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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 25, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'mjane hill. the headlines: boris johnson apologises after the report into parties at downing street during lockdown finds "failures of leadership and judgment". the report — by the senior civil servant sue gray — includes new pictures of events at downing street and said some should not have been allowed to happen — or to develop as they did. been allowed to happen — she been allowed to happen — has identified a number failings. she has identified a number of failings. some official, some political and some that i accept are entirely my own, for which i take full responsibility. this entirely my own, for which i take full responsibility.— full responsibility. this report will stand as _ full responsibility. this report will stand as a _ full responsibility. this report will stand as a monument - full responsibility. this report will stand as a monument to l full responsibility. this report i will stand as a monument to the hubris_ will stand as a monument to the hubris and — will stand as a monument to the hubris and arrogance of a government that believe _ hubris and arrogance of a government that believe it was one bill for them — that believe it was one bill for
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them and _ that believe it was one bill for them and another rule for everyone else _ them and another rule for everyone else. �* ., , them and another rule for everyone else. , ,, else. boris johnson is resisting calls to resign. _ else. boris johnson is resisting calls to resign. he _ else. boris johnson is resisting calls to resign. he will- else. boris johnson is resisting calls to resign. he will address else. boris johnson is resisting - calls to resign. he will address mps from his party in parliament. i live in downing street where, at a press conference, borisjohnson was asked, are you a liar? we will assess his chances for his political future. and the other major story today... president biden calls for tighter gun laws in america — after 19 children and two teachers are killed in a school shooting in texas. there are fears of widespread disruption on the railways — after one of the main transport unions voted to strike. unions will decide next week when strikes will be held.
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good afternoon. borisjohnson says he has been �*humbled' by the official report which found serious failures of leadership and judgment in downing street over parties held there during lockdown. the senior civil servant, sue gray delivered the report this morning , with the conclusion that "what took place at many of these gatherings was not in line with covid guidance at the time." in a commons statement, the prime minister apologised but insisted he'd not mis—led parliament over whether regulations had been broken. let's go straight to my colleague geeta guru—murthy who is in downing street. let's just run through what the report sets out. the top civil servant has concluded there were "failures of leadership and judgment in number 10 and the cabinet office". she says many of the events
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she looked into "should not have been allowed to happen" and senior leaders, both political and official "must bear responsibility" for the culture within downing street. the report shows martin reynolds, a key aide to the pm — was warned of "comms risks" around some events and he referenced �*getting away�* with drinks in a message to a special advisor. it also highlighted excessive alcohol consumption — with one person being sick and a �*minor altercation' occuring between two people sue gray also says there were �*multiple examples' of a lack of respect being shown and poor treatment of security and cleaning staff at number ten. speaking at a press conference, the prime minister said he was "humbled" and renewed his apology for the birthday party he attended but he says for context — he hasn't received any other fines from the police. meanwhile, the leader of the opposition, keir starmer said it was now impossible to defend the prime minister and
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the report �*lays bare the rot�* of the government. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports did you tell parliament the truth, prime minister? do you stand by everything you�*ve told mps before? the wait for the sue gray is finally over. for the prime minister, a day ofjudgment, months after he announced an investigation into parties that may have broken lockdown laws, boris johnson received the final report this morning, which would have been uncomfortable reading. it condemned a lack of leadership, details of late—night drinking, vomiting, an altercation and concern about the public�*s perception. i want to begin today by renewing my apology to the house, and to the whole country, for the short lunchtime gathering on the 19th ofjune 2020 in the cabinet room, during which i stood at my place at the cabinet table and for which i received a fixed penalty notice. and i also want to say, mr speaker, above all,
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that i take full responsibility for everything that took place on my watch. sue gray�*s report has emphasised that it is up to the political leadership in number ten to take ultimate responsibility and, of course, i do. the prime minister said he had no knowledge of other gatherings which broke the rules because he wasn�*t there. and i have been as surprised and disappointed as anyone else in this house as the revelations have unfolded, and, frankly, mr speaker, i have been appalled by some of the behaviour, particularly in the treatment of the security and the cleaning staff. and i would like to apologise to those members of staff. we now come to the leader of the opposition, keir starmer... labour said the report was damning. for months, members opposite have asked the country to wait, first for the police investigation which concluded that this prime minister is the first in our country�*s history to have
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broken the law in office. then they asked the country to wait for the sue gray report. they need wait no longer. that report lays bare the rot that, under this prime minister, has spread in number ten, and it provides definitive proof of how those within the building treated the sacrifices of the british people with utter contempt. sue gray�*s report looked into 16 events which took place between may 2020 and april last year. extracts of e—mail and message exchanges are published and only ministers and the most senior civil servants are named. the full report now published runs to 37 pages and contains photographs. it states that...
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..sue gray said... the most senior official in government, cabinet secretary, simon case, is not expected to resign or be sacked. sue gray�*s report gives an official account of what happened behind the doors of downing street while the public lived under covid restrictions. with it comes a difficult day for borisjohnson.
