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tv   The Travel Show  BBC News  May 25, 2022 2:30am-3:01am BST

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ior roughly and at about half or roughly 60% of cases, we know that multiple people are aware of something that is going to happen so it is really important that we are encouraging and educating people about what leakage looks like, telling them why it is important to report it and then providing them the mechanisms to do so because the reality is it is not up to the average that isn't to determine whether or not a threat is credible, we want to get it into the hands of people like law enforcement and other threat assessment professionals to be able to determine the credibility of the threat and effort as an actual risk, then to put in place a management plan to make sure that those individuals can't get to that full attack. does that require political decision—making or can that be done in any case? we're talking about one area where whatever your view on gun control, you're going to share the sentiment that something like this could be worked out, that
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they could be ways of improving they could be ways of improving the communication of fears that somebody might be about to do something terrible.— something terrible. absolutely. the biggest _ something terrible. absolutely. the biggest challenges - something terrible. absolutely. the biggest challenges is - something terrible. absolutely. the biggest challenges is this i the biggest challenges is this idea of information silos. our community in parkland, a lot of co—ordination between our schools, community mental health, our law enforcement, trying to break down the information chambers and trying to share information so they can work together and that is not something that requires political intervention, it requires people not to want gun violence in the community. what violence in the community. what does this do _ violence in the community. what does this do for _ violence in the community. what does this do for a _ violence in the community. what does this do for a community - does this do for a community like this? it is a small place. this 18—year—old is going to be known to a lot of people. it honestly does not matter what the size of the community is. i personally come from two communities that have had significant mass shootings. it
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does not matter how big or how small your community is, it changes your community for ever. at the epicentre is a people in that school, the families who lost loved ones, the kids and teachers who were exposed to things that should never have been exposed to but it will ripple out and encompass the entire community for the rest of everyone's existence. we need to support community, in a way that encompasses everybody affected today. encompasses everybody affected toda. . ~ encompasses everybody affected toda . ., ~ encompasses everybody affected toda . . ~' , encompasses everybody affected toda. ., , . today. thank you very much indeed for _ today. thank you very much indeed for your _ today. thank you very much indeed for your analogous i today. thank you very much | indeed for your analogous of today. thank you very much i indeed for your analogous of a truly dreadful situation. i should say that news is still of course coming into surrounding the development of the attack itself and if you want to keep right on top of it, go to our website. we are updating as we go to our live page on the situation in texas
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at the robb elementary school. we heard from joe biden just a few minutes ago. before he spoke, vice president kamala harris had been expressing her views and she urged lawmakers to come together and to find a path to pass in full gun—control measures. we do not know all the details yet. we do know that there are parents who have lost children, families who have lost children, and that loved ones, of course, and many others who may have been injured. so, i would normally say in a moment like this, we would normally say naturally our hearts break but our hearts keep getting broken. you know, there's so many elected leaders in this room, you know what i am
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talking about. every time a tragedy like this happens, our hearts break and our broken hearts break and our broken hearts are nothing compared to the broken hearts of those families. and yet, it keeps happening. so, ithink families. and yet, it keeps happening. so, i think we all know and have said so many times with each other, enough is enough. enough is enough. as a nation, we have to have the courage to take action and understand the nexus between what makes for reasonable and sensible public policy, to ensure something like this never happens again. so the president will speak more about this later. but for now, i will just say, to the people of
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uvalde, please, note this is a room full of leaders who grieve with you and we are praying for you and we stand with you. and... it is difficult at a time like this to think about much else but i do look around this room and i know who is here and i know this is a room full of american leaders who know and have the courage to take the stand and so let us tonight, as we do every time we all get together, recommit ourselves to having the courage to take action. kamala harris. very polarising views coming in under the situation in gun—control. the executive director of gifford centre to prevent gun violence. he has been speaking about what americans think about the idea of gun control.
