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tv   The Papers  BBC News  May 25, 2022 11:30pm-12:01am BST

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this is bbc news. our latest headlines. us officials have given more details of tuesday's fatal school shooting at a texas primary school. they say the gunman had locked the children in a classroom where he then murdered 19 of them. the british prime minister, borisjohnson, has again apologised after an investigation blamed senior leadership for a series of parties at downing street that broke covid lockdown rules, but he has dismissed renewed calls for his resignation. people up to the age of 50 can now enlist in the russian army. the law, passed by the parliament in moscow, is linked to efforts to recruit more troops as russian casualties in ukraine continue to mount. the former pakistani prime minister, imran khan, has vowed to reach islamabad, leading thousands of supporters
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who are demanding fresh elections. earlier, police used tear gas in an attempt to clear protesters from the streets. hello and welcome to another look ahead to what the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are lord darroch, former british ambassador to the united states, and mo hussein, former conservative advisor. and let's just show you some of the front pages. almost all the papers lead on the same story — the sue gray report into parties during lockdown at downing street. the financial times describes the prime minister as "damaged but unbowed" after the publication
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of lurid details of the events, but says a move against him by tory mps is unlikely. the guardian gives some of those details — drinking, a fight and vomiting — and also gives the pm's explanation that he didn't know the extent of what was happening. the metro quotes a message from the pm's private secretary, martin reynolds, who said those attending the drinks seemed to get away with it. the i sums it up as "failures of leadership," and points out that people at the parties made fun of cleaners and security staff who tried to intervene. the telegraph asks why the report author sue gray didn't look into an event at borisjohnson�*s flat, known as the "abba party". the daily mail takes a very different approach, saying new pictures in the report are not as damning as many expected. the paper asks, "is that it?" the sun says partygate is now over, and urges the government to get
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on with helping people through the cost of living crisis. while the times says the government will announce help with people's energy bills — possibly as much as £400 per household — to be funded partly by a windfall tax. so, let's dart off. mo, we can start with you this time. the mirror have a front page by their editor who made a lot of running with some of the early scoops on this story. their front page, while we were drinking until they were sick, laughing at security guards and cleaners and at all. —— us all. i suppose different politics and different papers of. the mirror have exposed _
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and different papers of. the mirror have exposed it _ and different papers of. the mirror have exposed it back— and different papers of. the mirror have exposed it back at _ and different papers of. the mirror have exposed it back at the - and different papers of. the mirror have exposed it back at the end i and different papers of. the mirror have exposed it back at the end of| have exposed it back at the end of last year with pippa herself doing a lot of that. i think there is a continuation of that, and we had this report today, there isn't anything particularly new or even more damaging, i don't think, in terms of any kind of smoking gun in this. a lot of the detail we've known about has been clear for a while. there is more colour and there is more detail in terms of some of these events that took place, the extent to how late people stated, how drunk people may have got, the treatment which i think is pretty abysmal of sunken sodium �*s —— for some custodians and other staff who do very good job there. this is what i think will chip away. there's also the other context of this. it talks about people actually
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knowing what they were doing were wrong —— was wrong and worrying about what the media response would be. i think that's at odds with what we have been told, that people thought these were just work events and that's what they thought they were doing. kim and that's what they thought they were doing-— and that's what they thought they were doinu. i. ., ~ were doing. kim darroch, you worked at number ten _ were doing. kim darroch, you worked at number ten quite _ were doing. kim darroch, you worked at number ten quite a _ were doing. kim darroch, you worked at number ten quite a lot. _ were doing. kim darroch, you worked at number ten quite a lot. is - were doing. kim darroch, you worked at number ten quite a lot. is boris i at number ten quite a lot. is boris johnson's explanation that he didn't really know what was going on, is that credible? and also, does the whole culture there come down from the prime minister?— the prime minister? whether it's credible, the prime minister? whether it's credible. it's _ the prime minister? whether it's credible, it's not _ credible, it's not impossible, but it's a _ credible, it's not impossible, but it's a bit— credible, it's not impossible, but it's a bit of— credible, it's not impossible, but it's a bit of a stretch, frankly. there — it's a bit of a stretch, frankly. there are _ it's a bit of a stretch, frankly. there are hundreds of officers in number— there are hundreds of officers in number ten, there are hundreds of officers in numberten, but receptions, parties whatever_ numberten, but receptions, parties whatever tend to be held in a handful— whatever tend to be held in a handful of reasonably large size spaces — handful of reasonably large size spaces -- — handful of reasonably large size spaces —— hundreds of offices. on the ground —
