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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 23, 2022 9:00am-10:01am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson and these are the latest headlines. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life — after an infant died at birmingham children's hospital. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are being urged to self—isolate for three weeks. almost 700 trains a day are axed in scotland because of driver shortages and a pay dispute. black and asian women are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care, according to an investigation
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by the charity birthrights. manchester city's premier league victory was marred by a pitch invasion, in which aston villa's goalkeeper was allegedly attacked. good morning. children's social care needs radical change to avoid tens of thousands more youngsters being taken away from theirfamilies — that's the warning following a major review of council—run children's services in england. the report said struggling families needed earlier support before they reached crisis point and calls for a windfall tax on the profits of the biggest privately run children's homes. here's our social affairs editor alison holt. ok, so let me know how it's been
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going since the panel. henrietta works with young people to help them pitch ideas and get their voices heard. and also it would be good to know, like, how you found working on the project as well. her own life was shaped by the crisis in the children's care system that today's report wants to change. after two difficult years, she was removed from her mother by social services. she was 1a, and in the next month, she was moved between five different homes. to me, being in care felt like a never—ending storm, just, like, every day not knowing where the support is going to be from, where am i even going to lay my head, where is the support for the families at the start when they are struggling, why does it need to be when they are taken away? and you can't put kids into dysfunction, when you have taken them out of dysfunction. it makes no sense. today's review says a radical reset is needed to shift the focus of children's social care away from crisis intervention. it wants more early help available
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in schools and communities, a new expert social worker role to strengthen child protection, the phasing out of what is described as wholly unsuitable young offenders institutions, a windfall tax on the profits of large children's homes companies, and to ensure change happens, an extra £2.6 billion of funding for services over the next five years. we need to build a care system where homes are available, filled with the sort of people who can provide stable, loving, long—term relationships, near to the schools and communities that these children already live in, that's the big change that we need in the care system. it's so empowering to know that your trauma doesn't define you. that is where places like new beginnings in stockport come in. these parents have had either children taken into care or they have come close to it. you know, we all understand that each day is different for everybody. here they have found support, counselling and advice which has turned their lives around.
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my little boy has been in with me a year and a half and i never, thought that would be possible again. and any time i need support, i reach out to new beginnings. they're like family, they are family, they are family that i never had. they have given me so much support and a lot of tools and strategies to work with, with my son who has got needs, special needs. and, again, they have given me the strength to push on, to not make them mistakes again. the government says it is piloting additionalfamily hubs providing early support. it also accepts more needs to be done to support family members, kinship carers, who take on a child who would otherwise go into care, and to find more foster carers. i think there is a real opportunity for us to get those children a loving, supportive home, and we know that family relationships, kinship care is equally important.
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the system needs to obsess about those relationships because that is how you get great outcomes for the children that need the most help in our society. the government says it will consider other recommendations over the longer term. alison holt, bbc news. a health worker has been arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life after a child died at birmingham children's hospital. the 27—year—old woman was arrested on thursday and has been suspended from her role at the hospital. west midlands police said an investigation was under way and the results of forensic tests were being examined. the child was being treated in the paediatric intensive care unit. people who are at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with cases are being asked to self—isolate for three weeks, according to new guidance from the uk health security agency. so far, there have been 20 cases of the illness in britain. austria, israel and switzerland are the latest to report
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the presence of the virus. mark lobel reports. it is still unclear why we are witnessing this unusual spread of monkeypox, as more patients emerge with the common symptoms of a bumpy rash, fever, sore muscles and a headache. it is something that everyone should be concerned about. we are working on it hard, to figure out what we do and what vaccine, if any, may be available for it. but it is a concern in the sense that if it were to spread, it is consequential. austria hasjoined israel and switzerland in confirming cases of monkeypox there, bringing the total number of nations reporting outbreaks to 15. so how dangerous is the virus strain detected in austria? translation: actually, it is not very dangerous. j we know from great britain that it is probably the west african strain and that is not very dangerous. the death rate is around i%
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but usually, we have mild cases. however, the uk health security agency warns severe illness can occur. there are certain individuals who are much more at risk of severe disease, particularly immunosuppressed individuals or young children. it can take around 12 days to show symptoms, and patients are advised to isolate until their scabs have fallen off. belgium has become the first country to introduce a compulsory 21—day quarantine for monkeypox patients. contact tracers in the uk are going one step further, advising people who have had direct, unprotected contact with a case to self—isolate for 21 days, too. what i think will happen is there will be more spread but it will be slow, and what you will start to see is that outbreak starting to kind of ebb away as more and more people become aware that monkeypox is spreading, and they seek treatment and we start to deploy the smallpox vaccine to do what is called ring vaccinations, to vaccinate all the contacts
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in a ring around the cases, so that we stop the spread. past outbreaks have been stopped in their tracks, like in the us in 2003. but the outbreak of this strain amidst a global pandemic and the emergence of monkeypox in countries where it doesn't normally appear adds to the concern. mark lobel, bbc news. let's attend one of our top stories, the major review of council run services in england, warning that social care needs radical change to avoid tens of thousands more youngsters being taken away from their families. youngsters being taken away from theirfamilies. dr lucy pete is chief executive of and ship, a charity that supports the carers of children who live full time or most of the time with a relative or friend who is not their parent. also