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what is important for people to know is the american people themselves are not that divided on this issue. when we do polling, 80 — 90% of americans support all kinds of common sense gun regulation and this is not something the american people are opposed to. this is something special interests and loving groups like the nra and the gun industry who have politicians doing their bidding in washington dc have a stranglehold on an for a long time, the conversation has not been about solutions, it has not been about what can we do to prevent this, it has been about who holds the reins of power in washington and unfortunately we have a very divided congress, very much beholden to special interests and so they are not willing to do what they constituents want. even gun owners when we bowl them and asked them, 75% of gun owners in america agree with
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common sense laws and yet it is not something we can get our congress to do so yes it is an important debate and there is a of opinion and americans definitely hold gun rights much more deeply than in many other places however it is not something that the american people agree with the kind of inaction that our government has held for so long and i think that is what is so frustrating for me. we still cannot get the leaders in washington and even in many states to take the action needed. i mean, texas holds the unfortunate record for four of the most devastating tragic mass shootings out of the last ten in this country so it is really a state where you have terribly weak loss, the proliferation of far too many guns and this is the consequence. we will talk more about some of these statistics around the
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various states and the uptake in gun violence but before we do that, we do have a picture that we can show you now. this is of salvador ramos, the 18—year—old understood to have carried out these killings. he had a handgun and a rifle, we understand, on his person as he went into the school. also there were some social media pictures one of which showed him holding a magazine for a rifle as well. it is understood, on top of that, that he went to the school, having already, we believe, having already, we believe, having shot and killed his grandmother. that is of the 18—year—old salvador ramos who is believed to have carried out these killings. you have been having a look at the gun laws and the way different states work and texas is pretty much
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as loose estate towards gun—control? as loose estate towards gun-control?— as loose estate towards gun-control? as loose estate towards nun-control? ., �* , , gun-control? that's right. they are, in general, _ gun-control? that's right. they are, in general, especially - are, in general, especially because of the republican lawmakers in the state, very pro guards, when you look at texas, it has more guns in their state than any other state in america. more than 45% of residents in texas live in a house that carries guns. now this is all happening amidst a rise in gun violence. an fbi report came outjust the day before this school shooting, pointing out that has been more than a 50% rise in active shooter incidents since 2020 and these incidents, 61 the number they ricotta, are becoming more deadly. then in 2017. 50 years ago president lyndon b. johnson cold guards
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the primary instrument of death in america and said because of the casual relationship towards firearms. if you look at today, compared to them, we had 90 million guns in the state, you now have 393 million civilian scouts, more guns than people so it is not something they have managed to figure out. republican lawmakers will point out that do not think restricting guns is the solution to these sort of shootings. solution to these sort of shootin95-_ solution to these sort of shootinus. ~ , ., , ., , shootings. while young people die through — shootings. while young people die through gun _ shootings. while young people die through gun incident - shootings. while young people die through gun incident than i die through gun incident than road traffic accident the first time possibly. let's focus on the fact that this is an elementary school. these are little children. not the first time of course in the us but i do not think anything house through like an incident like this. ~ , through like an incident like this. , ., through like an incident like this. ~ , ., this. when it comes to active shooter drills _ this. when it comes to active shooter drills and _ this. when it comes to active | shooter drills and lockdowns, these are very familiar to children in america and are becoming part of the national
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curriculum because this is not the first incident, as you say. there were 26 — 36, pardon, incidents reported by a trade publication which records these incidents. two—thirds are high school shooting like in florida. the one we are seeing today, these primary school shootings are less common. the last one was in sandy hook, connecticut, where 20 pupils died. it is not an isolated incident but the solution is still one highly debated by lawmakers. still one highly debated by lawmakers-_ still one highly debated by lawmakers. , ., , lawmakers. these are second, third and fourth _ lawmakers. these are second, third and fourth graders, - lawmakers. these are second, third and fourth graders, 7-10| third and fourth graders, 7—10 —year—olds. we will keep across the developments for you as they come into us. i want to