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spaces —— hundreds of offices. on the ground floor, and the forest floor. _ the ground floor, and the forest floor. and — the ground floor, and the forest floor, and the press office certainly — i'm sure it's the same place _ certainly — i'm sure it's the same place when — certainly — i'm sure it's the same place when i _ certainly — i'm sure it's the same place when i was there — it is very close _ place when i was there — it is very close on the — place when i was there — it is very close on the ground floor of the staircase — close on the ground floor of the staircase up to the prime ministerial flat. staircase up to the prime ministerialflat. so staircase up to the prime ministerial flat. so it's quite a stretch— ministerial flat. so it's quite a stretch to _ ministerial flat. so it's quite a stretch to imagine the prime minister— stretch to imagine the prime minister walking up stretch to imagine the prime ministerwalking up in stretch to imagine the prime minister walking up in the evening, not noticing the noise levels in the press _ not noticing the noise levels in the press office or coming down the next morning _ press office or coming down the next morning and not noticing piles of bottles — morning and not noticing piles of bottles. not impossible, but as i say, _ bottles. not impossible, but as i say, it's— bottles. not impossible, but as i say, it's a — bottles. not impossible, but as i say, it's a stretch. on the culture, it is set— say, it's a stretch. on the culture, it is set by— say, it's a stretch. on the culture, it is set by two people. certainly the prime — it is set by two people. certainly the prime minister, and also by the cabinet _ the prime minister, and also by the cabinet secretary, who is a big figure — cabinet secretary, who is a big figure in— cabinet secretary, who is a big figure in the numberten pyramid. and in— figure in the numberten pyramid. and in not— figure in the numberten pyramid. and i'm not saying it was perfect, but i _ and i'm not saying it was perfect, but i couldn't imagine the sort of things— but i couldn't imagine the sort of things that we read about from the sue gray— things that we read about from the sue gray report happening under the prime _ sue gray report happening under the prime minister i worked for or the cabinet _ prime minister i worked for or the cabinet secretaries i worked for in my time _ cabinet secretaries i worked for in my time in— cabinet secretaries i worked for in my time in that building.
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mo, let's look at the mail, because we just talked about the mirror's front—page. but the mail is a sort of the polar office it, saying is that it. there is a few that the sue gray report was a bit of a damp squid because there's been so much reporting and so many weeks. yes. squid because there's been so much reporting and so many weeks. yes, so the mail takes — reporting and so many weeks. yes, so the mail takes a _ reporting and so many weeks. yes, so the mail takes a completely _ the mail takes a completely different view on this. it's probably been more supportive to say the least. some would say it was perhaps trying to trivialise this issue because when you take a step back, we were told initially there was nothing to see here, there were no parties, and now we're at a situation where there is 126 finds. both papers will be using pictures that perhaps illustrate their elea tour —— the editorializing. so, i
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think those tour —— the editorializing. so, i think those are the tour —— the editorializing. so, i think those are the kind of politics of newspapers that are going on as well. the report was heavily trailed, perhaps reverse expectations management was taking place. there were some suggestions it would be a lot worse than it was, and actually wasn't. but you have to remember this is still a civil servant senior and a fermentable one, —— formidable. it was going to be factual and set out the rules and what sue gray found. it was never really going to be as explosive as people thought it would. kim darroch, one _ people thought it would. kim darroch, one other paper says, we got away with it. do you think boris johnson did? i got away with it. do you think boris johnson did?— johnson did? i think you may have not johnson did? i think you may have got away with _ johnson did? i think you may have got away with it — johnson did? i think you may have got away with it for _ johnson did? i think you may have got away with it for a _ johnson did? i think you may have got away with it for a while. - johnson did? i think you may have got away with it for a while. but i johnson did? i think you may have got away with it for a while. but if| got away with it for a while. but if i were _ got away with it for a while. but if i were him. — got away with it for a while. but if i were him. i_ got away with it for a while. but if i were him, i wouldn't be feeling that i_ i were him, i wouldn't be feeling that i was out of the wood. first of all,
