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tv   BBC World News  BBC News  May 24, 2022 5:00am-5:31am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. images they'd rather you didn't see, the hacked data passed to the bbc showing china's detention and indoctrination of uyghur muslims. a warning from the un, russia's blockade of ukraine could push tens of millions into severe hunger. you are talking about a declaration of war on global food security. it will have extraordinary consequences. new calls for british prime minister borisjohnson to resign as more photos emerge of lock down gatherings at downing street. �*democracies versus autocracies�*, that's how president biden frames a meeting with allies injapan,
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aimed at countering china's influence. (singing). and we meet the nigerian queen who fits in her role as a royal with entertaining her subjects. hello and welcome. documents seen by the bbc that are said to have been hacked from chinese police computers show that uyghur prisoners in the western region of xinjiang are shot on sight if they are caught trying to escape. thousands of photographs shed light on a secretive system of mass incarceration. the chinese government has dismissed as �*fake news�*, claims that uyghurs are arbitrarily detained in the region. john sudworth, who spent many years reporting from xinjiang as the bbc�*s china correspondent, has this special report.
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these are the faces of china never intended us to see. from inside its system of mass incarceration and xinjiang. they insist these camps are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3000 of them show the reality of how whole swathes of uyghur society have swept up person by person stopping the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention. the youngest, just 15. the uyghurs with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots and a history of separatism and violence have long faced tightening government control. and with mounting criticism
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over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uyghurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism.— from extremism. this is classified _ from extremism. this is classified internal - from extremism. this is - classified internal government information.— information. the files, said to have hacked _ information. the files, said to have hacked from _ information. the files, said to have hacked from police - have hacked from police computer service in xinjiang by a source whose identity is unknown with first past to this xinjiang scholar who in turn shared them with the bbc and they raised serious questions about china's narrative. you have police _ about china's narrative. you have police officers - about china's narrative. you have police officers in - about china's narrative. 7m, have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to some of the men stopping some of the men have their arms in a funny position as if they were handcuffed, so this is really powerful. i was looking through these images on my laptop in these images on my laptop in the living room and had to get up the living room and had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed.- take a break. i was overwhelmed. ., . ~ take a break. i was overwhelmed. . . ~ , overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain — also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of
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draconianjail spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uyghurs on masse. just for growing a beard, this man was sentenced to 16 years in jail. man was sentenced to 16 years injail. his chosen man was sentenced to 16 years in jail. his chosen expression of uyghur identity forcibly removed. by speaking to members of the uyghur daily aspirin places like turkey the bbc has been able to verify the data, showing it to contain real people. this man for example knew his eldest son had been jailed but the database tells and for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences. although as evidence, only has son's devout islamic faith is listed. in response to questions, the chinese embassy in the us issued a statement, saying in the grave and complex counterterrorism situation in xinjiang the authorities had taken a host of decisive,
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robust deradicalisation measures so that people could live a safe, happy and fulfilling life although there was no attempt to address any of the hacked data directly. it includes these images, once again from deep within the system that appear to offer further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people, not for what they have done, but for who they are. the united nations�* world food programme has described russia's blockade of ukrainian ports as a �*declaration of war on global food security', that could push tens of millions of people into severe food shortages. it echoes concerns raised by the ukrainian government, and wider accusations that the kremlin is deliberately targeting food supplies. 0ur economics editor faisal islam reports. across the world, food and energy crises are hitting households, increasing social instability and hunger, and leading to whole
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countries going bust. sri lanka at first, but more are feared to be heading in the same direction. from southeast asia to the middle east, and it's also affecting the uk, too. with russia's war in ukraine making these supply shocks much worse, the economic stakes are very high here, and across the world, according to one of britain's top bankers. many of the conversations here in davos have been what percentage likelihood you attach to a recession? i'll say 50—50. right now, thise emerging markets racked up debts understandably during the pandemic, and many, perhaps dozens, will go bust. is that how you see it? hopefully not dozens, but when you have political instability, cost of living crisis, also importing energy, it's going to be tough. part of the problem is that the natural response that should bring down energy orfood prices — producing more — isn't working because, for example, russia is blockading ukraine's food exports. if we don't open those ports, you're talking about a declaration of war on global food security.
