworn in as the country's new prime minister. the ceremony was brought forward to enable him to fly to tokyo to meet the leaders of the quad group which includes the us, japan and india. but before he left, he gave his first press conference, where he was asked about australia's relationship with china. the relationship with china will remain a difficult one. i said that before the election, that has not changed. it is china that has changed, not australia and australia should always stand up for our values and we will in a government that i lead. 0ur correspondent phil mercer in sydney has more on the relationship between australia and china. they have deteriorated in spectacular fashion in recent times over beria's geopolitical and trade disputes.
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sometime ago, australia's called for an independent enquiry into the origins of covid—i9 which infuriated beijing. it responded with a raft of trade restrictions on australia, and more recently china has struck a security accord with solomon islands. this is a melanesian archipelago to the north—east of australia, traditionally in australia's sphere of influence. there are concerns about china's ambitions in the pacific. plenty for anthony albanese to mull as he heads north on his first day in his newjob to tokyo. he's already had a telephone call from president biden and been congratulated by narendra modi on twitter. he's going to tokyo to shore up very important foreign policy alliances is as far as australia is concerned. does a labor party—dominated government represent perhaps
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a softer touch from a beijing perspective? well, according to the outgoing prime minister scott morrison that is most definitely what he said in pretty explosive claims made during the australian election. essentially, mr morrison was saying that the labor party was conniving in some way with beijing. that's been roundly rejected by mr albanese. i think what we will see is a softer diplomacy from the labor party when it comes to foreign policy. the indications are that mr albanese new government will seek to shore up these alliances indo—pacific region with countries such as japan and india and others, to try to counter china's growing assertiveness. that's what makes this quad meeting on tuesday in tokyo so important for australia as the new man gets down to business on his first day in his newjob.
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phil mercer in sydney. let's get some of the day's other news: iranian state media says a senior military officer has been assassinated in tehran. two people on a motorcycle are reported to have shot dead colonel sayyad khodaie outside his home. he was a member of the powerful iranian revolutionary guards. russia's invasion of ukraine has pushed the number of forcibly displaced people from around 90 million to more than 100 million, according to the united nations. millions have fled conflict violence, human rights violations and persecution in ethiopia, burkina faso, myanmar, nigeria, afghanistan and the democratic republic of the congo. days of flooding and landslides in parts of bangladesh and eastern india, have affected millions of people and left more than 50 people dead. bangladesh's north—east region has seen some of the worst flooding for nearly two decades. experts say that climate change
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is increasing the likelihood of events like this around the world. monkeypox has now been detected in three more countries — bringing the total to 15 as scientists say they are still unsure what is causing the outbreak. austria, israel and switzerland are the latest to report the presence of the virus. it is still unclear why we are witnessing this unusual spread of monkeypox as more patients emerge with the common symptoms, bumpy rash, sore muscles, either and headache. not hard, figure out what we do, and what vaccine if any may be available, it is a concern, in the sense if it were to spread,. in the sense if it were to spread. -— in the sense if it were to sread,. ~ , ., ., spread,. australia's has “oined israel in switzerland _ israel in switzerland confirming cases of monkey box there, bringing the total
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number of nations reporting outbreaks 215. so, how dangerous is the virus strain detected in austria? actually, it's not very — detected in austria? actually, it's not very dangerous. - detected in austria? actually, it's not very dangerous. we i it's not very dangerous. we know from great britain it's probably the west african strain and that is not very dangerous. the death rate is around 1%, usually we have mild cases. ., ., cases. however the uk health security agency _ cases. however the uk health security agency warns - cases. however the uk health security agency warns severe | security agency warns severe illness can occur.— illness can occur. there are certain individuals - illness can occur. there are certain individuals much . illness can occur. there are i certain individuals much more risk of severe disease, especially immunosuppressed individuals and young children. it can take 12 days to show symptoms and patients advised to isolate until scabs are fallen off, belgium has become the first country to introduce a compulsory 21 day quarantine for monkeypox patients. traces in the uk going further advising people with direct un— protected contact with a case
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to self isolate for 21 days as well. , ., , , ., well. there will be more spread but it will be — well. there will be more spread but it will be slow, _ well. there will be more spread but it will be slow, and - well. there will be more spread but it will be slow, and what - but it will be slow, and what you will start to see is that outbreak starting to give away as more and more people become aware that monkeypox is spreading and they seek treatment, then we deploy the smallpox vaccine to do what is called ring vaccination, vaccinate all the contacts in a ring around the cases, so we stop the spread.— ring around the cases, so we stop the spread. past outbreaks have been _ stop the spread. past outbreaks have been stopped _ stop the spread. past outbreaks have been stopped in _ stop the spread. past outbreaks have been stopped in their - have been stopped in their tracks like in the us in 2003, but the outbreak of this sprain against a global pandemic and the emergence of monkeypox in countries where it doesn't normally appear, add to the concern. stay with us on bbc news. still to come: the war in ukraine and, in particular, the war on truth in russia.
