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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 24, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines: insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street the routine. they said gatherings were common in during the pandemic and staff thought that they were permissible because the prime minister often popped in. he wasn't there saying — minister often popped in. he wasn't there saying this _ minister often popped in. he wasn't there saying this shouldn't - minister often popped in. he wasn't there saying this shouldn't happen i there saying this shouldn't happen that it should break up and everyone should go home. should everyone put masks on. no, he was not telling everyone that. he was grabbing a glass to himself.— glass to himself. ofgem had said that the price _ glass to himself. ofgem had said that the price cap _ glass to himself. ofgem had said that the price cap will _ glass to himself. ofgem had said that the price cap will reach - glass to himself. ofgem had said i that the price cap will reach £2800 this week —— this october. thousands of photographs are uncovered at the
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heart of china's highly secret in incarceration. includes details of the sheet kill policy. the murder of this toddler. the boyfriend is jailed. west ham defender pleads guilty to kicking and slapping a cat under offences under the animal welfare act. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. speaking for the first time, insiders who attended gatherings in downing street during covid lockdowns have told bbc news that they would arrive at work to find bins overflowing with empty bottles from the night before,
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and that parties were routine. they say staff sat on each other�*s laps at a leaving do in november 2020, where the prime minister has now been pictured, and that security guards were laughed at when they tried to stop one party from taking place. borisjohnson is facing fresh questions about his attendance at the leaving party, and the metropolitan police are facing calls to explain why the prime minister wasn't issued with a fine. 0ur political correspondent ben wright has the latest. boozy lockdown breaking parties in downing street have led to more than 100 fines, and big questions for borisjohnson. with number ten braced for the official report into the partygate scandal, panorama has spoken to three insiders who attended lockdown gatherings in number ten. their words are spoken by actors. what was it sometimes like the morning after? a mess. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in the bin but overflowing. 0r, indeed, sometimes
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left on the table. you would go into work in the morning in 10 downing street and find empty bottles littered around the place? yep. for the first time, people who were there described what the culture was like. they were every week. the event invites for friday press office drinks were just _ nailed into the diary. there were actually invites, there was a weekly regular invite to press office drinks on friday nights? yes, wine time fridays. invites that were in everyone's . calendar for every friday at 4pm. four o'clock in the afternoon was wine time? yes. two of the people who have spoken to the bbc on condition of anonymity have received fines for attending events that broke the law. 0ne staffer said they felt borisjohnson had given permission for the events to take place because of his attendance. he was there. he may have just been popping
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through on the way to his flat, because that's what would happen. you know, he wasn't there saying this shouldn't be happening. he wasn't saying, can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on? no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. he was certainly at this gathering. pictures released by itv news show the prime minister at a leaving party in november 2020. at least one person who attended was fined, but borisjohnson wasn't. a staffer who was there described the do. there was about 30 people if not more in a room. - everyone was stood l shoulder to shoulder. some people on each other's laps. people were sitting on each other�*s laps? yes, one or two people. a government source said the prime minister attended that event in a work capacity, a message repeated by ministers this morning. he probably was coming out of his office, carried the red boxes in, raised a glass to say thank you to a leaving member of staff who he would have been working closely with all the way through,
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and then presumably left. and the police would have had all of that information, which is why they didn't issue him a fixed penalty notice in case. a fixed penalty notice in this case. unemployment is now down i to its lowest level since 1974... at cabinet borisjohnson was talking aboutjob figures this morning but his own conduct in office because disbelief in the words of one staffer when the prime minister first told parliament there were no parties. so, when you and your colleagues in government saw borisjohnson say none of the rules had been broken? we were watching it live and we just sort of looked at each other in disbelief like, why? why is he denying this? when we've been with him this entire time. we knew that the rules have been broken, we knew these parties happened. the government has declined to respond to the testimony given to panorama. the prime minister has promised to make a statement to parliament
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as soon as the sue gray report is published. now the met�*s investigation is over, the labour london mayor has said the police have some explaining to do. i've not asked questions about this. i've kept away from this but i think it's important when it comes to trust and confidence, when it comes to policing by consent, questions being asked about the integrity of an investigation, that the police explain why they've reached the conclusions they have. and borisjohnson will soon have to explain to mps and voters how all of these gatherings were allowed to happen and who, if anyone, should take responsibility. let's talk to our political correspondence, david, now. david, does all this new testimony rack up pressure on borisjohnson, do you think? i pressure on boris johnson, do you think? ~' pressure on boris johnson, do you think? ~ ., , �* think? ithink it does, ben. it focuses in — think? ithink it does, ben. it focuses in on _ think? ithink it does, ben. it focuses in on the _ think? ithink it does, ben. it focuses in on the central - think? | think it does, ben. it- focuses in on the central question which is what we are coming to which
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is the question of did borisjohnson knowingly mislead parliament? the first thing they going to get is a sue gray report which we are told is arriving imminently this week. that may well include more of this sort of detail that the really important point for borisjohnson is how does this land with his own mps and we have been hearing today some of them, very troubled by what they've heard. some have not been fans of borisjohnson for a long time, such as dominic grieve, former mp. 0thers, defending him, as you've heard from cabinet ministers but, the question that is going to focusing is what borisjohnson told parliament, he was asked about the
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13th of november, that image we saw yesterday when he was at that party, he said, no, the guidance was followed, the rules were followed at all times. here we have someone describing that party and then hearing the prime minister described that the parliament and then being shocked by that so that's going to be the focus that mps and the inquiry that follows sue gray, did borisjohnson deliberately mislead parliament? this will add to those questions about the prime minister's truthfulness, what he said about the event. he is pictured at the event. people here, staff here said that he would pass through, raise a glass, not tell people to go home, all those things will feed into this next investigation. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford is here.
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daniel, the prime minister is under pressure. daniel, the prime minister is under pressure. there are questions for the metropolitan police as well, some people asking why there has been no fixed penalty notice for the prime minister about that specific party in late 2020. the police won't give in explanation? not only has he not been fined for that event but others at that event were fined well people needed to understand why that is and sadik khan, the mayor of london, went on the radio this morning and said that he believes that the police now need to give an explanation. the problem with that is if the police give detailed descriptions then it could identify other peoples and under national guidelines and that puts them in quite a difficult position. many people are arguing they should be
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able to give some more explanation but they feel that they can't. the best guess that we have is that they made a decision to have a —— he made a decision tab a quick drink at the end of the day and it's only human to say thanks, goodbye and make a short speech and perhaps, the prime minister has fitted into something short on the working day, necessary for work purposes but anyone who stayed on for much longer, long drinking session and essentially the event has gone from an arguably legal event to something that has breached the coronavirus guidelines. that's the best tips, nation we can give. it will take the someone to refuse to pay their fine so that it would end up in court and then they would end up in court and then they would have to reasoning court their decision. ., �* ., ~ decision. you've mentioned america london and — decision. you've mentioned america london and his _ decision. you've mentioned america
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london and his criticisms. _ decision. you've mentioned america london and his criticisms. he - decision. you've mentioned america london and his criticisms. he has i london and his criticisms. he has oversight over the metropolitan police. ,., . ., police. the police in quite a difficult position _ police. the police in quite a difficult position with - police. the police in quite a difficult position with the i police. the police in quite a - difficult position with the mayor of london, because last time he was critical of them acting it resulted in cressida dick losing the confidence in him and having to resign. he has been on the radio saying he thinks the police should explain themselves. whether they can actually feel that what he has said allows them to breach their decision which they don't want to explain more for the risk of identifying people, i'm not sure. there's certainly no sign of them giving any further explanation.— certainly no sign of them giving any further explanation. daniel sanford, our home affairs _ further explanation. daniel sanford, our home affairs correspondence. . our home affairs correspondence. speaking to bbc radio
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4, some people been caught up in this without asking the sympathy but there's a sense of injustice among some of them. there's a sense of in'ustice among some of them._ some of them. some feel not 'ust embarrassed fl some of them. some feel not 'ust embarrassed but i some of them. some feel not 'ust embarrassed but quite * some of them. some feel not 'ust embarrassed but quite hurt. h some of them. some feel notjust embarrassed but quite hurt. 0ne| some of them. some feel notjust i embarrassed but quite hurt. one of our insiders told us thatjunior staff didn't think there were breaking the rules because their bosses were there, notjust the prime minister but senior civil servants, who could find themselves under fire from sue gray tomorrow. the way that this has all played out, there's a sense of hurt and confusion. they feel they were promised that they would be protected. 0ne promised that they would be protected. one said he felt boris johnson was throwing stuff under a bus. i will use the phrase witchhunt the junior staff who have received multiple finds and that feels as though it's been a abated with that
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photo from yesterday. but the prime minister himself was not fined. this is an angry, complicated political debate about the justice and fairness of all of this. boris johnson is facing questions from his own mps about his involvement, but, definitely, for some of those in whitehall who have lived through all of this, working both in the cabinet and downing street and have lived with it in the previous months, explain to sue gray what they were up explain to sue gray what they were up to, receiving police vines as some of our insiders have, it's a very sorry episode and while they are sorry, i get the sense for what they did, they do not necessarily feel that the consequences are playing out in an equal way. we have the general — playing out in an equal way. we have the general secretary _ playing out in an equal way. we have the general secretary of _ playing out in an equal way. we have the general secretary of the - the general secretary of the prospect union which represents some
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staff for parliament. what do you make of these latest revelations we've had, the pictures in this new testimony that we've spoken about? we can all be clear that this is a failure of leadership. it brings to mind a phrase i've heard when the qualities of leadership are assessed and the standard you walk past is the standard you set and i feel this is most appropriate for the images we've seen in the suggestion that there is a culture in number ten that has condoned these events. i think the second thing i would want to emphasise is that, while some individuals obviously have to account for their actions, individuals obviously have to account fortheiractions, most account for their actions, most notably account fortheiractions, most notably the leadership, this is not the civil service, not the civil service that supported society through the pandemic. this is a culture that's reflected by number ten. the civil service more generally did and admirable job
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which we should all be grateful for and what we need to focus upon is why this has happened in this particular space.— why this has happened in this particular space. why this has happened in this articular sace. ~ , particular space. when you say this is not the civil— particular space. when you say this is not the civil service, _ particular space. when you say this is not the civil service, there - particular space. when you say this is not the civil service, there were l is not the civil service, there were civil servants who were part of these parties, when their? yes, there will be _ these parties, when their? yes, there will be on _ these parties, when their? yes, there will be on the _ these parties, when their? yes, there will be on the fact - these parties, when their? yes, there will be on the fact that. there will be on the fact that certain individuals in an environment which may have encouraged them that it was ok to behave as they did may have to account for individual actions. but executives across the country had to dig deep throughout this period and had to lead organisations and often people couldn't say goodbye in the way that they wanted if they were leaving the organisation and let's remind ourselves that people couldn't say goodbye to relatives and engage with their families in the way they wanted throughout this period. there is no doubt that
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leadership is what this is about. individual civil servants will have to reflect upon what choices they made but it's in the context of the culture of number ten and it's the culture of number ten and it's the culture of number ten and it's the culture of number ten which also affect how the civil service is being portrayed, how it's responding to the current situation that they can cut 91,000 jobs. this goes on week in, week out. pare can cut 91,000 jobs. this goes on week in, week out.— week in, week out. are you suggesting _ week in, week out. are you suggesting that _ week in, week out. are you suggesting that when - week in, week out. are you suggesting that when you l week in, week out. are you i suggesting that when you talk week in, week out. are you - suggesting that when you talk about the culture, are you suggesting that civil servants were led astray by their political masters? i civil servants were led astray by their political masters?- their political masters? i think it's difficult — their political masters? i think it's difficult to _ their political masters? i think it's difficult to come _ their political masters? i think it's difficult to come to - their political masters? i think it's difficult to come to any - it's difficult to come to any conclusion that there was a culture there which condoned these behaviours, which individuals in terms of political masters, as you put it, were most responsible, well, will have to wait to hear from the sue gray report, the images coming in and the analysis. but it points
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to one direction and one direction only given the images we've seen last night. d0 only given the images we've seen last niuht. ,, ~ only given the images we've seen lastniaht. ~ , , . last night. do you think the public should know _ last night. do you think the public should know not _ last night. do you think the public should know not only _ last night. do you think the public should know not only which - should know not only which politicians have been fine but which civil servants? these are people running the country, enforcing the rules but we don't know who has been fined for what? i rules but we don't know who has been fined for what?— fined for what? i think that's up to the seniority _ fined for what? i think that's up to the seniority and _ fined for what? i think that's up to the seniority and the _ fined for what? i think that's up to the seniority and the levels - fined for what? i think that's up to the seniority and the levels of- the seniority and the levels of authority. as your package indicates, people who given evidence had said that they thought they were in an environment where it was not a breach. now, leadership would have demonstrated that that is not the case. i think what you have to focus upon is those who had the authority, who set the tone? and those identities should be particularly focused on. identities should be particularly focused on-_ identities should be particularly focused on. , . , . ., , ., focused on. general secretary of the prosect focused on. general secretary of the prospect union. _ focused on. general secretary of the prospect union, thank _ focused on. general secretary of the prospect union, thank you. - focused on. general secretary of the prospect union, thank you. you - focused on. general secretary of the prospect union, thank you. you can | prospect union, thank you. you can see the programme party gay tonight
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at 7pm or on bbc iplayer. also, more online at our website. now, the head of 0fgem has said the current energy cap will reach £2900 in october. and there's a possibility to go even higher in the future. i possibility to go even higher in the future. ~' ., possibility to go even higher in the future. ~ ., , , ., , future. i know this is a very distressing _ future. i know this is a very distressing time _ future. i know this is a very distressing time for - future. i know this is a very i distressing time for customers future. i know this is a very - distressing time for customers but i do need _ distressing time for customers but i do need to— distressing time for customers but i do need to be clear with this committee, with customers and with the government about the likely events_ the government about the likely events for october. therefore, later today— events for october. therefore, later today i_ events for october. therefore, later today i wiii— events for october. therefore, later today i will be writing to the chancellor to give him our latest estimates— chancellor to give him our latest estimates of the price cap uplift. this is— estimates of the price cap uplift. this is uncertain. where only partway— this is uncertain. where only partway through the window but we are expecting the price cap in
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october— are expecting the price cap in october of £2800. now, ourfuture scenarios— october of £2800. now, ourfuture scenarios when we look beyond that, we are _ scenarios when we look beyond that, we are really managing between two extreme _ we are really managing between two extreme versions of events. one, where _ extreme versions of events. one, where price — extreme versions of events. one, where price pulls back down to where it was _ where price pulls back down to where it was before, for example if we see piecing _ it was before, for example if we see piecing ukraine but one where prices could _ piecing ukraine but one where prices could go— piecing ukraine but one where prices could go even further if we were to see and _ could go even further if we were to see and interruption of gas from russia — see and interruption of gas from russia. . . see and interruption of gas from russia. .., , ., , ., russia. kevin, can you tell us what we mean by _ russia. kevin, can you tell us what we mean by a _ russia. kevin, can you tell us what we mean by a price _ russia. kevin, can you tell us what we mean by a price cap? _ russia. kevin, can you tell us what we mean by a price cap? it's - we mean by a price cap? it's alarming the prices going up at what we talking about? it’s alarming the prices going up at what we talking about?— we talking about? it's referring to the rice we talking about? it's referring to the price cap _ we talking about? it's referring to the price cap quite _ we talking about? it's referring to the price cap quite a _ we talking about? it's referring to the price cap quite a lot. - we talking about? it's referring to the price cap quite a lot. it's - we talking about? it's referring to the price cap quite a lot. it's a - the price cap quite a lot. it's a limit on the price per unit of energy so that is set every six months at the moment and what that is used to do is to calculate what a typical household using a typical amount of energy will pay for their gas and electricity and that is the
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figure there, saying that typical, that household could be paying £2800 a year from october. that household could be paying £2800 a yearfrom october. these that household could be paying £2800 a year from october. these are households, 23 million that them across the uk who have been told since april who been paying £700 a year more which took up to the £2000 a year mark but now we've got used to bill shocks, i guess without gas and electricity but this is probably the biggest of all they are saying that typical household bill could be another £800 per yearfor that typical household bill could be another £800 per year for their gas and electricity, taking it up to £2800 per year. it's been said that these are once in a generation price rises connected to the war in ukraine because as we look to the future, it may be that the conflict there could put even more pressure on the energy market, on the prices
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that suppliers pay and clearly that gets passed the sass consumers. == gets passed the sass consumers. -- on to us. gets passed the sass consumers. —— on to us. so they could be further big increases to come depending on partly on how long the warring ukraine goes on?— partly on how long the warring ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown. of _ ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of course. _ ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of course. we - ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of course. we are - ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of course. we are in - ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of course. we are in a l unknown, of course. we are in a position of unprecedented levels, certainly in living memory, but there is some protection, the price cap means that you will know what you are paying until october so clearly the worry is that come october, when the days are colder and darker, people use gas and put their heating on more, put the lights on more and clearly, the situation for our finances becomes much more acute and that's why there's added pressure for ministers to try and come up with a may more
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targeted support measure. they put in various measures so far which have been general, broad measures, rebates for example through your council tax bill and money off bills coming in october which can be paid backin coming in october which can be paid back in october —— in instalments. but it's still uncertain. there's still a couple of months to look at the figures, certainly what suppliers are paying before it's confirmed but clearly the seriousness of the situation means that ofgem have felt that they need to put a figure on how serious and how high these energy bills could be. . ., how high these energy bills could be. ., ~' , .,
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thousands of photographs from the heart of china's highly secretive system of mass—incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities in the xinjiang region are part of a huge collection of data that's been handed to the bbc. it was hacked from police computer servers in the region — and includes evidence of a shoot—to—kill policy for anyone who tried to escape. the foreign secretary liz truss has called the information shocking. here's our correspondent, john sudworth. these are the faces china never intended us to see, from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it's running detention camps for uyghurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3,000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uyghur society have been swept up, person by person. the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention. the youngest, just 15.
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the uyghurs, with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots in a region with a history of separatism and violence, have long faced cycles of tightening government control. and with mounting criticism over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uyghurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism. yes, this is classified internal government information. the files, said to have been hacked from police computer servers in xinjiang by a source whose identity is unknown, were first passed to dr adrian zenz, a xinjiang scholar, who in turn shared them with the bbc — and they raise serious questions about china's narrative. you have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to some of the men. some of the men have their arms in a funny position as if they were handcuffed,
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so this is really very powerful about the image material. i was looking through these images on my laptop in the living room and had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uyghurs en masse. just for growing a beard, this man was sentenced to 16 years injail. his chosen expression of uyghur identity forcibly removed. by speaking to members of the uyghur diaspora in places like turkey, the bbc has been able to verify the data, showing it to contain real people. this man, for example, knew his eldest son had beenjailed — but the database tells him for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences. although as evidence,
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only his son's devout islamic faith is listed. in response to questions, the chinese embassy in the us issued a statement, saying that in the face of the grave and complex counterterrorism situation in xinjiang the authorities had taken a host of decisive, robust and effective deradicalisation measures so that people could live a safe, happy and fulfilling life — although there was no attempt to address any of the hacked data directly. it includes these images, once again from deep within the system, that appear to offer further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people, not for what they have done, but for who they are. john sudworth, bbc news. a man who murdered his partner's three—year—old son after inflicting more than 20 rib fractures over weeks of beatings has been jailed for at least 2a years.
