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tv   BBC News at Six  BBC News  May 24, 2022 6:00pm-6:31pm BST

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tonight at six, insiders who attended gatherings in downing street in lockdown tell the bbc of crowded, late—night events and parties that were routine. the revelations put further pressure on borisjohnson whose leadership at the time is called into question by one of those who was there. he was not there saying they should not be happening. he was not saying, can everyone break up and go home, can everyone break up and go home, can he wasn't saying because everybody go home, he wasn't telling people to put masks on, no, he was getting a glass himself. we will be asking where these new claims leave the prime minister. and our other main story this evening. another £800 rise in energy bills
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is likely in the autumn, says the head of the industry watchdog, after a £700 rise last month. the faces of thousands of members of the uighur community in china, the bbc obtains a huge data leak about their detention and harsh treatment by the authorities. good morning, everyone, and welcome to the brand—new elizabeth line service. and it is three years late and four million pounds over budget, but the elizabeth line on london's tube network open to the public today. and coming up on the bbc news channel, it is england's jarrod bowen. he and jamesjustin get their first international call—up ahead of next month's nation's league games. good evening.
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there are more questions for the government tonight over behaviour in downing street during covid lockdowns. for the first time insiders who attended gatherings there have told the bbc that parties were routine, and they would arrive at work to find bins overflowing with empty bottles from the night before. they say staff sat on each other�*s laps at a leaving do in november 2020, where the prime minister has now been pictured. and that security guards were laughed at when they tried to stop one party from taking place. borisjohnson�*s spokesman says he takes the accusations very seriously. the prime minister remains under pressure over his attendance at the leaving party two and a half years ago and the metropolitan police are with a fine whenn at least one other person was. i deputy political editor vicki young has the latest. unemployment is now down to its lowest level since 197a. unemployment is now down to its lowest level since 1974.— lowest level since 1974. boris johnson lowest level since 1974. boris johnson try — lowest level since 1974. boris johnson try to _ lowest level since 1974. boris johnson try to focus - lowest level since 1974. boris johnson try to focus on - lowest level since 1974. boris johnson try to focus on the i
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lowest level since 1974. boris - johnson try to focus on the positive johnson try to focus on the positive as he opened this week's cabinet meeting. they have all been defending his behaviour during lockdown at a time when we were breaking was rife inside number ten. there were bottles, empties, rubbish in the bin, but overflowing. 0r indeed sometimes left on the table. panorama has spoken to three insiders who attended gatherings insiders who attended gatherings inside downing street. police have issued more than 120 fines to those who partied here. this event took place in november 2020. at least one person was fined, mrjohnson wasn't. a staff member there described the do. their words were spoken by actors. ., g; :: , .,, actors. there were about 30 people, if not more. — actors. there were about 30 people, if not more. in _ actors. there were about 30 people, if not more, in the _ actors. there were about 30 people, if not more, in the room. _ actors. there were about 30 people, if not more, in the room. everyone l if not more, in the room. everyone was stood shoulder to shoulder with some people on each other�*s lapse. the prime minister will be disappointed. as you know, he has apologised — disappointed. as you know, he has apologised for what happened. i think_ apologised for what happened. i think he — apologised for what happened. i think he has popped down there to raise a _ think he has popped down there to raise a glass and say thank you to a
