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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  May 26, 2022 1:00pm-1:31pm BST

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the chancellor announces £15 billion worth of help for millions of families in the face of the rising cost of living. rishi sunak promises payments to the most vulnerable — including elderly people, those with disabilites and households on the lowest incomes. we will send, directly to around 8 million of the lowest income households, a one—off cost of living payment of £650. there will also be a grant for all households — the plans will partly be paid for through a one—off tax on oil and gas companies — we'll have the details on what's just been announced. also this lunchtime. prayers for the children and teachers killed at a primary school in texas — as it emerges the gunman wrote about the attack beforehand on facebook. ukraine says russian forces have
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attacked more than a0 towns in the eastern regions of donetsk and luhansk. concerns raised by families of two small children who were later murdered weren't taken seriously by child protection officials, says a review. and — the man with a new lease of life — after a double hand transplant. and coming up on the bbc news channel — the mass exodus at manchester city women continues, as the club announce that defender lucy bronze will leave at the end of her contract this summer. good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. the chancellor rishi sunak has been setting out the government's
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measures to address the rising cost of living. the chancellor said his package is worth £15 billion. it is expected to be partly paid by a windfall tax on oil and gas companies — something ministers had previously opposed. the measures include — 8 million of the lowest income households will receive a one—off payment of £650. and from autumn, 8 million pensioner households will receive an extra payment of £300. 6 million people on disability benefits will receive a one—off payment of £150. and everyone will get a £400 grant towards their energy bills. the chancellor said the government "will provide significant support for the british people" — as our political correspondent helen catt reports. as bills have gone up, so has
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pressure on the government to do more than it has. the pressure on the government to do more than it has.— pressure on the government to do more than it has. the chancellor of the exchequer. _ more than it has. the chancellor of the exchequer. this _ more than it has. the chancellor of the exchequer. this lunchtime - more than it has. the chancellor of| the exchequer. this lunchtime rishi sunak announced _ the exchequer. this lunchtime rishi sunak announced another _ the exchequer. this lunchtime rishi sunak announced another bot - the exchequer. this lunchtime rishi sunak announced another bot 9 - sunak announced another bot 9 billion worth of measures to help households. he scrapped a scheme that would have seen households have to pay back a reduction on their energy bills. for to pay back a reduction on their energy bills-— to pay back a reduction on their ener: bills. ., ., ., ., . ., energy bills. for the avoidance of doubt, this _ energy bills. for the avoidance of doubt, this is _ energy bills. for the avoidance of doubt, this is now _ energy bills. for the avoidance of| doubt, this is now unambiguously a grant. and furthermore, we have decided that the £200 of support for household energy bills will be doubled to £400 for everyone. we are on the side of hard—working families with £6 billion of financial support. with £6 billion of financial su ort. ., ., . with £6 billion of financial su ort. . ., . ., with £6 billion of financial su--ort. ., ., . . ., support. he announced extra one-off -a ments, support. he announced extra one-off payments. £650 _ support. he announced extra one-off payments. £650 to — support. he announced extra one-off payments, £650 to those _ support. he announced extra one-off payments, £650 to those on - support. he announced extra one-off payments, £650 to those on the - payments, £650 to those on the lowest incomes, £350 to pensioners and £150 to disabled people. and a
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major u—turn on how to pay for it. it will be charged on profits of oil and gas companies at a rate of 25%, it will be temporary and when oil and gas prices return to more normal levels, the levy will be phased out with a sunset clause written into the legislation. fit, with a sunset clause written into the legislation.— the legislation. a tax on the unexnectedly _ the legislation. a tax on the unexpectedly high - the legislation. a tax on the unexpectedly high profits i the legislation. a tax on the unexpectedly high profits ofj the legislation. a tax on the - unexpectedly high profits of north sea oil and gas companies have been called for repeatedly by labour. madam deputy speaker, after today's announcement, let there be no doubt about who is winning the battle of ideas in britain. it is the labour party. today it feels like the chancellor has finally realised the problem is that the country are facing. we first called for a windfall tax on oil and gas producers nearly five months ago. the snp and the lib dems had backed a windfall tax, the government had been resistant. the business secretary said this two days ago. do