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the little boy's mother also received 11 years for causing or allowing his death. navtej johal is outside court of us. the church at birmingham crown court described this case is particularly distressing and tragic. kemarni's relative to chair dell nathaniel pope's life sentence was read out and one told me she feltjustice had been served for the little boy whose death has devastated his family. this was kemarni watson darby, a three—year—old boy who was described in court as a lively, boisterous and happy. injune 2018, he died while in the care of the people who should have been protecting him — his mother, alicia watson, and her partner, nathaniel pope. ambulance service, is the patient breathing? yeah, but he's not responding to me, he's three.
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he's three? watson made this 999 call. although paramedics arrived quickly and took him to hospital, they couldn't save him. his ribs had been crushed and he died from severe abdominal injuries, which the court heard were comparable to a car crash orfall from height. doctors also found evidence on his body of a number of other serious injuries that he had suffered in the days and weeks before. it was a shocking case. the evidence that was heard was... was something i'd not seen before in my experience as a police officer. to hear about the descriptions of the injuries that kemarni suffered was really, really harrowing. pope had previous convictions, including for assault, burglary and dealing drugs. watson was described as having a zero to 100 temper. both used cannabis regularly. last month, pope was convicted of kemarni's murder. watson was cleared of murder but found guilty of causing or allowing the death of her son. they were both also found guilty of child cruelty. a safeguarding review which will reveal whether opportunities were missed to save kemarni will be published soon. navteonhal, bbc news, birmingham.
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a mother who's daughter was strip—searched by police said that she was so distraught she tried to take her own life. the force is currently being sued for strip searching another girl referred to as child 0, without an appropriate aduu as child 0, without an appropriate adult being present. headlines and more news coming up but let check out the weather prospects now. hello. further west, higher pressure slowly building in which has been killing off the showers. most showers will fade away but the next frontal system will work its way in, wetter,
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cloudier and windier and this will be further east. temperatures into mid single digits. this frontal system will work its way from west to east. more isobars on the chart, pretty much across—the—board. the system will clear eastwards, hanging back past east anglia. temperatures ranging from mid to high teens. fairly unsettled day on thursday, a few shells around. high pressure building from friday and beyond which means we should see more sunshine. you are watching bbc news and these are the headlines. insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine. they say gatherings were common during the covid pandemic, and that staff felt they were permissible because the prime minister often popped in.
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the energy regulator of germ it says the price cap is expected to reach £2800 this october, an increase of more than £800 on the current cap ofgem ——. thousands of photographs are uncovered from the heart of china's highly secretive system of incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities — it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy. the murder of three—year—old kemarni watson darby — his mother's boyfriend is jailed for at least 2a years after subjecting the toddler to weeks of beatings. the west ham defender kurt zouma admits kicking and slapping a cat, admitting the charges under the animal welfare act. we now have all the sport. gareth southgate has been naming his england squad? in the last half an _ naming his england squad? in the last half an hour— naming his england squad? in the last half an hour or _ naming his england squad? in the last half an hour or so, _ naming his england squad? in the last half an hour or so, england i last half an hour or so, england have called upjarrod bowen of west
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ham for the nations league matches against hungary, germany and italy. his first cap a reward for scoring 18 goals and providing 35 assists for west ham this season. he was in contention for the previous squad in march but was ruled out by a fractured foot bone. also called up forjamesjustin of leicester city. gavin phillips and kieran trippier return after injury. —— kalvin phillips. west ham's kurt zouma has admitted kicking and slapping his pet cat. the defender pleaded guilty to two counts under the animal welfare act when he appeared at thames magistrates' court in east london this morning. he was filmed on social media in february kicking and mistreating his pet by his younger brother yoan who plays for dagenham and redbridge — who also admitted one offence during the hearing. the animals are still being
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cared for by the rspca which raised the investigation. it was in february when footage emerged on social media filmed by his younger brother which showed kurt zouma kicking his cat across the kitchen and then slapping it in the kitchen and then slapping it in the face in front of his shop seven—year—old son. the footage ends with him shouting, i will kill it, i swear i will kill it. he pleaded guilty to two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal and his younger brother pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting the cause of unnecessary suffering. kurt zouma had been fined a quarter of £1 million by his club and lost sponsorship about the prosecution said he had caused the cat, fear, pain and anxiety and that the suffering was deliberate. kurt zouma as agreed for his cats to be rehomed and the brothers will be sentenced next month. danil medvedev has begun his french
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open with a straightforward win. the world number two encountered very few problems the world number two against argentina's facundo bagnis, easing to a comfortable straight sets win — 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. later, former champion simona halep and 2021 runner—up stefanos tsitsipas will take to the court for their opening matches. next to the fallout from wimbledon's decision to ban russian and belarusian players this year because of the war in ukraine. the men's and women's tours have stripped wimbledon of ranking points, and rafa nadal says he wants the atp and wimbledon to find a compromise. nadal beatjordan thompson in straight sets at roland garros yesterday. speaking afterwards, nadal admitted the situation was difficult and didn't say whether he agreed or disagreed with the move to take ranking points away from wimbledon. unlike world number one novak djokovic, who called it the right decision, whilst four time grand slam champion naomi osaka said she might skip
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wimbledon entirely if there are no ranking points available. former british turned jamaican international swimmer michael gunning has announced his retirement from the sport at the age of 28. gunning competed atjunior level for great britain before switching to the nation where his father was born and represented jamaica at two senior world championships. he narrowly missed out on the tokyo 2020 olympics but has passionately promoted lgbtq+ rights and diversity in the sport, areas he now aims to dedicated himself to further in retirement. i would have loved to qualify and gone to the commonwealth this summer, a home games which i am excited for and the olympics in paris, but, you know, really i think myjourney in swimming, in competitive swimming, is done, and ifeel like the impact i can make is helping the other side of sport. getting more people in swimming, carry on inspiring people in other ways and i think i am ready to almost spread my wings and see
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where is next for me outside of the water. that's all the sport for now. more for you later. studio: thanks forjoining us. all police officers are to be given antiracism training as part of a plan to tackle discrimination against black people but campaigners say the plan falls short of real change. our community affairs correspondent has this report. july 2020. this video of team gb athlete bianca williams and her partner went viral on social media, showing the moment they were stopped and searched by police in london. just two months before that, the murder of george floyd in the us led to the global resurgence of the black lives matter movement. and earlier this year, protests were held after the shocking case of child 0, the 15—year—old black girl who was strip searched by police at school without an appropriate
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adult present. the way black people are treated by police across the uk continues to raise serious questions. trust is broken. confidence is low. and these teenagers in east london say they are scared. me personally, i think the word that comes to me is fear. i feel like even when you see videos of people sort of acting up or being aggressive towards the police, i feel it all stems from fear. they put the gun to our face. yeah, that's one of my... second experience with the police. my first experience was actually in oxford street. i was shopping. stopped and searched me. and they let me go cos i didn't do anything wrong. but today, senior police officers say they are committed to real change, with the announcement of a new national action plan to address racial inequality. we have launched today a plan specifically targeting black communities that recognises we are falling short, and we are falling short cos
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confidence is low right now in us. black people in england and wales are seven times more likely to be stopped and searched compared with white people according to government figures. this new plan aims to address the disproportionate use of these powers as well as recruit more black officers to help rebuild trust in marginalised communities. but human rights campaigners aren't convinced by these new measures. their commitments made in the report are at complete odds with the announcements made by the government just last week, so the home secretary announced that the government would be creating new stop and search powers in the public order bill. it's expanding suspicion of stop and search in the police, crime sentencing and courts act. it's rolling out taser to volunteer police officers. these are exactly the powers and tools that disproportionately target and harass young black men. the action plan will take shape over the coming months with more details expected at the end of the year. adina campbell, bbc news.
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we can get some reaction to this with a former metropolitan police superintendent. action plan and more training for police officers and staff, will this make any difference, that is the question we have to ask?— have to ask? that is the golden question- _ have to ask? that is the golden question- i _ have to ask? that is the golden question. i suspect _ have to ask? that is the golden question. i suspect it _ have to ask? that is the golden question. i suspect it won't. - have to ask? that is the golden| question. i suspect it won't. the plan has already fallen short of what was expected and there is no acknowledgement of the macpherson report which talked about institutional racism and the plan is deliberately staying away from that, but what it has talked about and i don't understand what it means, it talks about anti establishment antiracism, institutional antiestablishment racism, i have never heard that phrase before and i don't know what it means. it lacks clarity and i think what will happen, we will have lots of words, although i hope i'm wrong, but i don't really see this making a
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significant amount of difference from where we are at the moment. what would you like to see if you were writing an action plan? you need the right — were writing an action plan? ym. need the right people around the table. i know of senior black police officers, well respected in the community, who applied to be part of the oversight scrutiny board, who were sifted out, and i think the board does not really have individuals who i would have a great deal of confidence in challenging, and at the first hurdle in this report, they have not been able to get the word institutional racism in the report, and that shows a failure right from the beginning, i think. you think the police is institutionally racist? most institutions _ institutionally racist? most institutions in _ institutionally racist? most institutions in this - institutionally racist? mostj institutions in this country, institutionally racist? most - institutions in this country, have institutional racism, and the police have that anger around this because they feel it is directed at individuals, but this is about policies, procedures, processes,
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that lead to racism and unfairness, and i think most organisations will have that. they will have disproportionality in the people of colour in senior positions, very low, only one black chief constable in the police in the history of the police service across this country and if you look at most institutions there will be a history of institutional racism and if you are not prepared to acknowledge that and not prepared to acknowledge that and not prepared to acknowledge that and not prepared to acknowledge what the macpherson report says, you have failed at the first hurdle. this a failed at the first hurdle. as a former metropolitan - failed at the first hurdle. as a former metropolitan police chief superintendent, can i ask you about the partygate investigation by the police because the police are under some pressure to explain after those pictures emerged last night of boris johnson at that party, why he was not fined for that particular event when at least one other person was? what do you make of the handling of this by the police? you think they are under real pressure? absolutely.
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the olice are under real pressure? absolutely. the police investigation _ are under real pressure? absolutely. the police investigation and - are under real pressure? absolutely. the police investigation and the - the police investigation and the whole handling of partygate has been woeful. it is a classic inspector clouseau episode. they were dragged kicking and screaming to investigate and the government investigated a retrospective crime, which seems bizarre, in a way, and i have been very slow, they have cherry picked which parties they were going to investigate and the incident you are talking about on the 13th of november, one individual in that party in that photograph has been given a fine and there are numerous people, who were there, and i think there is a clear and obvious breaches, there are empty bottles of alcohol, and nibbles and people drinking, and you have the prime minister holding a glass toasting people. whether he was in therefore
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nine minutes or 20 minutes is neither high nor there. my daughter celebrated her 18th birthday on her own. mean momen's daughters —— mina smallman's daughters at their party in an open space instead of a restaurant. lots of people made sacrifices so i find it difficult to understand why a fine was not given out. the police had three conditions and all seem to have been met and despite that, they did not give a fine on this occasion. so everybody at that gathering, _ fine on this occasion. so everybody at that gathering, whatever - fine on this occasion. so everybody at that gathering, whatever it - fine on this occasion. so everybody at that gathering, whatever it was, j at that gathering, whatever it was, should have been fined? yes. at that gathering, whatever it was, should have been fined?— at that gathering, whatever it was, should have been fined? yes. it was full lockdown _ should have been fined? yes. it was full lockdown at _ should have been fined? yes. it was full lockdown at the _ should have been fined? yes. it was full lockdown at the time _ should have been fined? yes. it was full lockdown at the time and - should have been fined? yes. it was full lockdown at the time and they i full lockdown at the time and they should not have been there together and i think the rules are very clear. ifind it surprising and i think the rules are very clear. i find it surprising and and i think the rules are very clear. ifind it surprising and in fact one person was fined and it does appear to be how good is your lawyer because the question was sent out to various people and depending
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on how good your lawyer was in writing the reply for you, depending on the next stages, and one individual was fined so i think the police need to reopen the investigation and they need to have transparency and openness and the police regulator needs to investigate this and fully understand. this has a big impact on trust and confidence in the police and there are a number of investigations which have now stood down, where we have gone from a real lack of clarity and things have been donein lack of clarity and things have been done in an —— ineffective way. lack of clarity and things have been done in an -- ineffective way. thank ou so done in an -- ineffective way. thank you so much — done in an -- ineffective way. thank you so much for— done in an -- ineffective way. thank you so much for your _ done in an -- ineffective way. thank you so much for your time. - done in an -- ineffective way. thank you so much for your time. i - done in an -- ineffective way. thank you so much for your time. i want i done in an -- ineffective way. thankj you so much for your time. i want to bring you some breaking news. this is from liverpool crown court. a 14—year—old boy has been found guilty of the murder of 12—year—old
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ava white who was fatally stabbed in the city centre of liverpool last november, the 25th of november last year. the trial at liverpool crown court heard that the 14—year—old defendant who cannot be named for legal reasons, he had admitted stabbing her but claimed he did so accidentally and in self—defence. that is what he said in court. he denied murder. an alternative charge of manslaughter. the trial lasted just over two weeks and the court was told ava white and her friends had become involved in a row with the defendant and three of his friends after the boys recorded snapchat videos of the group and friends say the boy laughed after stabbing her. the defendant said he wanted to frighten her away. he told the jury, wanted to frighten her away. he told thejury, that wanted to frighten her away. he told the jury, that he wanted to frighten her away. he told thejury, that he promised he did not mean to hit her, but a
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14—year—old boy has been found guilty nevertheless of murdering 12—year—old ava white, fatally stabbed in liverpool city centre last november. the uk's withdrawal from afghanistan was a catastrophic failure and a betrayal of britten's allies. —— britain. their report accuses ministers of having a "total absence of a plan," and calls for the resignation of the foreign office's top civil servant, sir philip barton, who stayed on holiday as kabul fell. paul adams reports. the west's withdrawal from kabul was chaotic and for vast numbers of afghans desperate to leave, profoundly traumatic. it was also, mps say, a betrayal of britain's allies, a catastrophic failure of intelligence, diplomacy and planning. knowing that american forces were soon going to leave, the report says the government failed to respond. well, it's clear that
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what we could have done really from 18 months out when the warning started is begun the really serious preparations, knowing who we needed to evacuate, planning on how we would get them out and where we would take them but instead i'm afraid that's not what happened. at a hearing last december, the foreign office's top civil servants struggled to explain why he and others, including the foreign secretary, stayed on holiday while kabulfell. i have reflected a lot since august on my leave and if i had my time again i would have come back from my leave earlier than i did. i did put in place, as i think you know, an acting permanent secretary in the normal way, but also a director—general to lead in power in afghanistan. today's report suggests mr barton should consider his position. it says many of the british officials and soldiers sent to try and manage the terrible situation at kabul airport worked under enormous pressure. but it criticises what it calls misleading statements about the evacuation process, and says the leadership
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at the foreign office should be ashamed that two civil servants risked their careers to bring the situation to light. the foreign office defends its record. our staff works tirelessly, a spokesperson said, to evacuate over 15,000 people from afghanistan within a fortnight. the report urges the government to commit to a serious strategy for dealing with afghanistan in the future. a failure to do that, it says, would abandon afghan women and girls to the biggest single reversal of rights in a generation. paul adams, bbc news. paul adams reporting. bp says it believes enough jobs paul adams reporting. bp says it believes enoughjobs can paul adams reporting. bp says it believes enough jobs can be created in its alternative energies business to replace those lost by a long—term shift away from oil. concerns have been raised that the number of new green jobs will not match those that
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will be lost as part of the energy transition. our reporter is in aberdeen with more on this. that is riuht. i'm aberdeen with more on this. that is right- i'm at— aberdeen with more on this. that is right. i'm at what _ aberdeen with more on this. that is right. i'm at what is _ aberdeen with more on this. that is right. i'm at what is historically - right. i'm at what is historically known as aberdeen harbour but has recently been rebranded as the port of aberdeen and to be more specific, the control tower that monitors the movements of supply boats and ferries in and out of the port, principally taking anything that is needed to go offshore over the horizon to some of these oil and gas installations. this is a place that has invested heavily in recent years, hundreds of millions of pounds to build a new harbour, just around the corner, in preparation for the next stage to start to develop offshore wind in the seas around here but this is also a place that in some respects is at the start of its energy transition.
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it is a familiar sight at the harbour in aberdeen. supply ships like these have kept oil platforms stocked for half a century. for the next generation, the changes ahead bring some challenge. obviously it is exciting with the renewables sector, and it is a welcome and needed change, but i think oil and gas will be around for a long time. aberdeen harbour has been the beating heart of the oil and gas industry for many decades now, but even it is changing to make room for these new industries, not least the growing number of wind farms that are cropping up along the east coast. change is on the horizon here, but it is still an oil town and that is by far the biggest source of employment, although the numbers are gradually declining. the head of bp's operation here tells me that the biggest change will come in the next eight years. we will be about 60—110 by 2030 in those two pillars. infavourof...? we will have a 40% reduction from today in the oil and gas
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business, so that will be about 60%, and then you will have the balance of it being the low carbon energy production streams. what does that transition mean forjobs in a place like aberdeen? can there be enough jobs created to replace the jobs that will be lost? absolutely, we are quite convinced about that. others, though, say that won't be the case across the industry, with these requiring fewer people to run them than a big oil installation. there is evidence that aberdeen is serious about embracing alternative energies. this centre now trains people to transfer from boats onto wind turbines in the middle of the sea. we all know the pace of energy transition is really picking up and so we, like other businesses, just have to adapt to that. it is why we have made investments in new facilities specific to the renewables industry, for example. aberdeen is a city trying to shake its tag as europe's oil capital, in favour of europe's energy capital.
