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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 27, 2022 10:00am-1:00pm BST

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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting, as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. and it emerges that the husband of one of the teachers killed by the attacker in texas died of a heart attack shortly after dropping off flowers at her memorial. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year in the uk if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. we've erred on the side of making it universal because i think the scale of the shock is such that it will impact a very large number of people.
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tens of millions of households need that support, so i think that's the right approach. the uk's opposition labour party welcomes the move, but has criticised the government's response to the crisis, saying it called for a windfall tax on oil companies months ago. the chancellor, the prime minister were resisting it, and saying that it would deter investment, that it was un—conservative, but it wouldn't raise enough money, but it would be silly to provide additional help. ukraine warns that russia's offensive in donbas could result in the region becoming uninhabited. a british health trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. it's been more than a0 years since abba's last tour, but they finally performed onstage again last night —
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in digital form as abba—tars. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. police in texas are facing criticism over their response to a mass shooting at a primary school which left 19 children and two teachers dead. witnesses say officers hestitated to confront the killer during the situation in uvalde. barbara plett usher reports. this is what the centre of town looks like two days after a massacre. a marker for every one of the 19 children and two of their teachers. some came from outside
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uvalde to show solidarity. there was even a brief visit by the duchess of sussex, meghan markle — she laid flowers at the cross for an eight—year—old boy. jackie would have turned ten next month, but she'd already found her own voice, her uncle said. jackie was the life of our family. she had just recently received her first communion. so she was on fire. she felt like a rock star. he says his brother argued with police on that day, demanding that they move faster to storm the school and stop the gunman. he wanted to go in there and charge this guy, but they wouldn't let him. "you guys going to do yourjob? do something! you know, you got 20 guys over there, standing, doing nothing. just get in there!" he goes, "you need to go back, scoot back." "no, we're not going to scoot back. you want to arrest us, arrest us, but we're not... we're not... you know, we're here. i'm not going to go anywhere until i see my baby!" the authorities defended their response to the shooting. they tried to provide answers, but many questions remain, a troubling undercurrent to a tragedy that is still unfolding. you got to understand, we're getting a lot of information
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we're trying to track down and see what is true — we want to vet it. with the latest news that the broken—hearted husband of a teacher who was killed had died of a heart attack, adding to the unimaginable pain here. there are so many bouquets now — we've seen those mounds of flowers grow throughout the day — and quite a few children here, as well. there is a memorial at the school, but this really feels like a safe space for the community to grieve and to remember. silva did not lose a loved one, but her world was shaken by those who did. we're part of the community and it's people that, one time or another, we have been together in a baseball game, and a football game, and a city event, and it'sjust children from our community and... we're here and i have the blessing to have my children with me, and these families don't. it is the hardest of the hard realities that have changed this town forever. barbara plett usher,
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bbc news, uvalde, texas. and we will be talking to another as our correspondence in uvalde in the next few minutes. in the uk, economists are warning that the treasury is likely to face further calls to help people pay their energy bills into next year — despite britain's chancellor rishi sunak unveiling a £15 billion support package. industry analysts are predicting that the price cap for england, scotland and wales will remain around £2,800 when it is re—calculated in april 2023. we'll hearfrom mr sunak in a moment — who says he does have the "tools" to help families. under the package of support all households, regardless of income, will receive a grant of £400 towards their energy bills. plans for loans have been abandoned. on top of that, those on the lowest incomes, around 8 million households, will receive a one—off payment of £650. and pensioner households,
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receiving the winter fuel allowance, will also receive an extra one—off payment of £300. people receiving disability benefits which are not means tested, will also receive an extra payment of £150. part of the cost will come from a temporary windfall tax of 25%, on the profits of energy companies — expected to raise £5 billion a year and which could last until 2025. labour said the chancellor had finally been forced to adopt its policy of a windfall tax, an idea that's also been backed by other opposition parties. andrew plant reports. under pressure to act, the government's support is a mix of universal payments and help targeted at the most vulnerable. we will send directly, to around eight million of the lowest—income households, a one—off cost—of—living payment of £650.