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long-term — raise a glass and say thank you to a long—term member of staff who was leaving _ long—term member of staff who was leaving and — long—term member of staff who was leaving and my view is that none of this should — leaving and my view is that none of this should have happened. insiders sa there this should have happened. insiders say there were _ this should have happened. insiders say there were weekly _ this should have happened. insiders say there were weekly invites - this should have happened. insiders say there were weekly invites to - say there were weekly invites to wine time friday in the press office at 4pm and several leaving parties. 0ne went on so late some people stayed the night. since december, mr johnson has been forced to answer questions about what went on. i johnson has been forced to answer questions about what went on. i have been repeatedly _ questions about what went on. i have been repeatedly assured _ questions about what went on. i have been repeatedly assured since - questions about what went on. i it? been repeatedly assured since these allegations emerged that there was no party and that no rules were broken. ., ., , ., no party and that no rules were broken. ., ., ., , broken. you and your colleagues felt that ou broken. you and your colleagues felt that you had — broken. you and your colleagues felt that you had essentially _ broken. you and your colleagues felt that you had essentially permission i that you had essentially permission from borisjohnson to have these events? from boris johnson to have these events? ., , from boris johnson to have these events? . , ., , ., from boris johnson to have these events? . , ., ., events? that is what you are saying? yes, events? that is what you are saying? yes. because — events? that is what you are saying? yes. because he _ events? that is what you are saying? yes, because he was _ events? that is what you are saying? yes, because he was there. - events? that is what you are saying? yes, because he was there. he - events? that is what you are saying? yes, because he was there. he may. yes, because he was there. he may have just been popping through on the way to his flat because that is what would happen. he wasn't there saying they shouldn't be happening, he wasn't saying, can everyone break
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up he wasn't saying, can everyone break up and go home? can everyone socially distance? can everyone put masks on? no, he wasn't telling anybody that, he was grabbing a glass for himself. aha, anybody that, he was grabbing a glass for himself.— glass for himself. a lot of these ounu glass for himself. a lot of these young members _ glass for himself. a lot of these young members of— glass for himself. a lot of these young members of staff - glass for himself. a lot of these young members of staff from i glass for himself. a lot of these - young members of staff from across downing _ young members of staff from across downing street who have been fined feel they— downing street who have been fined feel they went to these events and they did _ feel they went to these events and they did not think they were breaking the rules at the time because — breaking the rules at the time because the prime minister was at them _ because the prime minister was at them. some of the most senior civil servants— them. some of the most senior civil servants in— them. some of the most senior civil servants in the country were at them and were _ servants in the country were at them and were indeed organising some of them _ and were indeed organising some of them. �* ~ and were indeed organising some of them. , them. and mrjohnson's response to them. and mrjohnson's response to the allegations _ them. and mrjohnson's response to the allegations caused _ them. and mrjohnson's response to the allegations caused disbelief - the allegations caused disbelief according to one staffer. why is he denying this?— according to one staffer. why is he den in: this? ~ ., , denying this? when we have been with him this entire — denying this? when we have been with him this entire time _ denying this? when we have been with him this entire time we _ denying this? when we have been with him this entire time we knew - denying this? when we have been with him this entire time we knew that - him this entire time we knew that the rules had been broken, we knew these parties happens. the the rules had been broken, we knew these parties happens.— these parties happens. the police ma have these parties happens. the police may have finished _ these parties happens. the police may have finished their— may have finished their investigation into partying here in downing street but that is not the end of the matter. a senior civil servant is about to give a much fuller picture of what went on. this is about the behaviour of the prime minister and the country's top
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officials. it is about leadership and integrity in public life. mr johnson says he takes the allegations very seriously. so far he has been helped by cabinet ministers staying loyal, even though he has been fine. has a prime minister being honest about partying here in downing street? many conservative mps are waiting until they see sue gray's report before passing judgment. and you can watch the programme partygate inside the storm, tonight on bbc tonight at 7pm. and there is also more online. last week the met concluded its investigation into rule breaking after issuing 126 wines, including one for the prime minister for attending a birthday party injune, 2020. now, as you heard, there are fresh questions over why he wasn't fined further.