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but while oil peaked more than two decades ago, this is not a place that want to let go of it entirely any time soon. kevin keane, bbc news, aberdeen. be in no doubt that this is still very much an oil town and that is principally the source of employment for people who work here but there's a lot of planning going on at the moment in terms of working out how to transition those workers over the coming year into these new sectors, and a couple of people who have done that with me, michelle and harry, both former oil workers, now in renewables. why did you decide to make that move? i renewables. why did you decide to make that move?— renewables. why did you decide to make that move? i have worked in the same 'ob make that move? i have worked in the same job for — make that move? i have worked in the same job for about _ make that move? i have worked in the same job for about ten _ make that move? i have worked in the same job for about ten years _ make that move? i have worked in the same job for about ten years and - same job for about ten years and wanted _ same job for about ten years and wanted a — same job for about ten years and wanted a change and i thought i could _ wanted a change and i thought i could position myself to getting into renewables eventually but i found _ into renewables eventually but i found myself making the move right away and _ found myself making the move right away and it— found myself making the move right away and it was amazing. it found myself making the move right away and it was amazing.— away and it was amazing. it was eas ? a away and it was amazing. it was easy? a lot _ away and it was amazing. it was easy? a lot easier— away and it was amazing. it was easy? a lot easier than - away and it was amazing. it was easy? a lot easier than i - away and it was amazing. it was| easy? a lot easier than i thought away and it was amazing. it was i easy? a lot easier than i thought it was auoin easy? a lot easier than i thought it was going to _ easy? a lot easier than i thought it
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was going to be — easy? a lot easier than i thought it was going to be so _ easy? a lot easier than i thought it was going to be so it _ easy? a lot easier than i thought it was going to be so itjust - easy? a lot easier than i thought it was going to be so itjust is - easy? a lot easier than i thought it was going to be so itjust is the i was going to be so itjust is the same _ was going to be so itjust is the same discipline, and it is having a willingness — same discipline, and it is having a willingness to try something new. to some willingness to try something new. trr some degree it depends on what the job is that you are doing in the oil sector and renewable sectors are what was your experience of change, the same sort ofjob? yes. what was your experience of change, the same sort ofjob?— the same sort of “ob? yes, at the moment we — the same sort ofjob? yes, at the moment we have _ the same sort ofjob? yes, at the moment we have a _ the same sort ofjob? yes, at the moment we have a lot _ the same sort ofjob? yes, at the moment we have a lot of- the same sort ofjob? yes, at thej moment we have a lot of projects coming _ moment we have a lot of projects coming through _ moment we have a lot of projects coming through development i moment we have a lot of projects coming through development and moment we have a lot of projects i coming through development and the construction— coming through development and the construction phase _ coming through development and the construction phase so— coming through development and the construction phase so we _ coming through development and the construction phase so we have - construction phase so we have simitar— construction phase so we have similar construction _ construction phase so we have similar construction and - construction phase so we have - similar construction and engineering and commercial— similar construction and engineering and commercial and _ similar construction and engineering and commercial and commissioningl and commercial and commissioning roles— and commercial and commissioning roles so— and commercial and commissioning roles so you — and commercial and commissioning roles so you can— and commercial and commissioning roles so you can transfer— and commercial and commissioning roles so you can transfer straight i roles so you can transfer straight from _ roles so you can transfer straight from gas — roles so you can transfer straight from gas to— roles so you can transfer straight from gas to the _ roles so you can transfer straight from gas to the renewable - roles so you can transfer straight. from gas to the renewable sector, the skill— from gas to the renewable sector, the skill sets— from gas to the renewable sector, the skill sets are _ from gas to the renewable sector, the skill sets are largely— from gas to the renewable sector, the skill sets are largely the - from gas to the renewable sector, the skill sets are largely the samej the skill sets are largely the same although— the skill sets are largely the same although slightly _ the skill sets are largely the same although slightly different - although slightly different terminology _ although slightly different terminology which - although slightly different terminology which can i although slightly different terminology which can be | although slightly different - terminology which can be picked up in short— terminology which can be picked up in short order~ _ terminology which can be picked up in short order. fire— terminology which can be picked up in short order.— in short order. are you finding lots of --eole in short order. are you finding lots of people are _ in short order. are you finding lots of people are knocking _ in short order. are you finding lots of people are knocking on - in short order. are you finding lots of people are knocking on the i in short order. are you finding lots. of people are knocking on the doors who also want to make the transition?— who also want to make the transition? , . ., , , transition? yes, increasingly, eo - le transition? yes, increasingly, people in _ transition? yes, increasingly, people in and _ transition? yes, increasingly, people in and around - transition? yes, increasingly, people in and around the i transition? yes, increasingly, people in and around the oil. people in and around the oil industry. _ people in and around the oil industry, the _ people in and around the oil industry, the synergy- people in and around the oil industry, the synergy is i people in and around the oil- industry, the synergy is obvious, and there's— industry, the synergy is obvious, and there's a _ industry, the synergy is obvious, and there's a lot _ industry, the synergy is obvious, and there's a lot of— industry, the synergy is obvious, and there's a lot of good - industry, the synergy is obvious, and there's a lot of good stuff i and there's a lot of good stuff going — and there's a lot of good stuff going on— and there's a lot of good stuff going on in— and there's a lot of good stuff going on in conventional- and there's a lot of good stuff i going on in conventional industries but the _ going on in conventional industries but the renewables _ going on in conventional industries but the renewables sector - going on in conventional industries but the renewables sector is - going on in conventional industries but the renewables sector is very. but the renewables sector is very forward—looking _ but the renewables sector is very forward—looking and _ but the renewables sector is very forward—looking and it _ but the renewables sector is very forward—looking and it is- but the renewables sector is very forward—looking and it is an i forward—looking and it is an exciting _ forward—looking and it is an exciting place _ forward—looking and it is an exciting place to _ forward—looking and it is an exciting place to be - forward—looking and it is an exciting place to be so i forward—looking and it is an exciting place to be so it. forward—looking and it is an exciting place to be so it isl exciting place to be so it is gaining _ exciting place to be so it is gaining a _ exciting place to be so it is gaining a lot— exciting place to be so it is gaining a lot of— exciting place to be so it is gaining a lot of traction i exciting place to be so it is gaining a lot of traction inl exciting place to be so it is. gaining a lot of traction in the workforce _ gaining a lot of traction in the workforce-—
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gaining a lot of traction in the workforce. the focus of oil has chan . ed workforce. the focus of oil has changed over _ workforce. the focus of oil has changed over recent _ workforce. the focus of oil has changed over recent years i workforce. the focus of oil has changed over recent years and j workforce. the focus of oil has i changed over recent years and we workforce. the focus of oil has - changed over recent years and we had the cop26 conference last year and now there's an energy crisis going on, so do you feel that people's perceptions of the oil industry have changed and that there is maybe more of an interest in renewables and alternative energy?— alternative energy? absolutely. there is more _ alternative energy? absolutely. there is more interest - alternative energy? absolutely. there is more interest in i alternative energy? absolutely. i there is more interest in renewable sources, _ there is more interest in renewable sources, especially with the energy crisis _ sources, especially with the energy crisis but _ sources, especially with the energy crisis but we can't forget we are still going — crisis but we can't forget we are still going to need oil and gas for some _ still going to need oil and gas for some time — still going to need oil and gas for some time to come. if nothing else, to help _ some time to come. if nothing else, to help fund — some time to come. if nothing else, to help fund the renewable revolution. do to help fund the renewable revolution.— to help fund the renewable revolution. , ., ., revolution. do you find that the fundin: revolution. do you find that the funding is _ revolution. do you find that the funding is going _ revolution. do you find that the funding is going into _ revolution. do you find that the | funding is going into renewables from traditional oil and gas companies?— from traditional oil and gas companies? from traditional oil and gas comanies? ~ , . , , companies? absolutely. we see this in our own company, _ companies? absolutely. we see this in our own company, we _ companies? absolutely. we see this in our own company, we are - companies? absolutely. we see this in our own company, we are getting| in our own company, we are getting so many— in our own company, we are getting so many resources from headquarters, incredible _ so many resources from headquarters, incredible. fire so many resources from headquarters, incredible. �* , ., ., incredible. are you finding that the chan . e is incredible. are you finding that the change is accelerating _ incredible. are you finding that the change is accelerating at _ incredible. are you finding that the change is accelerating at the i change is accelerating at the moment? there is a lot of pressure to transition more quickly than we are doing. the
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to transition more quickly than we are doinu. . . to transition more quickly than we are doinu. .,, , ., to transition more quickly than we are doine. .,, , ., ., are doing. the last year, we saw a lane are doing. the last year, we saw a large number _ are doing. the last year, we saw a large number of _ are doing. the last year, we saw a large number of oil _ are doing. the last year, we saw a large number of oil and _ are doing. the last year, we saw a large number of oil and gas i large number of oil and gas operators— large number of oil and gas operators getting _ large number of oil and gas operators getting involved. large number of oil and gasl operators getting involved in large number of oil and gas i operators getting involved in the renewable — operators getting involved in the renewable industry _ operators getting involved in the renewable industry so _ operators getting involved in the renewable industry so they- operators getting involved in the renewable industry so they have | operators getting involved in the i renewable industry so they have got to get _ renewable industry so they have got to get involved _ renewable industry so they have got to get involved in _ renewable industry so they have got to get involved in this— renewable industry so they have got to get involved in this with - renewable industry so they have got to get involved in this with the - to get involved in this with the whole — to get involved in this with the whole supply— to get involved in this with the whole supply chain _ to get involved in this with the whole supply chain and - to get involved in this with the whole supply chain and so i to get involved in this with the | whole supply chain and so they to get involved in this with the - whole supply chain and so they are going _ whole supply chain and so they are going to _ whole supply chain and so they are going to get — whole supply chain and so they are going to get these _ whole supply chain and so they are going to get these projects - whole supply chain and so they are going to get these projects off - whole supply chain and so they are going to get these projects off the | going to get these projects off the ground _ going to get these projects off the ground and — going to get these projects off the ground and taking _ going to get these projects off the ground and taking the _ going to get these projects off the ground and taking the learnings . going to get these projects off the i ground and taking the learnings from the offshore — ground and taking the learnings from the offshore gas— ground and taking the learnings from the offshore gas and _ ground and taking the learnings from the offshore gas and oil— ground and taking the learnings from the offshore gas and oil sector, - ground and taking the learnings from the offshore gas and oil sector, it- the offshore gas and oil sector, it is all_ the offshore gas and oil sector, it is all transferable, _ the offshore gas and oil sector, it is all transferable, it _ the offshore gas and oil sector, it is all transferable, it is _ the offshore gas and oil sector, it is all transferable, it is all- the offshore gas and oil sector, it is all transferable, it is all good l is all transferable, it is all good stuff _ is all transferable, it is all good stuff. ~ ,, l, is all transferable, it is all good stuff. s a, t, is all transferable, it is all good stuff. i, l, f, is all transferable, it is all good stuff. i, l, stuff. what would you say to young eo - le stuff. what would you say to young peeple who — stuff. what would you say to young peeple who are _ stuff. what would you say to young people who are thinking _ stuff. what would you say to young people who are thinking at - stuff. what would you say to young people who are thinking at the - stuff. what would you say to young | people who are thinking at the start of their careers may be going into oil and wondering if there is a career? ~ , h, , l, oil and wondering if there is a career? ~ , , l, f, f, , career? absolutely, the oil and gas industry will _ career? absolutely, the oil and gas industry will be _ career? absolutely, the oil and gas industry will be around _ career? absolutely, the oil and gas industry will be around for - career? absolutely, the oil and gas industry will be around for a - career? absolutely, the oil and gas industry will be around for a time l industry will be around for a time to come — industry will be around for a time to come and _ industry will be around for a time to come and we _ industry will be around for a time to come and we need _ industry will be around for a time to come and we need to - industry will be around for a time to come and we need to produce| to come and we need to produce hydrocarbons _ to come and we need to produce hydrocarbons for— to come and we need to produce hydrocarbons for a _ to come and we need to produce hydrocarbons for a period - to come and we need to produce hydrocarbons for a period of- to come and we need to produce| hydrocarbons for a period of time until— hydrocarbons for a period of time until we — hydrocarbons for a period of time until we have _ hydrocarbons for a period of time until we have made _ hydrocarbons for a period of time until we have made this- hydrocarbons for a period of time i until we have made this transition, and if— until we have made this transition, and if you — until we have made this transition, and if you can— until we have made this transition, and if you can do— until we have made this transition, and if you can do that, _ until we have made this transition, and if you can do that, as - and if you can do that, as efficiently _ and if you can do that, as efficiently and _ and if you can do that, as efficiently and safely - and if you can do that, as efficiently and safely as l efficiently and safely as beneficially _ efficiently and safely as beneficially for - efficiently and safely as beneficially for the - efficiently and safely as - beneficially for the environment efficiently and safely as _ beneficially for the environment as possible. _ beneficially for the environment as possible. that _ beneficially for the environment as possible, that is _ beneficially for the environment as possible, that is a _ beneficially for the environment as possible, that is a good _ beneficially for the environment as possible, that is a good thing. - beneficially for the environment as possible, that is a good thing. so. possible, that is a good thing. so -et possible, that is a good thing. so get involved _ possible, that is a good thing. so get involved in— possible, that is a good thing. so get involved in it _ possible, that is a good thing. so get involved in it and _ possible, that is a good thing. so get involved in it and make - possible, that is a good thing. so get involved in it and make it - possible, that is a good thing. so get involved in it and make it a l get involved in it and make it a clean _ get involved in it and make it a clean transition. _ get involved in it and make it a clean transition.— get involved in it and make it a clean transition. those people, if the are clean transition. those people, if they are making _ clean transition. those people, if they are making a _ clean transition. those people, if they are making a first _ clean transition. those people, if they are making a first step - clean transition. those people, if they are making a first step into l they are making a first step into oil, will they find that their career can transition at a later stage fairly easily into renewables?
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absolutely, these skills are so transferable. a bit of new terminology and slightly different systems but nothing you would not face if _ systems but nothing you would not face if you — systems but nothing you would not face if you were changing employers anyway _ face if you were changing employers anyway so, — face if you were changing employers anyway so, yes, oiland face if you were changing employers anyway so, yes, oil and gas, face if you were changing employers anyway so, yes, oiland gas, and also _ anyway so, yes, oiland gas, and also wind — anyway so, yes, oil and gas, and also wind-— anyway so, yes, oil and gas, and also wind. , ., ., also wind. interesting future ahead for both of you. _ also wind. interesting future ahead for both of you. thanks _ also wind. interesting future ahead for both of you. thanks for - also wind. interesting future ahead for both of you. thanks forjoiningl for both of you. thanks forjoining us. at the moment one in ten people in the city is employed in the renewable sector but the forecast is that by the end of the decade more than half would have made the switch from oil into these new industries. kevin, thanks forjoining us. we are now going to look at the weather. it has been a pretty u nsettled unsettled day to day, and further west high pressure has been slowly building with a ridge of high pressure which has been killing off the showers and most of them will
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fade away for a time this evening and overnight at the next frontal system works into western areas so it will be wet and windy but also a bit milder. further east we will see temperatures. the frontal system works its way from west to east and more isobars on the chart so it will be a blustery day across the board. the frontal system will clear east, may be hanging back a bit across east anglia and the south—east but elsewhere it will turn a bright with sunshine and showers, most of these across the north west of scotland and the amateurs range from mid to high teens. another fairly unsettled day but then things will settle down from friday and beyond as high pressure builds in and we should see more sunshine.
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good afternoon. this is bbc news with me, ben brown. your headlines: insiders tell the bbc good afternoon. insiders tell the bbc. that lockdown parties in downing street were routine. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach £2800 in october, an increase of more than £800 on the current cap. a 14—year—old boys found guilty of the merger of ava white in liverpool
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last year. thousands of photographs are uncovered from the heart of china's highly secretive system of incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities — it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy. the premier league footballer kurt zouma has admitted kicking and slapping his pet cat. the west ham united defender pleaded guilty to two counts under the animal welfare act at thames magistrates' court. good afternoon and welcome to bbc news. speaking for the first time, insiders who attended gatherings in downing street during covid lockdowns have told bbc news that they would arrive at work to find bins overflowing with empty bottles from the night before, and that parties were routine. they say staff sat on each other�*s laps at a leaving do in november 2020, where the prime minister has now been pictured,
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and that security guards were laughed at when they tried to stop one party from taking place. borisjohnson is facing fresh questions about his attendance at the leaving party, and the metropolitan police are facing calls to explain why the prime minister wasn't issued with a fine. our political correspondent ben wright has the latest. boozy lockdown breaking parties in downing street have led to more than 100 fines, and big questions for borisjohnson. with number ten braced for the official report into the partygate scandal, panorama has spoken to three insiders who attended lockdown gatherings in number ten. their words are spoken by actors. what was it sometimes like the morning after? a mess. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in the bin but overflowing. 0r, indeed, sometimes left on the table. you would go into work in the morning in 10 downing street and find empty bottles littered around the place? yep.
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for the first time, people who were there described what the culture was like. they were every week. the event invites for friday press office drinks were just _ nailed into the diary. there were actually invites, there was a weekly regular invite to press office drinks on friday nights? yes, wine time fridays. invites that were in everyone's . calendar for every friday at 4pm. four o'clock in the afternoon was wine time? yes. two of the people who have spoken to the bbc on condition of anonymity have received fines for attending events that broke the law. one staffer said they felt borisjohnson had given permission for the events to take place because of his attendance. he was there. he may have just been popping through on the way to his flat, because that's what would happen. you know, he wasn't there saying this shouldn't be happening. he wasn't saying, can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance,
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can everyone put masks on? no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. he was certainly at this gathering. pictures released by itv news show the prime minister at a leaving party in november 2020. at least one person who attended was fined, but borisjohnson wasn't. a staffer who was there described the do. there was about 30 people if not more in a room. - everyone was stood l shoulder to shoulder. some people on each other's laps. people were sitting on each other's laps? yes, one or two people. a government source said the prime minister attended that event in a work capacity, a message repeated by ministers this morning. he probably was coming out of his office, carried the red boxes in, raised a glass to say thank you to a leaving member of staff who he would have been working closely with all the way through, and then presumably left. and the police would have had all of that information, which is why they didn't issue him a fixed penalty notice in this case.
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unemployment is now down i to its lowest level since 1974... at cabinet this morning borisjohnson was talking aboutjob figures this morning but his own conduct in office because disbelief in the words of one staffer when the prime minister first told parliament there were no parties. so, when you and your colleagues in government saw borisjohnson say none of the rules had been broken? we were watching it all live and we just sort of looked at each other in disbelief like, why? why is he denying this? when we've been with him this entire time. we knew that the rules have been broken, we knew these parties happened. the government has declined to respond to the testimony given to panorama. the prime minister has promised to make a statement to parliament as soon as the sue gray report is published. now the met�*s investigation is over, the labour london mayor has said the police have some explaining to do. i've not asked questions about this.