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his politicalfate, in part, resting on its findings. jonathan blake, bbc news. the prime minister has got away with it, hasn�*t he? his colleagues in the tory party have not so far come out publicly against him. i tory party have not so far come out publicly against him.— publicly against him. i think you're riuht. publicly against him. i think you're right. ultimately, _ publicly against him. i think you're right. ultimately, the _ publicly against him. i think you're right. ultimately, the public- publicly against him. i think you're right. ultimately, the public will. right. ultimately, the public will judge conservative mps as harshly as they will boris because it is the responsibility now to hold him to account for what was laid by basic grey�*s report which wasn�*tjust account for what was laid by basic grey�*s report which wasn�*t just the fact he broke the rules had lied about it, presided over culture and number ten were people were drinking themselves sick and whether cleaners were cleaning up the red wine stains on the wall the next day were being treated with contempt by more
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powerful individuals within the institution. i don�*t understand how any conservative mp could defend this and i don�*t understand why so many conservative mps seem to be competitive to their silence. they will be judged at the next general election. we will make sure of that. the country deserves better leadership right now are they seriously saying that in the ranks of the conservative parliamentary party that there is no one better than the prime minister has been proven guilty of lawbreaking, flying and presiding over this awful culture and number ten? and presiding over this awful culture and numberten? is and presiding over this awful culture and number ten? is that we live with the modern conservative party finds itself today? why to make the prime minister wants everyone to move on from this. he has apologised. isn�*t that the right thing to do given the enormous domestic and international challenges the uk now faces? boris johnson cannot be the answer to domestic and international challenges posed borisjohnson as part of the problem. it is the bow is that means that big oil and gas
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companies have their profit shielded as working people have their taxes increased by borisjohnson. this is a prime minister, by the way, he said again in the house of commons are prime minister questions that he is a low tax by minister. he is a tax—cutting prime minister. there have been 15 tax rises his watch including the rise in national insurance only recently so it is not just that he lies about will breaking and partying at number ten, it is that borisjohnson lies on a daily basis. i honestly can�*t imagine that any of his conservative predecessors would behave in this way and that is why, they say, a judge conservative mps at this stage and incredibly harshly but fairly harshly because they are complicit by keeping him in office. isn’t harshly because they are complicit by keeping him in office.— by keeping him in office. isn't it, to labour's— by keeping him in office. isn't it, to labour's electoral _ by keeping him in office. isn't it, to labour's electoral advantage i by keeping him in office. isn't it, | to labour's electoral advantage to to labour�*s electoral advantage to keep borisjohnson in office? why are you arguing for him to go given that at the moment he is behind in the opinion polls?— that at the moment he is behind in the opinion polls? quite possibly it is to our electoral _ the opinion polls? quite possibly it is to our electoral advantage - the opinion polls? quite possibly it is to our electoral advantage and l the opinion polls? quite possibly it
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is to our electoral advantage and i | is to our electoral advantage and i relish an election between boris johnson�*s party and the labour party but it is not good for the party. it is not good for the country that while there is a crisis in europe, war in ukraine and real pain of 18 pupils�*s pockets here that the focus is not on the cost of living crisis, is not on the cost of living crisis, is not on ukraine on the big challenges facing our public services in the aftermath of covid, it is borisjohnson�*s political survival. our country deserves better than this and i can�*t believe that conservative mps are keeping him in place that they need to know, at the next general election, they will be held to account by their voters because nearly three quarters of the british people believe that borisjohnson of the british people believe that boris johnson knowingly of the british people believe that borisjohnson knowingly lied to the country. that in itself is a resignation offence and a clear majority of people in the country believe that borisjohnson should resign and they, i think would draw conclusions. resign and they, i think would draw conclusions-— resign and they, i think would draw conclusions. why didn't they... why doesnt conclusions. why didn't they... why doesn't labour _ conclusions. why didn't they... why doesn't labour call _ conclusions. why didn't they... why doesn't labour call for _ conclusions. why didn't they... why doesn't labour call for a _ conclusions. why didn't they... why doesn't labour call for a vote - conclusions. why didn't they. .. why doesn't labour call for a vote of- conclusions. why didn't they... why doesn't labour call for a vote of no | doesn�*t labour call for a vote of no confidence in the prime minister if you feel that strongly about him
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being unfit for office? the you feel that strongly about him being unfit for office?— being unfit for office? the only mechanism — being unfit for office? the only mechanism to _ being unfit for office? the only mechanism to remove - being unfit for office? the only mechanism to remove them i being unfit for office? the only mechanism to remove them is | being unfit for office? the only i mechanism to remove them is if being unfit for office? the only - mechanism to remove them is if there are conservative mps who have the courage and decency in the conviction to stand up and do the right thing but i saw one of those conservative mps today, tobias ellwood, the chair of the defence select committee, someone who has a huge amount of integrity and courage and i do know, when he stood up and spoke truth to power, to boris johnson and asked his conservative colleagues how they could keep him in office, he was jeered and heckled by his own side. that is what has become of the conservative party. that is the kind of shambles we have running the country and that is why the only option i think available to voters now to elect a labour government led by kier starmer in the next general election and the sooner that election comes, the better. if sooner that election comes, the better. ,, ., ., , ., better. if kier starmer has to resi . n better. if kier starmer has to resign because _ better. if kier starmer has to resign because is _ better. if kier starmer has to resign because is given - better. if kier starmer has to resign because is given a - better. if kier starmer has to l resign because is given a fine, better. if kier starmer has to - resign because is given a fine, as he said that he will, of durham police fine him for that event, will you run for the labour leadership?
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well, i don�*t think there is a question of kier starmer having to resign because i have no reason to believe that durham police will, this time, find anything different than they found last time but what a contrast in conviction and principle that kier starmer has said, before the police have reached that judgment in this investigation, that if they find him, he will resign. borisjohnson has been fine, he�*s been proven to have lied and the majority wanting to go and he still won�*t resign. so, at the next election, they will be big choices on big issues like the cost of living, the future for our public services, but voters will also have a choice of the kind of leader they want to find that black door of 10 downing street. and, my goodness, and there is one thing that comes out of the sorry saga, it is the responsibility that no fault of the british people to make sure that politicians are held to account when they break the rules and when they lie to the to the country. the conservative mps won�*t do that. parliament has failed in its obligation to hold borisjohnson to
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account because conservative mps won�*t be the right thing to the british people now is to vote boris johnson out and vote kier starmer in at the next election and the sooner that election comes, the better. many thanks. my colleague is in the central lobby of the houses of parliament for us. what is the reaction? we have been here since the prime minister obviously spoke in the commons earlier. and testing the reaction from mps. what we have seen interestingly as many conservative mps then quite quiet on this. some coming out saying the prime minister has their support and in light of what they have seen. 0bviously, in light of what they have seen. obviously, there was tobias ellwood who stood up in the commons and said the prime minister didn�*t and he called on other tory mps and said they needed to restore proper leadership to the party said the
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mixed reaction there. what we do know is borisjohnson is on his way back here. and he will be meeting backbench tory mps in about 15 minutes or so. in the 1922 committee, to talk to them. and that he might get a bit more of a sense of them having digestive and what they think. someone else who has been digesting it as the snp�*s we do here who is with me, i am pleased to say. here who is with me, i am pleased to sa , , here who is with me, i am pleased to sa . ., here who is with me, i am pleased to sa. ., �* here who is with me, i am pleased to sa. . �* here who is with me, i am pleased to sa. ., �* , here who is with me, i am pleased to say. good afternoon. i'd make use of the re ort say. good afternoon. i'd make use of the report and _ say. good afternoon. i'd make use of the report and you _ say. good afternoon. i'd make use of the report and you had _ say. good afternoon. i'd make use of the report and you had were - say. good afternoon. i'd make use of the report and you had were boris . the report and you had were boris johnson had a say and you so what he said tojournalists, johnson had a say and you so what he said to journalists, what, johnson had a say and you so what he said tojournalists, what, for you, now, is this, what you take away from all of this? we have waited a long time for this we go back to the first allegations from the mirror newspaper never thing that happened in this place, all the debates we had about their so what is at the heart of this, i believe, is a prime minister who has abused the trust that was given to him by the