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that i was out of the wood. first of all. there is— that i was out of the wood. first of all, there is still the privileges committee report to come, so this will drag _ committee report to come, so this will drag on — committee report to come, so this will drag on. there are two by—elections coming in conservative seats _ by—elections coming in conservative seats it— by—elections coming in conservative seats. if they lose those, the pressure _ seats. if they lose those, the pressure on him will increase. i think— pressure on him will increase. i think it's — pressure on him will increase. i think it's possible that bits of this outcome of the police inquiry might— this outcome of the police inquiry might unravel. and they do seem to find a _ might unravel. and they do seem to find a lot— might unravel. and they do seem to find a lot more of the junior officiais _ find a lot more of the junior officials who attended, and there is a lot of— officials who attended, and there is a lot of speculation about why some people _ a lot of speculation about why some people got away with it. that could all unravel — people got away with it. that could all unravel a bit. ultimately, people got away with it. that could all unravela bit. ultimately, the verdict _ all unravela bit. ultimately, the verdict rests in the hands of the parliamentary conservative party. i wouldn't _ parliamentary conservative party. i wouldn't have thought he would have been thrilled by the number of empty places— been thrilled by the number of empty places on— been thrilled by the number of empty places on those benches in the debate — places on those benches in the debate today, or by some of the senior figures who said they had no confidence in him. so, if you asked
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me to _ confidence in him. so, if you asked me to predict it, i think you will survive — me to predict it, i think you will survive for— me to predict it, i think you will survive for a _ me to predict it, i think you will survive for a while —— he will survive. but _ survive for a while —— he will survive, but i would be confident that he _ survive, but i would be confident that he will still be leading the next _ that he will still be leading the next election.— next election. mo, the sun's headline _ next election. mo, the sun's headline is _ next election. mo, the sun's headline is partygate - next election. mo, the sun's headline is partygate is - next election. mo, the sun's| headline is partygate is over. that will be nice reading for the prime minister. he'll be a delighting to see that, but the question is is it over, or in the minds of voters? if you just buy the next election, how many of them will still be angry about this when it comes to casting their ballot —— if he does by the next election? you see a lot of _ he does by the next election? you see a lot of these _ he does by the next election? gm, see a lot of these images and accusations being used in campaign material from opposition parties, materialfrom opposition parties, so i don't think this will go away. it's interesting, a self—inflicted scandal which is detracted from other things like people facing hardship, cost of living, the war in europe, and it really has had an impact on bandwidth and focus,
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particularly if you are worried you may not even have a job in the coming weeks or months. i think several things are true at the same time. you can of course want the government to deal with the cost of living, look at energy bills, and you also think the people who make the rules should also be following the rules should also be following the rules. because this isn't some sort of intangible government policy, we need to look at those photos. you can probably do a camera roll and look at what you would do. it's the kind of thing i think still resignations with the public, regardless of what people moving the agenda on —— resonates with the public. i don't think this has the potential of continuing to drift further and further —— i think. kim. further and further -- i think. kim, we've not further and further -- i think. kim, we've got energy — further and further -- i think. kim, we've got energy bills _ further and further -- i think. kim, we've got energy bills help - further and further —— i think. kim, we've got energy bills help that the government are talking about, and they're moving very swiftly.
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we should pick up... rishi sunak will announce plans tomorrow to give every household in britain hundreds of pounds to help with the cost of living, paid for in part by a windfall tax. do you think this is something that's been rushed through to get pa rtygate something that's been rushed through to get partygate off the front pages quickly? i to get partygate off the front pages cuickl ? ~ , to get partygate off the front pages cuickl ? ~' , ., ., ., quickly? i think they had to do it. the dark clouds _ quickly? i think they had to do it. the dark clouds are _ quickly? i think they had to do it. the dark clouds are gathering, i quickly? i think they had to do it. | the dark clouds are gathering, the worse _ the dark clouds are gathering, the worse for— the dark clouds are gathering, the worse for generations. this new energv— worse for generations. this new energy price caps of £3800 is horrifying, so they had no choice but to _ horrifying, so they had no choice but to make a u—turn on the windfall tax. but to make a u—turn on the windfall tax~ i_ but to make a u—turn on the windfall tax~ ithink— but to make a u—turn on the windfall tax. i think they are doing that. an increase _ tax. i think they are doing that. an increase substantially the offer thev're — increase substantially the offer they're making for people. personally, i'm sure it's been hrought— personally, i'm sure it's been brought forward to try and change the news —