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i've kept away from this but i think it's important when it comes to trust and confidence, when it comes to policing by consent, questions being asked about the integrity of an investigation, that the police explain why they've reached the conclusions they have. and borisjohnson will soon have to explain to mp5 and voters how all of these gatherings were allowed to happen and who, if anyone, should take responsibility. i'v e i've been discussing this with our political correspondent, damien,. he told parliament did the party
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take place and he said, no. the uuidance take place and he said, no. the guidance was — take place and he said, no. fie: guidance was followed take place and he said, no. tie: guidance was followed at all take place and he said, no. ti9: guidance was followed at all times. here we have someone describing that party and describing hearing him describe that to parliament and being very party and describing hearing him describe that to parliament and being very shocked party and describing hearing him describe that to parliament and being very shocked by party and describing hearing him describe that to parliament and being very shocked by that. party and describing hearing him describe that to parliament and being very shocked by that. so that's going to be the focus that mps following two great�*s report will look at. the weight of all of this evidence, what does it add to those questions about the prime minister buzz truthfulness. what he said about the event when he is pictured at events. staff were saying he was he would pass them, come in, stop and raise a glass, not tell people to go home.— tell people to go home. questions are also being _ tell people to go home. questions are also being asked _ tell people to go home. questions are also being asked about - tell people to go home. questions are also being asked about why i tell people to go home. questions| are also being asked about why the police did not find the prime ministerfor his part in the police did not find the prime minister for his part in the event in which he has been pictured. daniel sandford will tell us more
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about that. flat daniel sandford will tell us more about that-— daniel sandford will tell us more aboutthat. :, :, , :, , about that. not only has he not been fined for that — about that. not only has he not been fined for that event _ about that. not only has he not been fined for that event but _ about that. not only has he not been fined for that event but others - about that. not only has he not been fined for that event but others at - fined for that event but others at that event — fined for that event but others at that event were fined. so people are asking _ that event were fined. so people are asking why— that event were fined. so people are asking why that is. the mayor of london — asking why that is. the mayor of london went on the radio this morning — london went on the radio this morning and says he believes that the police — morning and says he believes that the police now need to given explanation. the problem for the police _ explanation. the problem for the police is — explanation. the problem for the police is that if they start to give more _ police is that if they start to give more detail about how they reach these _ more detail about how they reach these decisions, that risks identifying people who have been given— identifying people who have been given fixed penalty notice and under national— given fixed penalty notice and under national guidelines they must not do that. national guidelines they must not do that so. _ national guidelines they must not do that. so, that puts them in quite a difficult _ that. so, that puts them in quite a difficult position. many people are arguing _ difficult position. many people are arguing they should be able to give some _ arguing they should be able to give some more explanation. then, feeling they can't _ some more explanation. then, feeling they can't. the best guess we've got at the _ they can't. the best guess we've got at the moment is a quick drink at the end _ at the moment is a quick drink at the end of— at the moment is a quick drink at the end of the day when someone is leaving _ the end of the day when someone is leaving on— the end of the day when someone is leaving on their last day, it's only human— leaving on their last day, it's only human to — leaving on their last day, it's only human to say thanks, goodbye and make _ human to say thanks, goodbye and make us— human to say thanks, goodbye and make us short speech and then perhaps— make us short speech and then perhaps the prime minister has fitted _ perhaps the prime minister has fitted in — perhaps the prime minister has fitted in a — perhaps the prime minister has fitted in a category of doing
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something that was short and fitted into the _ something that was short and fitted into the working day and was therefore necessary for work purposes. foranyone therefore necessary for work purposes. for anyone who stayed on for much _ purposes. for anyone who stayed on for much longer fault, for a long drinking — for much longer fault, for a long drinking session has opened themselves up to a fine. that's the best explanation we can give. we don't _ best explanation we can give. we don't really know and it would take someone _ don't really know and it would take someone to refuse to pay that fine for the _ someone to refuse to pay that fine for the case to end up in court for the police — for the case to end up in court for the police to— for the case to end up in court for the police to then outline their reasoning in court by us to really find out — reasoning in court by us to really find out. :. reasoning in court by us to really find out. :, :, , :, :, , reasoning in court by us to really find out. :, :, :, , :, : find out. can anyone really force them to explain? _ find out. can anyone really force them to explain? for _ find out. can anyone really force them to explain? for example, l find out. can anyone really force - them to explain? for example, you've mentioned the mayor of london. the police are in quite a difficult position now than there of london because last time, he was critical and it ended up with cressida dick feeling she had to resign, because she had lost the confidence of the mayor. the mp5 will be aware that
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when he goes on the radio saying that police should explain themselves that they should pay attention. whether they can actually feel that what he has said allows them to breach their decision which they don't want to explain for identifying people then certainly at this point there is no sign of them giving any explanation. earlier, i spoke to mike clancy, of prospect union, which represents some staffing parliament and he gave me his reaction. i think we can all be clear that this is a failure of leadership. it clear that this is a failure of leadership-— clear that this is a failure of leadership. clear that this is a failure of leadershi -. , , :, :, leadership. it brings to mind a hrase leadership. it brings to mind a phrase i've — leadership. it brings to mind a phrase i've heard _ leadership. it brings to mind a phrase i've heard when - leadership. it brings to mind a phrase i've heard when the . leadership. it brings to mind a - phrase i've heard when the qualities of leadership are assessed and it's the standard you walk passes the standard — the standard you walk passes the standard you accept and i feel that's— standard you accept and i feel that's most appropriate for the images — that's most appropriate for the images we've seen and the suggestion that there _ images we've seen and the suggestion that there is a culture in number ten that— that there is a culture in number ten that has condoned these events.
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ithink— ten that has condoned these events. i think the _ ten that has condoned these events. i think the second thing i would want _ i think the second thing i would want to— i think the second thing i would want to emphasise is that, whilst some _ want to emphasise is that, whilst some individuals will obviously have to account _ some individuals will obviously have to account for their actions, this is not _ to account for their actions, this is not the — to account for their actions, this is not the civil service. this is not _ is not the civil service. this is not the — is not the civil service. this is not the civil— is not the civil service. this is not the civil service who supported society— not the civil service who supported society during the pandemic. this is a particular— society during the pandemic. this is a particular set of events and culture — a particular set of events and culture which reflects the leadership at number ten and the civil service more generally. i think— civil service more generally. i think the _ civil service more generally. i think the civil service didn't admirat— think the civil service didn't admiraljob and we should all be grateful— admiraljob and we should all be grateful for so what we need to focus _ grateful for so what we need to focus on — grateful for so what we need to focus on is _ grateful for so what we need to focus on is why this has happened in this particular space.— this particular space. when you say this particular space. when you say this is not the _ this particular space. when you say this is not the civil _ this particular space. when you say this is not the civil service, - this particular space. when you say this is not the civil service, but - this is not the civil service, but there were civil servants who were part of these parties, weren't there? . part of these parties, weren't there? , , :, there? yes, there will be and the fact that certain _ there? yes, there will be and the fact that certain individuals - there? yes, there will be and the fact that certain individuals in - there? yes, there will be and the fact that certain individuals in an | fact that certain individuals in an environment because then to believe in the _ environment because then to believe in the way— environment because then to believe in the way they did will still have to account — in the way they did will still have to account for those individual actions — to account for those individual actions but all of us in leadership,
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executives— actions but all of us in leadership, executives across the country had to di l executives across the country had to dig deep— executives across the country had to dig deep throughout this period and had to— dig deep throughout this period and had to lead organisations and often people _ had to lead organisations and often people couldn't say goodbye in the way they— people couldn't say goodbye in the way they wanted to they were leaving the organisation and people couldn't say goodbye to relatives and engage with their— say goodbye to relatives and engage with their families in the way they wanted _ with their families in the way they wanted to— with their families in the way they wanted to throughout this period. there _ wanted to throughout this period. there is— wanted to throughout this period. there is no— wanted to throughout this period. there is no doubt that leadership is what this— there is no doubt that leadership is what this is— there is no doubt that leadership is what this is about. individual civil servants— what this is about. individual civil servants will have to reflect upon the choices they've made but it's in the choices they've made but it's in the context— the choices they've made but it's in the context of the culture of number ten. :. the context of the culture of number ten. :, :, , the context of the culture of number ten. :, :,, ~ ~' the context of the culture of number ten. :, ~~ :, _ ., ten. that was mike clancy, general secretary of _ ten. that was mike clancy, general secretary of prospect _ ten. that was mike clancy, general secretary of prospect union - ten. that was mike clancy, general secretary of prospect union and - ten. that was mike clancy, general| secretary of prospect union and you can see that programme party gate: inside the storm which is on at 7pm tonight or online, and you can find that on the bbc website. 14—year—old boy has been found guilty of the
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murder of i2—year—olds ava white. she was stabbed in the city centre whilst out with friends. judith moretz is outside liverpool crown court with the latest. judith, can you give us an update? this court with the latest. judith, can you give us an update?— court with the latest. judith, can you give us an update? this was a short time — you give us an update? this was a short time ago. _ you give us an update? this was a short time ago. the _ you give us an update? this was a short time ago. the jury _ you give us an update? this was a short time ago. the jury had - you give us an update? this was a short time ago. the jury had two i short time ago. the jury had two hours of deliberation and came back with a verdict, guilty of murder. now, this is a horrific case involving children. the victim, as you say, ava white, just 12 years old and the boy who we cannot name for legal reasons because we cannot name him publiclyjust ia years old. essentially, what we understand is that on the night that the christmas lights are being turned on in liverpool, just down the road here from the city centre, two groups of children as young as 11 years old
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and teenagers were out enjoying the evening. ava was in one group and the ia—year—old boy was in another and from what has been heard in court, the group of boys were filming ava on one of their phones. she objected to that there was an argument and she objected to that there was an argumentand in she objected to that there was an argument and in the course of that argument, the ia—year—old boy carried out a flick knife and stabbed ava in the neck and there were attempts to save her. she was taken to hospital but tragically, she died there short time later. now, the boy concerned initially did denied even being in a city centre then he accepted that he was there and had had the knife but he had said he done it in self defence. that's what the jury rejected and found him guilty of murder. there were some incredibly emotional states in —— scenes in the
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courtroom. the ia—year—old boy who's now been convicted wasn't in the courtroom. he was appearing by video link and put his head in his hands and stared at the floor when his —— when the verdict was read out. he will be required to reappear in court for sentencing. the energy regulator ofgem it says the price cap is expected to reach £2800 this october, an increase of more than £800 on the current cap we going to get some analysis of this from our personal finance correspondence who is explaining what a price cap is. by, correspondence who is explaining what a price cap is.— what a price cap is. a price cap is actually a — what a price cap is. a price cap is actually a limit _
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what a price cap is. a price cap is actually a limit on _ what a price cap is. a price cap is actually a limit on the _ what a price cap is. a price cap is actually a limit on the price - what a price cap is. a price cap is actually a limit on the price per. actually a limit on the price per unit of energy and so that set every six months at the moment and what thatis six months at the moment and what that is used to do is to calculate what a typical household using a typical amount of energy will pay for their gas and electricity. that the big thing that they use, they are saying that household could be paying an extra 2800 year. 23 million households across the uk have been told since april and have been paying £700 a year more which takes it up to the £2000 or so a year mark but now we've got used to bill shocks i guess with gas and electricity but this is the biggest of all because in october they are saying that typical household could be paying another £800 per yearfor their gas and electricity, taking it
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up their gas and electricity, taking it up to £2800 per year. so these have been described as one synod generation price rises and connected to the war in ukraine because, as we look to the future, it may be that the conflict there could put more pressure on the energy market, on the prices that suppliers pay and clearly, that gets passed on to us as consumers. 50 clearly, that gets passed on to us as consumers-— clearly, that gets passed on to us as consumers. so that increase cap miaht not as consumers. so that increase cap might rrot be _ as consumers. so that increase cap might not be the _ as consumers. so that increase cap might not be the last _ as consumers. so that increase cap might not be the last increase? - as consumers. so that increase cap i might not be the last increase? they could be further big increases to come depending on partly on how long that war in ukraine goes on? that’s that war in ukraine goes on? that's the treat that war in ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, _ that war in ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of _ that war in ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown, of course. - the great unknown, of course. clearly, women are position of unprecedented levels in many ways the people. —— we are in a position. this protection here, the price cap means that you will know what you are paying until october. clearly, the worry is that, come october,
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when the days are colder and darker, people use gas more and put their heating on more, put their lights on more but clearly, the situation for our finances becomes more more but clearly, the situation for ourfinances becomes more acute more but clearly, the situation for our finances becomes more acute and thatis our finances becomes more acute and that is why there is now added pressure on ministers to try and come up with a more targeted support measure. they put in various measure so far which have been general, broad measures, rebates for example through your council tax bill or more support coming in in october with some money off bills which will then be paid back in instalments afterwards. but clearly, it's highly unusualfor afterwards. but clearly, it's highly unusual for the regulator to say, afterwards. but clearly, it's highly unusualfor the regulator to say, at this stage, what it thinks the next bill will be and this is still uncertain. there were still be a couple of months of looking figures, certainly what suppliers are paying before its confirmed but the seriousness of the situation has
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made ofgem feel that giving evidence to the committee of mps today they needed to put a figure on how serious and how high these energy bills could be. that serious and how high these energy mus could be.— bills could be. that kevin, our ersonal bills could be. that kevin, our personal finance _ bills could be. that kevin, our . personal finance correspondence. thousands of photographs from the heart of china's highly secretive system of mass—incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities in the xinjiang region are part of a huge collection of data that's been handed to the bbc. it was hacked from police computer servers in the region — and includes evidence of a shoot—to—kill policy for anyone who tried to escape. here's our correspondent, john sudworth. these are the faces china never intended us to see, from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it's running detention camps for uyghurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3,000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uyghur society have been
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swept up, person by person. the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention. the youngest, just 15. the uyghurs, with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots in a region with a history of separatism and violence, have long faced cycles of tightening government control. and with mounting criticism over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uyghurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism. yes, this is classified internal government information. the files, said to have been hacked from police computer servers in xinjiang by a source whose identity is unknown, were first passed to dr adrian zenz, a xinjiang scholar, who in turn shared them with the bbc — and they raise serious questions about china's narrative.
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you have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to some of the men. some of the men have their arms in a funny position as if they were handcuffed, so this is really very powerful about the image material. i was looking through these images on my laptop in the living room and had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uyghurs en masse. just for growing a beard, this man was sentenced to 16 years injail. his chosen expression of uyghur identity forcibly removed. by speaking to members of the uyghur diaspora in places like turkey, the bbc has been able to verify the data, showing it to contain real people.
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this man, for example, knew his eldest son had beenjailed — but the database tells him for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences. although as evidence, only his son's devout islamic faith is listed. in response to questions, the chinese embassy in the us issued a statement, saying that in the face of the grave and complex counterterrorism situation in xinjiang the authorities had taken a host of decisive, robust and effective deradicalisation measures so that people could live a safe, happy and fulfilling life — although there was no attempt to address any of the hacked data directly. it includes these images, once again from deep within the system, that appear to offer further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people, not for what they have done, but for who they are. john sudworth, bbc news.
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let's talk to doctor david tobin from sheffield university who is a lecture on people studies. what you think this tells us in terms of the way china these people? the evidence reall shows way china these people? the evidence really shows a — way china these people? the evidence really shows a continuing _ way china these people? the evidence really shows a continuing programmel really shows a continuing programme of genocide. the real link between the president and the way the securities practised on the ground, evenin securities practised on the ground, even in microlevel details in these institutions. it also gives us more evidence of how people, real people in these conditions, survive and we've seen photos of images of people who been released but this is the first time we understand what goes on inside the camps and how people feel when inside the camps. we've got evidence of this shoot to kill policy for anyone who tries to
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escape. what do we know about that? this policy doesn't shock me as an analyst but what does shocked me is to see it written down that it's not secretive, it's given by top—level leader. that surprises me, the micro management and the level of the arrogance of this being done in impunity. arrogance of this being done in imuni . :, :, ~' arrogance of this being done in imuni . :, :, ,, :, , :, impunity. you talk about senior leaders. impunity. you talk about senior leaders- is _ impunity. you talk about senior leaders. is this _ impunity. you talk about senior leaders. is this all, _ impunity. you talk about senior leaders. is this all, are all - impunity. you talk about senior leaders. is this all, are all the i leaders. is this all, are all the chinese leadership fully aware of what's going on in these places? i believe so. similar policies were introduced into tibet. implementing human surveillance on a mass scale. these are the types of security controls and to crackdown on officials who don't want to implement these policies so it goes
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to the very top so we see this in speeches from china, ordering those who can be rounded up to be rounded up. who can be rounded up to be rounded u. ~ who can be rounded up to be rounded u . _ : ., . who can be rounded up to be rounded up. when had evidence of this before but this adds — up. when had evidence of this before but this adds to _ up. when had evidence of this before but this adds to that. _ up. when had evidence of this before but this adds to that. i _ up. when had evidence of this before but this adds to that. i suppose - up. when had evidence of this before but this adds to that. i suppose we i but this adds to that. i suppose we are still wondering what kind of pressure the welcome put on china, if any, to stop this kind of treatment of people? it’s if any, to stop this kind of treatment of people? it's a very aood treatment of people? it's a very good question- _ treatment of people? it's a very good question. the _ treatment of people? it's a very good question. the chinese - treatment of people? it's a very. good question. the chinese party state prides itself on appearing as a responsible power, a soft power. it's a real source of shame to the party state leadership that these images are released and we can see that there is a form of violence. this is not willingness of people to integrate. it's a mass programme of assimilation and genocide so we know this embarrasses the party state
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leadership and that's why it's classified. this specifically will put pressure on the leadership, perhaps to change course. but they flat out deny _ perhaps to change course. but they flat out deny there _ perhaps to change course. but they flat out deny there is _ perhaps to change course. but they flat out deny there is any _ perhaps to change course. but they flat out deny there is any kind - perhaps to change course. but they flat out deny there is any kind of. flat out deny there is any kind of human rights abuses taking place? china's party state believes the west is in decline and also believes the west to be introverted in looking into its own problems. the party believes that human rights is just a narrative that the west used to push china in certain directions. it's not that it's ok with these images being released but it simply does not think that the west or other states can do anything about it. :, ~ , :, , : other states can do anything about it. thank you very much for your time.