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joining me a sandra, we are using herfirst name to joining me a sandra, we are using her first name to protect the identity of the family, she looks after her grandson because her daughter is not able to. dr lucy, let me start with you because this review, this appraisal of those services calls for urgent reform. talk to me may be first of all about some of the areas that are most in need of change. we welcome the focus on kinship care and these recommendations. it feels like a pivotal moment because kinship carers have been battling support for year —— battling full support for year —— battling full support for year —— battling full support for years. it recommends two things which are critical, the first that kinship carers are playing a vital role and the second is that there are strong recommendations to invest in well supported kinship care so we can keep more children in their extended family network where they receive love and stability and do really well. they're things that they are saying specifically need to change our financial allowances for kinship carers, preparation and training, peersupport, legalaid training, peer support, legal aid
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and training, peersupport, legalaid and paid employment to leave so that people can have time off work to help children settle and then return to work if that is right for them. at the moment, far too many kinship carers are struggling financially because around half of them are forced to give up work to take on the children.— the children. let's be clear as well, the children. let's be clear as well. when — the children. let's be clear as well, when we _ the children. let's be clear as well, when we talk _ the children. let's be clear as well, when we talk about - the children. let's be clear as i well, when we talk about kinship care, that is essentially children being able to stay with members of the family, maybe not their parents but grandparents or other relatives and that is the point that is most important, keeping them within some kind of family unit? that important, keeping them within some kind of family unit?— kind of family unit? that is right. it is generally — kind of family unit? that is right. it is generally grandparents, - kind of family unit? that is right. | it is generally grandparents, aunts or uncles, older brothers and sisters or otherfamily or uncles, older brothers and sisters or other family or close friends who have stepped in, often at a moment's notice in a crisis, to take on the children. they will give them that love and security that they need. they will be committed to those children as long as they are needed and support them well into adulthood, which is why children tend to do better in kinship care than the care system and white really makes sense to invest in kinship care. really makes sense to invest in kinship care-— really makes sense to invest in
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kinship care. sandra, that is the situation in _ kinship care. sandra, that is the situation in which _ kinship care. sandra, that is the situation in which you _ kinship care. sandra, that is the situation in which you found - situation in which you found yourself and i know you have spoken previously about how you are catapulted back into motherhood just when you were preparing to retire. talk about that big change in your circumstances and what it has meant for you on a daily basis? it circumstances and what it has meant for you on a daily basis?— for you on a daily basis? it has been a complete _ for you on a daily basis? it has been a complete change - for you on a daily basis? it has i been a complete change because for you on a daily basis? it has - been a complete change because i'm a professional lady and my children are grown— professional lady and my children are grown up and i was catapulted into caring — are grown up and i was catapulted into caring for my grandson who is a ioddien _ into caring for my grandson who is a ioddien it_ into caring for my grandson who is a toddler. it changed my whole life, i am a _ toddler. it changed my whole life, i am a professional, with 40 years in my profession and i work full time and suddenly i had this toddler and it is almost— and suddenly i had this toddler and it is almost like starting again. i have _ it is almost like starting again. i have had — it is almost like starting again. i have had to care for him and look after— have had to care for him and look after him — have had to care for him and look after him and deal with some of his speciai— after him and deal with some of his special needs. there are lots of issues — special needs. there are lots of issues around it. i mean, one of the pleasing _ issues around it. i mean, one of the pleasing thing for me is the financial— pleasing thing for me is the financial support as a kinship carer which _ financial support as a kinship carer which they— financial support as a kinship carer which they will get hopefully on the back of— which they will get hopefully on the back of this as it goes through parliament because that has been one of the _ parliament because that has been one of the toughest bits to deal with. give me — of the toughest bits to deal with. give me a — of the toughest bits to deal with. give me a sense if you would of some of the things that changed for you,
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just when you thought you had gone through motherhood and were looking forward to retirement and suddenly, not least the cost because i would imagine you had planned for your retirement financially and then suddenly you have to pay for a lot of additional things and that will change your outlook on what you can do in your retirement? it change your outlook on what you can do in your retirement?— do in your retirement? it has chanced do in your retirement? it has changed my _ do in your retirement? it has changed my actual— do in your retirement? it has| changed my actual retirement do in your retirement? it has - changed my actual retirement now so iwark— changed my actual retirement now so i work full_ changed my actual retirement now so i work full time, i am professional, i work full time, i am professional, iwouid _ i work full time, i am professional, i would like — i work full time, i am professional, i would like to say i was comfortable before this happened but i am comfortable before this happened but lam no _ comfortable before this happened but i am no longer comfortable. i have had to— i am no longer comfortable. i have had to find — i am no longer comfortable. i have had to find a — i am no longer comfortable. i have had to find a full—time nursery placement at a cost of £1700 per month_ placement at a cost of £1700 per month and — placement at a cost of £1700 per month and on top of that, there was no start-up — month and on top of that, there was no start—up fund available for me. he came _ no start—up fund available for me. he came to— no start—up fund available for me. he came to me with no belongings and i had he came to me with no belongings and i had to— he came to me with no belongings and i had to sel— he came to me with no belongings and i had to set up, he was a baby, 14 months. — i had to set up, he was a baby, 14 months. i— i had to set up, he was a baby, 14 months, i had to set up all of his equipment, _ months, i had to set up all of his equipment, chairs, cots, bottles, milk, _ equipment, chairs, cots, bottles, milk, clothes, expense after expense, _ milk, clothes, expense after expense, nappies, wipes. the biggest shock— expense, nappies, wipes. the biggest shock was— expense, nappies, wipes. the biggest shock was the nursery. not being able to— shock was the nursery. not being able to pay— shock was the nursery. not being able to pay for certain things that he could — able to pay for certain things that he could do with, like clubs because
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the finances are not there now so i will have _ the finances are not there now so i will have to — the finances are not there now so i will have to put my retirement back in order— will have to put my retirement back in order to — will have to put my retirement back in order to continue to care for him because _ in order to continue to care for him because he — in order to continue to care for him because he is— in order to continue to care for him because he is going to be with me until he _ because he is going to be with me until he is— because he is going to be with me until he is a — because he is going to be with me until he is a young adult or an adult — until he is a young adult or an adult waiting to leave home. gf adult waiting to leave home. course. it is adult waiting to leave home. of course. it is a huge commitment on your part. dr lucy, if you look at some of the independent review and it is interesting hearing from sandra about the cost because the review also puts a price on this. they say the lifetime cost of adverse outcomes of children's social care is £23 billion per year and what the review is saying is, invest a little bit now and we save a lot more money down the line, don't we? maybe explain that for us? this is a really important point, all the evidence to suggest that children in well supported kinship care will do better than those children in the care system. so it does make sense to look at kinship care as a positive option for those children who are not able to remain with their parents. some children will always need foster care and adoption but for the vast majority, they go into kinship care. if we can support kinship carers, those
