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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 26, 2022 1:30pm-2:01pm BST

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in stockholm last year, they explained that sacrifices had to be made so the avatars could look as accurate as possible. you had to shave the beards for the avatar show, yeah. just how traumatic was that for you? no, again, just a decision. if it has to be done, it has to be done. to the end i tried, is there no other way we can do this? if the show�*s a hit and there's demand around the world, well, in true scandinavian flat pack style, the whole arena can be collapsed, transported and rebuilt in a different country, on a different continent. and that's the dream for abba — to tour the globe bringing joy to thousands, whilst sitting at home in sweden. colin paterson, bbc news, the abba arena. though, there's something in my eye.
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time for a look at the weather. here's darren bett. earlier in the programme it was all about money, money, money, now it's allabout about money, money, money, now it's all about highs and lows. the wind is strongest in scotland. we got some sunshine here and some sharp showers. furthersouth, quite cloudy and damp across much of northern england and north wales. we've had a bit of rain and drizzle. that's moving southwards. this is what's happened over the past few hours. this raining western scotland is petering out as it runs away from northern england and north wales and eventually we'll see sunshine coming through. not much rain arriving in the midlands and across southern england it may stay dry and there will be sunshine particularly in the south—east. here, it should be quite warm, temperatures reaching 21 degrees, but quite chilly across northern scotland where we've got the stronger winds. this weather front is responsible for the rain moving across england and wales. its weakening as it runs southwards. any remaining rain and cloud pushes away into the channel. we keep showers
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going overnight in scotland but otherwise light a winds, clearer skies, a bit chilly at night, temperatures as low as 7—9. looking ahead to tomorrow, we've got one of these heading towards the uk, high pressure, that means dry weather but it's not arriving everywhere. we still got some brisk winds for tomorrow in scotland, heavy showers across northern parts of the country as well and as the cloud increases through the day in southern scotland and northern ireland and northern england there could be one or two showers here as well but head further south across wales, the midlands and southern england, it should stay dry, lots of sunshine here and the winds are lighter so it should feel pleasantly warm. 18 degrees in the midlands and 21 celsius in the south—east of england. the main story over the weekend isjust england. the main story over the weekend is just this cool air that's going to be heading our way. temperatures will be dropping and later in the weekend we make is to see a few more showers arriving as well. if there any showers on saturday they are across northernmost parts of scotland. elsewhere, a dry, sunny start. the cloud will tend to build up. it may look threatening at times but it
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should stay dry. the highest temperature on saturday will be across south wales, 20 degrees here. it could make 17 degrees in the central belt of scotland. high pressure trying to get to the uk, then retreats all the way up towards iceland which keeps this run of northerly winds coming our way and drawing on some brisk winds for tomorrow in scotland, heavy showers across northern parts of the country as well and as the cloud increases through the day in southern scotland and northern ireland and northern england there could be one or two showers here as well but had further south across wales, the midlands and southern england, it should stay dry, lots of sunshine here and the winds are lighter so it should feel pleasantly warm. 18 degrees in the midlands and 21 celsius in the south—east of england. the main story over the weekend is just this cool air that is going to be heading our way. temperatures that's all from the bbc news at one. it's goodbye from me. 0n bbc one we nowjoin the bbc�*s
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news teams where you are. dan cabins dan evans is an action today as he bids to make it through today as he bids to make it through to the third round in roland garros for the third time in his career. in the women's draw there has been a surprise exit for a former french open semifinalist. the eighth seed 0pen semifinalist. the eighth seed has gone down in straight sets to the world number 227. the mass exodus at manchester city women continues. defender lucy bronze will leave the club at the end of her contract this summer. she joins the likes of stanway and we are in exiting the club. having spent three successful seasons at french club lyon, bronze re—joined city for a second
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spell in 2020 and was named as fifa best women's player that year. she'll feature for the lionesses this summer in the home european championship. northern ireland captain marissa callaghan has sustained a foot injury, just six weeks before those euros. the 36—year—old, missed cliftonville�*s win over glentoran on wednesday, but was present at the ground. she's set for further scans on her right foot. it's unclear, if the injury will impact her chances of leading her country at the euros. northern ireland's first game at their maiden major tournament, is against norway in southampton onjuly 7th. manchester united football director john murtough says fans will need to be patient with new boss erik ten hag. speaking at a fans�* forum, murtough said ten hag was a "�*proven winner" who's set out a "�*long—term vision to build a successful, exciting team". the former ajax coach was unveiled as 0le gunnar solskjaer�*s successor on monday. jose mourinho was in tears last night, after he became the first manager to win all three, major european trophies.