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electorate of these islands. let�*s just remember, this is the first prime minister ever has been found to have broken the law and find one in office. it is that abuse of trust, when you read to the report today and you read about the culture of partying that took place and you read about sue gray talking about the political leadership that was responsible for that culture, there was only one man ultimately who is responsible for the leadership and thatis responsible for the leadership and that is the prime minister. and i have to say i agree for where we are because there has to be standards in public life. has to be morality put has to be ethics and when you think about the poster am sure we can all remember the women in a hospital bed in the public were being asked whether or not they bent the rules this is not a prime minister who bent the rules, he crashed his own laws and i think so many people are just disgusted about that culture of partying that has taken place and we will see me meant we have a prime minister toasting colleagues at an event, to party that he came to the
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house of commons he told us it didn�*t happen, that he is a serial liar, he has misled parliament, tory mps have got to accept the responsibility put up i commend tobias ellwood because, at the end of the day, what kind of country do we live in, what kind of democracy do we live and when a prime minister believes he can get away with this? borisjohnson said in the house that he was investigated for a number of events that he was of parties, that he was cleared by the police for those ones and the one that he was fined for was one, he said, that he inadvertently didn�*t realise that this was breaking the rules, it was a birthday event and he views this as having some sort of indication. his defence is extraordinary. the prime ministers of the united kingdom saying that he did not understand his own rules. the bills were very clever tub at certain points when these parties took place of indoor gatherings of more than
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two people, he actually brought the legislation to parliament. he is responsible for it. to accept that he is the only prime minister in history who has been found guilty of breaking the law. he needs to reflect on his behaviour and he needs to reflect on what every other prime minister would have done in terms of accepting responsibilities. we should have had the decency, the decency, the morality, to understand that for him, the time is up. you called on — that for him, the time is up. you called on him — that for him, the time is up. you called on him in _ that for him, the time is up. you called on him in the _ that for him, the time is up. you called on him in the chamber to resign. you done that week in, week out for many weeks now. and what we are not seen as a sign from his mps that they support that. and in the chamber you are pointing at them, saying it is yourjob to do this and they are not doing that. you have any sort of prospect, and you think there is any prospect of that to pass or them removing him? i concede that at the end — pass or them removing him? i concede that at the end of _ pass or them removing him? i concede that at the end of the _ pass or them removing him? i concede that at the end of the day _ pass or them removing him? i concede that at the end of the day with - pass or them removing him? i concede that at the end of the day with a - that at the end of the day with a note he has removed vest with tory mps. we were told to wait for the police inquiry, and to wait for the grey report. we now have it. we know
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the nature and character of this month it will be no what he is like and i would argue there is a pattern of behaviour. a man who shot parliament down. he does have local elections in many parts of these islands in scotland be at the local elections and the tories got a very clear message and i can tell you that the public are still angry about this and have the toys are daft enough that they don�*t accept their own responsibilities and, ultimately, they will pay a price of the ballot box. there are by—elections coming up so this won�*t go away. there is a parliamentary inquiry. this is a man who is not fit for public office. he�*s not fit to be prime minister and we are appealing to tories to have a backbone, is about cultural failure that eventuates from its head and in this case that had is the prime minister. ., ~ this case that had is the prime minister. ., ,, , ., , . ., minister. thank you very much for takin: the minister. thank you very much for taking the time _ minister. thank you very much for taking the time to _ minister. thank you very much for taking the time to share _ minister. thank you very much for taking the time to share your - taking the time to share your thoughts with us. we will see what backbench tories say. we will see those by—elections coming up, that parliamentary inquiry. all of those
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things still to come. back to you. thanks very much indeed. boris johnson talking to the 1922, i�*m sure we will hear more from that. let�*s remind ourselves of what the prime minister has said this afternoon at the news conference here in downing street. molar afternoon at the news conference here in downing street.— afternoon at the news conference here in downing street. now that sue gra has here in downing street. now that sue gray has completed _ here in downing street. now that sue gray has completed her— here in downing street. now that sue gray has completed her requiring - here in downing street. now that sue gray has completed her requiring and j gray has completed her requiring and everyone can read her report i wanted without mitigating what has happened off a few points of context. 10 downing street is not just my official residence, but at the headquarters the government. hundreds of people work and because they directly support the prime minister, the regulations allow them to continue attending their offices for work purposes throughout lock downs. sue gray describes them as tight—knit groups of officials and advisers who work long hours under difficult conditions. these were the public servants who secured the ppe
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that saved many lives, establish the biggest testing programme in europe, and enable the development and distribution of the vaccines that succeeded in protecting so many people. when some of these officials and advisers were leaving their jobs, i briefly attended gatherings to thank them for everything they had done because i believe that recognising achievement and preserving morale, essential duties of leadership. the police did not find my attendance at these occasions to be a breach of the rules. but they found otherwise in respect to some of those gatherings after i had left or when i was not in the building. downing street and the cabinet office together have hundreds of rules. and, again, i say this not in any way to extenuating personal responsibility, but to give context to these events. and i was in particular appalled to learn that there have been multiple examples in
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sue gray�*s phrase, disrespectful, and poor treatment of cleaning and security personnel. and, this afternoon, i personally apologised to those dedicated members of staff for what happened. and i expect anyone who behaved in that way to do the same. i, , anyone who behaved in that way to do the same. 1, _., ,., anyone who behaved in that way to do thesame. ,, the same. boris johnson speaking earlier. the same. boris johnson speaking earlier- our _ the same. boris johnson speaking earlier. our political _ the same. boris johnson speakingl earlier. our political correspondent earlier. 0ur political correspondent spoke to eddie davey, leader of the liberal democrats, too. i spoke to eddie davey, leader of the liberal democrats, too.— liberal democrats, too. i think sue gra 's liberal democrats, too. i think sue gray's report _ liberal democrats, too. i think sue gray's report confirms _ liberal democrats, too. i think sue gray's report confirms what - liberal democrats, too. i think sue gray's report confirms what the - gray's report confirms what the british— gray's report confirms what the british public already knew that the prime _ british public already knew that the prime minster broke the law, downing street— prime minster broke the law, downing street was_ prime minster broke the law, downing street was involved in huge criminality and the prime minister misled _ criminality and the prime minister misled parliament lit up at what i took away — misled parliament lit up at what i took away from the prime minister's statement _ took away from the prime minister's statement was a rather muted reaction — statement was a rather muted reaction from conservative backbenchers rid of the prime minister _ backbenchers rid of the prime minister. and i felt, as they all streamed — minister. and i felt, as they all streamed out of the chamber, and were _ streamed out of the chamber, and were not— streamed out of the chamber, and were not there for the full