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children will do better in education, health, their well—being, better relationships, all of those things that will make their more successful as they grow up. it really does make sense to invest some money now in supported kinship care. it is for the best outcomes for children.— care. it is for the best outcomes for children. ., , ., ., for children. sandra, when you hear thins like for children. sandra, when you hear things like that, _ for children. sandra, when you hear things like that, you _ for children. sandra, when you hear things like that, you are _ for children. sandra, when you hear things like that, you are living - things like that, you are living this every day, and i think what is so striking about what you have been telling us this morning as well, you said despite the challenges, you have described caring for him as a true privilege. you have absolutely changed his life in the way that he has changed definitely, it is an honour and privilege _ definitely, it is an honour and privilege to have that relationship with such — privilege to have that relationship with such a little person and being responsible for them but to see them life now— responsible for them but to see them life now and being bonded. he was not part— life now and being bonded. he was not part of— life now and being bonded. he was not part of the family before that and now — not part of the family before that and now he has got cousins and he has got _ and now he has got cousins and he has got nieces and nephews that are out there _ has got nieces and nephews that are out there and he can actually attach himself— out there and he can actually attach himself to _ out there and he can actually attach himself to other members of the family— himself to other members of the family now. with support, he's doing
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really— family now. with support, he's doing really well _ family now. with support, he's doing really well. he does have some special— really well. he does have some special needs and therapy but you know, _ special needs and therapy but you know. he — special needs and therapy but you know. he is— special needs and therapy but you know, he is really well and that, it is an— know, he is really well and that, it is an honour— know, he is really well and that, it is an honour to see that and to see him grow — it is so lovely to hear you talk about him like that as well. a final word from you, doctor michael lucy, if anyone is in the position that sandra finds herself in, how confident are you that this review will deliver the change that will be able to help people like sandra? it feels like a pivotal moment but they are recommendations and we will keep pushing, shoulder to shoulder with people like sandra. there are thousands of kinship carers out there who have stepped up to travel —— to care for children in a crisis and we are calling on government to step up and do its part to put these recommendations into practice. it has been really great to talk to you both this morning. thank you for explaining what is are at stake. dr lucy pete, chair of kinship, and sandra, who was catapulted back into
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motherhood just as she was about to retire, so grateful for you motherhood just as she was about to retire, so gratefulfor you both being with us today, thank you. scotrail — which runs most train services in scotland — has introduced an emergency timetable, cutting its daily services by almost a third. it's due to a shortage of drivers and a pay dispute between the newly nationalised scotrail and the aslef union, as alexandra mackenzie reports. many rely on the rail network, but the new temporary timetable means a significant cut to services. there's two reasons for this. the first is that the pandemic meant we couldn't train enough drivers. that's resulted in a driver shortage. and the second issue is that aslef, the train drivers' union, is in dispute with us over pay. that's meant fewer drivers are making themselves available for overtime and for rest days, and that's resulted in cancellations for customers, which have been unacceptable. the last train from edinburgh to glasgow queen street, which is usually at 23.45,
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will leave at 22.15. if you're travelling from glasgow to dundee, the last train was at 23.10. that changes to 19.10. for the glasgow to mallaig train the last one was at 18.21. that now leaves around lunchtime. i think it's really disappointing because i like to go into town at the weekend, it's my only time off, and i don't want to have to drive because driving is awful in town. a lot of bus gates now. so yeah, i'm really disappointed that this is how it's ended up, but hopefully they'll figure something out. i will probably choose not to take the train in the future. i willjust plan to take the bus instead of the train. coming somewhere like glasgow shouldn't really have that - uncertainty because you feel like you're in a city centre i and you should be able to get in and out and things as well. j the reduced timetable is likely to impact scotland's world cup play—off against ukraine here at hampden onjune1st. the scottish conservatives have called on scotrail to lay on extra trains for thousands of fans. the scottish government has said
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that plans are being worked up for events like this one. alongside this disruption, rail workers are to be balloted on strike action over pay. every one of us is facing a cost of living crisis. we've seen our council tax, ourwater, oursewerage, gas, electricity, food, all going up. 0urfuel, everyone. we have a standard of living and we're trying to maintain that for our membership. scotrail said the temporary timetable would provide more certainty, but it will take some time for more drivers to be trained so the next few weeks could be challenging. alexandra mackenzie, bbc news, glasgow. ukraine's president volodomyr zelensky says his country may be losing 50—100 lives a day in the east. those ukrainian casualty figures come as british military intelligence estimates that russia has lost as many soldiers in its three—month invasion of ukraine as the soviet union lost in their entire nine—year war in afghanistan.
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0ur correspondent joe inwood is in kyiv. this gives us a rather vivid and stark sense of the human impact of this war, doesn't it? and also gives us a sense of how fierce the fighting still is.— us a sense of how fierce the fighting still is. yes, absolutely and i fighting still is. yes, absolutely and i think— fighting still is. yes, absolutely and i think it — fighting still is. yes, absolutely and i think it is _ fighting still is. yes, absolutely and i think it is worth _ fighting still is. yes, absolutely and i think it is worth pointing i fighting still is. yes, absolutely i and i think it is worth pointing out that in terms of the actual numbers, what british military intelligence are talking about will be 15,000 men killed in three months. there are other estimates we have heard that a higher still but as you say, it is a vivid illustration, the idea that in three months of what they say is not even a war but a special military operation, the idea that in that three month period, the russians have lost more than the entire soviet army did in nine years of disastrous war in afghanistan, it is a very, very clear indicator of the scale of the fighting here, of the scale of the fighting here, of the scale of the destruction. i think a lot of those deaths will have come at the start of the war, what you could frankly call a botched attempt to take the capital, kyiv. i know we