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it'll have extraordinary consequences. we are already facing the worst food crisis since world war ii. and when you take 400 million people that are fed by the food that comes out of ukraine, and you shut that off, and then you add on top of that fertiliser problems, droughts, food cost, fuel costs, we're looking at a hellstorm on earth. the world's biggest importers of wheat, the egyptians, told us they can cope for now, though prices are surging. the government is putting in place and utilising tools to limit that price increase, especially on the most vulnerable. we do have a high degree of resilience, in terms of our stocks of basic commodities, and we will continue to explore and to cooperate with our partners in alternative sources. this forum is normally about a combination of high finance and high politics.
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so far, it's been about the most basic of commodities — food — and the soaring prices affecting everywhere, including britain. and the fear of many here is that this is not an accident — it's a conscious strategy — the weaponisation of famine by the kremlin. a standing ovation for president zelensky�*s video address. his deputy prime minister says the west needs to get ukraine's food exports past russia's ships. so, we need the assistance of our partners, international partners, to secure our exports through the seaports, so i mean from the defence point of view, to find a way to build a corridor, or another solution, how to give the opportunity to ukrainian vessels. some sort of safe passage? safe passage, yes. events in ukraine have already proven how horrific, but mountains of its grain, blocked from reaching the world's most hungry, could yet make that worse. faisal islam, bbc news in davos, switzerland. it's democracies
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versus autocracies. that is how president biden characterised the status of the so—called quad countries compared to the likes of russia and china, in his opening comments in tokyo. the quad is made up of australia, japan, india as well as the us. ahead of the meeting, they all reaffirmed their commitment to the alliance. but it was comments made by mr biden yesterday that made the headlines, when he was asked this question about taiwan at a news conference. are you willing to get involved militarily to defend taiwan if it comes to that?— militarily to defend taiwan if it comes to that? yes. you are? that is the _ it comes to that? yes. you are? that is the commitment - it comes to that? jazz you are? that is the commitment we made. look, here is the situation. we agree with the one china policy, we signed onto it and all the attendant agreements made from there, but the idea that it can be taken by force,
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just taken by force is just not appropriate, it will dislocate the entire region and be another action similar to what happened in ukraine. brian hioe is the founding editor of new bloom magazine in taiwan, andjoins us now from taipei. welcome to you, thanks very much for being with us. what did you make of president biden�*s comments? is it a departure from us policy? it happened a few times before. at this point, president biden makes a comment that seems to support taiwan, which suggests the us will become involved but then these comments are often quickly walked back by the state department and because this has happened a few times they wouldn't taken as representing a substantial shift from policy in that way. how do people there feel about these comments? i how do people there feel about these comments?— how do people there feel about these comments? i think people are often supportive _ these comments? i think people are often supportive of- these comments? i think people are often supportive of views - are often supportive of views in the us that seem to support
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taiwan, particularly the us has been on security ground, inaudible is this more substantive or is it another gaffe so i think there would be others, probably there would be others, probably the general public looking for more clarity stopping at the same time there is debate amongst experts and policymakers about the advantages and disadvantages from shifting from strategic ambiguity to strategic clarity. is there a pervasive fare or feeling that china could launch some kind of attack to take back control of taiwan in the near future?— back control of taiwan in the near future? ., , ., ., near future? threats from china have been _ near future? threats from china have been long-standing, - near future? threats from china have been long-standing, it - near future? threats from china have been long-standing, it has have been long—standing, it has gone on for decades. at the same time and don't think people are panicking in the streets just yet because a lot of these military threats occur very far from taiwan, itjust blends into the news as another news item. often times it is in
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the background, news more focused on covid or the were in ukraine but with the war in ukraine but with the war in ukraine there is a lot of concern regarding that in taiwan so i think that is the way in which particularly developments elsewhere in the world offers another frame for reading issues in taiwan, because it is parallel to taiwan. because it is parallel to taiwan-_ because it is parallel to taiwan. , ., ., taiwan. china sees taiwan as a breakaway _ taiwan. china sees taiwan as a breakaway province _ taiwan. china sees taiwan as a breakaway province that - taiwan. china sees taiwan as a breakaway province that will i breakaway province that will eventually be returned as part of china as a whole, what is your view? 50 of china as a whole, what is your view?— of china as a whole, what is our view? �*, ., ., your view? so it's one of those thin . s your view? so it's one of those things because _ your view? so it's one of those things because if _ your view? so it's one of those things because if you - your view? so it's one of those things because if you think - things because if you think about the cost of the chinese invasion, it is not like china could take taiwan any time stopping there would be significant loss of life, the economic blow would be heavy, china is self—reliant on tony's supply change regarding semiconductor manufacturing so china would suffer cost however china would suffer cost however china projects that it would be easy so it is actually unlikely in the short—term although
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there is often discussion of china attempting to bounce its capacities, the ability to transport enough trips over to maintain a long—term occupation of taiwan, china is currently working on this and they are looking at the war in ukraine for example, people are taking away lessons from that stopping attempted to push taiwan towards more asymmetric warfare, seeing this as a successful strategy in ukraine and so far as a smaller country could fend off a much larger enemy. �*s i think is still being worked out but china wants to make it seem as though taiwan could be there is any time and this is only staving off the inevitable. interestingly in the last few minutes president biden has reiterated that there has been no change to the policy of strategic ambiguity on taiwan. good to get your thoughts, thank you for your time. rescue workers in iran say that dozens of people are still trapped in the rubble of a ten—storey building that collapsed in the city of abadan. at least six people have been killed, and more than 25 people injured.