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it. thank you very much for your time- there _ it. thank you very much for your time. there are _ it. thank you very much for your time. there are two _ it. thank you very much for your time. there are two new - it. thank you very much for your time. there are two new cases i it. thank you very much for your| time. there are two new cases of monkeypox in london today. that brings the total of confirmed cases to 59. health officials say that the risk overall is low and that monkeypox is generally a mild disease. abroad, the czech republic and slovenia has detected its first cases. germany has ordered monkeypox vaccine doses and france has recommended targeted vaccinations. let's talk to doctor william wealth from the health and security agency. monkeypox has had a lot of attention in the last few days. we're seeing case numbers rise gradually. not enormous numbers but 59 in the last count. how worried should have usb about this? 50. count. how worried should have usb aboutthis? :, ,, , count. how worried should have usb aboutthis? :, ,, count. how worried should have usb aboutthis? :, ~' :, about this? so, monkeypox is a viral infection and — about this? so, monkeypox is a viral infection and this _ about this? so, monkeypox is a viral infection and this is _ about this? so, monkeypox is a viral infection and this is the _ about this? so, monkeypox is a viral infection and this is the first - infection and this is the first occasion with spreading the uk
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without links to countries in western and central africa where it is endemic. so far, we've detected 70 cases in england and scotland has detected one case. so a total of 71 in the uk. it's mainly a mild illness which does spread easily dax does not spread easily. however anyone with rashes or lesions on any part of the body should contact the nhs iii part of the body should contact the nhs iii or their local health service. nhs111 or their local health service. :. . nhs111 or their local health service. :, : :, :, service. what is your pro'ection of this because. * service. what is your pro'ection of this because, as h service. what is your pro'ection of this because, as i _ service. what is your pro'ection of this because, as i say, _ service. what is your projection of this because, as i say, the - service. what is your projection of i this because, as i say, the numbers are gradually going up but do you think that's going to continue? that sort of increase in the coming days and weeks? taste sort of increase in the coming days and weeks?— sort of increase in the coming days and weeks? ~ :, :, :, , , and weeks? we are going to see cases over the next —
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and weeks? we are going to see cases over the next two _ and weeks? we are going to see cases over the next two days _ and weeks? we are going to see cases over the next two days and _ and weeks? we are going to see cases over the next two days and we - and weeks? we are going to see cases over the next two days and we are - over the next two days and we are doing contact tracing and working with the nhs to detect this and encourage people to come forward and, actually, that's really important in controlling how to identify people with monkeypox so we will see an ongoing increase in cases. ~ :. will see an ongoing increase in cases, ~ :, :, will see an ongoing increase in cases. ~ :, :, :, �*, will see an ongoing increase in cases. :, cases. what about what's happening in other countries _ cases. what about what's happening in other countries with _ cases. what about what's happening in other countries with this - in other countries with this because, as i mentioned in the introduction, it's notjust the uk, wasting it spreading to other countries around the world, aren't we? :, “ countries around the world, aren't we? :, 4' :, we? so, when working with our secial we? so, when working with our special partners _ we? so, when working with our special partners to _ we? so, when working with our special partners to understand | we? so, when working with our - special partners to understand what is happening and to share and learn from each other using different approaches. we will continue to do that, making sure we use the best information and evidence so we can control it, both here in the uk and also internationally. just control it, both here in the uk and also internationally.— also internationally. just to be very clear. _ also internationally. just to be very clear, people _ also internationally. just to be very clear, people rememberl also internationally. just to be - very clear, people remember back to
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the very early days of coronavirus, we saw a small number of infections and then it mushroom. this is not the same at all, is it? you're not expecting any kind of transmission to be like that? he. expecting any kind of transmission to be like that?— to be like that? no. this is a very different infection. _ to be like that? no. this is a very different infection. it _ to be like that? no. this is a very different infection. it does - to be like that? no. this is a very different infection. it does not. different infection. it does not spread that easily between individuals. we are seeing that spread through direct contact with skin lesions, scabs, especially if the skin is broken and occasionally from coughs and sneezes. we are saying this would transmission with very close contact which is significantly different and, that's one of the reasons we're following up one of the reasons we're following up on those contacts so we can provide appropriate advice. band
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up on those contacts so we can provide appropriate advice. and you 'ust provide appropriate advice. and you just updated — provide appropriate advice. and you just updated the — provide appropriate advice. and you just updated the numbers, - provide appropriate advice. and you just updated the numbers, so - provide appropriate advice. and you just updated the numbers, so 71 - provide appropriate advice. and you| just updated the numbers, so 71 you said was the number of cases in the uk at the moment?— said was the number of cases in the uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk, uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk. 70 — uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk. 70 in _ uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk, 70 in england _ uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk, 70 in england and - uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk, 70 in england and one - uk at the moment? that's correct. 71 in the uk, 70 in england and one in l in the uk, 70 in england and one in scotland and so far no cases in wales or northern ireland. thank you for your time. we can have a look at the weather now. it has been a pretty unsettled day to day. further west high pressure has been slowly building with a ridge of high pressure which has been killing off the showers and most of them will fade away for a time this evening and overnight but the next frontal system works into western areas so it will be wet and windy but also a bit milder. further east we will see temperatures in mid single digits. the frontal system works its way
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from west to east and more isobars on the chart so it will be a blustery day across the board. that frontal system will clear east, may be hanging back a bit across east anglia and the south—east but elsewhere it will turn brighter with sunshine and showers, most of these across the north west of scotland. the temperatures range from mid to high teens. another fairly unsettled day on thursday but then things will settle down from friday and beyond as high pressure builds in and we should see more sunshine. this is bbc news. i'm ben brown. the headlines: insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street the routine. they said gatherings were common in during the pandemic and staff thought that they were permissible because the prime minister often popped in. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach
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£2,800 this october, an increase of more than £800 on the current cap. thousands of photographs are uncovered from the heart of china's highly secretive system of incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities — it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy. a1a—year—old boy has been found guilty of the murder of the 12—year—old girl ava white in liverpool last year. now we have the sport. england have called up the west ham forward jarrod bowen for the nation league matches against germany, hungary and italy. 18 goals for west ham this season. he was in contention for the previous england squad in march but was ruled out with a fractured foot bone and there is also a called up forjamesjustin of leicester city and the complete squad is on the bbc
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website. southgate is full of praise forjarrod bowen. he website. southgate is full of praise forjarrod bowen.— forjarrod bowen. he is a goal threat, forjarrod bowen. he is a goal threat. he _ forjarrod bowen. he is a goal threat, he is _ forjarrod bowen. he is a goal threat, he is direct, _ forjarrod bowen. he is a goal threat, he is direct, and - forjarrod bowen. he is a goal threat, he is direct, and i- forjarrod bowen. he is a goall threat, he is direct, and i think hisjourney is really threat, he is direct, and i think his journey is really interesting in terms of the experiences he has had. a reminder that you don'tjust have to be an elite academy player and then come through that pathway, to play in the lower divisions and then have that experience is also a great route to go. works incredibly hard for the team at which we want all of ourforward players for the team at which we want all of our forward players to do. for the team at which we want all of ourforward players to do. so, yeah, he thoroughly deserves his call—up. west ham's kurt zouma has admitted kicking and slapping his pet cat. the video also showed him saying that he would kill the cat. the defender pleaded guilty to two counts under the animal welfare act when he appeared at thames
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magistrates' court in east london this morning. he was filmed on social media in february kicking and mistreating his pet by his younger brother yoan who plays for dagenham and redbridge — who also admitted one offence during the hearing. the animals are still being cared for by the rspca which brought the prosecution. kurt zouma pleaded guilty to two charges. he pleaded guilty to two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal and his younger brother pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting the cause of unnecessary suffering. kurt zouma had been fined a quarter of a million by his club and lost sponsorship but the prosecution said he had caused the cat, fear, pain and anxiety and that the suffering was deliberate. kurt zouma as agreed for his cats to be rehomed and the brothers will be sentenced next month. danil medvedev has begun his french open with a straightforward win. the world number two encountered very few problems against argentina's facundo bagnis,
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easing to a comfortable straight sets win — 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. the wimbledon semifinalist denis shapovalov has been beaten, in the shock result of the day. former british turned jamaican international swimmer michael gunning has announced his retirement from the sport at the age of 28. gunning competed atjunior level for great britain before switching to the nation where his father was born and represented jamaica at two senior world championships. he narrowly missed out on the tokyo 2020 olympics but has passionately promoted lgbtq+ rights and diversity in the sport, areas he now aims to dedicated himself to further in retirement. i would have loved to qualify and gone to the commonwealth this summer, a home games which i am excited for and the olympics in paris, but, you know, really i think myjourney in swimming, in competitive swimming, is done,
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and ifeel like the impact i can make is helping the other side of sport. getting more people in swimming, carry on inspiring people in other ways and i think i am ready to almost spread my wings and see where is next for me outside of the water. warwickshire say there is no timescale on chris woakes's return from a knee injury. he is one of seven england fast bowlers who will miss the first test match against new zealand next week because of injury. chris woakes has not played since the final test match against the west indies in march. more about that on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. more for you later. studio: the mayor of london sadiq khan has written to the head of the metropolitan police, seeking a detailed explanation of the handling by the merit of the individual cases in the downing street partygate
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investigation —— the handling by the met. he has sought a detailed explanation about their handling of the partygate investigation and he has also asked them to take steps to reassure londoners that the police, that by making this exploration to them directly, because he is concerned that the trust and confidence of londoners is being further eroded by a lack of clarity and the mayor has said he would not intervene in operational decisions but the investigation is now complete and so he has made this request in accordance with policing protocol paragraph 203g we will get more on that later. all police officers and staff
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in forces across england and wales are to be given anti—racism training as part of a new national plan to tackle discrimination against black people. the new measures have been announced by the national police chiefs' council and the college of policing, but campaigners say the plan falls short of real change. july 2020. this video of team gb athlete bianca williams and her partner went viral on social media, showing the moment they were stopped and searched by police in london. just two months before that, the murder of george floyd in the us led to the global resurgence of the black lives matter movement. and earlier this year, protests were held after the shocking case of child o, the 15—year—old black girl who was strip searched by police at school without an appropriate adult present. the way black people are treated by police across the uk continues to raise serious questions. trust is broken. confidence is low. and these teenagers in east london say they are scared. me personally, i think the word that
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comes to me is fear. i feel like even when you see videos of people sort of acting up or being aggressive towards the police, i feel it all stems from fear. they put the gun to our face. yeah, that's one of my... second experience with the police. my first experience was actually in oxford street. i was shopping. stopped and searched me. and they let me go cos i didn't do anything wrong. but today, senior police officers say they are committed to real change, with the announcement of a new national action plan to address racial inequality. we have launched today a plan specifically targeting black communities that recognises we are falling short, and we are falling short cos confidence is low right now in us. black people in england and wales are seven times more likely to be stopped and searched compared with white people according to government figures. this new plan aims to address the disproportionate use of these powers as well as recruit more black officers to help rebuild trust in marginalised communities. but human rights campaigners aren't
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convinced by these new measures. their commitments made in the report are at complete odds with the announcements made by the government just last week, so the home secretary announced that the government would be creating new stop and search powers in the public order bill. it's expanding suspicion of stop and search in the police, crime sentencing and courts act. it's rolling out taser to volunteer police officers. these are exactly the powers and tools that disproportionately target and harass young black men. the action plan will take shape over the coming months with more details expected at the end of the year. adina campbell, bbc news. the bbc has investigated the case of 115—year—old girl who was strip searched by police and was left traumatised —— of one girl who was 15—year—old girl. she had her underwear cut off in the presence of male police officers. olivia, not
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her real name, was strip searched in december 2020, the same month as child o december 2020, the same month as child 0 who was strip searched at school after she was wrongly accused of possessing drugs. we can get more on this from jane teeth. —— dieth. remind us what happened with child o? remind us what happened with child 0? it remind us what happened with child q? :, , : , i: i: q? it emerged that in december 2020 a airl had q? it emerged that in december 2020 a girl had been — q? it emerged that in december 2020 a girl had been took _ q? it emerged that in december 2020 a girl had been took out _ q? it emerged that in december 2020 a girl had been took out of _ q? it emerged that in december 2020 a girl had been took out of class - q? it emerged that in december 2020 a girl had been took out of class in - a girl had been took out of class in school in hackney and taken to the school in hackney and taken to the school medical room where two female police officers searched, but nothing was found, and a safeguarding report found that that strip searched by the was unjustified and the met said it should never have happened. the
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court said racism was a likely factor. i court said racism was a likely factor. :, :, :, factor. i mentioned about olivia, not her real— factor. i mentioned about olivia, not her real name, _ factor. i mentioned about olivia, not her real name, but _ factor. i mentioned about olivia, not her real name, but a - factor. i mentioned about olivia, not her real name, but a name l factor. i mentioned about olivia, i not her real name, but a name we factor. i mentioned about olivia, - not her real name, but a name we are using to protect her identity and you have spoken to her mother. what has she said? her you have spoken to her mother. what has she said?— has she said? her mother lisa, not her real name. _ has she said? her mother lisa, not her real name, she _ has she said? her mother lisa, not her real name, she said _ has she said? her mother lisa, not her real name, she said when - has she said? her mother lisa, not her real name, she said when her. her real name, she said when her daughter was watching the news about child o, daughter was watching the news about child 0, she said, that is like what happened to me, and there are similarities, she was a mixed—race girl from east london and she was arrested in connection with an allegation of an attempted robbery which was later dropped. when she was taken to a police station at she voluntarily handed over a blade that she kept on her person to use it to self—harm and when she was getting changed in the shower a stick fell out of her bra which she also used to self—harm and the police officers at that point forcibly strip—searched olivia and her mother talks about what happened during
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that strip search. thea;r talks about what happened during that strip search.— talks about what happened during that strip search. they have pinned her to the floor _ that strip search. they have pinned her to the floor and _ that strip search. they have pinned her to the floor and they _ that strip search. they have pinned her to the floor and they used, - that strip search. they have pinned her to the floor and they used, i i her to the floor and they used, i don't _ her to the floor and they used, i don't know— her to the floor and they used, i don't know if it was a knife or a pair— don't know if it was a knife or a pair of— don't know if it was a knife or a pair of scissors, to cut off her underwear— pair of scissors, to cut off her underwear in front of these grown—up male underwear in front of these grown—up mate police _ underwear in front of these grown—up male police officers which i feel is not right — male police officers which i feel is not riuht. ,, :, , ,, not right. similarities with child q and olivia was _ not right. similarities with child q and olivia was also _ not right. similarities with child q and olivia was also on _ not right. similarities with child q and olivia was also on her - not right. similarities with child q and olivia was also on her period| and olivia was also on her period and olivia was also on her period and her mother was not told that a strip search was going to happen and in fact her mother had tried to ring the police station and she was actually self isolating because of covid at the time and she tried to get through to the sergeant and tell him that her daughter had learning difficulties and needed a mental health assessment and she was worried about her self harming but no one rang her back. in the end her mother got in the car and drove to the police station to find out what was happening with her daughter, at a police car was coming out of the station the other way with olivia in the back and this is what olivia told her mother.— the back and this is what olivia told her mother. : , ,:, , :, ,
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told her mother. absolutely furious. absolutely fuming. _ told her mother. absolutely furious. absolutely fuming. i— told her mother. absolutely furious. absolutely fuming. i was _ told her mother. absolutely furious. absolutely fuming. i was even - told her mother. absolutely furious. absolutely fuming. i was even more| absolutely fuming. i was even more shocked _ absolutely fuming. i was even more shocked because _ absolutely fuming. i was even more shocked because i— absolutely fuming. i was even more shocked because i had _ absolutely fuming. i was even more shocked because i had made - absolutely fuming. i was even more shocked because i had made a - absolutely fuming. i was even morej shocked because i had made a point of telling _ shocked because i had made a point of telling the — shocked because i had made a point of telling the police _ shocked because i had made a point of telling the police when _ shocked because i had made a point of telling the police when i - shocked because i had made a point of telling the police when i rang - of telling the police when i rang them _ of telling the police when i rang them that— of telling the police when i rang them that my— of telling the police when i rang them that my child _ of telling the police when i rang them that my child is— of telling the police when i rang them that my child is autistic. them that my child is autistic and she doesn't— them that my child is autistic and she doesn't like _ them that my child is autistic and she doesn't like people _ them that my child is autistic and she doesn't like people touching i she doesn't like people touching her. she doesn't like people touching her and — she doesn't like people touching her and yet _ she doesn't like people touching her. and yet they— she doesn't like people touching| her. and yet they strip—searched her. _ her. and yet they strip—searched her. not — her. and yet they strip—searched her. not only— her. and yet they strip—searched her, not only have _ her. and yet they strip—searched her, not only have they- her, not only have they strip—searched - her, not only have they strip—searched her- her, not only have they strip—searched her buti her, not only have they- strip—searched her but they have handcuffed — strip—searched her but they have handcuffed her— strip—searched her but they have handcuffed her to _ strip—searched her but they have handcuffed her to do _ strip—searched her but they have handcuffed her to do it. - strip—searched her but they have handcuffed her to do it. the- handcuffed her to do it. the metropolitan _ handcuffed her to do it. metropolitan police have handcuffed her to do it.- metropolitan police have said handcuffed her to do it— metropolitan police have said they can't comment extensively on her case because she has made a complaint and they are investigating it but today they announced that they have referred to olivia's strip—searched of the independent office for police conduct, the independent watchdog, because they are aware that londoners will find this case concerning and the mayor of london sadiq khan has also said he is deeply troubled by the details of olivia's allegations. you he is deeply troubled by the details of olivia's allegations.— of olivia's allegations. you have obtained figures _ of olivia's allegations. you have obtained figures showing - of olivia's allegations. you have obtained figures showing the . of olivia's allegations. you have i obtained figures showing the skate of strip searching by the police on children and young people? —— showing the scale. taste