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don't get accurate daily figures, the russians don't tell us and i should say, the ukrainians have not until this point given any kind of running commentary on the numbers they are losing, they have kept it very close to their chest but the figures you referred to there, 50-100 figures you referred to there, 50—100 per day, were given by president zelensky in a press conference yesterday, answering media questions about the petition to stop people being able to leave the country. it was not a planned release of the information. but it does give us some kind of snapshot and indication of the numbers that are being lost will stop most of that fighting now is taking place in the east of the country, in the donbas, and as you say, it is incredibly brutal, there. yes, and also today. _ incredibly brutal, there. yes, and also today. we — incredibly brutal, there. yes, and also today, we are _ incredibly brutal, there. yes, and also today, we are expecting - incredibly brutal, there. yes, and also today, we are expecting to l incredibly brutal, there. yes, and i also today, we are expecting to hear president zelensky addressed the world economic forum, its summer gathering in davos and people might find it unusual that he is arresting business leaders and finance —— addressing business leaders but the impact of this war financially not
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only for ukraine but countries around the world are pretty clear as prices are rising forjust about everything. prices are rising for 'ust about everythingh prices are rising for 'ust about everything. absolutely and it is worth pointing _ everything. absolutely and it is worth pointing out _ everything. absolutely and it is worth pointing out that - everything. absolutely and it is worth pointing out that in - everything. absolutely and it is| worth pointing out that in some estimates, ukraine's gdp will fall by 50% this year. that is an absolutely staggering figure and it would in normal times make the running of any kind of government almost impossible. 0f running of any kind of government almost impossible. of course, they are on a warfooting, almost impossible. of course, they are on a war footing, they have national mobilisation and they have martial law, so things are operating slightly differently but they need help, i think it is very clear. we saw this huge programme that was announced and confirmed by the americans a few days ago, $40 billion and the eu has said more money is coming in but they do need money. you can'tjust win a war on enthusiasm and determination and will alone. you need cash and you need to keep paying people and you need to keep paying people and you need to keep paying people and you need to get the arms in. although as you say, it seems a bit odd to be addressing business leaders but it is really crucial to the ukrainian war effort that he does things like this. �* , ,., , war effort that he does things like this. �* ,,., , ., , ., war effort that he does things like this. �* , , ., , ., ., this. absolutely and 'ust a word because we * this. absolutely and 'ust a word because we are h this. absolutely and just a word because we are expecting - this. absolutely and just a word because we are expecting a - this. absolutely and just a word i because we are expecting a verdict
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in the war crimes trial of the russian soldier, that would be the first of the conflict.— first of the conflict. yes, absolutely, _ first of the conflict. yes, absolutely, and - first of the conflict. yes, absolutely, and it - first of the conflict. yes, | absolutely, and it seems, first of the conflict. yes, i absolutely, and it seems, it first of the conflict. yes, - absolutely, and it seems, it really is worth reflecting on how remarkable it is that this prosecution of this 21—year—old tank commander has taken place almost within weeks, maybe a couple of months of his killing of this 62—year—old ukrainian civilian. he has admitted to the killing but the question now is, was it a war crime or was he following orders? his lawyers have said he is not guilty of a war crime. i think public opinion here, generally, the consensus is that he is but it is the judgment of the court that matters. we understand the hearing will start in about an hour. we don't know how long it will take. but we expect we will find both a verdict and sentence if he is to receive one shortly after that. i know you will keep us posted on that. for now, thank you so much. let's return to one of our other top stories, one of the growing concerns
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over monkeypox. i'm joined now by professor catherine bennett, the chair in epidemiology with the institute for health transformation at deakin university in melbourne. thank you forjoining us. it is an interesting one, this, isn't it? seemingly it has come out of nowhere. we seemingly come as the public, know very little about it so maybe clarify a few things for us if you would, what do we know about the outbreak so far around the world? well, as you say, it is unusual to see the number of cases we are seeing now outside the parts of the world which is basically central and western africa where we know this virus is endemic, it is in animal reservoirs and we see human cases and human—to—human transmission from time to time. we have also seen travellers who have been in those areas, taking the virus back to the uk, singapore, overthe last areas, taking the virus back to the uk, singapore, over the last new year's. use see odd cases but we have not seen this number in close proximity in time and across so many
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different countries being reported at the same time. so it is unusual but it is possible that it is all stemming back to potentially one or two exposure events that happened to be what we call super spreader events, when we were talking about covid but you saw a number of people infected at the same time which has meant the virus has moved around the world, if these people were coming together from across countries, for a gathering or a party or whatever, and then took the virus home. and now of course the more actively research for it, we are finding more cases. the number of cases is the concern and we want to be sure that this is the virus as we understand it, it requires very close contact for transmission so it is really the household contacts, people who have spent a lot of time with a case, close physical contact, sexual contact, but also potentially respiratory droplets but it takes a greater degree of exposure than what we know with covid, for example.
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this casual licks —— less casual exposure, more close contact and we are hoping we will be able to explain their contacts by tracing back and finding out how they might link together. 50 it back and finding out how they might link together-— link together. so it is close contact and _ link together. so it is close contact and talk _ link together. so it is close contact and talk to - link together. so it is close contact and talk to me - link together. so it is close contact and talk to me a i link together. so it is close | contact and talk to me a bit link together. so it is close - contact and talk to me a bit about symptoms, what should people be looking out for and what should they do if they think they may have symptoms?— do if they think they may have s mtoms? ~ . ., symptoms? well, the incubation eered, symptoms? well, the incubation peered. the _ symptoms? well, the incubation peered, the time _ symptoms? well, the incubation peered, the time from _ symptoms? well, the incubation peered, the time from being - symptoms? well, the incubation - peered, the time from being exposed to developing symptoms is five or six days —— incubation period. up to two weeks and it might take as long as three weeks. the first symptoms might be quite hard to read, the usualfever, flu like might be quite hard to read, the usual fever, flu like symptoms that people might have, but what stands out about this infection is that you get swollen lymph nodes, you get muscle aches but particularly backache, and also, what is characteristic is the rash that then can develop so you get pustules or fluid—filled lesions on the skin.