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the bbc�*s azadeh moshiri has this report. it is simply impossible to see through the smoke, after this building collapsed in south—western iran. it was still under construction, and its lower floors were already open to shoppers, and located on one of abadan's busiest commercial streets, it is thought up to 150 people were inside when it crumbled. translation: the building collapsed suddenly. - this building had no strength at all. as news of the collapse troubled, i7 rescue teams rushed to the site, from abadan, as well as nearby cities, according to the iranian red crescent. rescuers are still trying to find more survivors, as well as bodies. translation: more casualties are still under the rubble. - the risk is high, because the rest of the surrounding buildings are also collapsing. officials say they still don't know how this could have
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happened, how this ten—storey building could have fallen apart so quickly, with its beams and concrete floors crushing the cars beneath it. chanting. but for residents, the answer is clear. they filled the nearby streets, blaming local authorities, and are declaring it a day of mourning for the city. for now, the building's owner and its contractor have both been arrested, as police try to piece together who was responsible. and in the meantime, the search through the building's ruins continues. azadeh moshiri, bbc news. let's bring you some live pictures now from the funeral in teheran of sayyad khodai, a colonel in the revolutionary guards. he was killed by two gunmen on sunday. iran has blamed elements linked to the global arrogance for his
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death. this is a very high—profile killing and we have heard from the prime minister saying, have heard from the prime ministersaying, i insist have heard from the prime minister saying, i insist on the serious pursuit of the killers by security officials and i have no doubt that the blood of this great martyr will be avenged. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: how this nigerian queen combines her humanitarian work with keeping her younger subjects royally entertained. in the biggest international sporting spectacle ever seen, up to 30 million people have taken part in sponsored athletic events to aid famine relief in africa. the first of what the makers of star wars hope will be thousands of queues started forming at 7am. taunting which led to scuffles, scuffles to fighting, fighting to full—scale riot as the liverpool fans broke out of their area and into
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the juventus enclosure. the belgian police had lost control. the whole world will. mourn the tragic death of mr nehru today. he was the father of the indian people from the day— of independence. the oprah winfrey show comes to an end after 25 years and more than 11,500 episodes. the chat show has made her one of the richest people on the planet. geri halliwell, otherwise known as ginger spice, has announced she's left the spice girls. argh! i don't believe it! she's the one with the bounce, the go, girl power. not geri. why? this is bbc news. the latest headlines: hacked data and pictures showing the indoctrination of uyghurs muslims by china. a warning from the un — russia's blockade of ukraine
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could push tens of millions into severe hunger. borisjohnson will face more pressure today to explain photographs that show him drinking at a gathering in downing street at a time when parties were not allowed because of the covid pandemic. the pictures were obtained by itv news, which says they were taken in november 2020. he's already been fined for breaking the lockdown rules his government imposed at a different event. an official report on the parties is expected to be published soon. the opposition labour party said the images showed the prime minister lied to parliament when he repeatedly insisted all covid rules had been followed. this is not a work meeting, this was a social gathering clearly against the rules. borisjohnson clearly against the rules. boris johnson knew this clearly against the rules. borisjohnson knew this and it seems like he is laughing at the public now. it is a part of parliament people will be disgusted by, i'm pretty certain of that. in the united states,
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she was an actress, director, and beauty queen. now she's a nigerian queen. angelique—monet gureje married the monarch of eti—0ni in 0sun state last year. she's been speaking to dami 0duolowu from bbc africa's �*what�*s new�* programme about how she's embracing her new life, and also about a very special skill she's brought to the kingdom. from beauty queen to royal queen. thank you for letting us into your kingdom. this is a royal majesty, angelique—monet gureje. born in america now wife of a nigerian king. how do you want to be addressed? the queen came to live in community in south—western nigeria after marrying 2021. so how did she adapt to the change from a showbiz life in america? first of all, it's something i'm really proud of, because the time i spent in africa, i
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married to a king and i have long—standing road to go ahead, and for the people and i'm happy to be here. just like a fairytale that came stop. haifa fairytale that came stop. how did ou fairytale that came stop. how did you meet. _ fairytale that came stop. how did you meet, your— fairytale that came stop. how did you meet, your husband thinking? we did you meet, your husband thinking?— did you meet, your husband thinkinu? ~ ~ ., ., thinking? we known each other for a while. _ thinking? we known each other for a while, it _ thinking? we known each other for a while, it was _ thinking? we known each other for a while, it was actually - for a while, it was actually our humanitarian projects that brought us together. which was like, to me it's a faith from god. it was an easy adjustment because i have always loved africa and i have always loved nigeria, and i learnt in the transatlantic trade some of my ways come from the traditions. it's been a beautiful adjustment, to be honest, i feel like as long as you are willing to give to the people, thenit willing to give to the people, then it makes yourjob a lot easier.