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the mayor of london sadiq khan has written to the acting met police commissioner to seek a detailed explanation of how decisions were made. our home affairs can correspondent daniel sandford explains. the prime minister, glass in hand, making a speech at the leaving party for his director of communications, lee kane. at least one person there has been fined, but the prime minister has not. the london mayor has written to the metropolitan police demanding an explanation. i police demanding an explanation. i think it is important when it comes to trust and confidence, when it comes to policing by consent, when it comes to questions being asked about the integrity of an investigation, that the police explain why they have reached the conclusions they have. but explain why they have reached the conclusions they have.— explain why they have reached the conclusions they have. but the mets are wa of conclusions they have. but the mets are wary of giving — conclusions they have. but the mets are wary of giving any _ conclusions they have. but the mets are wary of giving any further- are wary of giving any further explanation. they think the more detail they give, the more it risks identifying people who have been issued with fines and that goes against the national guidelines for fixed penalty notices. last week they said they looked at the circumstances behind each event,
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such as how many people were present, the actions of the individual, what reasonable excuse might they have for being there, and the legislation at that time. critically they said that for each fixed penalty notice they took great care to be sure that they had the necessary evidence to prosecute a trial were it not paid, so that was always at the back of their minds. so while most people were on lockdown, how was the prime minister not fined for attending a leaving party? it looks as if detectives who might have had to prove their case in court decided that a short leaving drink and speech for people who were at work anywhere was just about within the rules. but anyone who stayed on for a lengthy drinking session after the prime minister left risked getting fined. daniel sanford, bbc news. the energy bill for a typical household in great britain is likely to rise by £800 in october, the head of the energy watchdog,
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0fgem, has told mps. he said he expects the energy price cap to increase to around £2800 in october. the cap sets a limit on the rates you pay for each unit of gas and electricity. it currently stands atjust under £2000, but if you use more than the average amount, you will pay more. the regulator says 12 million households face fuel poverty. here is our business editor simonjack. beth from bristol and herfamily beth from bristol and her family are like millions of others, seeing their bills spinning out of control and she is clear about the biggest problem of them all.— and she is clear about the biggest problem of them all. energy has 'ust skyrocketed. — problem of them all. energy has 'ust skyrocketed. a fi problem of them all. energy has 'ust skyrocketed, a big i problem of them all. energy has 'ust skyrocketed, a big difference i problem of them all. energy hasjust skyrocketed, a big difference with i skyrocketed, a big difference with that. 0ver skyrocketed, a big difference with that. over the summer we will be ok because we have just switch the energy totally off, the heating. it is this winter that will be the problem when the cap rises again and thatis problem when the cap rises again and that is when we will struggle. fiend
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that is when we will struggle. and althou . h that is when we will struggle. and although expected, it was still shocking to hearjust how much worse things will get this winter. iterate shocking to hearjust how much worse things will get this winter.— things will get this winter. we are exectin: things will get this winter. we are exoecting the _ things will get this winter. we are expecting the price _ things will get this winter. we are expecting the price cap _ things will get this winter. we are expecting the price cap in - things will get this winter. we are j expecting the price cap in october in the _ expecting the price cap in october in the region of £2800. and expecting the price cap in october in the region of £2800.— expecting the price cap in october in the region of £2800. and how many households are _ in the region of £2800. and how many households are already _ in the region of £2800. and how many households are already spending - in the region of £2800. and how many households are already spending morej households are already spending more than 10% of their income on energy. we have around 6.5 million customers roughly— we have around 6.5 million customers roughly and _ we have around 6.5 million customers roughly and as a result of what has happened — roughly and as a result of what has happened in april. come october... if happened in april. come october... if you _ happened in april. come october... if you accept — happened in april. come october... if you accept all the caveats that i will not _ if you accept all the caveats that i will not run — if you accept all the caveats that i will not run through, it is around 12 million— will not run through, it is around 12 million households. the government _ 12 million households. the government has _ 12 million households. iie: government has already 12 million households. ti9: government has already knocked £350 of most bills this year, but mps wanted to know what more they would do. �* :, ~ , ., do. both the prime minister and chancellor _ do. both the prime minister and chancellor have _ do. both the prime minister and chancellor have said _ do. both the prime minister and chancellor have said there - do. both the prime minister and chancellor have said there is - do. both the prime minister and l chancellor have said there is more to do and we have to just wait and see what is forthcoming. do to do and we have to just wait and see what is forthcoming.— see what is forthcoming. do you think bill payers _ see what is forthcoming. do you think bill payers are _ see what is forthcoming. do you think bill payers are happy - see what is forthcoming. do you think bill payers are happy with l think bill payers are happy with that answer? just think bill payers are happy with that answer?— think bill payers are happy with that answer? think bill payers are happy with thatanswer? , . ., , ., that answer? just wait and see? no, we all know — that answer? just wait and see? no, we all know people _ that answer? just wait and see? no, we all know people are _ that answer? just wait and see? no, we all know people are under- that answer? just wait and see? no, we all know people are under huge l we all know people are under huge stress. iterate we all know people are under huge stress. . . ~ :, :, stress. we also know the cost of livin: is stress. we also know the cost of living is a _ stress. we also know the cost of living is a very — stress. we also know the cost of living is a very real— stress. we also know the cost of living is a very real issue - stress. we also know the cost of living is a very real issue and - living is a very real issue and nobody— living is a very real issue and nobody is _ living is a very real issue and
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nobody is suggesting that the government can pay the entirety of the energy bill. what we are committed to is giving support. the treasu committed to is giving support. treasury has committed to is giving support. ti9 treasury has said it stands ready to do more to help struggling households, but it wanted to see the size of the problem before it decided on the size of the solution. now we know and there is renewed pressure on the government to deliver more support. industry officials told the bbc they are expecting something as soon as this week. the question remains will the solution include a windfall tax on the profits of the companies that have profited as household incomes have profited as household incomes have seen their biggest cost of living squeeze since the 1950s? oil and gas companies have reported record profits over the obvious targets, but the government is also considering taxing other electricity generators that do not use fossil fuel to produce energy that have also gained from higher prices. the threat of a raid on older and renewable projects and it drew warnings it could shake investor confidence in new green technology.