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secretary said this two days ago. drr you secretary said this two days ago. dr? you support a windfall tax? secretary said this two days ago. do you support a windfall tax? i'd - secretary said this two days ago. do you support a windfall tax? i'd be i you support a windfall tax? i'd be very clear. _ you support a windfall tax? i'd be very clear. i _ you support a windfall tax? i'd be very clear, i don't _ you support a windfall tax? i'd be very clear, i don't think— you support a windfall tax? i'd be very clear, i don't think it - very clear, i don't think it suriports _ very clear, i don't think it supports investment, i don't think it's necessarily the right thing but as i it's necessarily the right thing but as i always — it's necessarily the right thing but as i always say, that's up to the chancellor, _ as i always say, that's up to the chancellor, he sees the economy across_ chancellor, he sees the economy across the — chancellor, he sees the economy across the piece, he is responsible for fiscal— across the piece, he is responsible for fiscal policy and is instinctively against windfall taxes but if _ instinctively against windfall taxes but if he _ instinctively against windfall taxes but if he feels it requires extraordinary measures that's up to him. . ~ extraordinary measures that's up to him. ., ~ ,., him. even at the weekend, downing street sources _ him. even at the weekend, downing street sources were _ him. even at the weekend, downing street sources were indicating - him. even at the weekend, downing street sources were indicating a - him. even at the weekend, downing street sources were indicating a big| street sources were indicating a big announcement on a windfall tax wasn't imminent. so, what has changed? well, the government is keen to move on from partygate fast. the announcement earlier by the energy regulator that the typical household bill will go up by £800 a yearfrom 0ctober household bill will go up by £800 a yearfrom october is household bill will go up by £800 a year from october is likely to have sharpened the focus. with prices set to keep rising, will this be the last time rishi sunak has to intervene? let's speak to our political correspondent ben wright.
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there's a lot of announcements in the last hour from the chancellor. this is a government keen to push the agenda away from the sue gray report. trio the agenda away from the sue gray re ort. ., , ., the agenda away from the sue gray reort. ., , ., ., ,., report. no question about it. the timin: report. no question about it. the timing isn't _ report. no question about it. the timing isn't accidental, _ report. no question about it. the timing isn't accidental, coming i report. no question about it. the timing isn't accidental, coming a | timing isn't accidental, coming a day after the sue gray report. downing street is desperate to turn the page on partygate, questions about boris johnson's the page on partygate, questions about borisjohnson's leadership and just today to more conservative mps have broken ranks and said boris johnson should go. this announcement is clearly more than just political presentation. this was a mini budget and i think it was inevitable he had to act, he was under pressure because of clear rises in the cost of living everyone is feeling and that's been accompanied by political pressure as well. the liberal democrats were the first to call for a windfall tax on oil and gas companies, that was followed by labour who have made it their signature policy and tory mps have
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demanded action too. interestingly, a clutch of cabinet ministers have spoken out publicly against the idea, they feel philosophically it is not a tory thing to do, it could deter investment. the chancellor has been sitting on the fence a bit but this wasn't a settled policy as recently as a few days ago but they have acted now. in the commons, rachel reeves the shadow chancellor said that the chancellor had caved in and inevitably to the political pressure and has acted finally, but it had been too late. i think the government hopes they will quieten the critics who have been calling for action. the critics who have been calling foraction. it's the critics who have been calling for action. it's the detail of this, the substance of the policies that will matter to people and its striking we are talking about universal help, measures that everyone will benefit from. the chancellor said he couldn't help everyone deal with the impact of rising inflation but this is a massive intervention. the energy bills support package
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comes as millions of people around the country are already struggling with the soaring price of food, energy and other key goods. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has been talking to people in warrington — and asking what is one thing the government could do to help them. rising prices are the talk of the town, from food banks... three boys. to workplaces _ town, from food banks... three boys. to workplaces. mark _ town, from food banks... three boys. to workplaces. mark and _ town, from food banks... three boys. to workplaces. mark and emma - town, from food banks... three boys. to workplaces. mark and emma both | to workplaces. mark and emma both work full—time but with three boys at home, energy doesn't come cheap. the one thing that would help me more would be some help with energy bills. if the government could assist with that it would be great. his wish has come true. the chancellorjust his wish has come true. the chancellor just gifted his wish has come true. the chancellorjust gifted him and every other house hold £400 off gas and electricity bills. it will help but with another price rise in october, he still has to find an extra £1000 or more. ~ �* ., , .,