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anything like that, people should be going straight to the doctor but if anyone has also had contact with people they know have recently come back from africa or who might be part of a network linking into some of the people who are now being reported as cases, that might link to certain venues. something like 93)’ to certain venues. something like gay bars or saunas in the uk, for example. if you think there could be a link, it is worth getting any of those more generic symptoms of fever and so on looked at. early diagnosis is really important, it helps not only manage that particular infection but also means potential close contacts of that person can be protected. we know that the smallpox vaccine works quite well against monkeypox virus. that is the key thing, getting in early so that infections are well managed and the contacts can be looked after. fiend contacts can be looked after. and somethin: contacts can be looked after. and something we _ contacts can be looked after. and something we have become very used to as a result of covid is self isolation, the uk now like belgium
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calling for 21 days of isolation if you fear you may be infected. talk to me about the importance of that, why is 21 days so important? we don't know _ why is 21 days so important? - don't know how long people are infectious for, usually it is considered, the period it takes until the lesions heal and there is a new, clear growth of skin over the lesions, and that usually coincides with the end of that infectious period but we cannot be sure. this is a way of trying to just stop that secondary transmission, asking people to remain isolated until they are well clear of infection and they have fully healed themselves and we have fully healed themselves and we have got this extra window of protection. it is important. itjust means we have a good chance of containing this, and that relies on that identification of cases and isolation and identifying contacts. we don't think people are infectious before they have symptoms so that helps us contain this so that if people, as soon as they have
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symptoms, are mindful, are isolating, whether they think it is covid or it could be monkeypox, wearing a mask, isolating, getting a diagnosis early is what matters and that then means we can contain this before it becomes a problem for the broader community. we before it becomes a problem for the broader community.— broader community. we are really crateful broader community. we are really grateful for _ broader community. we are really grateful for your— broader community. we are really grateful for your expertise - broader community. we are really grateful for your expertise this - grateful for your expertise this morning. thank you forjoining us. professor catherine bennett, chair of the institute for epidemiology and health transmission in melbourne. the senior civil servant sue gray is finalising her report on lockdown gatherings in downing street — and is expected to release her findings in the next few days. 0fficials she intends to name in the document had until 5pm yesterday to raise any objections. 0ur deputy political editor vicki young joins me now. so the wait is nearly over? yes, well, so the wait is nearly over? yes, well. we — so the wait is nearly over? yes, well, we think— so the wait is nearly over? yes, well, we think so. _ so the wait is nearly over? yes, well, we think so. there - so the wait is nearly over? yes, well, we think so. there have . so the wait is nearly over? joe: well, we think so. there have been several phases, haven't there, in the party—gate saga, and they have
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included the metropolitan police investigation which resulted in the prime minister himself being fined for breaking the covid laws that he himself drew up and then that police investigation they announced last week, that had come to an end, having issued more than 120 fines, and more than 80 people were found to have broken those rules and those laws. so that is now finished, which means that sue gray, the senior civil servant, can produce a report. she produced an interim report in january, she talked about a lack of leadership in number 10 downing st and the cabinet office and i think thatis and the cabinet office and i think that is where a lot of this focus will be and of course everyone will be looking to see whether particular people are blamed for all of this and the expectation is that many senior civil servants will bear the brunt of a lot of the criticism. some of those people who we know suggested some of these events, others themselves who will find —— who were fined. she will give a lot
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more detail about the events, who went to them, what form they took because we have not had any of that from the metropolitan police, they have not really explained why they have not really explained why they have brought in certain fines. that is where we are, we are expecting it sometime this week probably and a lot of conservative mps of course you have previously reserved judgment on the prime minister over all of this is that they are waiting for this to happen. we want to see the record profits that the industry is making at this time in productive capacity for our economy. insofar as that doesn't happen, the chancellor has been clear that we cannot rule anything out. and i think that must be the right position to adopt. philosophically, i don't want to be raising taxes, but nor, obviously, can we ignore the fact that there is a very challenging situation in terms of the cost of energy at the moment. you know, it will likely worsen ahead of next winter and the government is going to need to take action to address that.
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we are looking at the rising cost of living they are, what is interesting, actually, is it feels like some of the heat has gone out of theirs. downing street may be breathing easier because at the height of the investigation there was a lot of speculation about what might be included in the report, is it fair to say the pressure is off somewhat although we don't have the report yet. the somewhat although we don't have the re ort et. ., ., somewhat although we don't have the re ort et. . ., ., report yet. the damage to the prime minister has — report yet. the damage to the prime minister has already _ report yet. the damage to the prime minister has already been _ report yet. the damage to the prime minister has already been done, - report yet. the damage to the prime minister has already been done, you | minister has already been done, you could argue, he was fined, he was found to have broken the law, there was widespread lawbreaking in downing street, for lots of people, they have made theirjudgment on that. i suppose the other audience if you like our conservative mps, in the end, until the next election, they are only ones who can decide they are only ones who can decide the prime minister's political career, basically. i'd be satisfied or not? do not forget, once sue gray
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hasissued or not? do not forget, once sue gray has issued her report, there is another phase to all of theirs, an investigation by the parliamentary committee and they will look into whether the prime minister has misled parliament, some of the things he said about whether they had been rule breaking or not, denying there had been parties, that is the next phase of all this and lots of tory mps are worried about that because if you are found to have deliberately misled parliament, thatis have deliberately misled parliament, that is normally seen as a resigning matter. it is not over yet, but i do think there will be lots of members of the public who probably feel they have heard a lot about all of this, and have already made up their minds about it. , , ., ., ,, about it. interesting when you talk about it. interesting when you talk about the public, _ about it. interesting when you talk about the public, there _ about it. interesting when you talk about the public, there is - about it. interesting when you talk about the public, there is a - about it. interesting when you talkj about the public, there is a danger that it becomes a media circus, downing street want to draw a line and focus on the big issues which is the cost of living crisis. the truth is they will not go away until we get more detail. i is they will not go away until we get more detail.— is they will not go away until we get more detail. i think about the re ort, get more detail. i think about the reort, it get more detail. i think about the report. it will _ get more detail. i think about the report. it will go _ get more detail. i think about the report, it will go into _ get more detail. i think about the report, it will go into detail, - get more detail. i think about the report, it will go into detail, a - report, it will go into detail, a bit like you will remember the
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report into how the prime minister and his wife funded the refurbishment of their flat. we knew a lot about it but a report came out and it gave lots of detail, which was pretty uncomfortable for the prime minister. it could well be this is the case here, but i do think there will be an element of this report which will talk about the prime minister being let down by his closest advisers. i have heard that from some of those who worked in downing street saying he should have expected to have been told certain things, this website is why did you not use his ownjudgment certain things, this website is why did you not use his own judgment and show curiosity himself about the rules that he drew up and we all had to live by. we rules that he drew up and we all had to live b . ~ ., , rules that he drew up and we all had toliveb .~ ~ ,., rules that he drew up and we all had toliveb. ~ , to live by. we will keep a close eye on that and — to live by. we will keep a close eye on that and find _ to live by. we will keep a close eye on that and find the _ to live by. we will keep a close eye on that and find the correct - to live by. we will keep a close eye on that and find the correct video. | on that and find the correct video. thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with thomasz hello. it is looking fairly unsettled this week, with sunny spells and rain at times. the more persistent rain
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today will be across the south—east and east anglia. frequent showers in northern parts of scotland, wales, the midlands, the southwest and i would not rule out one or two rumbles of thunder, for example, in northern ireland. temperatures below par for the time of year, around 14 or 15 degrees for some of us. through the course of tonight, not much changes, outbreaks of rain possible almost anywhere at any time but towards the end of the night, it looks as though things will clear up a little bit, particularly around the western areas of the uk. now, the morning will be wet along the north sea coast, anywhere from edinburgh, through newcastle and actually, through the course of tuesday, this is where our most cloudy and wet weather will be. elsewhere across the country on tuesday, it is a breezy day with sunny spells and occasional showers. hello.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson and these are the latest headlines... thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. a 27—year—old health worker is arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life — after an infant died at birmingham children's hospital. people at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are being urged to self—isolate for three weeks. almost 700 trains a day are axed in scotland because of driver shortages and a pay dispute. black and asian women are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care — according to an investigation by the charity birthrights. and manchester city's premier league victory was marred by a pitch invasion in which villa's goalkeeper was allegedly attacked.