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the government does not like the idea of a windfall tax but the reality of the situation may yet force a u—turn. simonjack, bbc news. many families will be really worried tonight about the prospect of another huge hike to their bills. our political editor chris mason is at westminster. the government is keenly aware to move on from the whole partygate issue and they are awaiting the publication of sue gray's report, as we have been talking about. after that, potentially as soon as thursday, an intervention and response to what we have seen today from the energy regulator. the prime minister has been speaking to senior economists on a range of views, exploring the options as far as government intervention is concerned. he will meet the chancellor rishi sunak in the next couple of days and potentially as soon as thursday, or certainly in the coming days, a decision and an
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announcement about what they might do. what could they do? they could be a bomb pop for benefits, there could be a lump sum payment to the most vulnerable families, and then there is a discussion to be had about a broader range of households being offered support in the medium term as the winter fuel payments and the warm homes discount. any combination of these measures is likely to be way more expensive than the money generated by any windfall tax. i think there is a recognition from many that to do something that would be noticeable will be expensive. would be noticeable will be exoensive-_ would be noticeable will be exensive. , . ~' ,, would be noticeable will be exensive. , ., ,, i. , expensive. chris, thank you. chris mason reporting _ expensive. chris, thank you. chris mason reporting from _ expensive. chris, thank you. chris mason reporting from a _ expensive. chris, thank you. chris mason reporting from a very - expensive. chris, thank you. chris mason reporting from a very wet i mason reporting from a very wet westminster. a man has beenjailed for at least 24 years after murdering his partner's three—year—old son, and inflicting more than 20 rib fractures over weeks of beatings. the court heard that nathanial pope caused injuries to kermarni watson caused injuries to kemarni watson darby, comparable to a car crash. kermarni watson derby's
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mother also received 11 years imprisonment for causing or allowing his death. some viewers may find the details in this report by navtej johal distressing. this was kemarni watson darby, a three—year—old boy who was described in court as lively, boisterous and happy. injune 2018, he died while in the care of the people who should have been protecting him. his mother, alicia watson, and her partner, nathaniel pope. his ribs had been crushed and he died from severe abdominal injuries, which the court heard were comparable to a car crash orfall from height. doctors also found evidence on his body of a number of other serious injuries inflicted at his home in west bromwich that he had suffered in the days and weeks before. the evidence that was heard was something i've not seen before in my experience as a police officer. to hear about the descriptions of the injuries that kemarni suffered was really, really harrowing. pope has been given a life sentence for kemarni's murder
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with the minimum term of 24 years in prison. watson has been jailed for 11 years for causing, orallowing the death of her son. they have also both been found guilty of child cruelty charges. thejudge here at birmingham crown court said this had been a particularly distressing and tragic case. kermani's relatives let out a small cheer as the life term was read out and one of them told me that she felt justice had been served for the little boy whose death has devastated his family. navteonhal, bbc news, birmingham. our top story this evening. fresh fractions for the prime minister as insiders tell the bbc that parties at downing street during lockdown were routine. and 14 new monkeypox cases are detected in the uk. we will get the latest on this unusual outbreak.