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his roma side beat feyenoord 1—0 to win the inaugural uefa conference league. it means mourinho now has a perfect record, with five wins from five finals. england's tammy abraham and chris smalling both picked up winners�* medals. and this is how some of the roma players celebrated, by gatecrashing mourinho's news conference, spraying him with what looks like water, he didn't seem to mind too much though, joining in with the singing and dancing. former manchester united defender smalling has been praised for his performances this season. he picked up the man of the match award and was was asked afterwards whether he thinks he could force his way back into the england squad ahead of the world cup later this year. i would never close the door on something like that, but at the minute i am clearly not in gareth�*s plans, but equally i willjust focus on playing my games and i would never close the door on such an
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opportunity. british gymnastics�* head national coach amanda reddin has stepped down from her position with immediate effect. reddin had temporarily stepped aside in 2020 while an investigation into claims about her conduct took place. rio 2016 0lympian ruby harrold said reddin presided over a "culture of fear" at british gymnastics camps in lilleshall. reddin "completely refuted" the claims, which were not upheld and her suspension was lifted, but another independent investigation is ongoing into "further historical complaints". that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. that's bbc.co.uk/sport good afternoon, we will spend the next few minutes talking about those announcements that have come from
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the commons. announcements that have come from the common— the commons. rishi sunak telling a acked the commons. rishi sunak telling a packed house _ the commons. rishi sunak telling a packed house of— the commons. rishi sunak telling a packed house of commons - the commons. rishi sunak telling a packed house of commons that - the commons. rishi sunak telling a packed house of commons that he | the commons. rishi sunak telling a. packed house of commons that he is bringing in measures to address the rising cost of living as the government tries to draw a line under partygate. let's go through some of those announcements. 0ne—off payments of different amounts will be given to the most vulnerable — the elderly, those with disabilities, and those with the lowest incomes. all households will receive a £400 discount on energy bills and eight million of the lowest income families will also get a one—off payment of £650. let's hear a little of what the chancellor said to the commons. we should not be ideological about this, we should be pragmatic. it is possible to both tax extraordinary profits fairly and incentivise investment. and so like previous governments, including conservative ones, we will introduce a temporary, targeted energy profits levy, but we have built into the new levy... laughter and shouting.
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but we have built into the new levy... into the new levy an annual investment allowance that means companies will have a new and significant incentive to reinvest their profits. the new levy will be charged on profits of oil and gas companies at a rate of 25%. it will be temporary and when oil and gas prices return to historically more normal levels. the revenue will be phased out with a sunset clause written into the legislation and, crucially, with our new investment allowance we are nearly doubling the overall investment relief for oil and gas companies. that means that for every pound a company invests they will get back 90% in tax relief.