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sport and for a full round up, from the bbc sport centre: the big talking points, wrapping up the title, fourth in five seasons. they know how to do grammar. they produced more yesterday. they had to win against aston villa to assure themselves of winning the title, they were two —— zero down, they had to score three goals in five minutes to score three goals in five minutes to overturn that deficit and make sure of another premier league title. the other big talking point came after the final whistle when there was a pitch invasion and the aston villa goalkeeper robin 0lsen was attacked. we'll have more on that in a moment. matters at the other end of the table, with burnley
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the final team to be relegated from the final team to be relegated from the premier league from this season. this day is manchester city's. premier league champions again. well, that's the simple version. they did it in a very manchester city way. ten years on from their first premier league, and you know who, it was deja vu. 2—0 down against aston villa, title on the line, city did their final day thing again. ilkay gundogan and then rodri threaded a new story into city's modern premier league tapestry. all it needed now was the finishing touch. de bruyne cross, gundogan scores! you cannot imagine the joy of our tears, was today, it was incredible relief, satisfaction. i want to shout for the whole organisation, for man city. there were tears of a different kind at anfield as liverpool's late win over wolves was too little, too late.
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they will still have the champions league to play for next weekend. this, though, was a day for highs and lows, the ups and downs. leeds started sunday staring at relegation. they finished it up on cloud nine. 0h, brilliant! leeds are safe! that's meant burnley were not. defeat by newcastle ends their six—year stay in the top flight. just devastated, really. all the season, we have just not been good enough, frankly. too many mistakes and not enough goals and that's going to result in you being down lower down the table. higher up, tottenham seized fourth spot and champions league football with a 5—0 win at norwich. son heung—min's brace means he shares the golden boot with mo salah. manchester united stumbled into sixth after losing at crystal palace. they will play in the europa league under new boss erik ten hag. and amongst city's celebrations, more unsavoury conduct in the pitch invasion.
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the club say they will investigate after celebrations, more unsavoury aston villa's robin 0lsen was attacked. what the hell is going through fans minds when they have just won the title, and we saw it in the forest sheffield united game, we saw it in the everton v palace game, we have seen it again today. it has to stop. yeah, we have seen one culprit, we have seen one jailed. but the premier league and the fa, they need to protect. that's the players place of work. they have got to do more. once the fans had dispersed, city were able to savour the latest addition to their trophy cabinet. and as the sun sets on another memorable premier league season, the blue moon has risen again. ben croucher, bbc news. this morning there have been developments from greater manchester police. they say two fans have been charged but enquiries into the reported assault of a player on the etihad pitch are ongoing, with officers working with both clubs.
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these eight inquiries into the robin 0lsen assault are ongoing, it is a worrying trend, the fifth pitch invasion across the leaks in the past week. and it should be a day to remember at the french open, with novak djokovic, rafael nadal and five british players all in action today. one of those british stars who'll be on court is emma raducanu. the us open champion is making her debut at roland garros and will face the czech qualifier linda noskova in the opening round. britain's harriett dart, heather watson, dan evans and cameron norrie are all also on court throughout the day. that's all the sport for now. manchester city fans can relive what happened yesterday, an open top bus tour on the streets of manchester where they will parade the trophy. no trophy celebrations yet for liverpool when you consider despite the two trophies they have in the bag, there is the small matter of the champions league final to come in paris this weekend.
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an inquiry by the charity birthrights says black and asian women in the uk are being harmed by racial discrimination in maternity care. the year—long study found that some women felt unsafe, were denied pain relief and faced racial stereotyping. divya talwar reports. i kept thinking, is there something wrong with me? what if i actually don't make it out of here? hiral had leila almost a year ago. she says it was a traumatic labour. i felt shivery, my whole body was achey, every time i told the midwives that i don't feel good, they were like, "oh, well, you look fine." it was 24 hours before doctors realised hiral was seriously ill. she had sepsis. it was just so frustrating that, like, you're just not listened to. it was a fight the whole way. it was constant fighting. and... it's not what having a baby should be like.
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you shouldn't have to keep fighting. hiral believes her race played a part in her treatment. so i noticed, like, with the racial stereotypes and the micro aggressions, i think they'd come in and they'd be like," morning, princess." she meant princess as in, "princess", i think indian girls, asian girls are little daddy's girls, mummy�*s girls, get everything handed to them. can't handle pain. instead of taking me seriously, i think theyjust thought i was a big crybaby. an inquiry by the charity birthrights had similar stories to hiral�*s. black and asian women reported experiencing racial stereotyping and micro aggressions and felt dismissed. tinu felt ignored during her three pregnancies. with her youngest daughter, she had unexplained bleeding, but was told it was just an infection. it got worse and she ended up needing multiple blood transfusions. if i had not have been hospitalised, i don't think i'd be
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sitting here right now. and i don't think my daughter would be here either. anotherfinding of the inquiry was black women being denied pain relief based on racial stereotyping of tolerance. i never got anything other than gas and air, and even that, i had to beg for. everybody handles pain differently. i don't know where people get this idea that we can handle more than most people. all my experiences in my pregnancies have been tainted by my race. the report highlights the need for urgent action including better education. the key thing for me to come out of this inquiry as a health care professional is the gaps in our knowledge and the lack of understanding when it comes to how unconscious bias is consistent in the care we provide.