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bring you up—to—date on some other major news. the british prime minister borisjohnson is under renewed pressure following the latest allegations by people who attended gatherings in downing street during the covid lockdown. they described a culture in which parties were routine, sometimes crowded affairs and security guards were even laughed at when they tried to stop a party taking place. it has been obtained by bbc panorama programme and it comes as mrjohnson graces himself of the publication of official reports into the matter. 0ur deputy political editor has the latest. unemployment is down to its lowest level since 197a. unemployment is down to its lowest level since 1974. boris johnson tried _ lowest level since 1974. boris johnson tried to _ lowest level since 1974. boris johnson tried to focus - lowest level since 1974. boris johnson tried to focus on - lowest level since 1974. boris johnson tried to focus on the | johnson tried to focus on the positive since opening the meeting. they have been defending his behaviour during lockdown at a time when a rule
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breaking was right inside number ten.— breaking was right inside number ten. ,., , number ten. there were bottles, em ties, number ten. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, _ number ten. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in— number ten. there were bottles, empties, rubbish, in the - empties, rubbish, in the overflowing or indeed sometimes left on the table.— left on the table. panorama has soken left on the table. panorama has spoken to _ left on the table. panorama has spoken to three _ left on the table. panorama has spoken to three insiders - left on the table. panorama has spoken to three insiders who i spoken to three insiders who attended gatherings in downing street. elizabeth had more than 125 fines of those who partied here. that — police have issued. at least one person was fired but mrjohnson was not. a staffer who was that described the do. there words are spoken by actors. the do. there words are spoken by adore— by actors. everyone was stood shoulder to — by actors. everyone was stood shoulder to shoulder, - by actors. everyone was stood shoulder to shoulder, some i shoulder to shoulder, some people on each other�*s labs. the prime minister would be disappointed. as you know, he apologised for what happened. i think_ apologised for what happened. i think he — apologised for what happened. i think he has popped down to raise — think he has popped down to raise a — think he has popped down to raise a glass and say thank you to a _ raise a glass and say thank you to a long—term member of staff who is— to a long—term member of staff who is leaving and my view is none — who is leaving and my view is none of— who is leaving and my view is none of this should have happened, of course. insiders
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say there _ happened, of course. insiders say there were _ happened, of course. insiders say there were weekly - happened, of course. insiders say there were weekly invites | say there were weekly invites to gatherings at 4pm and several parties which went on to late several parties which went on to [ate some people stayed overnight. since december, mr johnson has been forced to answer questions about what went on. i answer questions about what went on. ., , answer questions about what went on. . , , ., , went on. i have been repeatedly assured since _ went on. i have been repeatedly assured since these _ went on. i have been repeatedly assured since these allegationsl assured since these allegations emerged that there was no party... and that no covid rules were broken. party. .. and that no covid rules were broken.- party... and that no covid rules were broken. you and your colleagues _ rules were broken. you and your colleagues felt _ rules were broken. you and your colleagues felt that _ rules were broken. you and your colleagues felt that you - rules were broken. you and your colleagues felt that you had - colleagues felt that you had essentially permission from borisjohnson to have these events? boris johnson to have these events? , �* , events? yes. because? he was there, he — events? yes. because? he was there, he made — events? yes. because? he was there, he madejust _ events? yes. because? he was there, he made just be - events? yes. because? he wasj there, he madejust be popping through on the way to his flat, because that is what would happen. you know, he was not there it sank this should not be happening. he was not saying can everyone break up and go home, can everyone socially distance and put masks on. no,
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he was not doing that, he was taking a glass for himself. aha, taking a glass for himself. a lot of these stuffers feel they went — lot of these stuffers feel they went to — lot of these stuffers feel they went to these events and felt they — went to these events and felt they were not breaking the rules— they were not breaking the rules because the prime minister was at them. some of the most — minister was at them. some of the most senior civil servants were — the most senior civil servants were at— the most senior civil servants were at them and indeed were organising some of them. mr organising some of them. johnson's organising some of them. yj�*i johnson's response to the allegations caused disbelief. why is he denying this? when you the rules had been broken. we knew these parties happen. ——we knew the rules had been broken. --we knew the rules had been broken. , , ., ., broken. this is not the end of the matter- _ broken. this is not the end of the matter. a _ broken. this is not the end of the matter. a senior - broken. this is not the end of the matter. a senior civil- the matter. a senior civil servant is about to give a much fuller picture of what went on. this is about the behaviour of the prime minister and the country's top officials. it is about leadership and integrity in public life. mrjohnson says he takes the allegations very
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seriously. so far has he been helped by cabinet minister staying loyal, even though he's been fine. but many conservative mps are waiting until they see sue gray �*s report before passing judgement. that main report may come out in the hours ahead. russia says it is ready for a prolonged conflict in ukraine as its troops continue to make slow progress in the don best region in the east of the country stopping the ukrainian defence ministry said the offensive was in its most active phase. moscow said it would continue until all its object had been met. 0ne city is almost encircled by russian forces and neighbouring villages being heavily shelled. the ukrainian army could be fighting a losing battle in luhansk. they're committing reserves