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statement, they look like they were embarrassed by the prime minister. the concern — embarrassed by the prime minister. the concern i have is, i'm not sure they— the concern i have is, i'm not sure they will— the concern i have is, i'm not sure they will act— the concern i have is, i'm not sure they will act or do anything, their pay charting duty is to get rid of the prime — pay charting duty is to get rid of the prime minister and pay charting duty is to get rid of the prime ministerand i pay charting duty is to get rid of the prime minister and i think they won't _ the prime minister and i think they won't do _ the prime minister and i think they won't do that. and when we have got millions— won't do that. and when we have got millions of— won't do that. and when we have got millions of families and pensioners struggling with the cost of living, huge _ struggling with the cost of living, huge numbers on the nhs waiting list, huge numbers on the nhs waiting list. farm — huge numbers on the nhs waiting list, farm is crying out in feeling betrayed — list, farm is crying out in feeling betrayed by the conservatives, that is not _ betrayed by the conservatives, that is not good — betrayed by the conservatives, that is not good enough or do need new leadershib — is not good enough or do need new leadership. the new someone who can be trusted _ leadership. the new someone who can be trusted in _ leadership. the new someone who can be trusted in this crisis and that is not _ be trusted in this crisis and that is not this— be trusted in this crisis and that is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope _ is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope was — is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope was going _ is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope was going to - is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope was going to be - is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope was going to be in - is not this prime minister. been a lot of hope was going to be in the j lot of hope was going to be in the report today that a deeply embarrassing for the government, deeply embarrassing for tory mps but ultimately, they are not ready to push borisjohnson over the edge. so we probably trundle on in a similar sort of atmosphere. this we probably trundle on in a similar sort of atmosphere.— we probably trundle on in a similar sort of atmosphere. this is very bad for the country. _ sort of atmosphere. this is very bad for the country. that _ sort of atmosphere. this is very bad for the country. that is _ sort of atmosphere. this is very bad for the country. that is why - sort of atmosphere. this is very bad for the country. that is why i - sort of atmosphere. this is very bad for the country. that is why i say - for the country. that is why i say it is the — for the country. that is why i say it is the conservative mp's patriotically to oust the prime minister— patriotically to oust the prime minister because we need someone who is going _ minister because we need someone who is going to _ minister because we need someone who is going to have a real package of helpful— is going to have a real package of helpful people. particularly with
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the cost — helpful people. particularly with the cost of living emergency that the cost of living emergency that the liberal democrats have been saying _ the liberal democrats have been saying for— the liberal democrats have been saying for months that people needed a tax cut— saying for months that people needed a tax cut that we have been calling for a _ a tax cut that we have been calling for a vat _ a tax cut that we have been calling for a vat tax cut. even calling for help _ for a vat tax cut. even calling for help for— for a vat tax cut. even calling for help for pensioners and people on low incomes and disabled people. and the conservatives have not been listening — the conservatives have not been listening. you said you could pay for that— listening. you said you could pay for that with a windfall tax on the oil and _ for that with a windfall tax on the oil and gas — for that with a windfall tax on the oil and gas companies and the conservatives voted against that proposal — conservatives voted against that proposal so we does not really have a plan, _ proposal so we does not really have a plan, and — proposal so we does not really have a plan, and that is really bad for the country. a plan, and that is really bad for the country-— a plan, and that is really bad for the count . . ., ., , ., ~ the country. another conservative mp has said that — the country. another conservative mp has said that he _ the country. another conservative mp has said that he thinks _ the country. another conservative mp has said that he thinks it _ the country. another conservative mp has said that he thinks it is _ the country. another conservative mp has said that he thinks it is now - the country. another conservative mp has said that he thinks it is now in - has said that he thinks it is now in the public interest by the prime minister to resign. the public interest by the prime ministerto resign. he the public interest by the prime minister to resign. he has issued a statement on his twitter feed, he minister to resign. he has issued a statement on his twitterfeed, he is the mp for york and he has said that the mp for york and he has said that the sue gray report clearly shows the sue gray report clearly shows the prime minister has presided over widespread disregard for coronavirus
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regulations is now as to whether he misled parliament when asked about these events. he goes on, talking to constituents it is clear that discussions about parties in downing street remain a damaging distraction at a time when our country faces message of challenges with war returning to europe, global cost of living crisis and our recovery from the pandemic. this is clearly a time and we cannot have any about the honesty, integrity and personal character of the prime minister. he goes on, i thought it was important to wait for the conclusion of the met police investigation the publication of the sue gray report. i�*m now unable to give the payments to the benefit of the doubt abilities now in the public interest for him to resign. so that is a new voice from the conservative benches. julian sturdy, mp. calling for boris johnson to go. i will correspondent has been getting a bit of a sense of what the public reaction is to the report. what are people been saying?
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we are 150 miles away from the westminster bubble where you paddle those debates and interviews and press conferences talking about the sue gray report today. this is an interesting place to come because it was a seat that was held by labour for many years, decades, and fight. but in 2019 it went to the tories so we have traditional labour voters who we spoke to today and new tory voters. mixed reaction to the sue gray report. this is what they had to say. gray report. this is what they had to sa . �* , gray report. this is what they had tosa. , to say. i'm very disappointed in the government _ to say. i'm very disappointed in the government because _ to say. i'm very disappointed in the government because i _ to say. i'm very disappointed in the government because i do _ to say. i'm very disappointed in the government because i do believe i to say. i'm very disappointed in the i government because i do believe that they should be leading by example and what we have seen is very much double standards. as a next nhs worker, i havejust retired, obviously i have worked through covid so i�*ve seen quite a lot and peoples distress around not being able to visit loved ones and to know that government were just blatantly flouting the rules that they actually made is an absolute disgrace. i actually made is an absolute dis race. ~ , ., ., disgrace. i think it is exaggerated. what is your _ disgrace. i think it is exaggerated. what is your opinion _ disgrace. i think it is exaggerated. what is your opinion about - disgrace. i think it is exaggerated. what is your opinion about it? -
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disgrace. i think it is exaggerated. | what is your opinion about it? boris has to learn — what is your opinion about it? boris has to learn to _ what is your opinion about it? boris has to learn to listen. _ what is your opinion about it? boris has to learn to listen. he's - what is your opinion about it? boris has to learn to listen. he's not listening — has to learn to listen. he's not listening and _ has to learn to listen. he's not listening and i— has to learn to listen. he's not listening and i think, - has to learn to listen. he's not listening and i think, on - has to learn to listen. he's not listening and i think, on basis, what's — listening and i think, on basis, what's happened _ listening and i think, on basis, what's happened in— listening and i think, on basis, what's happened in this - listening and i think, on basis, i what's happened in this situation, he has _ what's happened in this situation, he has to— what's happened in this situation, he has to go _ what's happened in this situation, he has to go. you _ what's happened in this situation, he has to go— what's happened in this situation, he has to go. you had from former nhs worker— he has to go. you had from former nhs workerjust _ he has to go. you had from former nhs workerjust now. _ he has to go. you had from former nhs workerjust now. we - he has to go. you had from former nhs workerjust now. we have i he has to go. you had from former- nhs workerjust now. we have spoken to a semi retired nurse, donna, she is also a local labour councillor on the district council. and part of nurses united which is a grassroots organisation. she was telling me. this is what she had to say about the report. you�*ll make you go to the report. you�*ll make you go to the families of nearly 170,000 people who have died whether we can just get on with it. 1600 health care workers and social care workers died during this pandemic as well put up less ask those people whether they think we should just get on with it. it is very removed from us. we are 150 miles away from westminster but this community really held its held up high during the pandemic. at the freedom
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project, the local food bank offering advice and support. i went out and delivered probably about 90 food parcels and a couple of months on other things that really struck me was that when we went with a food parcel even though we were socially distancing etc, people were really pleased to see is what people were isolated for that they were lonely. they were scared to go out and there are so many clinically vulnerable people still under those restrictions at the moment. they are restricting themselves, social issues, psychiatric issues within the community. children have really struggled to get back and engage with education, etc. so, from my own constituents, you know, again, possibly a people have suffered during the pandemic. so there were lots of people here today that we spoke to off, that were very passionate about this sue gray report and lots of support is actually for boris johnson but they didn�*t want to talk on camera. they have also approached the three tory councillors in this area for commenter reaction we tried to speak
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to the local tory mp and the local conservative association. the moment, they don�*t feel ready to talk to us here. thank you very much. we will keep everyone posted on what the public reaction is there at the moment. just to let you know, borisjohnson is addressing his own backbenchers, the 1922 committee, he has had the banging on the tables, the customary welcome for the prime minister. and one tory mp saying that the report might sway a few colleagues and convince them johnson should go. it is heard from julian sturdy, the mp for york, who has tweeted he thinks the prime minister should now resign. but it is a question really aware that there are enough numbers who could prove problematic for the prime minister. he needs 154 in order to trigger a vote of no confidence and boris johnson, the moment, is a huge majority, of course, in parliament. we will be back with my babies in.