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in the biggest international sporting spectacle ever seen, up to 30 million people have taken part in sponsored athletic events to aid famine relief in africa. the first of what the makers of star wars hope will be thousands of queues started forming at 7am. taunting which led to scuffles, |scuffles which led to fighting, | fighting to full—scale riot as the liverpool fans - broke out of their area and. into the juventus enclosure. the belgian police had lost control. i the whole world will mourn the tragic death of mr nehru today. he was the father of the indian people from the day of independence. the oprah winfrey show comes to an end after 25 years and more than 4,500 episodes. the chat show has made her one of the richest people on the planet. geri halliwell, otherwise known as ginger spice, i has announced _ she's left the spice girls. argh! i don't believe it! she's the woman with the bounce, the go, girl power. not geri. why?
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this is bbc world news. the latest headlines: president biden has had a meeting with emperor naruhito during his first visit to japan since taking office as the us seeks to bolster its regional influence against a dominant china. let's turn to russia now, where it's a crime to call the invasion of ukraine a "war" and anyone who contradicts the official line on russian military action risks up to 15 years in prison. dozens of people have already been prosecuted including the opposition activist vladimir kara—murza, who accused russia of war crimes. sarah rainsford reports from ukraine. walking through the ruins of russia's war on its neighbour, evidence of its cruelty in every crushed street and home, in every story of
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civilians targeted and killed. but russia itself is silencing those facts, denying what's clear to see on the ground, and it's arresting those who still dare to speak out, even abroad. the whole world sees what the putin regime is doing to ukraine — the cluster bombs on residential areas, the bombings of maternity wards and hospitals and schools — the war crimes. these are war crimes. for that speech, vladimir kara—murza is now facing ten years behind bars. his wife already lives abroad for safety. vladimir was poisoned twice in russia and nearly died, but evgenia says he refused to be silenced. he was charged, basically, for speaking the truth about the war and about the russian army's atrocities committed in ukraine.
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with this war, evgenia tells me, the repression has only intensified. truth is actually the regime's main enemy, and this is why i believe this regime is using this law to squash all dissent in russia and to scare people into silence. this is the result of an all—out war. but in russia, it's a crime to call it that or to criticise what was done here as vladimir putin's army tried to seize ukraine's capital. in andriivka, we found a team from the un collecting evidence of suspected war crimes — stories that most russians will never hear. the village elder told me 13 civilians were executed here, hands tied and shot in the head. and when i asked who they were, he listed the dead one by one. lists names in ukrainian.
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translation: we didn't need protecting. - just look how they protected us — they killed so many people. i've got no words for it. they're swine. all of this destruction — russia's war on ukraine — hasn't come from nowhere. vladimir putin has spent two decades dismantling democracy in this country, crushing his critics, silencing the free media and now, criminalising the truth — eliminating all checks on his power to make this possible. but there are russians resisting even now — like this reporter heading for a ukrainian front line and seeing for herself the destruction caused by russian bombs. the war started, it was an immediate, "i need to be there,
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i need to be there right now". lilia yapparova writes for a website now blocked in russia — like almost all independent news — but she is determined to go on reporting what the kremlin doesn't want people to hear. do you think about the risk to you, personally, in the future? co nsta ntly, yea h! yea h, co nsta ntly. it's difficult. it's disturbing. it hurts sometimes to write because i know that, yeah, i will say that, for sure, because i can't hide facts, but am i going to jailfor that? the risks are far higher for ukrainians — that's clear on every street. but as war so devastates this country, in russia, vladimir putin has declared war on truth itself. sarah rainsford, bbc news, andriivka.