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brought forward to try and change the news agenda for the rest of this week_ the news agenda for the rest of this week and _ the news agenda for the rest of this week and try and get the media off partygate — week and try and get the media off partygate. be partially successful, it would _ partygate. be partially successful, it would be completely assessable, but there _ it would be completely assessable, but there is too much from partygate to follow—up. but there is too much from partygate to follow-un— to follow-up. that's something the opposition have — to follow-up. that's something the opposition have been _ to follow-up. that's something the opposition have been pushing - to follow-up. that's something the | opposition have been pushing hard. many tories don't think it's a conservative thing to do, to slap a new task on two big companies —— new taxes. new task on two big companies -- new taxes. , ~ �* , ., ., ., . ~ new task on two big companies -- new taxes. , ~ �* , ., ., ., . ,, ., taxes. they think it's an attack on business. i don't _ taxes. they think it's an attack on business. i don't quite agree - taxes. they think it's an attack on business. i don't quite agree with| business. i don't quite agree with that view. conservative governments have imposed taxes before, and actually, this idea about being ideologically conservative, and 2019, a lot of people voted conservative who are not lifelong tories, so i think the government does have to remember it has a coalition of support and probably has to think outside the box in
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terms of trying to appeal to a wider range of voters. of course you have a debate around how much money this will deter investment, but if the companies are not really pushing those lines, i think it's quite right for the government to accept now rather than looking to help people in a few months and does something that will actually resonate quite well with the public. kim, let's talk about the horrific school shooting, the latest in the united states. if you needed to have it brought home any more, the times have such a heartbreaking picture of a ten—year—old girl who was awarded an achievement certificate hours before being shot. i mean, it's unimaginable, the horror there. the question yet again is what can be done about the gun laws in america.
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former ambassador to the us, will there be any sort of change in the gun laws anytime soon?— there be any sort of change in the gun laws anytime soon? you're quite riaht about gun laws anytime soon? you're quite right about how— gun laws anytime soon? you're quite right about how utterly _ gun laws anytime soon? you're quite right about how utterly horrifying - right about how utterly horrifying this is, _ right about how utterly horrifying this is, and just to illustrate the uii'i this is, and just to illustrate the gun laws— this is, and just to illustrate the gun laws issue, this 18—year—old, who by— gun laws issue, this 18—year—old, who by the — gun laws issue, this 18—year—old, who by the way, had been posting stuff on _ who by the way, had been posting stuff on his facebook account about threatening to kill people and had been for— threatening to kill people and had been for some time. there are some signs— been for some time. there are some signs that _ been for some time. there are some signs that he — been for some time. there are some signs that he was going off the rails _ signs that he was going off the rails he — signs that he was going off the rails. he committed this assault, killed _ rails. he committed this assault, killed 19 — rails. he committed this assault, killed 19 people, with two assault rifles _ killed 19 people, with two assault rifles and — killed 19 people, with two assault rifles and 375 rounds. you have to ask, _ rifles and 375 rounds. you have to ask, how — rifles and 375 rounds. you have to ask, how on — rifles and 375 rounds. you have to ask, how on earth can an 18—year—old -et ask, how on earth can an 18—year—old get that— ask, how on earth can an 18—year—old get that sort — ask, how on earth can an 18—year—old get that sort of hardware, that sort of equipment? the answer is that the uii'i of equipment? the answer is that the gun control— of equipment? the answer is that the gun control laws in the united states— gun control laws in the united states are extraordinarily weak. the weakest _ states are extraordinarily weak. the weakest in _ states are extraordinarily weak. the weakest in the western world. that's