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let�*s have a quick look at the weather now. today we have seen a band of rain pushed eastwards. the skies are bright enough for many of us this afternoon and a few showers but already a retention is out in the atlantic where we have a next area of low pressure forming. but what will bring some major central regions of the uk. during this evening showers will fade away for many. they will be confined to the north—west coast but later in the night cloud moving into northern ireland without base of a moving on here. quite a cold night for the time of year in scotland but relatively mild for northern ireland, england and wales put up damages for many staying into double figures. here comes the weather front, then commences tomorrow but the air is going to be coming from quite different places across different parts of the uk. mild flow coming from the south of the uk. cold conditions to the north of the uk so a big temperature variation building on. i rain moves from northern ireland across the morning of the parts of england and wales to
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the north—west of visitors a day of sunshine and showers photo quite blessed to be here. in the south, quite a bit of club is a bright we will have those big temperature contrasts. 21 on the south—east of england but 11 for northern scotland, that is on the cold side of the term of years so depending on where you never would depend where the weather feels tomorrow. code in the weather feels tomorrow. code in the north but quite mild in the south. hello good evening. watching bbc news. these are the latest headlines. borisjohnson apologises but resist calls to resign following the reported of parties in downing street during the covid—19 lockdown and finds failures of leadership and judgment and number ten. the report by the senior civil servant includes new pictures of the parties the downing street and set some of them should not have been allowed to happen or to develop as they did. she has identified a number of
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failings some official and some political and some that are entirely my own, political and some that are entirely m own, , , ., ., , political and some that are entirely m own, , ., my own, this will stand as a monument _ my own, this will stand as a monument to _ my own, this will stand as a monument to the _ my own, this will stand as a monument to the hubris i my own, this will stand as a monument to the hubris in l my own, this will stand as a i monument to the hubris in the arrogance _ monument to the hubris in the arrogance of a government that believed — arrogance of a government that believed it was one of the rule for them _ believed it was one of the rule for them and — believed it was one of the rule for them and another for everyone else. another— them and another for everyone else. another major story, president biden calls for tighter gun laws in america after 19 children into teachers were killed in a school shooting southern texas. here, there are fears of widespread disruption on the railways the summer after the main transport union voted to strike. though the site next week whether or not the strikes will be held. more news to come but now we�*re going to catch up with the sports news is we always do at this time of day.
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british number1 emma raducanu has been knocked out despite taking a one—set lead over aliaksandra sasnovich she failed to capitalise.. losing 6—1, 6—1 in the next two.. it means the us open champion has lost in the second round in her two grand slams since the win in new york last year. afterwards, she said it�*s been a positive clay court season but there�*s still work to do. i think ithinki i think i got stronger as the season went on but itjust takes more to win the point on the surface and you hit the ball, you hated flat, it doesn�*t do much. but when to use the shape and style. but, yeah. but i still got quite a long way to go on the surface but overall, i definitely had a good first experience and i feel i definitely had a good first experience and ifeel i can definitely improve a lot more than where i am right now. and british men�*s number one cameron norrie is the first of the nation�*s players to reach the third round at roland
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garros this year. he beat australia�*s jason kubler in straight sets 6—3, 6—4, 6—3... a twelve week saga is almost over after the government approved the the 4.25 billion pound takeover of chelsea football club by la dodgers co owner todd boehly. the deal has been one of the most complex in the history of as our senior sports news correspondent laura scott explains. this is the moment that parents of been waiting for since he announced he would be selling the club after nearly 20 years of ownership and there have been unprecedented complexities to this whole process of trying to sell the club due to the sanctions that were put on him in the freezing of his assets in chelsea due to his links with vladimir putin but finally late last night, the government of the legal assurances they needed to put forward a special licence to enable the sale of the club and they were sure to make sure that the proceeds
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would not benefit any sanctioned individuals and now they will ensure that the proceeds will go to humanitarian efforts in ukraine to support the victims of the war there. we have not heard word yet but perhaps there waiting for this all to be finally rubber—stamped. this takeover is to enough billion pounds of the sale and £1.75 billion of investment into the club. and the premier league and the government makes this one major step closer to the completion of one of the biggest sports sales in history. mo salah says he will be at liverpool next season. but he wouldn�*t be drawn over whether he will sign a new contract. the striker�*s deal ends injune 2023 which has led to speculation that he could be sold if he didn�*t sign. he�*s been training today ahead of his team�*s champions league final against real madrid on saturday. i�*m just focused on the team and they want to win the champions league again and i want to see that
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it will give it to me afterwards. just focused on the team i don�*t want to talk with the contract now because we have a long time and i�*m standing next season, for sure. meanwhile — liverpool managerjurgen klopp is hopeful that midfielder thiago can make the squad for the champions league final in paris. he went off injured against wolves in the team�*s last premier league match of the season. britain�*s simon yates has abandoned the giro d�*italia, with four stages to go. he has struggled since injuring his knee in a crash on stage four. stage 17 was won by colombia�*s santiago buitrago, after he broke clear on the final climb. richard carapaz keeps the leader�*s pinkjersey — he�*s still three seconds clear ofjai hindley in the overall standings. that�*s all the sport for now.