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or more. we've got the smart metre in the living _ or more. we've got the smart metre in the living room _ or more. we've got the smart metre in the living room which _ or more. we've got the smart metre in the living room which was - or more. we've got the smart metre in the living room which was in - or more. we've got the smart metre in the living room which was in a - in the living room which was in a drawer before, in the last 18 months we put it on the fireplace. thermostat is on a lot lower. the wife was good at leaving the windows open and the heating on to dry washing and stuff so we stopped doing that now as much. just being more cautious about what we do. showers instead of parts, because they are a lot cheaper, especially when the boys spend an hour in the bath each but the hot tub is constantly running. that bath each but the hot tub is constantly running.- bath each but the hot tub is constantly running. at this food bank, constantly running. at this food bank. then _ constantly running. at this food bank, then he _ constantly running. at this food bank, then he has— constantly running. at this food bank, then he has lent- constantly running. at this food bank, then he has lent to - constantly running. at this food i bank, then he has lent to swallow her pride and ask for the help she needs. �* ., ., ,., ., needs. i've got a neighbour who lives next _ needs. i've got a neighbour who lives next door _ needs. i've got a neighbour who lives next door who _ needs. i've got a neighbour who lives next door who spent - needs. i've got a neighbour who lives next door who spent my i needs. i've got a neighbour who i lives next door who spent my husband some money to get electric today so i was like, thank god for that. there is a more generous package available from july for bernie and millions like her, as much as £1200. it won't cover her full energy bill either but make a big difference when arrives. let's talk to our economics
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correspondent andy verity. how does what we've heard compare really with what we were expecting? 0ne really with what we were expecting? one word answer, bigger. we were expecting 10 billion, we've got 15 billion. also, it's much more targeted. before the announcement there was some concern on the part of anti—poverty charity is that this would be universal and apply to everybody. an element of it was, so we had 6 billion paying for £400 off energy bills for every household. that's not only twice is because the government said in april, it's also not going to have to be paid back. the catch with the support visit was a rebate that would be repaid. that's not going to happen now, it's £400 going to every household. so, that was larger than anticipated in april but the big thing was further targeted support, 9 billion of targeted support, 9 billion of targeted support. this is almost
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exactly what the likes of the joseph rowntree foundation have been calling for. the best way to target support on those hardest hit by the crisis, the poorer half of households, some of whom are heading for destitution if they don't have more support, the best way to target it is through the benefits system. we have the mechanism already there. rishi sunak took away the booster payment of £20 a week after the pandemic. he was much criticised for hitting the poorest households. now he's countering that by saying, i'm giving 9 billion here. the other interesting thing is he said we have decanted inflation by being fiscally responsible but this is a giveaway rather than a takeaway, in other words the government is putting more money into the economy, handing more money into the economy, handing more money over than taking back in taxes. it's already done the tax rise, that's already baked in, we got hit by that in april, one of the big tax rises for years. some 20 billion of households and firms. but thatis billion of households and firms. but that is giving a lot more back than
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we were anticipating in the spring statement. so, 8 million households will get £650 each to help with bills, that's more generous than expected, pensioner households will also get £300 which is also more generous than expected.- also get £300 which is also more generous than expected. and you can find more information about these measures over on the bbc news website — at bbc.co.uk/news. now we will turn to the rest of the day's news. it's emerged that the teenager who killed 19 children and two teachers at a primary school in texas on tuesday wrote messages about the attack on facebook moments earlier. salvador ramos was shot dead by police after he barricaded himself inside a classroom. president biden is expected travel to the town of uvalde in the next few days, to meet the families of those killed. 0ur north america correspondent nomia iqbal reports from there. they came for the thoughts and prayers. families held each other tightly
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to try and make sense of the unimaginable. they sang and prayed. the mood was sombre, and their grief palpable. this couple told us their eight—year—old grandson made it out of the school alive. i went and checked on my grandson. as soon as he saw me, he hugged me, he was so scared. and i cried with him also. i told him, it'll be ok. this is a community that's dealing with profound grief — and people came here inside the arena in their hundreds. usually rodeo shows happen here, but there was a prayer vigil, and people say this is their way of healing. the murder of 19 children and their two teachers has left this country reeling. xavier lopez was in his fourth year at primary school, as was elle garcia and ameriejo, just ten. theirteacher, eva mireles, died jumping in front of her students. they had all been barricaded
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in one classroom. how would you describe your daughter in a few words? how would you describe her? full of love and full of life. she would do anything for anybody. and to me... it comforts me a little bit to think that she'd be the one to help her friends in need there and then. the shooter was next door, and whenever i heard - that he was in room number 18 and the shooter was in 19, i my heartjust dropped. i started panicking, crying. i was thinking that the shooter was shooting everywhere, i that it was going to go through one of the walls and shoot him. - the man who cruelly took their lives was this local teenager, 18—year—old salvador ramos. he sent out messages on social media saying he was going to attack an elementary school. he was killed by police. it's the worst school shooting in a decade. the death of small children has reignited the polarising issue of gun control in america.