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a new maternity task force has been set up which the department of health and social care said would address unacceptable disparities in care. tinu hopes these disparities will end long before her girls need maternity care. i have two daughters. i don't want them to have to go through what i've gone through. divya talwal, bbc news. joining me now is sandra igwe, co—chair of the inquiry, and founder of the motherhood group which aims to amplify the voices of black mothers after they face discrimination during pregnancy and birth. she is also the author of my black motherhood. what was telling about that report, it is not what having a baby should feel like. you carried out some of
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this research. you have been involved in this in inquiry. individual pieces can turn out to be a huge problem. it individual pieces can turn out to be a huge problem-— a huge problem. it all adds up to a massive problem. _ a huge problem. it all adds up to a massive problem. some _ a huge problem. it all adds up to a massive problem. some of- a huge problem. it all adds up to a massive problem. some of the - massive problem. some of the findings from the report show that black and brown women are constantly at the end of racism, micro—aggression, constant stereotyping and being dismissed, unhurt, not listen to, not taken seriously which ultimately puts black and brown women at high risk and leads to poor repair and near misses and sometimes death as well. you have your own personal experience of this. can you explain what you encountered? the experience of this. can you explain what you encountered?— experience of this. can you explain what you encountered? the work i do is based on — what you encountered? the work i do is based on my _ what you encountered? the work i do is based on my personal _ what you encountered? the work i do is based on my personal experience, | is based on my personal experience, not receiving pain relief after begging for hours and been told that i am strong enough to handle the pain. not feeling like i was treated with kindness and care and feeling
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like i did not have much choice in the way and how i gave birth which unfortunately led to psychological harm and trauma afterwards as a result. i5 harm and trauma afterwards as a result. , ., , harm and trauma afterwards as a result. , . , ., , result. is there any element of this that it could _ result. is there any element of this that it could be _ result. is there any element of this that it could be maternity - result. is there any element of this that it could be maternity servicesl that it could be maternity services are pushed to the limit, under resourced and understaffed and how much is quite clear that is a race problem? how do you separate the two? we problem? how do you separate the two? . . . ., , problem? how do you separate the two? ~ ., , ., ., two? we cannot deny that there are issues regarding _ two? we cannot deny that there are issues regarding the _ two? we cannot deny that there are issues regarding the health - two? we cannot deny that there are issues regarding the health care - issues regarding the health care services being understaffed, overworked, tired and frustrated, thatis overworked, tired and frustrated, that is undeniable. but we cannot deny that there are statistics that clearly highlight and show that black and brown women, black women are four times more likely to have complications, and agents are three times as likely. the statistics show that black and brown women are at a disadvantage. looking at the
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numbers, we can clearly see even though staff members may be overworked and underfunded, why are black women and brown women at the most risk? it is a conversation that needs to happen around how race and racism play a part in these outcomes for black and ethnic minority women. i wonder what the conversation with son like and what it would look like and what it would deliver? it is great that we can talk about this but unless we can deliver change, this does not change much for those women who are facing those problems. what needs to change on a day—to—day basis? what needs to change on a day-to-day basis? ., , basis? one thing about inquiry it sets out five _ basis? one thing about inquiry it sets out five actions _ basis? one thing about inquiry it sets out five actions for - basis? one thing about inquiry it sets out five actions for change, | sets out five actions for change, one of them committing to be an antiracist organisation. racism has got something to do with the way that black and brown women are treated, being treated as equal to your white counterparts, and allowing everyone to have a
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personalised care as well. secondly, allow black and brown women to be decision—makers in their care. and listen. not listen to here but to understand and take on board every concern that a mother might raise. my concern that a mother might raise. my favourite one is creating a safe and inclusive work culture, workforce culture, making sure that we see at all levels black and brown women at policy level and at the level where they are interacting and engaging directly with black and brown people. engaging directly with black and brown people-— engaging directly with black and brown people. engaging directly with black and brown --eole. ., ~' . ., brown people. thank you so much for ex-alainin brown people. thank you so much for explaining that _ brown people. thank you so much for explaining that and _ brown people. thank you so much for explaining that and good _ brown people. thank you so much for explaining that and good luck- brown people. thank you so much for explaining that and good luck with . explaining that and good luck with the rest of your work. we should say the rest of your work. we should say the nhs is investing £7 million in tackling maternity inequality and making sure at least three quarters of minority ethnic women are cared for by those same midwives.
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new research has calculated just how much family budgets are going up by — and it's a lot. basic goods, services and energy prices for a typical family with two young children are around £400 a month more expensive than they were last year, according to data from loughborough university. our business correspondent noor nanji has been looking at the research and has the details. this will not be a huge surprise for a lot of people. if you go to the supermarket, energy bill, everything is more expensive. we supermarket, energy bill, everything is more expensive.— is more expensive. we have been heafina is more expensive. we have been hearing about _ is more expensive. we have been hearing about prices _ is more expensive. we have been hearing about prices are - is more expensive. we have been hearing about prices are going - is more expensive. we have been | hearing about prices are going up, we have experience it. we know it is the lowest income families that are being hardest hit. today, we have new research that puts figures, hard numbers on to that. this data by loughborough university was calculated by looking at the course one year ago of what people consider to be the minimum acceptable standard of living and comparing that to where we are now. firstly, families with two young children are
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now facing cuts of at least £400 a month more. that isjust for the bare minimum. and within that, it will not surprise you that household energy is going up the most. we that household energy, setting families back by nearly £130 per month. it is not only energy. transport, childcare, social activities, all of thatis childcare, social activities, all of that is starting to weigh on families. that is leading to difficult decisions for people like stacey, stacey is a single mum of two young children and she told us that she is having to take things like treats and big out of the budget. things like alton towers, taking my nine—year—old to alton towers, we can't do that any more. and they notice the difference as well when their friends at school can go to places like that and i just simply can't afford it. it's really, really affecting me at the minute. mentally, physically as well. i love doing stuff for my kids, i love
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going out on my days off and making sure they are happy. i can't fulfil that. itjust makes me feel like i am a little less of a mum. i just don't know what i've got to do or what i've got to cut down on to pay the stuff. food has gone up as well. my average food bill used to be £50 a week, it has gone up to £90 a week now. so that is a noticeable difference for me. i am having to kind of shop less, we are trying to eat healthily as well, all the healthy food has gone up, more expensive than the junk food now. a difficult situation. unfortunately, this is not unusual. if you are on a lower wage a bigger proportion of your income goes on food and energy. we have been hearing about how the cost of living is going up, last week we had the inflation figures for april, now at 9%. forthe inflation figures for april, now at 9%. for the most vulnerable in society, the research found it is