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children and young people? -- showing the scale.— children and young people? -- showing the scale. we asked police forces to give _ showing the scale. we asked police forces to give us _ showing the scale. we asked police forces to give us the _ showing the scale. we asked police forces to give us the numbers - showing the scale. we asked police forces to give us the numbers for i forces to give us the numbers for children under 18 being strip—searched and we were quite surprised, and not all police forces responded but the majority did and they said that in the last five years they have strip—searched more than 13,000 children and that is roughly equivalent to about 50 children per week and disproportionately it is a black and mixed—race boys and girls who are searched, so to give you an example, in london, largely, the met police searched more than 1500 boys in custody in police stations. more than 900 of those, 60%, were black or mixed race and when it comes to girls approaching a1% of girls strip—searched in police custody in london were black and mixed—race, and the force says it does not want to strip—searched children but sometimes it is necessary but there are people that question whether there is a disproportionate targeting of people by the colour of
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their skin when it comes to stop and search and strip and search articles to date we have heard in the chief constable's race action plan that they accept there is discrimination and bias in policing in the uk today. and bias in policing in the uk toda ., :. and bias in policing in the uk toda ., :, :, and bias in policing in the uk toda :, :, :, , today. jane, thanks for “oining us. jane has been * today. jane, thanks for “oining us. jane has been working _ today. jane, thanks forjoining us. jane has been working on - today. jane, thanks forjoining us. jane has been working on this - today. jane, thanks forjoining us. jane has been working on this for| jane has been working on this for channel a. we can now talk to a legal consultant who has been working with olivia's mother. can you talk to us about what rights people have in cases like this? the first thin people have in cases like this? tt9: first thing the people have in cases like this? tt9 first thing the police need to be aware of and people is that there are the police and criminal evidence act and they are set in place to make sure that a person's dignity is protected and they minimise the embarrassment to the person and also prevent the misuse of police powers. when the police are in this
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situation but we should know what our laws and rights are, but also the police should know what they are, and when it comes to strip searches it appears that the please do not know their own laws. what searches it appears that the please do not know their own laws. what is the scale of — do not know their own laws. what is the scale of the _ do not know their own laws. what is the scale of the problem? _ do not know their own laws. what is the scale of the problem? do - do not know their own laws. what is the scale of the problem? do you i the scale of the problem? do you think this is pretty commonplace? iterate think this is pretty commonplace? we do think this is pretty commonplace? , do get cases within our business where people don't know what their rights are and there's a lot of cases where the police have abused their powers, especially cases like this, and what happens then, these people don't know what their personal rights are, so say, the police do something wrong, we as individuals assume they know what they are doing and we are brought up to trust the police, if they say
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something, believe what they say, and to go to them if you are in trouble, but there is a mistrust in the police because of the mistakes and the incompetence and the failures they are continuing to do. so what would you like to see the police do to rectify this and what kind of action needs to be taken into police forces in the uk? t was into police forces in the uk? i was ha - to into police forces in the uk? i was happy to see _ into police forces in the uk? i was happy to see that _ into police forces in the uk? i was happy to see that there _ into police forces in the uk? i was happy to see that there is - into police forces in the uk? i was happy to see that there is an - happy to see that there is an antiracism training being introduced, which was on the news this morning, that is the first thing that needs to be done, there needs to be more training and i think they need to basically start from scratch with the training and relearn what is right and wrong and what should be done because it should be common sense, that male police officers should not be present when a female child or a female is being strip—searched because it is an intimate search. thatin
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because it is an intimate search. that in itself should be self—explanatory but even the simplest of things like that are not being adhered to. the simplest of things like that are not being adhered to.— simplest of things like that are not being adhered to. the case studies we have heard _ being adhered to. the case studies we have heard about, _ being adhered to. the case studies we have heard about, this - being adhered to. the case studies we have heard about, this can - being adhered to. the case studies we have heard about, this can be l we have heard about, this can be really dramatic?— we have heard about, this can be really dramatic? what is happening, as well, especially _ really dramatic? what is happening, as well, especially with _ really dramatic? what is happening, as well, especially with children, - as well, especially with children, as well, especially with children, as i said earlier, you have got to trust the police, that is what we are teaching children, so it is not just a case they have done something wrong, but it is a complete breakdown of trust in everything that you have been brought up to believe from such a young age. so it not only affects you physically and emotionally but your mental health and the way that you perceive the police to be is completely misguided. police to be is completely misguided-— police to be is completely misguided. police to be is completely miseuided. :, :, :, misguided. gail, thanks for “oining us. misguided. gail, thanks for “oining average — misguided. gail, thanks for “oining us. average household _ misguided. gail, thanks forjoining us. average household energy - misguided. gail, thanks forjoining| us. average household energy bills are set to rise by £800 in october according to the energy regulator. the energy price cap is expected to increase to
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£2800 per year because of continued volatility in gas and energy prices. with me now isjust —— volatility in gas and energy prices. with me now is just —— justina, the head of a price comparison website. are you surprised by what has been said? �* :, are you surprised by what has been said? �* :. :. , are you surprised by what has been said? :,:, ,. ,, said? i'm not overly surprised because we — said? i'm not overly surprised because we are _ said? i'm not overly surprised because we are expecting - said? i'm not overly surprisedj because we are expecting this said? i'm not overly surprised - because we are expecting this rise in october but what is surprising is the scale and the fact that the ceo of ofgem it says this so early on, because they have not even finished the observation period for the price cap, so that is a very early warning and it shows the severity of the situation. it and it shows the severity of the situation. . :. and it shows the severity of the situation. , :, , , ., situation. it is a big rise and it miaht situation. it is a big rise and it might rrot _ situation. it is a big rise and it might rrot be _ situation. it is a big rise and it might not be the _ situation. it is a big rise and it might not be the last? - situation. it is a big rise and it - might not be the last? absolutely. this is not might not be the last? absolutely. this is rrot a _ might not be the last? absolutely. this is not a final _ might not be the last? absolutely. this is not a final figure, _ might not be the last? absolutely. this is not a final figure, as - might not be the last? absolutely. this is not a final figure, as i - this is not a finalfigure, as i say, we are still in the period
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where ofgem are observing what the wholesale markets are doing and they are very volatile so we don't know what the markets are going to do. there might be another rise in the future, as well.— future, as well. given all of that, what is your— future, as well. given all of that, what is your advice _ future, as well. given all of that, what is your advice to _ future, as well. given all of that, | what is your advice to customers? the best advice, first of all, don't panic about this. if you are struggling already, get in touch with your supplier, and at the moment there are not any deals to switch at the moment, but it is a good time to actually start saving money on your energy at home, so if you can do more to save energy at home, that is the best time to start doing this, before the rises begin. once upon a time of the advice was to switch but that is not really an option now. when you say may be cut down on your fuel bills, that is easier said than done for a lot of people. easier said than done for a lot of
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--eole. : , ,:, , people. absolutely. it is a very difficult thing _ people. absolutely. it is a very difficult thing to _ people. absolutely. it is a very difficult thing to do _ people. absolutely. it is a very difficult thing to do but - people. absolutely. it is a very difficult thing to do but at - people. absolutely. it is a very difficult thing to do but at the i difficult thing to do but at the moment because it is summer, the usage is a bit less and it is good to get into these energy saving habits. the other thing that is coming out today, one of the reasons why ofgem have given these warnings is that the government is also thinking about what should be done in the autumn, about the energy bills, and the government needs to think about how to help those who just can't afford those bills and can't cut down any more so we need to wait and see what government comes up with to help those who are already struggling. that comes up with to help those who are already struggling.— already struggling. that is good advice on insulating _ already struggling. that is good advice on insulating homes, - already struggling. that is good advice on insulating homes, to | already struggling. that is good l advice on insulating homes, to do already struggling. that is good - advice on insulating homes, to do it over the summer before it gets really cold, and before it gets to the autumn and winter, it now. absolutely. if you can afford to do this, this is the best time to do this, this is the best time to do this, and there are incentives the government has announced, and it would save you money in the autumn, and in the winter when the heating
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starts and you need to use most of your energy. starts and you need to use most of your energy-— your energy. justina, thanks for “oinine your energy. justina, thanks for joining us- _ your energy. justina, thanks for joining us. mps _ your energy. justina, thanks for joining us. mps have _ your energy. justina, thanks for joining us. mps have delivered l your energy. justina, thanks for| joining us. mps have delivered a scathing assessment of the government's evacuation of afghanistan last year. their report accuses ministers of having a "total absence of a plan," and calls for the resignation of the foreign office's top civil servant, sir philip barton, who stayed on holiday as kabul fell. paul adams reports. the west's withdrawal from kabul was chaotic and for vast numbers of afghans desperate to leave, profoundly traumatic. it was also, mps say, a betrayal of britain's allies, a catastrophic failure of intelligence, diplomacy and planning. knowing that american forces were soon going to leave, the report says the government
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failed to respond. well, it's clear that what we could have done really from 18 months out when the warning started is begun the really serious preparations, knowing who we needed to evacuate, planning on how we would get them out and where we would take them but instead i'm afraid that's not what happened. at a hearing last december, the foreign office's top civil servants struggled to explain why he and others, including the foreign secretary, stayed on holiday while kabulfell. i have reflected a lot since august on my leave and if i had my time again i would have come back from my leave earlier than i did. i did put in place, as i think you know, an acting permanent secretary in the normal way, but also a director—general to lead in power in afghanistan. today's report suggests mr barton should consider his position. it says many of the british officials and soldiers sent to try and manage the terrible situation at kabul airport worked under enormous pressure. but it criticises what it calls misleading statements about the evacuation process, and says the leadership at the foreign office should be
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ashamed that two civil servants risked their careers to bring the situation to light. the foreign office defends its record. our staff works tirelessly, a spokesperson said, to evacuate over 15,000 people from afghanistan within a fortnight. the report urges the government to commit to a serious strategy for dealing with afghanistan in the future. a failure to do that, it says, would abandon afghan women and girls to the biggest single reversal of rights in a generation. paul adams, bbc news. we are now going to look at the weather.
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it is looking fairly unsettled over the next few days but then it is going to settle down after that. some of these showers in central and eastern parts of the country, fewer out west with a ridge of high pressure starting to build, so some dry weather by the end of the day at west and the odd shower head, most of them further east. temperatures around the seasonal norm, 18—19. this evening and overnight, it turns drier, and fought central and eastern parts of the country, the ridge of high pressure, the lower area will bring wind and rain to the west. a couple of cool spots under the clear skies. the frontal system works its way from east to west across the country on wednesday and more isobars on the charts so it will be a blustery day across the board. we have that weather front and outbreaks of rain are trending eastwards through the morning and eventually clearing into the afternoon to leave another day of sunshine and blustery showers and some of these will be heavy over the north and west of scotland. some
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good spells of sunshine in between in places and those temperatures around the mid to high teens. into thursday, lopressorto around the mid to high teens. into thursday, lopressor to the north of the uk, high pressure to the south, —— low pressure. lots of northern england and the midlands and wales, they will have showers, but that will clear away, and plenty of cloud around on thursday, glimmers of brightness here and there, scotland and northern ireland with another breezy day with sunshine and showers and some of those will be heavy across western scotland. temperatures ranging from 13—19. friday, high pressure pushes in from the south—west and it will bring a lot of dry weather for much of southern scotland and northern ireland and england and wales and more sunshine over the south so it will feel warm up but also still quite breezy in the north west of scotland, with further showers here at times. we could see the high teens or may be touching 20 in the south and south—east. things turn a bit cooler into the weekend with a
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high—pressure dominating the scene so largely dry with sunshine and we will start to pick up a cooler northerly wind.
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this is bbc news with me, ben brown. insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine. what was it like sometimes, the morning after? abs, what was it like sometimes, the morning after?— what was it like sometimes, the mornin: after? : ,, morning after? a mess. there were bottles, entities, _ morning after? a mess. there were bottles, entities, rubbish, - morning after? a mess. there were bottles, entities, rubbish, in - morning after? a mess. there were bottles, entities, rubbish, in the . bottles, entities, rubbish, in the bin but— bottles, entities, rubbish, in the bin but overflowing. or, sometimes left on _ bin but overflowing. or, sometimes left on the — bin but overflowing. or, sometimes left on the table. in bin but overflowing. or, sometimes left on the table.— left on the table. in an interview with panorama _ left on the table. in an interview with panorama one _ left on the table. in an interview with panorama one insider- left on the table. in an interview with panorama one insider said i left on the table. in an interview i with panorama one insider said that colleagues watched in disbelief as borisjohnson said the guidance and rules were followed at all times. why has he denied this when we've been with him the whole time? we knew the rules had been broken. we knew the rules had been broken. we knew these parties happen.-
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knew these parties happen. ofgem sa s the knew these parties happen. ofgem says the price _ knew these parties happen. ofgem says the price cap _ knew these parties happen. ofgem says the price cap is _ knew these parties happen. ofgem says the price cap is due _ knew these parties happen. ofgem says the price cap is due to - knew these parties happen. ofgem says the price cap is due to reach l says the price cap is due to reach £2800, more than £800 on the current cap. a 1a—year—old boy is found guilty of the murder of ava white in liverpool last year. thousands of photographs are uncovered from the heart of china's highly secretive system of incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities — it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy. the west ham defender kurt zouma admits kicking and slapping a cat, admitting the charges under the animal welfare act. good afternoon.
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good afternoon. speaking for the first time, insiders who attended gatherings in downing street during covid lockdowns have told bbc news that they would arrive at work to find bins overflowing with empty bottles from the night before, and that parties were routine. they say staff sat on each other's laps at a leaving do in november 2020, where the prime minister has now been pictured, and that security guards were laughed at when they tried to stop one party from taking place. borisjohnson is facing fresh questions about his attendance at the leaving party, and the metropolitan police are facing calls to explain why the prime minister wasn't issued with a fine. our political correspondent ben wright has the latest. boozy lockdown breaking parties in downing street have led to more than 100 fines, and big questions for borisjohnson. with number ten braced for the official report into the partygate scandal, panorama has spoken to three insiders who attended lockdown gatherings in number ten. their words are spoken by actors. what was it sometimes like the morning after?
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a mess. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in the bin but overflowing. or, indeed, sometimes left on the table. you would go into work in the morning in 10 downing street and find empty bottles littered around the place? yep. for the first time, people who were there described what the culture was like. they were every week. the event invites for friday press office drinks were just _ nailed into the diary. there were actually invites, there was a weekly regular invite to press office drinks on friday nights? yes, wine time fridays. invites that were in everyone's . calendar for every friday at apm. four o'clock in the afternoon was wine time? yes. two of the people who have spoken to the bbc on condition of anonymity have received fines for attending events that broke the law. one staffer said they felt borisjohnson had given
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permission for the events to take place because of his attendance. he was there. he may have just been popping through on the way to his flat, because that's what would happen. you know, he wasn't there saying this shouldn't be happening. he wasn't saying, can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance, can everyone put masks on? no, he wasn't telling anybody that. he was grabbing a glass for himself. he was certainly at this gathering. pictures released by itv news show the prime minister at a leaving party in november 2020. at least one person who attended was fined, but borisjohnson wasn't. a staffer who was there described the do. there was about 30 people if not more in a room. - everyone was stood l shoulder to shoulder. some people on each other's laps. people were sitting on each other's laps? yes, one or two people. a government source said the prime minister attended that event in a work capacity, a message repeated by
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ministers this morning. he probably was coming out of his office, carried the red boxes in, raised a glass to say thank you to a leaving member of staff who he would have been working closely with all the way through, and then presumably left. and the police would have had all of that information, which is why they didn't issue him a fixed penalty notice in this case. unemployment is now down i to its lowest level since 1974... at cabinet this morning borisjohnson was talking aboutjob figures this morning but his own conduct in office because disbelief in the words of one staffer when the prime minister first told parliament there were no parties. so, when you and your colleagues in government saw borisjohnson say none of the rules had been broken? we were watching it all live and we just sort of looked at each other in disbelief like, why? why is he denying this? when we've been with him this entire time. we knew that the rules have
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been broken, we knew these parties happened. the government has declined to respond to the testimony given to panorama. the prime minister has promised to make a statement to parliament as soon as the sue gray report is published. now the met�*s investigation is over, the labour london mayor has said the police have some explaining to do. i've not asked questions about this. i've kept away from this but i think it's important when it comes to trust and confidence, when it comes to policing by consent, questions being asked about the integrity of an investigation, that the police explain why they've reached the conclusions they have. and borisjohnson will soon have to explain to mp5 and voters how all of these gatherings were allowed to happen and who, if anyone, should take responsibility. i've been discussing this with our political correspondent, damien gramaticus.