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coming up, an emotionalfarewell to jo—wilfried tsonga. he ends his 18 year career in front of a home crowd at roland garros as he is knocked out in the first round of the french open. a huge collection of data, including these photographs, which are linked to china's treatment of uighurs and other minorities has been handed to the bbc. they shed more light on china's highly secretive system of mass incarceration of uighur people in the country's xinjang region. the information was hacked from police computers servers, and it includes evidence of a shoot to kill policy for anyone who tried to escape. the foreign secretary liz truss has called the revelations "shocking". here is our correspondent john sudworth. camera shutter click. these are the faces china never intended us to see
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from inside its system of mass incarceration in xinjiang. the government has long denied it is running detention camps for uighurs, insisting instead they are vocational schools for willing students. the photos, almost 3000 of them, show the reality of how whole swathes of uighur society have been swept up person by person. the oldest was 73 at the time of her detention, the youngest just 15. the uighurs, with their turkic language, islamic traditions and roots in a region with a history of separatism and violence, have long faced cycles of tightening government control. singing and with mounting criticism over the camps, the authorities have taken journalists on tours, showing them uighurs celebrating their culture and, they say, being guided away from extremism.
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but it's a narrative undermined by the tens of thousands of files passed to the bbc. one set of documents described the guarding of this camp just outside the city of kashgar with armed police stationed at all the main buildings and with each watchtower guarded by two officers equipped with sniper rifles and machine guns. inside, lessons are watched over by police carrying shields, batons and handcuffs. and the documents describe the response to students who attempt to escape. if warning shots are ignored the order is clear — shoot them dead. yes, this is classified, internal government information. the file, said to have been hacked from police computer servers in xinjiang by a source whose identity remains unknown, were first passed to doctor adrian zamis, a xinjiang scholar, who in turn shared them with the bbc. we have police officers in heavy riot gear standing next to the men. some of the men have their arms in a funny position as if they were handcuffed,
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so this is really very powerful image material. i was looking through these images on my laptop in the living room and i had to get up and go somewhere else and take a break. i was overwhelmed. the hacked files also contain hundreds of spreadsheets, row upon row of draconian jail sentences often targeting expressions of islamic faith, as a parallel method alongside the camps for detaining uighurs en masse. just for growing a beard, this person was sentenced to 16 years injail, his chosen expression of uighur identity forcibly removed. many others have been jailed for listening to "illegal religious lectures", including this couple. the documents don't say whether their daughters have been sent, like so many others, to the state—run boarding schools built alongside the camps.
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the data can be verified, shown to contain real people. abdulrahman hassan has not seen his wife and children since he left xinjiang in 2017, yet a search of the hacked files found this. oh, god. a photo of his wife, sentenced, the documents say, to 16 years in prison for a vague offence that appears time and again — gathering a crowd to disturb the social order. you can see how her spirit is broken, he tells me. mahmood toti knew his eldest son had beenjailed, but the database tells him for how long. 15 years for terrorism offences, although as evidence only his son's devout islamic faith is listed. the chinese foreign ministry spokesman responded to our reporter, describing it as simply the latest
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anti—china falsehoods and an attempt to smear china with rumours and lies. xinjiang is stable, prosperous and the people live happy lives, he said. but there has been no attempt to address the evidence itself, which includes these images from deep within the system, further evidence of the harsh detention and indoctrination of a people not for what they have done, but for who they are. john sudworth, bbc news. a 14—year—old boy, who fatally stabbed a schoolgirl in a row over a snapchat video has been found guilty of her murder. ava white, who was 12, was killed in liverpool city centre after a christmas lights switch—on in november last year. the boy, who cannot be named for legal reasons, will be sentenced at a later date. our north of england correspondent judith moritz reports.