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so the more a company invests, the less tax they will pay. earlier the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves, said rishi sunak�*s statement was long overdue. todayit today it feels like the chancellor has finally realised the problems the country is facing. we first called for one full tax on oil and gas producers nearly five months ago to help struggling families and pensioners. today he has announced that policy but he can't dare say the words, it is a policy that dare not speak its name with this chancellor, and it was labour that first highlighted the unfairness of this government's buy now pay later compulsory loan scheme. it should not have taken a rocket scientist to work out that this would have cut it and we pointed it out at the time. but that is just the mark of this
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chancellor. announced now, dig later. here he is once again the treasury's one man rebuttal unit, the chancellor himself. for months it has been clear that moore was necessary to help people bring their bills down. so what took this government so long? every day that they have refused to act, £53 million more added to britain's household bills during this cost of living crisis. this government's dither and delay has caused our country dearly. dither and delay has caused our country dearly-— dither and delay has caused our country dearly. rachel reeves for labour. and this was the reaction from the snp. this is kirsty blackman. it is quite amusing to hear the chancellor talking about this being timely. it is timely because it happens to happen the week of the sue gray
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report. itjust happens that report came out yesterday and the chancellor has suddenly realised today that people are really struggling, that he suddenly needs to announce something about it. the chancellor stood up in the spring statement that he made when he announced the energy loan and said, look at these amazing things i am announcing, and genuinely seemed to believe at that time that that was the best this government could do. now he has changed his mind, he has listened to the calls of the opposition, he has listened to the calls of people up and down these islands who are struggling, who are struggling in many cases more than they have ever struggled before. i don't understand why he has announced only a £15 billion package. he has got £28 billion of fiscal headroom in public sector net debt. he has got £32 billion of fiscal headroom in balancing the
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current budget. those are the 0br figures for march. yet, he is refusing to spend that money now in the timely, targeted way that it is needed now for people.— needed now for people. kirsty blackman _ needed now for people. kirsty blackman for _ needed now for people. kirsty blackman for the _ needed now for people. kirsty blackman for the snp. - needed now for people. kirsty blackman for the snp. let's i needed now for people. kirsty - blackman for the snp. let's discuss what the chancellor unveiled in the last hour and a half or so. joining me now is lucy frazer mp who is currently the financial secretary for the treasury. good afternoon. wasn't kirsty blackman making a good point? there will be people listening to rishi sunak, delighted with what he was saying, but thinking this is pretty shameless after the sue gray report. what has happened this week is that 0fgem have announced what they expect the price cap to be in october. the chancellor has always said that when he was aware of the figures and the estimate he would look again at what support should be provided. that is exactly what he
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has done, so those figures came out this week. it will take time, of course, to implement the measures he has announced. as soon as he could he has come back to parliament today to announce those measures, which will support a significant number of people who are struggling with the cost of living. emit; people who are struggling with the cost of living-— cost of living. only a couple of da s auo cost of living. only a couple of days ago there _ cost of living. only a couple of days ago there were _ cost of living. only a couple of days ago there were still- cost of living. only a couple of- days ago there were still members of your party saying they did not think a windfall tax on energy companies was a good idea. why is it a good idea today? the was a good idea. why is it a good idea today?— was a good idea. why is it a good idea toda ? . ., ., , idea today? the windfall tax he has announced. — idea today? the windfall tax he has announced, the _ idea today? the windfall tax he has announced, the extraordinary - idea today? the windfall tax he hasj announced, the extraordinary profit seekers taxing, he is notjust saying we are going to introduce a tax, what he is saying, which is what he has always said, is we really want these companies to reinvest their profits in order to ensure we have domestic energy security and that is what he announced today. he has thought very carefully about this, he has not just rushed into announcing a tax on business, which is not what he wanted to do. what he is saying is