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why america has a history of events like this, of— why america has a history of events like this, of killings like this, stretching back through parkland in 2018 and _ stretching back through parkland in 2018 and sandy hook in 2012 and columbine back around 1999. it's not going _ columbine back around 1999. it's not going to _ columbine back around 1999. it's not going to go _ columbine back around 1999. it's not going to go away. there are incidents— going to go away. there are incidents like this as bad as this every— incidents like this as bad as this every few— incidents like this as bad as this every few months. sometimes it feels everv— every few months. sometimes it feels every two _ every few months. sometimes it feels every two weeks. but it is such an ideologically divisive issue, the right— ideologically divisive issue, the right to — ideologically divisive issue, the right to bear arms, it's embedded in american _ right to bear arms, it's embedded in american culture, and although you will find _ american culture, and although you will find the democrats pleading with moderate republicans tojoin them _ with moderate republicans tojoin them in _ with moderate republicans tojoin them in legislation on this, i don't think— them in legislation on this, i don't think it's _ them in legislation on this, i don't think it's going to happen. it didn't happen after sandy hook or after holland line —— columbine or parkland. — after holland line —— columbine or parkland, and it won't happen this time _ parkland, and it won't happen this time this is — parkland, and it won't happen this time. this isjust too divisive an
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issue _ time. this isjust too divisive an issue and — time. this isjust too divisive an issue and both sides are just too deeply embedded in their positions. mo hussein, let's look at the i as well. the quote from joe biden, when are we going to stand up and pictures of the very young victims and a couple of the teachers as well. as kim was saying, this isn't likely to happen in terms of reform to gun control, but what is likely to happen is more school shootings green ages. but what is likely to happen is more school shootings green— school shootings green yes, it's devastating _ school shootings green yes, it's devastating and _ school shootings green yes, it's devastating and senseless, - school shootings green yes, it's devastating and senseless, and| school shootings green yes, it's - devastating and senseless, and just the idea of the president asking this question shows how powerless he is to really change anything about it. precisely because it's so ingrained in the american consciousness, the right to bear arms. any even small modifications will not get the support politically, so instead, you just have this cycle of these devastating
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events happening, public outcry to some extent, the most powerful person in the country calling it out, making the most of statements, and sadly at happened again. but it begs the question about some point, when will the balance tips? funds already in the states have been the leading cause of death and children until he enters, so how long can this go on? it's all hard to understand in the ukjust how important the constitution and the right to bear arms there is, so even that cannot sway opinion when children are being senselessly killed. ~ ., , ., children are being senselessly killed. ., , ., ., ~ ., killed. well, really good to talk to both of you- _ thank you so much for your analysis of the newspapers tomorrow. thanks so much again, mo hussein and lord kim darroch. the papers will be back again tomorrow evening dojoin us then if you can, but for now, goodnight.
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good evening, i'm marc edwards with your sport. british number one emma raducanu was unable to capitalise on a one—set lead as her french open debut ended with a defeat in the second round. the reigning us open champion started strongly against aliaksandra sasnovich to take the first set 6—3. however, her belarusian opponent came roaring back and proved too strong for the 12th seed, coming through 3—6,6—1,6—1. despite the defeat raducanu says being injury free has been her "biggest win" and she was positive about her clay court season this year. i think i definitely got stronger as recruiting went on. itjust takes a lot more to win the point on this surface, and you hit a ball flat, it doesn't really do that much.
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so i definitely learned when to use the shape and stuff. but, yeah, i still feel like i got quite a long way to go. but overall, i would say i've definitely had a good first experience on the clay, and i think that i can definitely improve a lot more than what i am right now. it's been a very busy afternoon in the men's draw, with lots of the top seeds in action. teenage sensation carlos alcaraz won his second match, and defending champion novak djokovic is through to the third round as well. he had a relatively comfortable day with a straight sets victory against slovakia's alex molcan. djokovic is searching for his 21st grand slam victory and his third at roland garros.
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rafael nadal�*s quest to reclaim the french open continued in style with a straight sets victory over corentin mouet. having waited all day to step foot on court philippe chatrier, nadal wasted no time in racing to a two sets to love lead for the loss ofjust four games. wasn't quite as straightforward for third seed alexander zverev, though. he had to come from 2 sets down and match point down to beat sebastian baez in five sets. jose mourinho's roma have beaten feyenoord to win the inaugural uefa conference league — theirfirst trophy of any sort since 2008. the only goal of the game came in the first half through nicolo zaniolo. mourinho becomes the first manager to win all three major club european trophies with a perfect record of five wins from five finals. england's tammy abraham and chris smalling both picked up winner's medals.