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ava white was only 12 when she went into liverpool for the christmas lights being switched on last year. she was messing around with friends when they encountered another group of schoolchildren. there was an argument and a 14—year—old boy pulled out a flick knife, and stabbed ava white in the neck. her mum and dad and sister are still completely devastated by what has happened to ava, and it has been heartbreaking for them to witness a final minute during that court process. since that dreadful night they have suffered immeasurable grief and sadness. some of the teenagers leaving their phones here in the street to film videos for snapchat, ava asked the 40—year—old to delete the petition he had taken, the argument escalated and he lunged at her with a knife. in the aftermath of the stabbing the teenager responsible denied having even been in the city centre at the time. later on, he accepted having
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the knife and said he had used it in self defence, something that the jury self defence, something that the jury quickly rejected.— self defence, something that the jury quickly rejected. jury quickly re'ected. the fact that a jury quickly re'ected. the fact that e rz-yeer-eu— jury quickly rejected. the fact that a 12-year-old child _ jury quickly rejected. the fact that a 12-year-old child has _ jury quickly rejected. the fact that a 12-year-old child has become i jury quickly rejected. the fact that a 12-year-old child has become a | a 12—year—old child has become a victim of knife crime surely sets a new low. , ., , ,:, , victim of knife crime surely sets a newlow. i, new low. it is absolutely shocking. an one new low. it is absolutely shocking. anyone who _ new low. it is absolutely shocking. anyone who hears _ new low. it is absolutely shocking. anyone who hears the _ new low. it is absolutely shocking. anyone who hears the edge - new low. it is absolutely shocking. anyone who hears the edge of - new low. it is absolutely shocking. anyone who hears the edge of the | anyone who hears the edge of the victim _ anyone who hears the edge of the victim and — anyone who hears the edge of the victim and the edge of the defendant binds the _ victim and the edge of the defendant binds the whole thing shocking and if that— binds the whole thing shocking and if that does not send out a message to young _ if that does not send out a message to young people about knives i am not sure _ to young people about knives i am not sure what will. the to young people about knives i am not sure what will.— not sure what will. the family ava screamed and _ not sure what will. the family ava screamed and cheered _ not sure what will. the family ava screamed and cheered as - not sure what will. the family ava screamed and cheered as the - not sure what will. the family ava i screamed and cheered as the verdict was read out in court, the schoolboy who murdered her told that he will be sentenced injuly. the trial judge has warned that when she passes sentence may consider the term too short, but she will have to reflect the age of boy responsible. judith moritz, bbc news, liverpool. another 14 cases of monkeypox have been identified in the uk, bringing the total number confirmed here to 71. the mostly mild disease was first noticed outside parts
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of central and west africa, where it is endemic, in early may, and has now spread to at least 19 countries. our medical editor, fergus walsh, reports. ok, so i understand that you've been experiencing a rash. tell me a little bit about that. monkeypox is having a big impact sexual health services. several clinics like this one in south london have star isolating at home for up to 21 days. now, after an initial telephone appointments, fa ce—to —fa ce initial telephone appointments, face—to—face consultations are done in full ppe, because of the risk of infection. iterate in full ppe, because of the risk of infection. ~ ., in full ppe, because of the risk of infection. 9 . ., , :, , ., , infection. we have a number of staff self-isolating _ infection. we have a number of staff self-isolating because _ infection. we have a number of staff self-isolating because they - infection. we have a number of staff self-isolating because they came i self—isolating because they came into direct contact with our first case patient, and that was way back last week before all the information came out so, just a few members of staff it can make a major impact in is delivering services, day to day. monkeypox is not usually regarded as a sexually transmitted disease. doctors say that i should be no
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stigma. the rash and blisters caused by monkeypox will usually clear up after a few weeks. monkeypox is not another covid. it does not spread easily, but requires close contact, usually skin to skin, and although cases are continuing to rise, there is optimism that this current outbreak will be brought under control. " packs of cases will be offered a smallpox vaccine, which is effective at preventing or suppressing monkeypox. so far, 1000 doses have been issued. the entire uk stock is less than 5000 jabs. fergus walsh, bbc news. the west ham footballer kurt zouma and slapping his cat. the french defender admitted two counts under the animal welfare act at thames magistrates�* court in london this morning afterfootage emerged of him abusing the animal in february. the government is denying