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to the front line. russian firepower is destroying towns and killing ukrainian soldiers. one unit went into the line with 240 men and came out with 100 of them killed, wounded and captured. bakhmut is a town getting slowly eaten by the war. this week, it's around three miles from the russians — well within range. next week, it might be much closer. civilians with somewhere to go have left. in the ruins in donbas, the victory in kyiv in march, the euphoria, glory and sacrifice feel distant. "where's the cease fire?", says this man. "even if it costs land." translation: what could it change for me? - the main thing is to stay alive. this isjust the beginning. everything still to come. if we survive, we'll
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see how it goes. at a safe distance from the front line, civilians were brought to a railway platform for evacuation. most were too weak and too old to leave before the war swallowed them, and now they're wounded. leda was rescued from ruined severodonetsk, almost surrounded by the russians. thousands of ukrainian civilians are still there. the train's been transformed into an ambulance and intensive care unit by msf — doctors without borders. the intensity of the fighting means the train is running at close to full capacity. the medics work continuous back—to—back trips. relative safety in lviv is 20 hours down the track. it's an escape
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capsule from a war that's so hard to predict that the medical teams only know who's coming in the last hours before they leave. sometimes they're wounded the same morning. this man from bakhmut was on the train six hours after he was hurt in an airstrike. translation: i saw our soldiers standing nearby j and crawled towards them. then i realised my strength was leaving me and i wouldn't be able to crawl. i got up and started screaming. even when families survived with them, the lives they led are smashed. translation: my| husband and i have lived together for 51 years in peace and harmony, and now it ends so badly. i guess we're running out of time. yasser kamaledin organises the train, evacuating the wounded is vital for the ukrainians, as the war in the east
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intensifies. the hospitals closer to the front line are overwhelmed, are receiving continuously big numbers of patients beyond their capacity to cope. so it's very important for us and for the ministry of health here in ukraine to make sure that these hospitals are always ready to receive more patients, especially the war—wounded. this war is much more organised now than it was back in february when it started. notjust medical evacuation, though what they're doing on this train is really remarkable, but also where the decisions are made — the generals, the presidents. you get the feeling that they've settled in for a long, hard attritional struggle. the ukrainians don't talk much about their own casualties, but the graveyards in the east are filling up and their president says up
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to 100 soldiers a day could be dying in donbas. he says only diplomacy can end the war. his allies, led by the us and uk, want to weaken putin's russia permanently. their critics say they'll fight to the last ukrainian. the currency of war is blood. new graves are ready. as they're filled, more ukrainians will question the blood price they're paying and ask how much a cease fire will cost. jeremy bowen, bbc news, in eastern ukraine. health authorities have been announcing measures to tackle the spread of monkeypox as more countries announce their worst cases, another 14 cases have been identified here in the uk which brings the total number confirmed here to 71. mostly mild disease but it was first noticed outside parts of central and west africa where it is endemic. that was back in early may and it has spread to at least 19 different
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countries. monkeypox is having a big impact on sexual health services. several clinics like this one in south london have staff isolating at home for up to 21 days. now after an initial phone appointment, fa ce—to —fa ce initial phone appointment, face—to—face consultations are donein face—to—face consultations are done in full ppe because of the risk of infection.— risk of infection. with got a number of _ risk of infection. with got a number of staff _ risk of infection. with got a i number of staff self-isolating number of staff self—isolating because they came into direct contact with our first case patient and that was way back early last week before all the information came out and so just a few members of staff can make a major impact in delivering our service from day to day. delivering our service from day toda. ~' , delivering our service from day toda. ~ , ., to day. monkeypox is not usually regarded - to day. monkeypox is not usually regarded as - to day. monkeypox is not usually regarded as a - to day. monkeypox is not - usually regarded as a sexually transmitted disease. doc is say there should be no stigma. the rash and blisters caused by monkeypox usually clear up after a few weeks. monkeypox is
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not another covid. it doesn't spread easily but requires close contact, usually skin to skin and although cases are continuing to rise, there is optimism that this current outbreak will be brought under control. close contacts of cases will be offered a smallpox vaccine which is effective at preventing or suppressing monkeypox. so far 1000 doses have been issued. the entire uk stock is less than 5000 jabs. here is a new transport symbol for you, the most macular railway in the world, its creators call it. 0thers railway in the world, its creators call it. others say it is the most technologically advanced rail service and existence. it is the elizabeth line and will run eventually all the way from reading in the west from essex to the east.