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let�*s return now to our main news: borisjohnson has refused to resign, after the sue gray report found that many of the rule—breaking parties in and around downing street during the pandemic "should not have been allowed to happen". over to my colleague lewis goodall for some detailed analysis: remember, downing st spent months saying that there weren�*t parties or gatherings and whatever happened obeyed the rules. sue gray today confirmed, just like the met that, whatever the initial intent, what took place at many of these gatherings and the way they developed was not in line with covid guidance at the time. that is contrary to what the prime minister told the house of commons. she says quite starkly that many of the events she investigated, simply should not have been allowed to happen and that "the senior leadership at the centre, both political and official, must bear responsibility for this culture." let�*s take a look at some examples, she highlights a gathering onjune the 18th 2020 for
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which the deputy cabinet secretary provided a karaoke machine. she goes on to say that the event involved the consumption of excess alcohol. at another event there was wine on the wall. so much alcohol was consumed that extent that one person attending the gathering was sick. and there was even a �*minor altercation�* at the event sue gray also highlights �*multiple examples�* of a lack of respect being shown and poor treatment of security and cleaning staff at number ten who tried to raise their concerns. she says this is unacceptable. downing st�*s press officers and comms chiefs spent months saying there were no parties. yet part of the report including exchanges of whatsapp messages — and one of his officials literally said "best of luck a complete non story but better than them focusing on our drinks. which we seem to have
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got away with." referring to one of the drinks events. and there remain plenty of questions. for example, the gathering in the downing st flat on 13th november, which the prime minister was present, for at least part of it. the police didn�*t give the pm a fine for this and sue gray says she didn�*t investigate it as they�*ve concluded their investigations and so she thinks it wasn�*t proportionate. some mps are asking, why not? jane. earlier nick spoke to the former cabinet minister and conservative mp robert buckland. she spoke a little earlier this afternoon. i she spoke a little earlier this afternoon-— she spoke a little earlier this afternoon. . ., , afternoon. i feelthat we have been betra ed afternoon. i feelthat we have been betrayed and _ afternoon. i feelthat we have been betrayed and we _ afternoon. i feelthat we have been betrayed and we have _ afternoon. i feelthat we have been betrayed and we have been - afternoon. i feelthat we have been betrayed and we have been treatedj betrayed and we have been treated with contempt and i had to make so many sacrifices as my dad laid there dying and also i was not able to
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give him the funeral that he would�*ve wanted. we were not allowed to comfort each other. there was no hugging, no tactile comfort. just a few of us gathered around his gravesite and it was a pretty bleak affair. and i can neverforget. i�*m affair. and i can never forget. i'm sor to affair. and i can never forget. i'm sorry to bring _ affair. and i can never forget. i'm sorry to bring that all back to the forefront for you. boris johnson is apologised and said he is humbled and he is sorry and he has made changes in the wind event that he was at, he was there to thank staff and he was not necessarily aware of all the events. is that enough? it is not enough and no, i do not believe him. borisjohnson is sorry
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he got caught. his apologies are meaningless, they are empty. there are devoid of any sincerity at all. he, he presided over a culture of entitlement at 10 downing street. his staff knew that they could break the rules and that they had his tacit approval and that they had no compunction whatsoever about sending out e—mails, organising parties and then, snickering and laughing that we got away with it. they knew they were breaking the rules. all of them did and they had the prime minister�*s tacit approval. he turned a blind eye enjoined and in some
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cases. but turned a blind eye. he set the culture, he�*s the boss and he set the culture for what was permissible and what was tolerated at 10 downing street. his home and his office. and at the blame for this is to be laid firmly and squarely at his store and sue gray makes it quite clear in her report that there were problems with the leadership at 10 downing street. so, that�*s as clear as anything. leadership at 10 downing street. so, that's as clear as anything.- that's as clear as anything. losing her father during _ that's as clear as anything. losing her father during the _ that's as clear as anything. losing her father during the first - that's as clear as anything. losing her father during the first wave i that's as clear as anything. losing her father during the first wave ofj her father during the first wave of covid—19. more on that coming in the six o�*clock news. but we will talk about the other major story here today. to co nfro nt
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to confront the countries gun lobby. after the worst school shooting for a decade. 19 children and two adults died in southern texas after an 18—year—old man open fire at the elementary school in the city. the school teaches children who are aged between seven and ten. the gunman who was shot dead by police at the scene was armed with a handgun in a semi automatic rifle. 0ur correspondent has more. he went from classroom to classroom shooting indiscriminately. 18—year—old salvador ramos was himself shot dead. but not before he inflicted the deadly shooting of its kind since the sandy hook massacre
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nearly a decade ago. the family of xavier lopez confirmed he died in the school. he was ten years old and the school. he was ten years old and the father of ten—year—old amerie jo garza has confirmed that his daughter was killed. and the father of rodriguez is still searching. i will look all night if i have to. present biting said he was sick and tired of the carnage caused by gun violence. b5 tired of the carnage caused by gun violence. �* , ., tired of the carnage caused by gun violence. . , . ., ., ., , violence. as a nation, when in gods name are we _ violence. as a nation, when in gods name are we going _ violence. as a nation, when in gods name are we going to _ violence. as a nation, when in gods name are we going to stand - violence. as a nation, when in gods name are we going to stand up i violence. as a nation, when in gods name are we going to stand up to l violence. as a nation, when in gods l name are we going to stand up to the lui'i name are we going to stand up to the gun lobby? _ name are we going to stand up to the gun lobby? when in gods name will be due will— gun lobby? when in gods name will be due will be _ gun lobby? when in gods name will be due will be in order got needs to be done? _ due will be in order got needs to be done? as _ due will be in order got needs to be done? �* , ., ., due will be in order got needs to be done? ~ , ., ., .,, a senator pleaded for gun control
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laws. i a senator pleaded for gun control laws. ., ., , ., ., ., a senator pleaded for gun control laws. ., ., , ., , ., laws. i am on this floor, to beg, to literally get — laws. i am on this floor, to beg, to literally get on _ laws. i am on this floor, to beg, to literally get on my _ laws. i am on this floor, to beg, to literally get on my hands _ laws. i am on this floor, to beg, to literally get on my hands and i laws. i am on this floor, to beg, to | literally get on my hands and knees and beg _ literally get on my hands and knees and beg my— literally get on my hands and knees and beg my colleagues _ literally get on my hands and knees and beg my colleagues find - literally get on my hands and knees and beg my colleagues find a - and beg my colleagues find a path forward _ and beg my colleagues find a path forward here~ _ and beg my colleagues find a path forward here. buit— and beg my colleagues find a path forward here-— and beg my colleagues find a path forward here. �* ., forward here. but there remain those who bitterly oppose _ forward here. but there remain those who bitterly oppose legislation, i who bitterly oppose legislation, compromising americans constitutional rights to bear arms. the solution is to try to restrict constitutional rights of law—abiding citizens, it doesn�*t work, it doesn�*t prevent crime. citizens, it doesn't work, it doesn't prevent crime. they have been in the _ doesn't prevent crime. they have been in the grip _ doesn't prevent crime. they have been in the grip of— doesn't prevent crime. they have been in the grip of a _ doesn't prevent crime. they have been in the grip of a gun - doesn't prevent crime. they have been in the grip of a gun buying l been in the grip of a gun buying frenzy of the past two decades. there are now around 400 million guns in circulation. more guns than people. the motive for this rampage is still not known. meanwhile, the nra is due to hold its annual meeting in texas this coming weekend. the white house is saying
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that the president plans to visit the town in the wake of that tragedy. white house officials and joe biden make visit as soon as this weekend. 0fficials still working out the finer details but he is going to visit that town in southern texas where 19 children and two teachers died. a woman who murdered a baby boy she wanted to adopt as been jailed for at least 18 years. she shook the 13 month —year—old at their home in cumbria injanuary last year. they had admitted manslaughter but in the crown court, they are found guilty of murder and child cruelty. fiona reports. a little boy who deserves to be loved.