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a military plane carrying powdered baby milk has arrived in the us from europe. it's hoped this will help address the critical shortage. more shipments are expected in the next few days. emily brown reports. 35 tons of powdered baby milk. that's enough to fill 500,000 bottles, arriving on a military plane in the united states from europe. it is hoped this will help address what is now a critical shortage of formula in the us. at the moment officials say this first shipment is not coming straight to the shelves. instead, it will be fed to the babies who need it most. fiur babies who need it most. our babies who need it most. our bab has babies who need it most. our baby has a — babies who need it most. our baby has a dairy _ babies who need it most. oi" baby has a dairy allergy and we did not learn it until she was about two months old that she did have a dairy allergy. it's a terrifying feeling to not know where your next meal is going to come from so i am able to provide breast not for her sometimes, which is great, but ijust don't... fix.
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sometimes, which is great, but ijust don't-u— i just don't. .. a lot of what ifs. i i just don't. .. a lot of what ifs. i could _ i just don't. .. a lot of what ifs. i could only _ i just don't. .. a lot of what ifs. i could only imagine i i just don't. .. a lot of what ifs. i could only imagine if| i just don't. .. a lot of what i ifs. i could only imagine if we were solely — ifs. i could only imagine if we were solely on _ ifs. i could only imagine if we were solely on formula. - ifs. i could only imagine if wej were solely on formula. local su -l were solely on formula. local supply formulas _ were solely on formula. local supply formulas were - were solely on formula. local supply formulas were made l were solely on formula. local- supply formulas were made worse in the us by product recall and after a production plant closed in february because of a health scare. president biden invoked the cold war era defence production act to help increase supply. production act to help increase su -l . , production act to help increase su .l _ , ., , production act to help increase su -l . , . , ., supply. these families and these children _ supply. these families and these children need - supply. these families and these children need these| these children need these formulas to grow and thrive every day and so, to see this kind of urgency in action is really, really special and i wanted to be here to make sure that we forget all coming off the plane, knowing that we're going to be working with our partners and families.- partners and families. now, there is a — partners and families. now, there is a big _ partners and families. now, there is a big push - partners and families. now, there is a big push to - partners and families. now, there is a big push to get i there is a big push to get these supplies out to those most in need. emily brown, bbc news. in afghanistan, the taliban said women had to wear a face veil whilst in public. since then, the taliban have ordered female tv presenters and other women on screen to cover theirfaces whilst on air. the decree came in on sunday and the move has been met with criticism.