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(singing). and what she gives is the unique skill of ventriloquism. i started doing it for humanitarian reasons, for over a decade now, i had retired from and performing full—time. but the ventriloquism is something i have been doing around the world, to make people happy because it does. this is milk! milk, i would like you to meet all of our friends again. i like you to meet all of our friends again.— like you to meet all of our friends again. i already know who they _ friends again. i already know who they are! _ friends again. i already know who they are! this _ friends again. i already know who they are! this is - friends again. i already know who they are! this is the - who they are! this is the oldest coca _ who they are! this is the oldest coca plantation i who they are! this is the oldest coca plantation in j who they are! this is the i oldest coca plantation in all of nigeria. that's right and where are you from? the united states of america _ where are you from? the united states of america but _ where are you from? the united states of america but now i i where are you from? the united states of america but now i am | states of america but now i am here _ states of america but now i am here. �* . , states of america but now i am here. �* ., , ., here. are ill ready to welcome milk to be _ here. are ill ready to welcome milk to be here _ here. are ill ready to welcome milk to be here with _ here. are ill ready to welcome milk to be here with you, i here. are ill ready to welcome milk to be here with you, milk the cow. ., ., .
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the cow. the art of ventricle -- ventriloquism _ the cow. the art of ventricle -- ventriloquism my - the cow. the art of ventricle j -- ventriloquism my mother the cow. the art of ventricle i -- ventriloquism my mother sent —— ventriloquism my mother sent me. gracie the pig became friends and we became friends after. $55 friends and we became friends after. a ,_, friends and we became friends after. a , , ., ., after. as ma'esty and i are workinu after. as ma'esty and i are working on — after. as majesty and i are working on a _ after. as majesty and i are working on a few - after. as majesty and i are working on a few film i after. as majesty and i are i working on a few film projects and some animations as well as telling the history of cape town and the work we are doing. could say i am retired from acting, full—time performing. the globalfilm acting, full—time performing. the global film industry is huge. would you consider being part of? huge. would you consider being art of? �* , ., huge. would you consider being artof?, ., part of? any great story, the alace part of? any great story, the palace has — part of? any great story, the palace has let _ part of? any great story, the palace has let me _ part of? any great story, the palace has let me know- part of? any great story, the palace has let me know they| palace has let me know they support me doing things that make a difference, if it's a beautiful story and it happens to be in hollywood, definitely we are open—minded to it. the we are open-minded to it. the queen with — we are open-minded to it. the queen with a _ we are open-minded to it. the queen with a very _ we are open—minded to it. the queen with a very special skill. now here's the latest sports news from the bbc sport centre.