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it's roma's first recognised trophy since they won the cup all the way back in 1961. there's been an update on mo salah's much talked about new contract. he's confirmed that he will be at liverpool next season, but he wouldn't be drawn over whether he will sign a new deal. the striker�*s current agreement ends injune 2023, which has led to speculation that he could be sold if he didn't sign. he's been training today ahead of his team's champions league final against real madrid on saturday. i'm focused with the team. i want the champions league again. i want to see him throwing in his hand _ i want to see him throwing in his hand and — i want to see him throwing in his hand and given it to me after. i'm focused with the team, i don't want to talk about the contract. i'm staying next season for sure. meanwhile, liverpool managerjurgen klopp
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is hopeful that midfielder thiago can make the squad for the champions league final in paris. he went off injured against wolves in the team's last premier league match of the season. a 12—week saga is almost over after the government approved the £4.25 billion takeover of chelsea football club by la dodgers co owner todd boehly led consortium. the deal has been one of the most complex in the history of the sport, as our senior sports news correspondent laura scott explains. this is the moment fans have been waiting for since roman abramovich announced he would sell the club back in march after nearly 20 years of ownership. there have been unprecedented complexities to this whole process of trying to sell the club due to the sanctions that were placed on abramovich — the freezing of his assets, including chelsea, due to his links with vladimir putin, but finally, late last night, the government got the legal assurances they needed to put forward a special licence to enable the sale of the club. they said they were assured
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that the proceeds of the sale wouldn't benefit abramovich or any other sanctioned individuals, and now they will ensure that the proceeds go to humanitarian efforts in ukraine to support the victims of the war there. former manchester city captain vincent kompany is in talks with relegated burnley about their vacant manager's job. anderlecht confirmed that kompany had left the club after finishing third in the league this season, and ending up as runners—up in the belgian cup final. it's understood kompany is on a three—man burnley shortlist. britain's simon yates has abandoned the giro d'italia, with four stages to go. he has struggled since injuring his knee in a crash on stage 4. stage 17 was won by colombia's santiago buitrago, after he broke clear on the final climb. richard carapaz keeps the leader's pinkjersey. he's still three seconds clear ofjai hindley in the overall standings. finally, he's england's leading all—time test run—scorer and has 72 first—class centuries under his belt. former england captain alastair cook
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turned out for bedfordshire young farmers cc in a 12—over game against potton town yesterday. but after making 20 from 15 balls, he tried to swing the young seam bowler to the leg—side and his middle stump was knocked back. what a moment. the 15—year—old is called kyran shackleton. perhaps a name to keep an eye on. and that's all your sport for now. from me, marc edwards, and the rest of the team, goodbye. hello again. i think it's fair to say eastern england had the best of wednesday's weather. durham was the sunniest place, eight hours of sunshine. and the warmest spot was holbeach in lincolnshire with 20 c. it was a lovely end to the day meanwhile in worchestershire. right now, the weather is quite quiet, a few showers for the northwest of scotland but thickening cloud moving into northern ireland starting to bring outbreaks of rain.
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it's mild for the most part, but quite chilly air with us in scotland today, and if you look at where the air is coming from, although across the uk we will all have westerly winds. in the south, the air is coming from a long way south, whereas in the north, the air is coming around past iceland, so from polar regions working eventually working northern scotland, so they'll be big temperature contrasts across the country from north to south. we start off with a band of rain thursday morning in northern ireland, pushing eastward across northern england, scraping into the far south of scotland, north wales, the front itself weakens it as it slowly trickles down towards lincolnshire through the afternoon, brighter skies through the afternoon. to the northwest, blustery showers in northwest scotland. this blustery spells and feeling warmer, temperatures 21 degrees some fairly brisk blustery winds
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making it feel quite chilly. through friday ,the winds turned to more of a northwesterly direction, those winds will bring plenty of showers to northern and western scotland, one or two for northern ireland, the northwest of both england and wales, but otherwise, most of you will see spells of sunshine. and the sunshine not feeling bad for the southern areas of uk, 20 in cardiff, 21 in london, warm in the sunshine but across the far northwest, a little on the cool side once again. for the weekend, high pressure is influencing our weather but it is moving to the northwest of the uk allowing these winds to dive in. might well start of sun where you are and a cold start to the day cloud may be a bit thicker on sunday, perhaps one or two showers around and temperatures for the most part will be dropping a few degrees, so it will start to feel should be a bit us sunshine around.
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but 11 in aberdeen and just 1a and london.
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welcome to newsday, reporting live from singapore, i'm karishma vaswani. the headlines... us investigators say all nineteen schoolchildren murdered by a teenage gunman in texas were in the same classroom. minutes before the killings, he'd posted that he was going to attack an elementary school. in the town of uvalde, there's grief, shock, and anger. president biden says he's sick of the carnage caused by gun violence. the idea that an 18—year—old can walk into a store and buy weapons of war designed and marketed to kill is i think, just wrong. also in the headlines — britain's prime
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minister borisjohnson says he will not resign after

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