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there are delayed trains then there crossrail. 3.5 years behind schedule, £4 billion over budget but finally today passengers got their ticket to ride london's elizabeth line. i turned up really early, they have been waiting almost ten years for this to open.- years for this to open. there are shiny — years for this to open. there are shiny new— years for this to open. there are shiny new platforms - years for this to open. there are shiny new platforms and| years for this to open. there - are shiny new platforms and the latest, smoothest trains bringing commuters into central london from east and west. transport line in a city like london opening, probably won't happen again in my lifetime stop low thejourney happen again in my lifetime stop low the journey time blew my mind. stop low the “ourney time blew m mind. , ., ., stop low the “ourney time blew m mind. ., , �* my mind. one station isn't finished — my mind. one station isn't finished and _ my mind. one station isn't finished and trains - my mind. one station isn't finished and trains won't i my mind. one station isn't i finished and trains won't run into and for another year. still it is seen as a major engineering achieve, at least the south—east. engineering achieve, at least the south-east.— engineering achieve, at least the south-east. the elizabeth line is a really _ the south-east. the elizabeth line is a really important - line is a really important thing for us to be very proud of, but don't believe that it has gone down beautifully well in leeds and liverpool and manchester where they want to share the investment cake.
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public transport use is still down after the pandemic. passenger forecasts have been reduced for the loan's first few years but we are told it is designed to add capacity for the future.— the future. this railway isn't built for today _ the future. this railway isn't built for today or _ the future. this railway isn't built for today or tomorrow, the future. this railway isn't i built for today or tomorrow, it is not for the next 150 years. there were celebrations in london this morning with claims this line will add millions to the country's economy. passengers on other routes are asking when they will see the same sort of improved service. ijust want i just want to remind you ijust want to remind you if you go to our website you get the very latest developments on the very latest developments on the shootings in uvalde in texas. in fact we can bring you the latest line because the aduu the latest line because the adult has also now been named, she was eva morales, the only teacher we understand that this
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stage we understand has been killed. 18 children killed, one teacher, others are still being treated. that is bbc news, thanks for being with us. hello again. tuesday was a very unsettled day, we had loads of showers across the whole of the uk, some impressive thunderclouds, this one spotted across the skies of west london. and there were reports of some hail, lots of thunder and lightning and around kent we even had reports of a funnel cloud, that's like a tornado coming down but doesn't quite reach the ground. although there were loads of showers, the thunderstorms really were concentrated across eastern areas of england. why? that was down to the jetstream. we have this trough moving across eastern areas of england, that's what kicked up the showers and made those thunderstorms whereas a ridge to the northwest the showers actually weren't very heavy at all.
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that trough feature has pinged all the way across into northeast europe and looking at the charts for wednesday, a strong jetstream will be pushing in this set of weather fronts. the fronts themselves not particularly active by the time they get to eastern areas of england but it will be a blustery kind of day, certainly a different day compared with tuesday. northern ireland, western parts of england and wales, across scotland will push its way eastward, barely any rain left on by the time it reaches east anglia and south—east england, what follows is much brighter weather with sunshine and a few showers mainly across north—western areas. temperatures about 16—18 degrees celsius, it won't feel too bad in that strong may sunshine. looking at the weather picture through wednesday night, many of the showers will fade away but then the cloud will start to rebuild in northern ireland as we head into the first part of thursday morning with that rain starting to make inroads here. this is another weather front off the atlantic, a tiny bit of uncertainty about where that is going, northern england and wales looks the favoured spots for seeing rain, scotland, sunshine and showers more likely and towards southern england, variable cloud but there will be some sunny spells coming and going here. temperatures quite a range, cooler air getting in across scotland and northern ireland, highs just around 13— 15 degrees for some but warmer to the south—east
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with temperatures up to 20. and towards the end of the week and the all—important weekend, this area of high pressure is going to be building in from the west. the weather is set to settle down but we eventually are going to get some fairly brisk northerly winds and those winds will feed in some showers to northern scotland at times but otherwise a fair amount of dry weather with some sunny spells. that's the latest.
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hello, welcome to bbc news, i'm david eades, our top stories: another mass shooting in the united states, at least 18 children and one teacher have been killed at a primary school in texas. a short time ago police released a photo of the gunmen, salvador ramos who was shot dead. president biden has addressed the nation, saying he felt sick and tired of hearing that another school had been attacked. i that another school had been attacked. ., r' that another school had been attacked. . w ., ., that another school had been attacked. . ., ., ., attacked. i ask the nation to ra for attacked. i ask the nation to pray for them _ attacked. i ask the nation to pray for them stop - attacked. i ask the nation to pray for them stop you - attacked. i ask the nation to pray for them stop you give | attacked. i ask the nation to i pray for them stop you give the parents and siblings the strength in the darkness they feel right now?—
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strength in the darkness they feel right now? education staff are preparing _ feel right now? education staff are preparing counselling - are preparing counselling sessions for those affected. mr;

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