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hello. day three of the french open promises to be busy. rain on tuesday means more first round matches to complete. novak djokovic had no troubles, though, under the roof of phillipe chatrier, cruising through his first round tie. and he's waded into the wimbledon points polemic. the defending champion has said it's right that the tournament has lost its ranking points for banning russian and belarusian players. djokovic was speaking after his victory overjapan's yoshihito nishioka, 6-3, 6-1, 6-0. the world number one is defending 2,000 ranking points from his win at roland garros last year and he needs them. i'm glad that players got together, with atp, the governing body of men's tennis, and show to the grand slam, that, you know, when there is a mistake happening, and there was, from the wimbledon side, we have to, we had to show there is going to be some
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consequences. the women's defending champion is out, though. barbora krejcikova was beaten by french teenager diane parry. the nineteen—year—old came back from losing the first set 6—1 to knock out last year's winner. and four—time grand slam champion naomi 0saka is also out, losing to amanda animasova. 0saka, whose preparation for the tournament was disrupted by an achilles injury, really struggled with her serve and had eight double faults. she went on to lose 7—5, 6—4. her defeat comes 12 months after withdrawing from last year's event because of mental health struggles. following her match, she said she's not sure if she'll play at wimbledon after ranking points were stripped from the tournament — describing it as being �*more like an exhibition' without points on offer. it's kind of like, i don't want to say pointless, no pun intended, but, like, i, iam
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the type of power that gets motivated by seeing my ranking go motivated by seeing my ranking 9° up, motivated by seeing my ranking go up, and stuff like that. i'm going to see how the decisions turn out, that's going to be because i'm sure there's going to be a little bit of back and forth with the whole point situation, then i guess i'll make my decision. it's going to be a fifth season for hamburg in the german second tier. they lost on aggregate despite a first leg lead in their bundesliga play—off with hertha berlin. marvin plattenhardt�*s stunning free—kick helped hertha stay in germany's top division. that gave them a 2—0 win at hamburg in the second leg of the promotion—relegation playoff. felix magath's side had trailed by a goal after the first leg in berlin. after a day off, the riders are back on their bikes for the final week of the giro d'italia. richard carapaz is leading the first grand tour of the year but not by much. the ecuadorian is just seven seconds ahead going into tuesday's sixteenth stage from salo to aprica.
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you can get all the latest sports news at our website — that's bbc.com/sport. but from me, and the rest of the sport team, goodbye. i'll be back with all the top business stories later. hello. after a wet night across parts of england and wales, keep the umbrellas handy wherever you are during tuesday. there will be some sunny spells. it won't be wet all the time, but you may never be too far away from a shower that could be heavy, possibly thundery. now, low pressure is beginning to edge away. we have a flow of air coming in from the west—northwest to the uk. it is unstable, so along with those sunny spells, there will be some big clouds building at times with those showers breaking out. away from central, southeast and eastern england, where it could still be quite wet first thing, quite a bit of dry weather early on, probably chillest across western scotland, a few spots in low single figures. just wait for the showers to break out. after the rain's cleared away from the eastern side of england, hints of brightness, and then the showers break out here as well, so you can see
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them coming through. they will be accompanied by gusty winds. as mentioned earlier, it doesn't mean it's going to be raining all the time, we mayjust have a brief shower and then a lengthy dry and bright spell afterwards. temperatures i2 celsius in stornoway, 18 celsius in london. most around 14—17 celsius, not too far from average for the time of year, perhaps a little bit below. a lot of dry weather to end the day as the showers fade away, but then overnight and into wednesday, from west then pushing eastwards, there will be some cloud and outbreaks of rain, which means as wednesday begins, the lower temperatures mid single figures in a few spots where you have the clearer skies across the eastern side of england. so, this latest batch of wet weather will push on through, mainly during wednesday morning, not much rain, though, into the early afternoon into east anglia and southeast england, whereas elsewhere, it brightens up again, and it will be another afternoon of sunshine and scattered showers. temperatures pretty similar. wednesday is going to be a windier day, some gusts in excess of a0 mph, parts of scotland, northern england, perhaps the south coast of england as well. now, high pressure trying to build in for thursday, not having much success, as another weather front snakes its way in from the atlantic.
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it does mean there will be quite a bit of cloud around on thursday, some outbreaks of rain pushing in, some heavy showers in northern scotland. ahead of the system towards the southeast, although expected to cloud over, we mayjust see a few sunny spells, enough to lift temperatures back in a few spots into the low 20s, whereas elsewhere, it's as you were. now, high pressure does move in friday, and at least into the start of the weekend, settling things down. although it is high pressure, though, that will not translate into warmth.
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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. the war in ukraine is creating a globalfood crisis that could send tens of millions into famine, warns the united nations. airbnb checks out, the bbc has learned that the company is shuting down its domestic rentals in china, where harsh covid restrictions continue with no end in sight. and a difficult balance. as we move away from oil and gas, will there be enough green jobs created? we have a special report from the uk's oil capital, aberdeen.

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