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we will tax you, but if you invest you will get relief on that taxation, so if you invest, you will get 90% of what you would be taxed back. is get 9096 of what you would be taxed back. , ., ., ., , ., ., back. is that going to be monitored? is the back. is that going to be monitored? is the company's _ back. is that going to be monitored? is the company's progress _ back. is that going to be monitored? is the company's progress on - back. is that going to be monitored? is the company's progress on all- back. is that going to be monitored? is the company's progress on all of. is the company's progress on all of that going to be monitored? will they be held to account on that investment?— they be held to account on that investment? ., ., _, , ., investment? there are of course tax reliefs already _ investment? there are of course tax reliefs already in _ investment? there are of course tax reliefs already in operation - investment? there are of course tax reliefs already in operation and - reliefs already in operation and they will operate in the usual way. in terms of the universality, there is a lot that is targeted, and i want to come on to that, but there are a few payments that are universal. would there be anyway for some people to opt out of that if they can? there will be people who frankly don't need the money. they could give that money to better places. is there a way for people to do that? g , ., places. is there a way for people to do that? , ., u, places. is there a way for people to dothat? , ., ., do that? just to come back to the tar: eted do that? just to come back to the targeted because _ do that? just to come back to the targeted because it _ do that? just to come back to the targeted because it is _ do that? just to come back to the targeted because it is important i do that? just to come back to the l targeted because it is important to highlight, that what the chancellor is trying to do is target those most
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vulnerable people and three quarters of the money will go on the most vulnerable. 8 million of the most vulnerable. 8 million of the most vulnerable people will be getting £1200, and that is what we estimate the average increase in bills over the average increase in bills over the course of this year. yes, it is notjust the course of this year. yes, it is not just the vulnerable who the course of this year. yes, it is notjust the vulnerable who are struggling, it is notjust those on means tested benefits who will feel the pinch and that is why the chancellor has done a broader package of measures, so you mention to the £400 that will come into play in october, so a broader section of society will benefit.— in october, so a broader section of society will benefit. absolutely and eo - le society will benefit. absolutely and --eole and society will benefit. absolutely and people and think _ society will benefit. absolutely and people and think tanks _ society will benefit. absolutely and people and think tanks have - society will benefit. absolutely and people and think tanks have been i people and think tanks have been praising the targeted nature of a lot of this, that is not in dispute, but every household getting £400, thatis but every household getting £400, that is literally some millionaires getting £400 of taxpayers' money, isn't it? n, ., getting £400 of taxpayers' money, isn't it? ., ., , , isn't it? most of the money is tarueted isn't it? most of the money is targeted on — isn't it? most of the money is targeted on those _ isn't it? most of the money is targeted on those who - isn't it? most of the money is targeted on those who need l isn't it? most of the money is| targeted on those who need it isn't it? most of the money is - targeted on those who need it most. three quarters of people will be the most vulnerable. what we are
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targeting it on is those on means tested benefit, pensioners and this additional money for those who are disabled as well. the additional money for those who are disabled as well.— disabled as well. the windfall tax on oil and gas — disabled as well. the windfall tax on oil and gas companies - disabled as well. the windfall tax on oil and gas companies will. disabled as well. the windfall tax on oil and gas companies will not pay for all of this, we know that. how concerned are you about the inflationary nature of this, about how in the long term it will be paid for? we understand the point of it, it has all been outlined, but it is expensive. it has all been outlined, but it is exoensive-_ it has all been outlined, but it is exensive. ., ., ., expensive. you are right to say it needs to be _ expensive. you are right to say it needs to be paid _ expensive. you are right to say it needs to be paid for— expensive. you are right to say it needs to be paid for and - expensive. you are right to say it needs to be paid for and some i expensive. you are right to say it needs to be paid for and some of expensive. you are right to say it i needs to be paid for and some of it, 5 million, will come from the additional tax on the extraordinary profits and the rest will come from borrowing. we don't think there will be a significant impact in terms of inflation. as you highlighted in the clip that came from the chancellor, it is targeted, timely, temporary and it will come to an end. but it is only about _ and it will come to an end. but it is only about 5 _ and it will come to an end. but it is only about 5 billion _ and it will come to an end. but it is only about 5 billion from - and it will come to an end. but it is only about 5 billion from the l is only about 5 billion from the windfall tax on energy companies and 10 billion in borrowing. that is an