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claims the foreign office stood by as nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe is forced to sign a false commission. —— levels confession. it is after she revealed she was only allowed to leave the country after agreeing to a uk official�*s instruction to sign a false confession presented at the airport by iran's regime. the foreign office minister amanda milling said the official only passed on iran's message that she wouldn't be allowed to leave without signing. the population of northern ireland has risen to almost 2 million people. last year's census recorded a figure of more than 1.9 million, the highest since northern ireland was established in 1921. figures showed that birth rates were falling but people are living longer. details about the religious make—up of the population will be released in the autumn. tens of thousands of passengers have taken their first journey on the latest addition to london's public transport system. the elizabeth line opened this morning. the railway, currently running
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from paddington in west london to abbey wood in the south—east of the city, was meant to open three years ago and is more than £4 billion over budget. our transport correspondent katy austin has this report. just after 6am and the doors are finally open as a passenger screamed into new stations including at woolwich in south—east london, to catch the first new trains. as the country's newest really got up and running. it country's newest really got up and runnine. , , _, :, running. it is very convenient for me. in a running. it is very convenient for me- in a city _ running. it is very convenient for me. in a city like _ running. it is very convenient for me. in a city like london, - running. it is very convenient for me. in a city like london, i- running. it is very convenient for i me. in a city like london, i thought it would not— me. in a city like london, i thought it would not happen _ me. in a city like london, i thought it would not happen again - me. in a city like london, i thought it would not happen again in - me. in a city like london, i thought it would not happen again in my i it would not happen again in my lifetime — it would not happen again in my lifetime. ., lifetime. the line links reading in berkshire with _ lifetime. the line links reading in berkshire with shenfield - lifetime. the line links reading in berkshire with shenfield in - lifetime. the line links reading in berkshire with shenfield in essex| lifetime. the line links reading in i berkshire with shenfield in essex by a central london. it is initially running in three separate parts. from today the newly built section
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between paddington and abbie wood will run monday to saturday with a train every five minutes. seamless end—to—end travel comes later by may next year. we are now on board one of the new trains that are up and running on the elizabeth line. they are pretty state—of—the—art and they are 200 metres long. each one can carry up to 1,500 passengers. late and over budget, but it is seen as a hugely impressive engineering achievement. this crossrail, the elizabeth line, is a really important thing for us to be very proud of. but don't believe that it has gone down beautifully well in leeds, liverpool and manchester, where they want a share of the investment cake. and i'm sure that there will be big discussions about that in future. the use of public transport has not returned to pre—pandemic levels. passenger number forecast for the first few years of the elizabeth
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line have been scaled back by transport for london insists it is still needed. this railway isn't built for today or tomorrow, it's built for the next 100 to 150 years and we are very confident that this is a catalyst now for the post—pandemic recovery. you can see the reaction of customers today, they have been absolutely wowed by the railway and we think this will drive customers back onto the railway. there was a celebratory atmosphere as the new railway arrived with a promise to transform railway travel across london. it is unclear when something like this might get built again. katie austin, bbc news. time for the weather, here is chris. it has been a day for spotting storms, we have seen lots of those across south—eastern england. this typifies the massive thundercloud going across the skies of west london. there have been reports of hail and even a funnel cloud, a tornado that doesn't make it all the way to the ground. these storms have been entirely exclusively across
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eastern england. why are? because of the jet stream. these are fast wins high up in the atmosphere and ahead of it the wins accelerate causing the air to rise and that is why we have seen the storms across just east of england today. back drop is moving eastwards quickly, the storms are dying away. give them a couple of hours and it should be clear. clear spells will then follow. later tonight we will see cloud ticketing, outbreaks of rain, pushing back into western areas. temperatures tonight ranging from around 7—11 celsius. tomorrow will be a different kind of day with low pressure in charge. that will bring weather fronts into the west. they will be most active to the north—west of the uk where we will see the heaviest rain but tightly packed isobars, and quite a windy day with gusts of around 30—40 mph, pushing this band of rain eastwards. there might not be too much rain across eastern england, but what follows through the afternoon in quite a condition for the north—west with a mixture of sunshine and showers. temperatures
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7018, for sunshine and showers. temperatures 70 18, for many, not sunshine and showers. temperatures 7018, for many, not feeling too

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