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the question really focuses on what borisjohnson the question really focuses on what boris johnson told the question really focuses on what borisjohnson told parliament. he was asked about the 13th of november, we saw the image where he was at that party and he told parliament, no, the guidance and rules were followed at all times. here we have someone describing that party and describing hearing the prime minister say that the parliament and being, they said, very shocked by that. so, that's going to be the focus that mps in their inquiry, did borisjohnson mislead parliament? what the weight of this evidence add to those questions about the prime minister's truthfulness. about these events. he is pictured at events. people, staff saying he was there. he would come and raise a glass, not tell people to come home. all of those will feed
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into the next few days.— into the next few days. well, this afternoon. _ into the next few days. well, this afternoon, the _ into the next few days. well, this afternoon, the mayor _ into the next few days. well, this afternoon, the mayor of - into the next few days. well, this afternoon, the mayor of london i into the next few days. well, this i afternoon, the mayor of london has written to the acting commissioner of the metropolitan police asking for a detailed explanation of party gait finds. he wants to know about the forces decisions on individual cases about the parties in downing street. the mayor has asked for accountability saying he is concerned about the trust and confidence in the police. let's talk to simon harding now, a former investigating officer at the metropolitan police who retired last year. simon, thanking the being with us. should the police be telling us more about their investigation? about their decision—making in terms of who they find and who they didn't find? t of who they find and who they didn't find? ~' of who they find and who they didn't find? ~ �* , , , : find? i think it's very difficult for them. — find? i think it's very difficult for them, they _ find? i think it's very difficult for them, they certainly - find? i think it's very difficult| for them, they certainly won't find? i think it's very difficult - for them, they certainly won't come out and do that without them. and it
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sounds like the mayor of london is trying to make that happen. i think, with a lot of this, when you look at the allegations around the 13th of november party, a lot of this is about what the police knew, did they know about this already? is that photo being leaked part of the 500 plus photographs they had as part of their inquiry. if they did know about that already then this public going to have to be some justification at some stage as to why only one person in that image, let alone the prime minister was the only person not to get a ticket. you've got a 26 tickets and 83 individuals then some people have got more than one so it stands to reason within the maths. so the real questions are going to have to be explained around decision—making, perhaps a tier system of when they
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gave out tickets.— gave out tickets. you're talking about fixed _ gave out tickets. you're talking about fixed penalty _ gave out tickets. you're talking about fixed penalty notices. - gave out tickets. you're talking | about fixed penalty notices. the problem for the police is that, according to the national guidelines and fixed penalty notices, individuals can't be named. ts and fixed penalty notices, individuals can't be named. is that correct? yes. _ individuals can't be named. is that correct? yes, that's _ individuals can't be named. is that correct? yes, that's right - individuals can't be named. is that correct? yes, that's right and - individuals can't be named. is that correct? yes, that's right and i - correct? yes, that's right and i think the police are following laws essentially made by the government so it's very difficult for them and it might be something that the mayor of london say to himself but might never be published. certainly it's going to be difficult for the police to explain the structure that they deployed but, again, do they have to? can they be. 17 deployed but, again, do they have to? can they be.— deployed but, again, do they have to? can they be. ? probably not. but when people — to? can they be. ? probably not. but when people say _ to? can they be. ? probably not. but when people say that _ to? can they be. ? probably not. but when people say that particular- to? can they be. ? probably not. but when people say that particular set l when people say that particular set of pictures, that party wear that prime minister is raising a glass, toasting people at the party with lots of alcohol on the table, and common sense will stay that if one person has been fined for being that why shouldn't everyone else be fined
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and washing that include prime minister? t and washing that include prime minister? , :, , and washing that include prime minister? :, , :, minister? i spoke about this awhile aeo. when minister? i spoke about this awhile ago- when you _ minister? i spoke about this awhile ago. when you decide _ minister? i spoke about this awhile ago. when you decide what - minister? i spoke about this awhile | ago. when you decide what strategy is going to be forgiving out fixed penalties at the start of the inquiry, is it everybody that was there? the organisers? there is a strategy there somewhere because you should be talking about organisers who should be receiving hefty fines which is what people have been done throughout the country, organising parties during lockdown and there are going to be problems, is there going to be a catchall? i don't quite understand the figures. it doesn't make sense the number of parties, to the number of people you can see on images so i'm confused and it was something that i would have dealt with maybe when i was in the play so i don't understand the strategy, the structure or the
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decision—making process. not to say that it decision—making process. not to say thatitis decision—making process. not to say that it is not right but i don't understand it so clarity needs to be given. understand it so clarity needs to be eiven. ~ :. understand it so clarity needs to be eiven. . :, :, ,:, understand it so clarity needs to be aiven.~ :, :, :, given. what would you say about the olice given. what would you say about the police investigation. _ given. what would you say about the police investigation. i'm _ given. what would you say about the police investigation. i'm sure - given. what would you say about the police investigation. i'm sure you - police investigation. i'm sure you are relieved you weren't part of it! the police seem to have been dragged kicking and screaming into the investigation in the first place. they didn't want to get involved. then they did get involved. then lots of man—hours, detectives involved and they've come up with a set of fines which don't appear to have satisfied many people. t set of fines which don't appear to have satisfied many people. i don't think there is _ have satisfied many people. i don't think there is a _ have satisfied many people. i don't think there is a particular _ have satisfied many people. i don't think there is a particular winning l think there is a particular winning inquiry for anybody. certainly, think there is a particular winning inquiry foranybody. certainly, most people in this country will look at the police and say i want them to be doing something else. we hear things like, we don't see the police around, we don't see them doing anything. it's because they're dealing with things like this. it's an unfortunate inquiry that has taken 12 detectives, short of half
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£1 million of taxpayer's money dealing with it and i'm sure police dealing with it and i'm sure police dealing with it don't want to but are dealing with it. those in the inquiry who are very good offices with great integrity, there is not an integrity issue. it's not about that at all. it's about whether they are being. tell everyone what their strategy is and the idea behind inquiry. the officers themselves will have been given the job, they do theirjob and that's what they are paid for. they may be following decisions made by senior officers in charge of the whole inquiry making decisions on where they feel fixed penalties should go. you are right. i'm glad i wasn't dealing with it! thank you, simon harding, former senior investigating officer. you can see that programme on bbc
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iplayer or tonight at 7pm. the chief executive of ofgem has said that the energy price cap is expected to reach £2800 this october. the cat is currently at £1900. mps were told that the price cap could go even higher in the future. our personal finance correspondence has explained to us what exactly is meant by a price cap. to us what exactly is meant by a rice ca -. . : to us what exactly is meant by a --riceca. , : , to us what exactly is meant by a --riceca. ,: ._ price cap. the price cap is actually a limit on the _ price cap. the price cap is actually a limit on the price _ price cap. the price cap is actually a limit on the price per— price cap. the price cap is actually a limit on the price per unit - price cap. the price cap is actually a limit on the price per unit of - a limit on the price per unit of energy which are set every six months at the moment and what that is used to do is to calculate what a typical household using a typical amount of energy will pay for their gas and electricity and that is the figure being used to say that typical household could be paying
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£2800 per yearfrom october. now, remember, these are households, 23 millions of them across the uk who have been told since april have been paying £700 a year more take shot to £2000 a year mark but now with got used to bill shocks without gas and electricity but this is probably the biggest of all because in october, that typical household could be paying another £800 a year for their gas and electricity, taking up to 2000 £800 per year. these have been difficult described as once in a generation rises connected to the war in ukraine because as we look to the future, it may be that conflict there puts more pressure on the energy market, on the prices that suppliers pay and clearly, that gets passed on to us as consumers. so.
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passed on to us as consumers. so, that increased _ passed on to us as consumers. so, that increased cap, that might not be the last increase? they could be more to come depending on partly how long the war in ukraine goes on? that's the great unknown. clearly, at the moment, we are in a position of unprecedented levels in many ways the people, certainly in living memory, for many people paying their energy bills. there is some protection here. the price cap means that you will know what you're paying until october. clearly is the worry that come october, when the days are colder, darker and people use gas more that the heating on more, but the lights on more then clearly, the situation for our finances becomes much more acute and that's why there is now added pressure on ministers to try and come up with more targeted support measures. clearly, they put in various measures so far which had
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been general, broad measures, rebates through your council tax bill or coming on in october with some money off deals which would then be paid back in instalments afterwards. clearly, it's highly unusualfor afterwards. clearly, it's highly unusual for the regulator to say, afterwards. clearly, it's highly unusualfor the regulator to say, at this stage, what it thinks the next bill will be on this is still uncertain. they'll still be a couple of of looking figures on what suppliers are paying before it's confirmed but clearly, the seriousness of the situation has meant that ofgem has decided to tell the committee of mps today a figure explaining how high these energy bills could be.— bills could be. that's from a personal— bills could be. that's from a personal finance _ bills could be. that's from a - personal finance correspondence. a a0—year—old boy has been found guilty of the murder of 12—year—old ava white in liverpool last year. —— 1a—year—old. ava died after being
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stabbed in the city centre while out with friends. judith moretz is at liverpool crown court for us. this is a horrific— liverpool crown court for us. this is a horrific case _ liverpool crown court for us. ti 3 is a horrific case involving children. the victim, just 12 years old and a boy who we can't name for legal reasons because he's too young to be named publicly his been found guilty of her murder atjust 1a years old. we understand that what happened was on the night where the christmas lights are being switched on in liverpooljust down the road from the city centre, two groups of children, teenagers were out enjoying the evening. ava was in one group in the 1a year boy and another. what was heard in court was the group of boys were filming ava on their phones. one of them was filming her on his phone. she objected to that, there was an argument and then the 1a—year—old
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boy pulled out a flick night he had been carrying and stabbed her in the neck. there were attempts to save her and she was taken to hospital but tragically, she died there short time later. the boy concerned initially denied even being in the city centre and then accepted that he had and had had the knife but he said it was done in self defence. that is what the jury rejected and they found him guilty of murder. there were some incredibly emotional scenes in the court a short time ago. ava white's cheering and screaming when that verdict came in. and the 1a—year—old boy who is now being convicted did not appear in the courtroom, he appeared by video link and put his head in his hands when the verdict was passed. he will be required to go back in front of the cork on the 11th ofjuly. he is being held in secure custody and then he will be sentenced the murder
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of ava white. back in front of court —back in front thousands of photographs from the heart of china's highly secretive system of mass—incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities in the xinjiang region are part of a huge collection of data that's been handed to the bbc. it was hacked from police computer servers in the region — and includes evidence of a shoot—to—kill policy for anyone who tried to escape. the foreign secretary liz truss has called the information shocking. here's our correspondent, john sudworth. these are the faces china never intended us to see, from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it's running detention camps for uyghurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3,000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uyghur society have been swept up, person by person. the oldest was 73 at
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the time of her detention. the youngest, just 15. the uyghurs, with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots in a region with a history of separatism and violence, have long faced cycles of tightening government control. and with mounting criticism over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uyghurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism. yes, this is classified internal government information. the files, said to have been hacked from police computer servers in xinjiang by a source whose identity is unknown, were first passed to dr adrian zenz, a xinjiang scholar, who in turn shared them with the bbc — and they raise serious questions about china's narrative.
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you have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to some of the men. some of the men have their arms in a funny position as if they were handcuffed, so this is really very powerful about the image material. i was looking through these images on my laptop in the living room and had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uyghurs en masse. just for growing a beard, this man was sentenced to 16 years injail. his chosen expression of uyghur identity forcibly removed. by speaking to members of the uyghur diaspora in places like turkey, the bbc has been able to verify the data, showing it to contain real people.
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this man, for example, knew his eldest son had beenjailed — but the database tells him for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences. although as evidence, only his son's devout islamic faith is listed. in response to questions, the chinese embassy in the us issued a statement, saying that in the face of the grave and complex counterterrorism situation in xinjiang the authorities had taken a host of decisive, robust and effective deradicalisation measures so that people could live a safe, happy and fulfilling life — although there was no attempt to address any of the hacked data directly. it includes these images, once again from deep within the system, that appear to offer further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people, not for what they have done, but for who they are. john sudworth, bbc news.
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going to talk to doctor adrian who was in this report. his senior fellow in the china studies. flan was in this report. his senior fellow in the china studies. can you tell us more — fellow in the china studies. can you tell us more about _ fellow in the china studies. can you tell us more about how— fellow in the china studies. can you tell us more about how you - fellow in the china studies. can you tell us more about how you got - fellow in the china studies. can you | tell us more about how you got hold of this material. what went through your mind because it's so hard to get any real information about what's going on in china? t get any real information about what's going on in china? i was really stunned. _ what's going on in china? i was really stunned. so _ what's going on in china? i was really stunned. so much - what's going on in china? i was really stunned. so much of- what's going on in china? i was| really stunned. so much of this, what's going on in china? i was i really stunned. so much of this, i mean, i spend so much time looking at chinese government documents, trying to read between the lines, trying to read between the lines, trying to read between the lines, trying to piece together information. i'm amazed by the bluntness of the speeches by chinese officials. really telling these officials. really telling these officials to just open fire, you know, and handcuff, shackle them,
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blindfold them. very unguarded language. internal speeches. blindfold them. very unguarded language. internalspeeches. so, it really took some time to process everything. really took some time to process everything-— everything. what does it tell us? we've known _ everything. what does it tell us? we've known for _ everything. what does it tell us? we've known for awhile - everything. what does it tell us? we've known for awhile about. everything. what does it tell us? i we've known for awhile about how minorities are treated that this is additional information. very vivid, you say. what is going on? why do the chinese authorities treat these people so badly? what is it about them they fear so much? t people so badly? what is it about them they fear so much?- them they fear so much? i think there's some — them they fear so much? i think there's some sort _ them they fear so much? i think there's some sort of _ them they fear so much? i think there's some sort of paranoia, l there's some sort of paranoia, historians and scholars find their paranoia is a common factor with mass atrocities and human rights violations where you try to pre—emptively detain or kill an entire population that you have a
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threat perception that's greatly blown up. i think that's what we are seeing here. threat perception, a population you can't control, thinking differently, they have a different language, and a small minority have conducted acts of violence but you get from there, from sort of counter terrorism measurements other governments would implement, you go from there to pre—emptively interning ten or 20% of that group. you pre-emptively interning ten or 2096 of that grow-— of that group. you are in no doubt that this all _ of that group. you are in no doubt that this all comes _ of that group. you are in no doubt that this all comes from _ of that group. you are in no doubt that this all comes from the - of that group. you are in no doubt that this all comes from the very i that this all comes from the very top in china? this is something that has been ordered by the leadership? we now know that for sure because one of the most important documents in this cash is a speech by china's highest police official. the
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president has alleged to have been closely informed that amps were overcrowded and that the president himself gave orders for the recruitment of more prison guards, detention camp guards, expanding camps and building new ones. fiend. detention camp guards, expanding camps and building new ones. and, in the end, camps and building new ones. and, in the end. china — camps and building new ones. and, in the end, china will _ camps and building new ones. and, in the end, china will always _ camps and building new ones. and, in the end, china will always deny - the end, china will always deny this, things that you and other experts say about this. they will say there are no human rights abuses so what can we do about this? the world? what can be done to put more pressure on the chinese leadership? at this point, well governments have often remained fairly silent about it. politicians have spoken of allegations and found some excuse to tone down the respondent but now it's what —— now what is beijing going to do about these photos? what what i do about images that their own police took off the camps. i
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think those politicians are under a lot of pressure to properly speak out. really make a bold statement that this is shocking and unacceptable and if beijing is not relenting of this in the next step is really to be in escalation of sanctions. is really to be in escalation of sanctions-— is really to be in escalation of sanctions. :, ~ :, :, :, sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for our sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for your time- — sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for yourtime- now. _ sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for your time. now, we're _ sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for your time. now, we're going - sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for your time. now, we're going to - sanctions. doctor adrian, thanks for i your time. now, we're going to pause and take a look at the latest weather forecast. and take a look at the latest weatherforecast. how is it looking? with had some potent showers, rumbles of thunder. some hail, all tied in with this weather front which has enhanced the showers stop
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with gutter frontal system. one or two chilly spots but where there's that new frontal system, wetter and windier. double figures here. wednesday starts dry and cool and in the north west wet and windy, abandoned cloud and rain will fizzle out as it reaches the north—east. elsewhere, it will be a windier day they will be further blustery showers may be in the north. thursday, another rather cloudy day in the forecast but by friday and the weekend, high—pressure so we should see further sunshine. you are watching bbc news and these are the headlines.
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insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine. they say gatherings were common during the covid pandemic, and that staff felt they were permissible because the prime minister often popped in. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach £2,800 this october, an increase of more than £800 on the current cap. thousands of photographs are uncovered from the heart of china's highly secretive system of incarceration of uyghurs and other minorities — it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy. a 1a—year—old boy has been found guilty of the murder of 12—year—old girl ava white in liverpool last year. another 1a cases of monkeypox have been identified england which brings the overall total to 71 in the uk,
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although the risk remains low overall. and kurt zouma has been found guilty of two charges under the animal welfare act. now back to the animal welfare act. now back to the main story, staff from downing street telling the bbc how people danced and anonymous sources have said the prime minister did not dampen down the activities. downing street have said they take the allegations very seriously, and they said whole sale changes have been made with further to come. we can talk to the snp mp tommy sheppard. the snp has called on the leader of the scottish conservatives to resend
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a letter of no confidence in the prime minister. let me ask you first of all, we are still waiting for sue gray's report, may be tomorrow, may be later this week, but what are you expecting from it in terms of details about the various parties that were held at number ten? t presume we will get chapter and verse on most of what we now already know, we know the prime minister broke the law and has been fined and we now know from the pictures which have emerged overnight and today that he not only did that but he presided over a culture of lawbreaking. that number ten was partying every week and breaking the rules that they were forcing everyone else to live by. i think there's going to be more evidence coming out that shows the prime minister's position is untenable and it is high time he did the decent thing and chose to resign. before he
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gets pushed. taste thing and chose to resign. before he gets pushed-— gets pushed. we are looking at the ictures gets pushed. we are looking at the pictures that _ gets pushed. we are looking at the pictures that came _ gets pushed. we are looking at the pictures that came out, _ gets pushed. we are looking at the pictures that came out, that - gets pushed. we are looking at the pictures that came out, that itv . pictures that came out, that itv news revealed last night, of the prime minister toasting people at the party with a drink in his hands and a lot of confusion amongst the public about why somebody else at least, one other person at the gathering was fine, but other people were not including the prime minister. what is your take on that? that is a matter for the metropolitan police but they have not already examined these images i hope they will do so now. and that they will consider perhaps whether it is a case for reopening, especially when you consider the revelations that are coming out today about the weekly parties. people thought they were almost sanctioned by the prime minister. the reaction from number ten is quite outrageous, and for them to regard, for them to say the prime minister will take the revelation seriously, well, clearly they can't
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be revelations to the prime minister because he was there, and it was him that was involved in these weekly gatherings and he was seen repeatedly, so to pretend they are now revelations and something went on that he did not know about, i think is to beggar belief. to on that he did not know about, i think is to beggar belief.- think is to beggar belief. to put what the government _ think is to beggar belief. to put what the government have - think is to beggar belief. to put what the government have said| think is to beggar belief. to put i what the government have said all along is that downing street is not any house, it is in office, and the prime minister lives in his office, effectively, so when you talk about a work event, that is what the government have talked about in terms of these gatherings. taste government have talked about in terms of these gatherings. we all live through _ terms of these gatherings. we all live through this _ terms of these gatherings. we all live through this period _ terms of these gatherings. we all live through this period and - terms of these gatherings. we all live through this period and we i terms of these gatherings. we all| live through this period and we all faced these restrictions and we all know very well that a lot of workplaces had to function to maintain essential services but there were very strict rules and protocols about what you would do in the workplace and you had to keep your distance and take all the public health precautions and follow the advice that was given and that did not include breaking out the
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wine cabinet at five o'clock on a friday night and having a party which is what seems to have happened not once or twice but repeatedly throughout the period when those making these rules were telling everybody else to abide by them but refused to do though themselves. people will find this really quite sickening because the worst thing is that we have a prime minister who has shown no shame or contrition and no humility. he probably thinks what he did is ok and therein lies the problem because it mostly was not ok and we now have a prime minister without integrity and credibility and the sooner he goes, the better, to be honest. and the sooner he goes, the better, to be honest-— to be honest. there are people includin: to be honest. there are people including a _ to be honest. there are people including a lot _ to be honest. there are people including a lot of _ to be honest. there are people including a lot of conservative l to be honest. there are people - including a lot of conservative mps who had originally called for him to go but who now aren't because they say there is so much that the prime minister needs to focus on especially the war in ukraine and the cost of living crisis. some people say this is not the time to actually have a change of prime minister. , :. actually have a change of prime minister. , :, , ~
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minister. they are but i think that is wrone. minister. they are but i think that is wrong- i _ minister. they are but i think that is wrong. i think _ minister. they are but i think that is wrong. i think a _ minister. they are but i think that is wrong. i think a change - minister. they are but i think that is wrong. i think a change of - minister. they are but i think that l is wrong. i think a change of prime minister would assist the government and the country in dealing with the crisis both domestic and international that we are facing just now. this will continue to be a distraction and the story will be about the prime minister himself and his integrity and his character. that is not really something which is a good thing for the country or the government so those tory mps have got a big decision to make but i hope that do the right thing because borisjohnson, if he wants to brazen it which he seems to want to brazen it which he seems to want to do, theoretically he can because he has a majority, such as the limitation of our parliamentary system, but it is for the conservative members of parliament themselves to realise the affront this is causing to ordinary people up this is causing to ordinary people up and down the uk and to do something about it and i hope over the coming days, especially when they see the evidence in detail in they see the evidence in detail in the sue gray report, that they will take action and that they will make sure that the prime minister is
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pushed if he is not prepared to jump. pushed if he is not prepared to “um -. :, , pushed if he is not prepared to “um. :, _, , pushed if he is not prepared to jump. tommy sheppard, snp mp at the -a 's jump. tommy sheppard, snp mp at the party's constitutional _ jump. tommy sheppard, snp mp at the party's constitutional affairs _ party's constitutional affairs spokesperson, thanks forjoining us. that and the party. —— and the party's constitutional affairs spokesperson. now we have the sport. england have called up the west ham forward jarrod bowen for the nation league matches against germany, hungary and italy. 18 goals for west ham this season. and also 35 assists. he was in contention for the previous england squad in march but was ruled out with a fractured foot bone and there is also a called up forjamesjustin of leicester city and the complete squad is on the bbc website. gareth southgate was asked for his thoughts on the recent fan disorder seen at football matches. there have been a number of pitch invasions after games in recent weeks with
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incidents of supporters attacking players, including here at the etihad stadium on saturday when the aston villa goal keeper robin olsen was seen to be assaulted. taste aston villa goal keeper robin olsen was seen to be assaulted.- was seen to be assaulted. we don't want to no was seen to be assaulted. we don't want to go back _ was seen to be assaulted. we don't want to go back to _ was seen to be assaulted. we don't want to go back to fences _ was seen to be assaulted. we don't want to go back to fences up - was seen to be assaulted. we don't want to go back to fences up and i was seen to be assaulted. we don't. want to go back to fences up and the type of environment that created because the game has been more inclusive over the last 25 years and a better place for families and women to attend and completely more diverse audience so really positive that we don't want to step back. but football reflects society so it will be easy for some people just to put it on the football but that is not the reality of it. i repeat, football has a responsibility we have to do our bit and we have to get that right. —— and we have to do our bit. the west ham defender kurt zouma admits kicking and slapping a cat,
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admitting the charges under the animal welfare act. the video also showed him saying that he would kill the cat. the defender pleaded guilty to two counts under the animal welfare act when he appeared at thames magistrates' court in east london this morning. he was filmed on social media in february kicking and mistreating his pet by his younger brother yoan who plays for dagenham and redbridge — who also admitted one offence during the hearing. the animals are still being cared for by the rspca which brought the prosecution. our reporter was at thames magistrates' court. he pleaded guilty to two counts of causing unnecessary suffering to a protected animal and his younger brother pleaded guilty to aiding and abetting the cause of unnecessary suffering. kurt zouma had been fined a quarter of a million by his club and also lost sponsorship but the prosecution said he had caused the cat, fear, pain and anxiety and that the suffering was deliberate. zouma has agreed for his cats to be rehomed by the rspca. the brothers will be sentenced next month. emotional where fell forjo—wilfried
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tsonga at the french open, the end of a remarkable career for him. tsonga at the french open, the end of a remarkable careerfor him. —— emotional farewell. of a remarkable careerfor him. —— emotionalfarewell. semifinalist of a remarkable careerfor him. —— emotional farewell. semifinalist at wimbledon, of course. danil medvedev has begun his french open with a straightforward win. the world number two encountered very few problems against argentina's facundo bagnis, easing to a comfortable straight sets win — 6-2, 6-2, 6-2. the wimbledon semifinalist denis shapovalov has been beaten, in the shock result of the day. beaten in straight sets by a danish 19—year—old. former british turned jamaican international swimmer michael gunning has announced his retirement from the sport at the age of 28. gunning competed atjunior level for great britain before switching to the nation where his father was born and represented jamaica at two senior world championships. he narrowly missed out on the tokyo 2020 olympics but has passionately promoted lgbtq+ rights and diversity in the sport, areas he now aims to dedicated himself
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to further in retirement. warwickshire say there is no timescale on chris woakes' return from a knee injury. he is one of seven england fast bowlers who will miss the first test match against new zealand next week because of injury. woakes has not played since the final test match against the west indies in march. more about that on the bbc sport website. that's all the sport for now. more for you later. the chief executive of ofgem says the energy price cap is expected to reach £2800 this october. the cap is currently £1900. jonathan brearley said that the price cap could go even higher in the future. t said that the price cap could go even higher in the future. i know this is a very _ even higher in the future. i know this is a very distressing - even higher in the future. i know this is a very distressing time - even higher in the future. i know this is a very distressing time for customers, but i do need to be clear with this committee and with customers and with the government, about the likely price implications for october. latertoday
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about the likely price implications for october. later today i will write to the chancellor to give him our latest estimates of the price cap uplift, and this is uncertain, we are only part way through the price cap window, but we are expecting a price cap in october in the region of £2800. ourfuture scenarios, when we look beyond that, we are really managing between two extreme versions of events, and one where the price falls back down to where the price falls back down to where it was before, for example if we saw peace in ukraine, and one where prices could go even further, if we were to see, for example, a disruptive interruption of gas from russia. :. :. . : disruptive interruption of gas from russia. :, :, , : . russia. that was the chief executive of of: em russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and _ russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and we — russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and we can _ russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and we can now _ russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and we can now talk - russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and we can now talk to - russia. that was the chief executive of ofgem and we can now talk to a i of ofgem and we can now talk to a man from the resolution foundation. that is a think tank which focuses on people who are on lower incomes and calm, it is people on lower incomes who will find news of another big rise in the price cap pretty alarming.