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awful lot of borrowing on top of everything we have seen during a two—year pandemic. irate everything we have seen during a two-year pandemic.— everything we have seen during a two-year pandemic. we want to and need to support _ two-year pandemic. we want to and need to support people _ two-year pandemic. we want to and need to support people who - two-year pandemic. we want to and need to support people who are - need to support people who are vulnerable and that is why we announced this package today. but what the chancellor also said was, we need to grow, we need to grow and that will be one of the ways that we tackle inflation. he set out a number of measures and he really reiterated them today. he also talked about fiscal responsibility, so, yes, we are borrowing money but nowhere near what kirsty blackman suggested that we ought to be borrowing and nowhere near what the labour party would be spending. it is targeted support, it is temporary support, and it is timely.— is targeted support, it is temporary support, and it is timely. thank you ve much support, and it is timely. thank you very much for— support, and it is timely. thank you very much for now, _ support, and it is timely. thank you very much for now, the _ support, and it is timely. thank you very much for now, the financial- very much for now, the financial secretary to the treasury. and it is worth flagging that we will answer any questions you might have about all of thisjust any questions you might have about all of this just after half past three this afternoon. a couple of
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hours to get your questions in and go through everything today. get in touch with the hashtag #bbcyourquestions, or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk we will have a couple of experts here and we will go through as many questions as we can on everything the chancellor has announced today just after 330 this afternoon. now time for a look at what's making headlines across the uk. while the inquiry into the grenfell tower fire and the search for answers continues, victims are being remembered in a series of events to mark five years since the tragedy. one of them has been held at the grounds of queens park rangers. the club's charity has been supporting survivors
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and bereaved families, as ayshea buksh explains. it isa it is a beautiful game for so many and for the community affected by the grenfell tower fire, football has been a healing force. local club queens park rangers has been working with young people since the fire began and with the fifth anniversary in just a few weeks, they opened its doors to hundreds of locals as part of a memorial tournament. the community _ of a memorial tournament. tue: community continues of a memorial tournament. tte: community continues to of a memorial tournament. t"t2 community continues to go of a memorial tournament. tt2 community continues to go through the public inquiry, which is extremely difficult for everybody involved. so to have a day like this where the sun is shining, we can get the community into the stadium, playing football, meeting friends, seeing each other and supporting each other, it is our way of marking the fifth anniversary.— the fifth anniversary. having it here today _ the fifth anniversary. having it here today means _ the fifth anniversary. having it here today means so - the fifth anniversary. having it here today means so much - the fifth anniversary. having it here today means so much to | the fifth anniversary. having it. here today means so much to me the fifth anniversary. having it - here today means so much to me on a personal— here today means so much to me on a personal level and i feel like today has been _ personal level and i feel like today has been an absolutely amazing opportunity to have everyone from the community come down and participate and a lot of local
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people _ participate and a lot of local people get the chance to play on the pitch _ people get the chance to play on the itch. 4: :: people get the chance to play on the itch. ~:: :: , , pitch. 600 football players took art in pitch. 600 football players took part in the _ pitch. 600 football players took part in the grenfell _ pitch. 600 football players took part in the grenfell memorial i pitch. 600 football players took. part in the grenfell memorial cup and teams from across london joined local squads, such as grenfell athletic and mines united. we are deafinu athletic and mines united. we are dealing with _ athletic and mines united. we are dealing with mental _ athletic and mines united. we are dealing with mental health - athletic and mines united. we are dealing with mental health every i athletic and mines united. we are i dealing with mental health every day and our players are struggling with mental health, our men and women, so this is such an incredible occasion for them, to have this opportunity and there are a lot of smiles and support and it is a community event. the final match was between a team of bereaved and survivors against a squad made up of players from the met police and london fire brigade. ifeel honour and met police and london fire brigade. i feel honour and privilege to play on the _ i feel honour and privilege to play on the bereaved and survivors plumb aside, _ on the bereaved and survivors plumb aside, my— on the bereaved and survivors plumb aside, my friends, they are all absolute — aside, my friends, they are all absolute heroes for me. i am an emotional— absolute heroes for me. i am an emotional talking about it, i am on the pitch— emotional talking about it, i am on the pitch with my heroes. with emotional talking about it, i am on the pitch with my heroes.