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she was put into care just two days after he was born. his life was in this woman�*s hands and laura cassel shook him to death. he also had a head injury. she lied about what happened to the police. can adjust to the that and i said, right,. leader, she admitted manslaughter. she was at her wits end, she said it was struggling to bond with james. she is a manipulative liar and a bully — she is a manipulative liar and a bully she _ she is a manipulative liar and a bully. she had opportunities to actually— bully. she had opportunities to actually say what had occurred it would _ actually say what had occurred it would have actually increased the opportunity forjames to live and she just — opportunity forjames to live and she just is — opportunity forjames to live and she just is self—centered and stressed _ she just is self—centered and stressed about her and she thought she could _ stressed about her and she thought she could lie repeatedly to get away with what _ she could lie repeatedly to get away with what was murdered. be she could lie repeatedly to get away with what was murdered.— with what was murdered. be heard from james — with what was murdered. be heard from james birth _ with what was murdered. be heard from james birth mother _ with what was murdered. be heard from james birth mother and i with what was murdered. be heard from james birth mother and a i with what was murdered. be heard l from james birth mother and a letter to thejudge she from james birth mother and a letter to the judge she directed this statement. you blamed him for your
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disgusting behaviour. shame on you. you are not a mother, you�*re a monster. she did not trust the authority and said this would not have happened if he was with her. an independent review into what happened will be published in july. review into what happened will be published injuly. brute review into what happened will be published in july.— published in july. we are deeply sor for published in july. we are deeply sorry for his _ published in july. we are deeply sorry for his death and - published in july. we are deeply i sorry for his death and should not of happened _ sorry for his death and should not of happened. in— sorry for his death and should not of happened. in our— of happened. in our thoughts and sympathies are _ of happened. in our thoughts and sympathies are with _ of happened. in our thoughts and sympathies are with his - of happened. in our thoughts and sympathies are with his birth- of happened. in our thoughts and i sympathies are with his birth family and anyone — sympathies are with his birth family and anyone who _ sympathies are with his birth family and anyone who knew— sympathies are with his birth family and anyone who knew this - sympathies are with his birth family and anyone who knew this little i sympathies are with his birth familyl and anyone who knew this little boy. adoption _ and anyone who knew this little boy. adoption should _ and anyone who knew this little boy. adoption should have _ and anyone who knew this little boy. adoption should have given - and anyone who knew this little boy. adoption should have given him i and anyone who knew this little boy. adoption should have given him a i adoption should have given him a chance at life, there isjustice in his killer being jailed but his grieving family wants to know if she could have been stopped. theirfears of disruption on british railways of the workers at network rail and train operators voted overwhelmingly in favour of taking strike action. nearly 19% of the union improved
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industrial action on the turn more than 70%. more from our correspondent. the prospect of a rail strike the prospect of a railway strike on a national scale hasjust the prospect of a railway strike on a national scale strike has just moved a step closer. the industry and the government called the rmt ballad premature but the union said it was not unreasonable to ask for a pay rise and a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies. this is a major set of industrial action if we end up calling it. but it is a last resort, our members the pitch and we do not want them to lose money if we can get a settlement. we are hoping this will focus minds when they need to be focused and we think there is now an opportunity to sit down
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and negotiate a settlement. signallers have not taken part in a national walk—out since 1994, struck involving ban and railway workers at 1310 companies would not only cause disruption to passengers, the boss of a large railway freight business say that supplies of steel, fuel and materials needed to run power stations would be interrupted as fewer trains could run. it is as long—term disruption that results from the dispute then it will be dramatic. and it will crystallise in various forms whether that be a shortage of fuel at the pumps or production being stopped in factories or electricity generation and not being able to generate electricity. contingency plans are being worked on to try to keep as many goods moving as possible. now, the railways are under pressure to cut costs following the financial impact of the pandemic. the government poured £16 billion of taxpayers�* money in to keep services running, it says. and railway usage have only recovered to around three quarters of what it used to be.
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train operators say the railways need to reform and the railways could be at risk. both sides have called for talks. katy austin, bbc news. the famous boxing champion. the brothers of said recent increases in food and energy prices as a result of the conflict could test support in their urging western nations to stay strong in their support for ukraine. they have been talking to her economics editor of the world economic forum. 0ne brother would make a tough enough opponent for anyone. both together should be formidable but now the foremost of which champions of their era posts the biggest fight. the survival of
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their nation under attack from vladimir putin. visiting ukrainian refugees taken in by swiss authorities. the mayor of kyiv and outside, telling them to abandon their traditional neutrality and a play tank ammo. their traditional neutrality and a play tank ammo-— their traditional neutrality and a -la tank ammo. ~ ,., play tank ammo. were getting some su ort but play tank ammo. were getting some sopport but it's _ play tank ammo. were getting some support but it's not _ play tank ammo. were getting some support but it's not enough - play tank ammo. were getting some support but it's not enough because| support but it�*s not enough because it�*s never enough as long as this war is still going. please, do not forget, we are notjust defending our city, notjust our family and our city, notjust our family and our children, we are defending everyone in the european union. bath everyone in the european union. both brothers together at the world economic performance of insulin. but at a time when some european capitals under oppression from surging prices seem to be pulling their punches and their support. black and white, you have to decide, you�*re either on the side of democracy and peace in ukraine or you are on the side of a dictator, oppressors, russian federation. thea;r
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oppressors, russian federation. they should be willing _ oppressors, russian federation. they should be willing to pay the price domestically right now to cut off russian oil, money and gas money? yes, it�*s very painful question for the economy but we need to stop the war. and it�*s going to be challenging. people feel closer to the winter, closer to the end of the year, we will feel the war in ukraine is going to knock on the door of all of us in the world. went back and a message from the boxing brothers. i want to say thank you so much for the support that is been provided. it is notjust verbally, it is the financial side, military equipment, the refugees and much, much more. we feel this is very important for us. please, do not stop. we would like to thank
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everyone who has supported ukraine. the islands of the northumberland coast are home to one of the largest the fame islands — off the northumberland coast — are home to one of the largest populations of puffins in the uk. but since the start of the pandemic, scientists haven�*t been able to visit — to see if numbers are up or down.now, national trust rangers have finally been able to return — to check the seabirds — and our reporterjonathan swingler has gone with them. the wildlife brings in the tourists and scientists are concerned about the population of puffins, it is declining in other countries. {iii the population of puffins, it is declining in other countries. of the -o - ulation declining in other countries. of the population is _ declining in other countries. of the population is elsewhere _ declining in other countries. of the population is elsewhere and i declining in other countries. of true: population is elsewhere and affected is that only a matter of time before the puffins here start getting affected? it if we are not doing something about it, what is going to happen? but it is going to watch the