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and whilst politicians unite in grief, they quickly divide on the politics. when in god's name will we do what needs to be done to if not completely stop, fundamentally change the amount of carnage that goes on in this country? republicans here say this isn't about guns. they say strict gun control infringes on american people's constitutional right to bear arms. it divides america deeply — and even after a horrific shooting, that divide deepens. the second amendment is a part of our liberties to even be here in america. this is not about politics, gun control is not about politics. guns don't kill people, people kill people. president biden says he will visit the city in the coming days. will this be a turning point? in america, when it comes to tougher gun laws, the grim expectation is either little or nothing will change.
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more details are emerging about what happened that day. a video has been released by reporters which appears to show armed guards outside the school while the active shooter was inside. and it shows onlookers urging the guards to go in and stop the shooter. some of them even tried to go in themselves but are pulled back. questions are being asked about why that happened, why were the police so slow? also, with armed guards, does that make a difference? does having armed guards make a difference and that is really crucial, because this is the argument republicans may, if you want to tackle gun violence it's not about gun control, they say it's about gun control, they say it's about arming guards. and questions are being asked about the timeline. president biden will be visiting
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uvalde in the coming days with his wife jill uvalde in the coming days with his wifejill biden. he says he wants to try and bring comfort to the community here, which is still in a deep state of grief. in ukraine, russian forces have attacked more than 40 towns in the eastern donetsk and luhansk regions — officials say at least five civilians have been killed. two key cities have come under intense bombardment, and there's heavy fighting for a crossroads connecting ukrainian territory. 0ur correspondentjoe inwood reports from kyiv. russia is trying to take the donbas with overwhelming force. these shots, released by the ukrainian ministry of defence, show a thermobaric bombardment of their positions. russia's current targets are the twin cities of severodonetsk and lysychansk. they're not cut off — yet. but the only route to them has been under increasing bombardment for days.
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if it becomes impassable, thousands of ukraine's best soldiers may be cut off, along with civilians. towns across the region are emptying out. translation: idon't- know where we are going. we are just trying to get as far away as possible from the war, that is the main thing. the increasing human cost of this war has led to some people questioning whether it's worth ukraine giving up some land to save lives. recently the suggestion was made by former us secretary of state henry kissinger, at the world economic forum. it's fair to say it did not go down well here in kyiv. translation: no matter. what the russian state does, there's always someone who says, let's take its interests into account. this year in davos it was heard again. despite thousands of russian missiles hitting ukraine, despite tens of thousands of ukrainians killed, despite bucha and mariupol, despite the destroyed cities. and that destruction continues.
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this is kramatorsk, a key city in the donbas both the russians and ukrainians. people know that if, when, severodonetsk falls, their city will be next. yevgen isjust 13. distant bombing. he barely flinches at the sound of shelling now. "i got used to it in my village," he says. "that was a 122 shell." the longer this war goes on, the greater the scars — notjust on the towns and villages of this country, but on the people that live there too. joe inwood, bbc news, kyiv. it's 1:19 it'si:19 p it's 1:19 p m. our top story this lunchtime... the chancellor announces £15 billion worth of help for millions of families, in the face of the cost of living crisis. # you are the dancing queen # young and sweet #. and coming up — my my,
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abba are back — in digitalform. the supergroup's new show finally opens in london tonight. and coming up on the bbc news channel — dan evans is in action at the french open. he's up against mikael ymer as he bids to make it through to the third round at roland garros for the very first time. concerns raised by family members of two children who were later murdered by their parents' partners weren't taken seriously enough by child protection professionals — according to a report into the case of 16—month—old star hobson, and of six—year—old arthur labinjo—hughes. a child safeguarding review also says the two cases reflect wider problems with the child protection system in england. 0ur social affairs editor alison holt has the details. arthur, are you going to play for england? no, why not? arthur labinjo—hughes was six
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when he was murdered by his father's girlfriend after weeks of horrific abuse. today's report says whilst responsibility for his death lies with his abusers, mistakes were still made by the police and social workers who might have protected him. his cousin find that hard to hear. arthur was a gorgeous child. he could have gone on to have such a wonderful future. he would have been encouraged to achieve all his goals and ijust think to say that a mistake is the reason we don't have him is not enough. and star hobson, here in the arms of her mother's partner, who would later kill her, was 16 months old. the report found with star, as with arthur, concerns raised by wider family were too often disregarded by child protection professionals. sta r�*s star's and