— the pitch with my heroes. with the fifth anniversary _ the pitch with my heroes. with the fifth anniversary in _ the pitch with my heroes. with the fifth anniversary in just _ the pitch with my heroes. with the fifth anniversary in just a _ the pitch with my heroes. with the fifth anniversary in just a few- fifth anniversary in just a few weeks it is a very difficult time for many people here, but something
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like this shows the resilience of this community and how coming together has a healing power for their grief. together has a healing power for their grief. nottinghamshire wildlife trust says the government is in danger of failing to meet its pledges on nature and wildlife protection. the conservation charity says there's evidence of a dramatic decline in species even in protected areas. sally bowman went to visit a site of scientific interest. so give us an idea of how rich this area is in wildlife and why. visit sellers would near nottingham with erin mcdade and you soon realise why he's so wild about protecting it. the old clay pits provide a wonderful habitat for amphibians, dragonflies, a large feeding area for bats. but as well as it being a designated ancient woodland we have also got areas of established meadow, just a real mix of habitat, which means we have got everything from rare wild flowers through to the amphibians, mammals, a whole range of species really. there are more than 4000 sites of special scientific interest in england,
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but only 38% are in good condition. the other numbers for nature don't look good either. we are having a nature and climate crisis. 0ur wildlife is declining around us. 41% of species are in decline, 15% are threatened with extinction. we can'tjust see that decline continue. in its nature recovery green paper the government sets out an ambition to protect 30% of land and sea for nature by 2030. it's called 30 by 30, but the wildlife trust say the environment that comes nowhere near to setting legally binding the environment act comes nowhere near to setting legally binding targets to achieve that. we have got the environment act over the line, that's a really important piece of legislation, but we need the targets that underpin that to be ambitious. what the government is currently proposing is effectively to allow nature to decline for another decade and then hope that it recovers by 10% by 2042. you just can't imagine if that was a target being set for something like nhs waiting lists, there would be a public outcry and we needed to be more public outcry and the government
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needs prove that it believes nature matters. a public consultation on environmental legal targets has just been extended untiljune the 27th. sally bowman, bbc east midlands today, nottingham. families in cornwall are being sent out of the county into emergency accommodation, as pressures on the housing sector intensify. the number of people in emergency accommodation has risen to 1,500, up from around 1,000 a year ago. tamsin melville reports. the bathroom, where we need to do the dishes as well. the bathroom, where we need to do the dishes as well. imagine unexpectedly losing your home and then spending weeks in a hotel room with your three children, with no idea what's next. this is a cot for darcy. that's the reality for charlene pascoe, whose private landlord wanted his rental property back so issued her a so—called "no fault" section 21 notice of eviction. it is almost like i am being punished through no fault of our own
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and it is frustrating. i paid the rent every month on time, we kept the house clean and tidy and then we are out and we have got nowhere to go and it is like we are stuck in one room. it is really, really difficult and it is very isolating. with private rents out of reach and the council's social housing waiting list growing ever longer, charlene's one of hundreds of people turning to the council for help. it's providing modular cabins, places in holiday parks and buying properties for temporary housing. but it's proving hard to keep up with the numbers of private rentals being lost. if you are a landlord right now, i understand the situation, with increasing regulation, it is more difficult to become a landlord. however, we are facing a real drastic crisis in the amount of available rented accommodation at the moment and if you can afford to hang on for another 12 months and keep those tenants in there, then please do so. anna brito's landlord has