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rachel stanton reports. a new normal on afghanistan's tv screens. female presenters and other women on air now have to wearface coverings. and other women on air now have to wear face coverings. the ruling comes two weeks after the taliban ordered all women to wear a face veil in public or risk punishment. translation: iii or risk punishment. translation: , . . , translation: if such decrees are issued _ translation: if such decrees are issued and _ translation: if such decrees are issued and imposed - translation: if such decrees are issued and imposed on - are issued and imposed on women, then women across afghanistan will be eliminated. afghanistan will be eliminated. a presenter much different must feel totally calm and relaxed and convey the truth but for the first time, have to present my programme wearing a mask and i was not feeling good at all. in an act of solidarity with his female colleagues, the anchor of the main evening bulletin wore a face covering all broadcasting live to the nation. 0ther male colleagues also will face masks on the channel's offices in support. broadcasters say they were told they had to comply with the order. translation: we were told ou
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order. translation: we were told you are — order. translation: we were told you are forced _ order. translation: we were told you are forced to - order. translation: we were told you are forced to do - order. translation: we were told you are forced to do it. - told you are forced to do it. you must do it. there is no other way. pl. you must do it. there is no other way-— you must do it. there is no other way. you must do it. there is no otherwa . ~ , ., ., other way. a spokesman for the ministry of _ other way. a spokesman for the ministry of vice _ other way. a spokesman for the ministry of vice and _ other way. a spokesman for the ministry of vice and virtue - ministry of vice and virtue said: when the taliban took control of the country last year, they vowed to honour women's rights but since the takeover, many restrictions have been put in place. restrictions have been put in lace. �* , restrictions have been put in lace. v ., , restrictions have been put in lace. �*, . , , place. it's really unthinkable that in 2022, _ place. it's really unthinkable that in 2022, we _ place. it's really unthinkable that in 2022, we are - place. it's really unthinkable that in 2022, we are seeing | place. it's really unthinkable i that in 2022, we are seeing the same kinds of abuses against women and girls that the taliban imposed in 1996 when they last took power. their overall strategy seems to be to completely erase women and girls from public life. but completely erase women and girls from public life.- girls from public life. but for now, girls from public life. but for now. these _ girls from public life. but for now, these afghan - girls from public life. but for now, these afghan women l now, these afghan women presenting the news remained defiant. rachel stanton, bbc news. time to remind you of our main story, president biden has held a meeting with emperor naruhito
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during his first visit to japan since taking office. he also met the prime minister fumio kishida is the us seeks to bolster its regional influence. hello. after the warmth of last week, when both scotland and england recorded their highest temperatures of the year so far, things are looking cooler this week, especially where it was so warm last week. it'll be wet at times, not all the time, mostly in the form of showers. a rather cloudy—looking picture for monday, and messy on the chart here with quite a few weather fronts around as well, so we are going to see some wet weather at times. this is how we start the day. this weather front here with cloud and some patchy rain stretching through parts of england. still raining into the north and north—west of scotland, after a damp sunday. that rain, though, just beginning to fizzle out, allowing some brighter skies and a few showers.
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and elsewhere, although there will be a lot of cloud around, there will be a few bright spells — but notice the showers becoming more widespread, late morning and into the afternoon. some heavy, perhaps with a rumble of thunder. an area of rain also for parts of south east england and east anglia later in the day. some uncertainty about how far north and west that will get but don't get caught out by it, and it will make for a cooler day compared with sunday. and overnight and into tuesday, eastern areas most likely to see cloud and some outbreaks of rain. showers around elsewhere through england and wales. northern scotland and northern ireland becoming mainly dry, here with some clear spells and probably the lowest temperatures as tuesday begins. and then on tuesday, we will continue across some eastern areas to have some rain, perhaps initially toward south—east scotland, and running southwards, through the eastern side of england. elsewhere, it's a case of sunny spells, perhaps catching a shower. a lot of them fading, though, from western areas later in the day. and similar temperatures. a breezy day on tuesday. wednesday's looking like a windier day because one low pressure's moving away, another one's coming in with weather fronts bringing
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another shot of wet weather from west to east during the day and lifting that wind. looks to be wettest in western scotland for a time, although even here, turning showery. the rain more patchy the more further south you are. further showers following on behind, though. i think increasingly dry and sunny towards the end of wednesday. a blustery day wherever you are. gusts in scotland, northern ireland, northern england, perhaps around a0 mph or so. looks like we'll see another weather system coming in on thursday with further outbreaks of rain pushing further south across the uk before high pressure settles things down for friday and, indeed, into next weekend. that's your latest forecast.
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this is bbc news. the headlines: president biden has had a meeting with emperor naruhito of japan during the second leg of a trip to east asia, that's intended to reinforce ties to its allies in the region. mr biden is due to hold talks with the political leaders of japan, india and australia. australia's labor party leader, anthony albanese, has been sworn in as the country's new prime minister, ending nearly a decade of rule by the conservative coalition. the swearing—in was accelerated so that mr albanese could attend a quad leaders' meeting in tokyo, in an official capacity. the monkeypox virus has now been detected in three more countries, austria, israel and switzerland —
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bringing the total to 15.

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