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sta r�*s and and star's and and step great—grandfather say when family told those professionals they were worried even providing photos of bruising on star, they didn't investigate properly thought they being malicious. if investigate properly thought they being malicious.— investigate properly thought they being malicious. if social services had done their— being malicious. if social services had done theirjobs _ being malicious. if social services had done theirjobs in _ being malicious. if social services had done theirjobs in the - being malicious. if social services had done theirjobs in the first i had done theirjobs in the first place, we know star would still have been with us, because they'd have come down to see us, they'd have seen there was a problem with star and said, right, yeah, we need to step in here. and said, right, yeah, we need to step in here-— and said, right, yeah, we need to step in here. may if they'd sat down and soke step in here. may if they'd sat down and spoke to _ step in here. may if they'd sat down and spoke to us _ step in here. may if they'd sat down and spoke to us in _ step in here. may if they'd sat down and spoke to us in person _ step in here. may if they'd sat down and spoke to us in person they i step in here. may if they'd sat down. and spoke to us in person they might have actually thought, oh, hang on a minute, _ have actually thought, oh, hang on a minute, they are notjust being malicious _ minute, they are notjust being malicious. literally theyjust took their_ malicious. literally theyjust took their word — malicious. literally theyjust took their word for it that we were being malicious— their word for it that we were being malicious and they didn't bother hearing — malicious and they didn't bother hearing our side of what was going on. , ., hearing our side of what was going on. ,., .., ., _ hearing our side of what was going on. ., _ ., on. the report, carried out by a national panel _ on. the report, carried out by a national panel of— on. the report, carried out by a national panel of experts, i on. the report, carried out by a i national panel of experts, concluded that in both arthur and star's cases, family concerns were disregarded, decision making by social workers and police was weak, information sharing poor, and that this reflected problems found in many parts of the country. the woman
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who led the review wants to see new expert teams bringing together social workers, expert teams bringing together socialworkers, police expert teams bringing together social workers, police and others to investigate and oversee cases. i don't think we can ever exaggerate how complicated and how difficult it is to do this work and we must give every child every family, but also every child every family, but also every practitioner who is working in this area, the best possible chance of protecting children well and keeping them safe. find of protecting children well and keeping them safe.— of protecting children well and keeping them safe. and the report sa s the keeping them safe. and the report says the failings _ keeping them safe. and the report says the failings identified - keeping them safe. and the report says the failings identified in i says the failings identified in arthur and star's cases need to lead to fundamental change that means other children are better protected in the future. the government says it will publish its plans later this year. alison holt, bbc news. people who are victims of sexual offences are being promised less invasion into their private lives, under changes to how evidence is gathered in england and wales. prosecutors and police will have to justify requests to obtain mobile phones and social media conversations. the new rules are aimed
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at preventing the intrusive gathering of personal information. the prime minister of the irish republic has warned that a trade war between uk and european union would be "shocking" and "unnecessary". there are fears that the dispute about planned changes to the post—brexit arrangements for northern ireland could further harm relations. micheal martin is urging negotiators to ensure the row doesn't affect trade between britain and the bloc. a man whose hands were left unusable by an autoimmune disease has been given what is believed to be the world's first double hand transplant for the condition. steven gallagher, who's 48, was diagnosed with scleroderma, which causes scarring of the skin and organs, as well as what he describes as "horrendous pain". but now, he says, he is pain free. 0ur health correspondent catherine burns has the story. these are the hands that have changed steven gallagher's life. when his consultant
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first mentioned the idea of a double hand transplant, the 48—year—old wasn't keen. i kind of laughed and i thought that's space age kind of things. no way i'm going through that, kind of thing. but he spent years in pain thanks to scleroderma. it's an autoimmune disease that causes scarring on the skin and internal organs. it got to the point where it was basically two fists, and then it was my hands were unusable, basically, i couldn't do a thing. it shapes your mouth and pulled my teeth back, and it also makes the nose pointy as well. he knew there was a small risk he could lose his hands, but had the surgery in leeds last december. a 12—hour operation involving 30 different people. it's given me another lease of life, basically. yeah, i'm still finding things hard just now, but things are getting