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puffins disappear? clinic happen? but it is going to watch the puffins disappear? clini- puffins disappear? clinic today, the national trust _ puffins disappear? clinic today, the national trust started _ puffins disappear? clinic today, the national trust started this - puffins disappear? clinic today, the national trust started this survey i national trust started this survey for the number of puffins that are here. ~ ., for the number of puffins that are here. . . ., ., “ for the number of puffins that are here. ~ ., ., ., ,, ., , here. we are looking for fresh droppings _ here. we are looking for fresh droppings near _ here. we are looking for fresh droppings near the _ here. we are looking for fresh droppings near the boroughs i here. we are looking for fresh i droppings near the boroughs of fresh digging _ droppings near the boroughs of fresh digging or— droppings near the boroughs of fresh digging or feathers near the entrance and if we cannot tell from the outside — entrance and if we cannot tell from the outside if the borough was occupied — the outside if the borough was occupied do not that we can barely gently— occupied do not that we can barely gently put — occupied do not that we can barely gently put her hands inside the borough — gently put her hands inside the borough and we do this, we risk getting — borough and we do this, we risk getting up— borough and we do this, we risk getting up bite from one of them, but we _ getting up bite from one of them, but we make it an egg or get a puffin — but we make it an egg or get a puffin in — but we make it an egg or get a puffin in there. yes, i've been bitten — puffin in there. yes, i've been bitten by— puffin in there. yes, i've been bitten by a _ puffin in there. yes, i've been bitten by a puffin of quite a few times — bitten by a puffin of quite a few times ~— bitten by a puffin of quite a few times ~ lt— bitten by a puffin of quite a few times. . , , ., ., times. . it is fun seeing them on an island a coople _ times. . it is fun seeing them on an island a couple of _ times. . it is fun seeing them on an island a couple of miles _ island a couple of miles with northumberland _ island a couple of miles with northumberland they- island a couple of miles with northumberland they think i island a couple of miles with . northumberland they think it's island a couple of miles with i
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northumberland they think it's an absolute — northumberland they think it's an absolute joy — northumberland they think it's an absolute joy to _ northumberland they think it's an absolute joy to see _ northumberland they think it's an absolute joy to see stop - northumberland they think it's an absolute joy to see stop by- northumberland they think it's an absolute joy to see stop by the i absolute joy to see stop by the world — absolute joy to see stop by the world is — absolute joy to see stop by the world is changing _ absolute joy to see stop by the world is changing and - absolute joy to see stop by the world is changing and can i absolute joy to see stop by the world is changing and can we l absolute joy to see stop by the i world is changing and can we see a massive _ world is changing and can we see a massive reduction— world is changing and can we see a massive reduction in— world is changing and can we see a| massive reduction in their numbers in the _ massive reduction in their numbers in the years— massive reduction in their numbers in the years to _ massive reduction in their numbers in the years to come? _ massive reduction in their numbers in the years to come? i _ massive reduction in their numbers in the years to come?— in the years to come? i don't think it's auoin in the years to come? i don't think it's going to _ in the years to come? i don't think it's going to happen _ in the years to come? i don't think it's going to happen in _ in the years to come? i don't think it's going to happen in the - in the years to come? i don't think it's going to happen in the near i it�*s going to happen in the near future but, they are in decline. and what are their children went out to sea. but our children�*s children going to have to see? i think that legacy is really important and we need to be doing something now. and it looks like global climate change is going to be the biggest threat to these birds and we have to be doing stuff like that. for these birds and we have to be doing stuff like that.— stuff like that. for the rangers, car in: stuff like that. for the rangers, carrying out _ stuff like that. for the rangers, carrying out the _ stuff like that. for the rangers, carrying out the surveys - stuff like that. for the rangers, i carrying out the surveys important working visitors are enjoying the chance to see thousands of these birds. more coming up in the six o�*clock newsjust a moment. her right now, we take a look at the weather prospects and chris is here now. the weather was not as dramatic as
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yesterday we had all the storms. today, most of us have seen some bread or whether pushing in is to go to the afternoon with a bit of sunshine coming around and saw how things work in north wales and we seeing them with sunny spells. settle a picture already looking out to the atlantic with the next weather systems bring and bringing in outbreaks of rain through central regions of the uk and are still a few showers left over at the moment but they will become confined to northwest scotland overnight with clear spells elsewhere and later in the night, the weather will move into bring some rain to northern ireland and northern ireland, england and wales will be quite a chilly start in scotland with the interest getting down to low single figures and we�*ll all have westerly winds but the weather will vary a lot depending on where it comes from. across the south, will have mild air and across the north, quite chilly coming from the northwest. in the range of temperatures on the way for sure. we�*ll start off in
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northern ireland and the move away pretty quickly but heads westwards or eastwards in the northern england, wales and the mittens too. so quite cloudy with bread and sunny spells to the northwest where we have blustery showers in the modest weather will be across the southeast and 21 degrees and for many areas, temperatures will be quite close to average and not feeling too bad but across the north of scotland, chilly air temperature is 11 degrees but for the area as well, and friday, the high pressure will build and towards the west now bring in a lot of dry weather into wales and england few showers across the areas and it looks like we will see fairly frequent and at times quite heavy showers moving in on the brisk winds and range of temperatures still quite chilly for the time of year across northern scotland run 20 or 21 for london should not feel too bad over the breeze but through the weekend, the high—pressure still hanging around whoever will start to
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quite a lot of cloud down the sea with the sunshine across wales, southwestern parts of england in the northwest of england not doing too badly as well. temperatures run 20 degrees but notice things turning cooler around the north sea coast given the onshore winds in a similar story of the cloud big enough to bring some showers and it could be one or two building elsewhere but none too heavy. between 11 and 16 degrees. that is your latest.
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today at six... the final report into lockdown parties at number ten. it says people will be dismayed at behaviour that fell well short of the highest standards. do you stand by everything you have told mps before? the reports outlines repeated breaches of covid rules and lays the blame squarely onpolitical leaders and senior officials. party time — the report highlights a drinking culture and a lack of respect for cleaning staff and security personnel. that report lays bare the rot that has spread under this prime minister prime minister at number ten. we are humbled by the experience and we have learned our lesson. we�*ll get public reaction.
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was it one rule for them and another for the rest of us?

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