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another big rise in the price cap pretty alarming-— another big rise in the price cap pretty alarming. that is right, and we know that _ pretty alarming. that is right, and we know that no _ pretty alarming. that is right, and we know that no matter— pretty alarming. that is right, and we know that no matter where - pretty alarming. that is right, and| we know that no matter where you live, you will still spend a similar proportion, similar amount of money trying to heat your home and that will really bite this winter. if the price cap rises by £800 in october, to £2800 for energy bills for a typical household but we estimate around a0% of all families will be in if you which means they are spending more than 10% of their income on their energy bills —— will be in fuel stress. income on their energy bills -- will be in fuel stress.— income on their energy bills -- will be in fuel stress. there is not much the can be in fuel stress. there is not much they can do — be in fuel stress. there is not much they can do about _ be in fuel stress. there is not much they can do about it _ be in fuel stress. there is not much they can do about it because - be in fuel stress. there is not much they can do about it because may i be in fuel stress. there is not much| they can do about it because may be in the past they could switch to a cheaper provider but that is not an option. cheaper provider but that is not an otion. : , option. absolutely right. if we think about — option. absolutely right. if we think about where _ option. absolutely right. if we think about where the - option. absolutely right. if we think about where the cap - option. absolutely right. if we j think about where the cap was option. absolutely right. if we i think about where the cap was 18 months ago, some people will see their energy bills rising by over 150% and we have seen some energy companies go out of business and it is now effectively you are on the price cap, and some energy companies
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were offering some fixed rate deals a couple of months ago but even then they were above the price cap, so it has become a single market and that is why it is basically down to the government, they are the only agent in this scenario who can actually provide support and mitigate against the high energy bills. tiaras provide support and mitigate against the high energy bills.— the high energy bills. how do you think they should _ the high energy bills. how do you think they should do _ the high energy bills. how do you think they should do that? - the high energy bills. how do you think they should do that? we . the high energy bills. how do you think they should do that? we do j think they should do that? we do know is that _ think they should do that? we do know is that the _ think they should do that? we do know is that the poorest - think they should do that? we do - know is that the poorest households, around three quarters of them are likely to be in fuel stress this winter so they should target more support to those households to avoid situations we have already started to see last winter where people face difficult decisions about choosing whether to leave the heating on or have a full cupboard of food and the easiest way to do that is to target support towards people on the state pension and also on working age benefits like universal credit. what advice would _ benefits like universal credit. what advice would you _ benefits like universal credit. what advice would you give _ benefits like universal credit. what advice would you give to ordinary consumers in terms of trying to reduce their energy bills? i know thatis reduce their energy bills? i know that is not easy at all but a lot of
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homes are not properly insulated so should people do more on that while the weather is a bit warmer before it gets worse? this the weather is a bit warmer before it gets worse?— it gets worse? this is difficult but in the ideal _ it gets worse? this is difficult but in the ideal situation _ it gets worse? this is difficult but in the ideal situation you - it gets worse? this is difficult but in the ideal situation you could i in the ideal situation you could wind the clock back a few years and get going with the insulation grants and providing more support but we have to understand that there is not enough time now between now and this winter, especially a cold winter, there is no easy solution, and we have seen the likes of martin lewis suggest a long list of possible things households could do to keep warm and keep the energy bills down but the thing is that there is not really a choice for many households because they often older people or people with health conditions who need the heating on at home. goad people with health conditions who need the heating on at home. good to talk to you- — need the heating on at home. good to talk to you. karl— need the heating on at home. good to talk to you. karl from _ need the heating on at home. good to talk to you. karl from the _ talk to you. karl from the resolution foundation, thanks for joining us. now the latest news
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headlines. insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine. they say gatherings were common during the covid pandemic, and that staff felt they were permissible because the prime minister often popped in. the energy regulator ofgem says the price cap is expected to reach £2,800 this october, an increase of more than £800 on the current cap. a 1a—year—old boy has been found guilty of the murder of 12—year—old girl ava white in liverpool last year. health officials have confirmed 1a more cases of monkeypox in england. that brings the total number across the uk to 71 and the uk health security agency says the risk to the british population remains low but it has urged anybody with unusual rashes or lesions on any part of their body to contact nhs111 or
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their body to contact nhs111 or their local sexual health service. earlier i spoke to a dr who is from that agency. earlier i spoke to a dr who is from that agency-— that agency. this is a very different _ that agency. this is a very different infection - that agency. this is a very different infection and - that agency. this is a very different infection and it l that agency. this is a very - different infection and it doesn't spread that easily between individuals and we are seeing it spread through direct contact with skin lesions and scabs, especially if the skin is broken, contact with clothing with someone who has a rash and occasionally from coughs and sneezes, but we see this as transmission with very close contact which is significantly different. and that is one of the reasons that we are following up those contacts to be able to provide appropriate advice to them to help control this. you updated the numbers, so 71 you said was the number of cases in the uk at the moment? that
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said was the number of cases in the uk at the moment?— uk at the moment? that is correct. 70 in england _ uk at the moment? that is correct. 70 in england and _ uk at the moment? that is correct. 70 in england and one _ uk at the moment? that is correct. 70 in england and one in _ uk at the moment? that is correct. 70 in england and one in scotland i 70 in england and one in scotland and as of yesterday there are no cases identified in wales and northern ireland. the uk's withdrawal from afghanistan last year was a catastrophic failure and a betrayal of britain's allies, according to an inquiry by mps. the foreign affairs committee says there was a fundamental lack of planning or leadership before and during the taliban's takeover of kabul. our correspondent paul adams has this report. the west's withdrawal from kabul was chaotic and, for vast numbers of afghans desperate to leave, profoundly traumatic. it was also, mps say, a betrayal of britain's allies, a catastrophic failure of intelligence, diplomacy and planning. knowing that american forces
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were soon going to leave, the report says the government failed to respond. well, it's clear that what we could have done, really from 18 months out when the warning started, is begun the really serious preparations, knowing who we needed to evacuate, planning on how we would get them out and where we would take them, but instead i'm afraid that's not what happened. at a hearing last december, the foreign office's top civil servant struggled to explain why he and others, including the foreign secretary, stayed on holiday while kabulfell. i have reflected a lot since august on my leave, and if i had my time again i would have come back from my leave earlier. today's report suggests mr barton should consider his position. it says many of the british officials and soldiers sent to try and manage the terrible situation at kabul airport worked under enormous pressure. but it criticises what it calls misleading statements about the evacuation process, and says the leadership at the foreign office should be ashamed that two civil servants
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risked their careers to bring the situation to light. the foreign office defends its record. the report urges the government to commit to a serious strategy for dealing with afghanistan in the future. a failure to do that, it says, would abandon afghan women and girls to the biggest single reversal of rights in a generation. a mother who's daughter was strip—searched by police said that a failure to do that, it says, would abandon afghan women and girls to the biggest single reversal of rights in a generation. paul adams, bbc news. victims groups are strongly opposed
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to the legislation which would mean suspects who cooperate with a fact—finding investigation would not be prosecuted. speaking in the house of commons as mp5 began their first debate on the legislation, julian smith urged the government to look again and gave the example of one victim and his family. fin again and gave the example of one victim and his family.— victim and his family. on the 24th of october — victim and his family. on the 24th of october 1990, _ victim and his family. on the 24th of october 1990, patsy _ victim and his family. on the 24th of october 1990, patsy who - victim and his family. on the 24th of october 1990, patsy who was i victim and his family. on the 24th i of october 1990, patsy who was a2, was abducted by the ira from his family home, and patsy was chained to a lorry and it contained a large bomb. he was forced to drive to an army checkpoint. he shouted a warning to the soldiers just as the ira detonated the bomb and it killed patsy and five young soldiers from the king's regiment. the ira opened fire from across the border and many soldiers were injured but many were saved because of patsy�*s warning. kathleen has never had a full
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investigation and she is devastated that the men and women who did this to her husband will now walk free. to date many victims feel that they have been hit by a double whammy with this bill and their route to justice cut off and that the same time, their route to the truth has been restricted. fsine time, their route to the truth has been restricted.— time, their route to the truth has been restricted. one of the largest infrastructure _ been restricted. one of the largest infrastructure projects _ been restricted. one of the largest infrastructure projects located - been restricted. one of the largest infrastructure projects located in i infrastructure projects located in the uk has officially opened to passengers. the new elizabeth line also known as crossrail runs 170 kilometres across london and into the suburbs. trains run underground through london although some sections are not yet in operation. it is named after queen elizabeth, of course, the officially opened at the service a few days ago after 13 years of construction. our transport correspondent has this report. just after 6am and the doors
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were finally open. passengers streamed into new stations, including here in woolwich in south—east london, to catch the first trains... good morning everyone and welcome to your brand—new elizabeth line service. ..as the country's newest railway got up and running. i turned up really early, i have been waiting for nearly ten years for this to open. just shuttle travel for me, - very convenient for me, yeah. once—in—a—lifetime opportunity. a transport line in a city like london opening, it probably won't happen again in my lifetime. the journey time between canary wharf and whitechapel blew my mind. the line links reading in berkshire with shenfield in essex, via central london. it is initially running in three separate parts. from today, the newly built section between paddington and abbey wood will run monday to saturday with a train every five minutes. seamless end—to—end travel will come later, by may next year. we are on board one of the new elizabeth line trains, they are pretty state—of—the—art and 200 metres long. each one can carry up
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to 1,500 passengers. the crossrail project is opening three and a half years late. one new station, bond street, is still not ready, and its budget has swelled to £18.5 billion, but it is still seen as a hugely impressive engineering achievement. the crossrail is a really important thing for us to all be proud of, but don't believe it has gone down beautifully well in leeds, liverpool and manchester where they want a share of the investment cake, and i'm sure there will have to be big discussions in future. use of public transport hasn't returned to pre—pandemic levels. passenger numbers forecast for the elizabeth line's first few years have been scaled back, but transport for london insists it is still needed. this railway is not built for today or tomorrow but for the next 100 to 150 years. we are very confident it is a catalyst for the post—pandemic recovery. you can see the reaction of customers today, they are wowed by the railway and we think it will drive customers
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back onto the railway. there was a celebratory atmosphere as the new railway arrived with a promise to transform travel across london and the south—east. it is not clear when something like this might be built again. katy austin, bbc news. end ofan end of an era in new york, the last phone box in the city has gone. phone boxes are now a thing of the past there. the city began replacing them with wi—fi hotspots in 2015 which allow people to charge their devices and make free phone calls. whilst taking the last phone box away, people gathered to capture the moment. listeners to radio two have chosen a song they want to help bring people together to celebrate the queen's platinum jubilee. bring people together to celebrate the queen's platinumjubilee. and here it is. the queen's platinum jubilee. and
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here it is. , :, ., ~ the queen's platinum jubilee. and here it is. , :, :, ,, , :, here it is. the “ubilate thank you aunt here it is. the “ubilate thank you eunnhem— here it is. the “ubilate thank you aunt them is — here it is. the jubilate thank you aunt them is neil— here it is. the jubilate thank you aunt them is neil diamond's - here it is. the jubilate thank you i aunt them is neil diamond's sweet caroline. mt aunt them is neil diamond's sweet caroline. : : :, ,, . aunt them is neil diamond's sweet caroline. : : : :, caroline. all time classic, of course. _ caroline. all time classic, of course. so _ caroline. all time classic, of course, so don't _ caroline. all time classic, of course, so don't get - caroline. all time classic, of course, so don't get me i caroline. all time classic, of- course, so don't get me started, otherwise i could be singing that all afternoon... the listeners do zoe ball's breakfast show shows that hit, which is 53 years old, apparently. they said it was a happy uplifting melody which everybody can sing along with. zoe ball said she is hoping 10 million people will join her sing along. jane hill is singing that in the background and she is up next! now we have the weather. looking fairly unsettled with lower pressure over the next few days with low pressure dominating but high pressure will build over the remainder of the week and it will become more subtle. sunshine and
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heavy showers and a rumble of thunder in central and eastern parts of the country at the moment, and there will be fewer at west with a ridge of high pressure building in its own dry weather by the end of the day out west and the odd shower here and most of the showers further east. temperatures in the seasonal normal range. tonight it turns dry and for much of central and eastern parts of the country the ridge of high pressure and the new area of low pressure pushes in it which will bring increasing wind, cloud and outbreaks of rain, so mild it out west. a few cool spots under clear skies. this frontal system works its way from west to east during wednesday and more isobars on the chart so it will be a blustery day across the board. we have that weather front and outbreaks of rain trending eastwards through the morning and eventually clearing into the afternoon to leave another day of sunshine and blustery showers and some of these will be heavy over the north and west of scotland. good spells of sunshine in between and
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temperatures around the mid to high teens. as we head into thursday we have low pressure to the north of the uk and higher pressure to the south, and we have some rain through ireland and northern england, the midlands and wales, but that will clear away. we should see quite a bit of cloud around on thursday across england and wales with glimmers of brightness here and there. scotland and northern ireland with another breezy day with sunshine and some of the showers will be heavy over western scotland. temperatures ranging from 13—19. friday, high pressure pushes in from the south—west and in fact it will bring a lot of dry weather around for much of southern scotland and northern ireland are much of england and wales, more sunshine in the south so it will feel warmer. still quite breezy in the north—east of scotland with further showers at times and temperatures in the low to mid teens and we could see the high teens or touching 20 in the south and south—east will top things turn and south—east will top things turn a bit cooler into the weekend with high pressure dominating the scene so largely dry with sunshine and it
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was start to pick up a cooler northerly wind. —— and it will start.
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this is bbc news, i'mjane hill. the headlines... insiders tell the bbc that lockdown parties in downing street were routine as pictures are released of the prime minister during lockdown. what was it like the morning after? a mess, there were bottles, empties, rubbish in the bin but overflowing. or indeed sometimes left on the table. the prime minister's official spokesman says that borisjohnson takes revelations about what happened in downing street during lockdown "very seriously." a 1a—year—old boy is found guilty of the murder of 12—year—old ava white in liverpool last year. the energy regulator ofgem says
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the price cap is expected to reach

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