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closer, it feels more like 13%. separate to that, food in particular, the consumer group found that hundreds of grocery prices have been going up by as much as 20%. that is including basics, milk and butter. the consumer report found there were fewer authors. fresh fruit and vegetables, that is making it tough for people. a lot of people are struggling, some for the first time. we spoke to the money advice trust to give advice on what to do if you are finding things tough. not everyone claims all of the benefits that they are entitled to and as your situation changes, your situation in regard to what you are entitled to can change as well. so if you haven't looked at that for quite some time, it is worth looking at that again. there are also lots of grants and different kinds of support that people can access and it is worth, we would always say, considering talking to debt crisis charities like national debtline or your citizens advice bureau, and they can help you understand what else it is that you might be
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able to access in your situation. so that is all about kind of the income side. 0n the spending side, then, the advice there is, we will all be familiar with it, looking at ways that you can cut your budget. that is very difficult, i think, for lots of people at the moment, particularly people who are already managing on quite a tight budget. some good advice. they also told us what not to do, not to avoid the situation and not to avoid, don't put it behind you, don't cancel your direct debits because that can make things worse. 50 direct debits because that can make things worse-— direct debits because that can make thins worse. . , , ., ~ , things worse. so many things to keep an e e on things worse. so many things to keep an eye on at — things worse. so many things to keep an eye on at the _ things worse. so many things to keep an eye on at the moment, _ things worse. so many things to keep an eye on at the moment, thank- things worse. so many things to keep an eye on at the moment, thank you | an eye on at the moment, thank you to our business correspondence. we can speak to fiona small, who is a mum of two in peckham and founder of the young mum's support network. thank you forjoining us. hopefully you could hear some of that. it
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illustrates some of the pressures you and your members are facing. what is the challenge right now? there are so many challenges, it is very common in the news around the cost of living, families on low income, people really struggle living in severe poverty, we have actually seen mothers who are saying by friday, they are left with £1. they have no money and they are really, really struggling. this is having a massive deterioration on their mental health and well—being. and self worth as well. not understanding, you know, where the next money is coming in, how you are going to feed your children. we recently offered a programme where we worked with another organisation providing financial support for those who did not know about their entitlements. to date, we have
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worked with 140 mothers and have managed to get in excess of £2000 where some people's universal credit had stopped or there was a situation and as a result of our intervention, money has been reinstated and they have found extra income. you know, something that was said in a while ago, a lot of people are suffering in silence and you are overwhelmed with a combination so many things, reaching out to organisations is really important. i reaching out to organisations is really important.— reaching out to organisations is reall im ortant. ., ., really important. i wonder, we often hear those on _ really important. i wonder, we often hear those on the _ really important. i wonder, we often hear those on the lowest _ really important. i wonder, we often hear those on the lowest incomes i really important. i wonder, we oftenl hear those on the lowest incomes are the most badly affected, disproportionately affected by price rises. is that what your members are telling you, the little increases that some people would not notice have a huge impact if your budget is limited? ii have a huge impact if your budget is limited? , ., . have a huge impact if your budget is limited? ., ., ., , .,
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have a huge impact if your budget is limited? ., ., ., ., limited? if you are already on a titht limited? if you are already on a tight budget. — limited? if you are already on a tight budget, and _ limited? if you are already on a tight budget, and you - limited? if you are already on a tight budget, and you have - limited? if you are already on a tight budget, and you have not| tight budget, and you have not budgeted for an increase, wages have not gone up, jobs at the moment, some people have to weigh up the cost of childcare versus what they have to pay in rent. it depends on their housing situation, some people are in temporary accommodation, are reliant on housing benefit or additional income, those slight increases, two others are major in their financial situation. increases, two others are ma'or in their financial situation.�* increases, two others are ma'or in their financial situation. thank you ve much their financial situation. thank you very much for— their financial situation. thank you very much for talking _ their financial situation. thank you very much for talking to _ their financial situation. thank you very much for talking to us - their financial situation. thank you very much for talking to us this - very much for talking to us this morning. we have got many interesting stories and important stories. thank you for being with us. founder of the young mum support network. the story, a health worker administering poison with intent to endanger life at birmingham children's hospital. 0ur
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correspondent is at the hospital. it is an astonishing case. what more do we know right now? the is an astonishing case. what more do we know right now?— we know right now? the details of this incident _ we know right now? the details of this incident are _ we know right now? the details of this incident are limited. - we know right now? the details of this incident are limited. we - we know right now? the details of this incident are limited. we know that so far the was being treated here at immingham children's hospital on thursday when they died. in the paediatric intensive care unit. in terms of what happened next, the police arrested that same evening a 27—year—old woman at a property in the west midlands. that was on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life. she has been released as investigations continue. while forensic tests are examined. she has been suspended from her role at the hospital by the nhs trust responsible here and they have issued a statement saying they are supporting the family of the infant at this distressing time and ask that premise privacy is respected during this process. the hospital treats tens of thousands of children
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and young people every year. it is especially a leading centre for paediatric care. there is no doubt this news will have shocked and saddened the people work here. thank ou ve saddened the people work here. thank you very much- — saddened the people work here. thank you very much. please _ saddened the people work here. thank you very much. please keep _ saddened the people work here. thank you very much. please keep us posted throughout the morning. now it's time for a look at the weather with thomasz. hello. it is looking fairly unsettled this week, with sunny spells and rain at times. the more persistent rain today will be across the south—east and east anglia. frequent showers in northern parts of scotland, wales, the midlands, the southwest and i would not rule out one or two rumbles of thunder, for example, in northern ireland. temperatures below par for the time of year, around 14 or 15 degrees for some of us. through the course of tonight, not much changes, outbreaks of rain possible almost anywhere at any time but towards the end of the night, it looks as though things will clear up a little bit, particularly around the western areas of the uk. now, the morning will be wet along the north sea coast,
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anywhere from edinburgh, through newcastle and actually, through the course of tuesday, this is where our most cloudy and wet weather will be. elsewhere across the country on tuesday, it is a breezy day with sunny spells and occasional showers.
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this is bbc news. i'm ben thompson and these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. people in the uk at high risk of developing monkeypox after coming into contact with positive cases are being urged to self—isolate for three weeks. a verdict is due in the war crimes trial of a 21—year—old russian soldier who admits killing a civilian in the early stages of the invasion. thousands more youngsters will end up in care unless there's a "radical reset" of the system — that's the warning from a landmark review of child protection in england. a 27—year—old health worker in the uk is arrested on suspicion of administering poison with intent to endanger life, after an infant died while receiving care. us presidentjoe biden says he would use military intervention
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to protect taiwan if it were attacked by china.

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