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served her a section 21 notice, after fifteen years of renting near newquay. the teaching assistant has until august to find somewhere else with her family. what i was told was that if i did choose to leave my property when i had been asked to leave, i would be put in emergency accommodation, myself and my children, and there is a high possibility that that could be out of the county. it was a shock. i knew there was a housing crisis, but i didn't realise it was that bad. reforms means section 21's are set to go, but there's a warning it's pushing more landlords to sell up or switch to holiday lets and a call for more recognition to keep them in the game. it is just another nail in the coffin for those landlords who are considering, can i continue? can i afford to continue? we are seeing more landlords going, section 21 is going, we need to sell.— more landlords going, section 21 is going, we need to sell. having it as a holiday let _ going, we need to sell. having it as a holiday let or— going, we need to sell. having it as a holiday let or an _ going, we need to sell. having it as a holiday let or an air— going, we need to sell. having it as a holiday let or an air 3&3, - going, we need to sell. having it as a holiday let or an air 3&3, they i a holiday let or an air 383, they -et a holiday let or an air 383, they
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get more — a holiday let or an air 383, they get more money, which i understand, but we _ get more money, which i understand, but we are _ get more money, which i understand, but we are in— get more money, which i understand, but we are in a situation where there _ but we are in a situation where there are — but we are in a situation where there are no houses to go round and there _ there are no houses to go round and there is— there are no houses to go round and there is no— there are no houses to go round and there is no safety net for families like me _ there is no safety net for families like me and i feel like i am in a really— like me and i feel like i am in a really difficult position, i hopeless situation. much more coming up at 2pm and more analysis of all those announcements from the chancellor this morning and your questions answered coming up at 3:30pm. that is after the weather and here is darren bent. it is going to cool down this weekend as we see the wind direction change. in scotland we are seeing some sunshine and showers and this is the area we will all get into tomorrow. in northern england and north wales we have had cloud and
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drizzle and that is moving southwards. i had in the south—east we have brighter skies and temperatures of 21 degrees. still chilly in northern parts of scotland where we have got those strong winds. this is weakening as it runs southwards and it is petering out and what is left of the cloud will get blown away into the english channel. we will keep blustery showers going, especially in the north—west. elsewhere it will be a bit cooler than last night, perhaps down to seven to nine celsius. moving into friday and one of these is heading our way. high pressure means dry weather and sunshine. but it is not arriving everywhere. we have still got some strong winds in scotland and that is where we will see heavier showers, in the north of the country. in southern scotland, northern ireland and northern england there will be a few light showers. in wales and southern england it will stay dry with a lot of sunshine around and it will feel quite warm. 18 in the midlands, 21
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in the south—east of england. heading into the weekend the main story is the cooler air that is heading our way. temperatures will drop and we may see a few more in showers arriving through the second half of the weekend. there could be one or two showers in northern scotland, otherwise a dry day with a sunny start. the client will spread out a little bit during the day, but the temperatures peaking at around 20 degrees in south wales and it may make 17 and the central belt of scotland. but the high pressure that has been trying to build towards the uk will retreat back up towards iceland and it keeps these northerly winds heading our way on sunday and thatis winds heading our way on sunday and that is bringing in this much cooler air as well. with pressure drop and we are likely to find more cloud, cyclic cloud, on sunday and that could lead to a few more showers as well, particularly in eastern areas. driest in the west and where we will find the highest temperatures. 0nly find the highest temperatures. only 12 degrees in newcastle and only 12
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in norwich, so rather cool. this is bbc news. i'm geeta guru—murthy and these are the latest headlines... the government announces a 15 billion pound package in the face of the rising cost of living with all households to receive a £400 discount on energy bills. millions of the most vulnerable — including elderly people, those with disabilities and households on the lowest incomes — will also recevie an extra one—off payment. we will send directly to around 8 million to the lowest income households a one—off cost of living payment of £615. the shadow chancellor hits out at the government for delaying the windfall tax on oil and gas giants to fund payments. this government dither and delay has
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cost our— this government dither and delay has cost our country dearly.

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