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better every week. now he's able to do more for himself. there are still things he struggles with. he can't do up buttons, for example, but he's having regular physio and hopes to go back to work in the future. it's thought steven is the first person with scleroderma to have this surgery. for him, the biggest change is the pain. he says it used to be horrendous. now, it's gone. catherine burns, bbc news. the world—famous tt races return to the isle of man this weekend, for the first time in three years. around 40,000 fans from all over the world are expected to be at one of the most difficult and dangerous courses on the motor sport calendar. ben croucher has more. the isle of man, stunning, scenic and, for the last two years, largely silent. but on sunday it's about to get a lot louder. after covid
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complications cancelled the isle of man tt in 2020 and 2021, now, the event is back. it’s man tt in 2020 and 2021, now, the event is back-— event is back. it's a cliche but it's absolutely _ event is back. it's a cliche but it's absolutely unique. - event is back. it's a cliche but it's absolutely unique. there l event is back. it's a cliche but| it's absolutely unique. there is nothing in the world like this, whether it's to do with the history, the topography, the challenge and the topography, the challenge and the danger, there is nothing that compares to it. this the danger, there is nothing that compares to it.— the danger, there is nothing that compares to it. as such it's a huge draw for fans. _ compares to it. as such it's a huge draw for fans. around _ compares to it. as such it's a huge draw for fans. around 40,000 i compares to it. as such it's a huge i draw for fans. around 40,000 flocked to the island every year. so when the red flag fell in that spring of 2020, its impact was significant. there is one particular event, our flagship tourism event, generates around £39 million for the manx economy and create thousands of jobs. economy and create thousands of “obs. ~ . . jobs. with the race returning businesses _ jobs. with the race returning businesses are _ jobs. with the race returning businesses are happy, i jobs. with the race returning businesses are happy, the i jobs. with the race returning i businesses are happy, the fans are excited, but there is a human cost on these roads. riders lose their lives and for the last two years with no racing there have been no fatalities. so why do they do it is yellow we all accept that motor
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sport in general is dangerous. that sport in general is dangerous. git the end of the day no one is making me do this, i want to do it, i want to race the tt course. find me do this, i want to do it, i want to race the tt course.— to race the tt course. and over the line together... _ to race the tt course. and over the line together... that _ to race the tt course. and over the line together... that challenge i to race the tt course. and over the line together... that challenge has| line together... that challenge has been largely _ line together... that challenge has been largely unchanged _ line together... that challenge has been largely unchanged for - line together... that challenge has been largely unchanged for the i line together... that challenge has| been largely unchanged for the last 100 years. sure, the machinery might be different and the speed is now topping 200 miles an hour, the race's lofty targets to reach international audiences and offset its carbon footprint, but maintaining the peace might not be one of them. ben croucher, bbc news, one of them. ben croucher, bbc news, on the isle of man. it's more than 40 years since abba went on tour. now, from tonight — after a big build up and a new album — fans can see the scandinavian foursome performing some of their greatest hits at a new show in london — thanks to digital technology. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson has been finding out more about the abbatars, and talking to some music: dancing queen, by abba abba — as you've seen them before, looking like they did
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in their 1970s heyday. # you are the dancing queen. # six years in the making, tonight it's the premiere of the abba voyage concert, featuring avatars, or, as they've come to be known, abbatars of the band, in a 3000—capacity purpose—built arena in east london. where's the best place to watch the show in the arena? svana gisla has worked on the project since the start. we want to pull on the emotions, so if you come out of here and feel like you've seen a visual spectacle we have failed, unfortunately. if you've come out of here and feel like you've just seen something that is so emotional that you laughed and you cried and you can't wait to go back, and everyone around you felt the same, that's what we want. # my my, at waterloo napoleon did surrender. # abba performed the songs in front of 160 cameras for five weeks, so every aspect of their movements could be captured. that is so lifelike!
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quite amazing. when i went to visit them in stockholm last year, they explained that sacrifices had to be made so the avatars could look as accurate as possible. you had to shave the beards for the avatar show, yeah. just how traumatic was that for you? no, again, just a decision. if it has to be done, it has to be done. to the end i tried, is there no other way we can do this? if the show�*s a hit and there's demand around the world, well, in true scandinavian flat pack style, the whole arena can be collapsed, transported and rebuilt in a different country, on a different continent. and that's the dream for abba — to tour the globe bringing joy to thousands, whilst sitting at home in sweden. colin paterson, bbc news, the abba arena. though, there's something in my eye.
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