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the chancellor said they want to help those for whom the struggle is too hard, amid the cost—of—living crisis. under the new measures, all households in the uk will get £400 this october to help with energy bills. the poorest households will also get an additional payment of £650. there'll be a one—off disability cost—of—living payment of £150, and pensioners entitled to the winter fuel allowance will get £300. the government says, in total, the measures provide support worth £15 billion. direct debit and credit customers will have the money credited to their account, while customers with prepayment meters will have the money applied to their meter, or via a voucher. speaking to the bbc, rishi sunak said he wanted to provide support for all households. we know this is a squeeze on ordinary working families,
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and whilst i can't solve every problem — no government could — we want to show that we are on people's side and where we can try and ease the burden a bit, we will. but people in bristol had mixed reactions about whether it would make a difference to them. i heard you mention £400, but they reckon it's going to go up by £800, so £400 isjust not going to cut it. they do not target things properly, and that's what angers me. - i will see how much i will get, and if i'm 0k...i will put some of it into a savings pot. so where will the money come from? the chancellor says a tax on oil and gas firms who have benefited from globally high prices would raise around £5 billion. for the remaining 10 billion, that's still unclear. today it feels like the chancellor has finally realised the problems that the country are facing.
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a windfall tax was an idea they had previously rejected, but something labour had been calling for. they welcomed the u—turn, but said they were disappointed by how long it's taken. leading economists say the chancellor is doing a lot for those on the lowest incomes, but some worries remain. what about those families who are just above the means—tested benefit level? they might be quite peeved that people looking very much like them are getting a lot of money and they're not. the question now is, will this be the last time the chancellor has to intervene? andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. 0ur political correspondent nick eardley explained what had prompted rishi sunak to take action — described by some as "un—conservative".... there's been huge pressure on the chancellor to come up with a package. we've been asking for weeks if he was going to do it. the treasury said, yes,
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when we know more once we know what the autumn energy price cap is going to look like. we heard from the chancellor this morning that it was 0fgem's comments on tuesday in parliament when they said the price cap in the autumn is likely to go up by hundreds of pounds again that persuaded him he had to act now. listen to what the chancellor told bbc breakfast. i have always said we should be pragmatic about this. i think there is a strong argument to tax these profits fairly, given that energy companies are making extraordinary profits, as a result of prices that are elevated, in part due to pressure's invasion of ukraine, so there is an argument to tax profits fairly, but what we wanted to do is take the time to get it right so that we can to continue to incentivise investment, so the way that we are doing this is with a new, very generous investment relief, so that those companies that do invest more will pay less tax. that is an important thing, that is good for our country,
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if those companies are investing. it is good for our economy, good forjobs, and it is good for our energy security. we wanted to take the time to get it right. so, that's rishi sunak�*s argument, i think that the broad package, ben, has been welcomed, largely, by mps and by those who have been lobbying the treasury to do more, particularly the fact that a lot of the money is targeted at those households who are feeling the cost of living squeeze the most. the chancellor was saying this morning that it is progressive, three quarters of the cash that he is spending will go towards those who need it the most. what's less welcome to some tories, though, is the windfall tax. we know that some members of the cabinet are really uncomfortable. the business secretary, for example, kwasi kwarteng, doesn't like windfall taxes, he has told us in the past. he is worried that they will lead to some companies investing less in the uk. we saw bp, for example, saying last night that it is going to rethink
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what it does in the north sea because of this windfall tax. labour, though, are delighted that this has happened. they have been calling for something like this for the last few months. this morning we heard from the shadow chancellor rachel reeves. it's clear that labour are winning the battle of ideas because, as you say, charlie, this is something i've been calling for, keir starmer has been calling for, for months and months now. and at every stage, the treasury ministers, the chancellor, the prime minister were resisting it and saying it would deter investment, that it was un—conservative, that it wouldn't raise enough money, that it would be silly to provide additional help. and yesterday, we had a full iso—degree turn, which is very welcome because we all know that there are pensioners who are turning off their heating because they're worried about how they're going to pay the bills. you have got mums and dads skipping
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meals because they want to ensure that their children get three proper meals a day and you've got working families who thought they were doing all right, but are now worried about how they're going to pay for a new school uniform or any additional expenses. so it is welcome that the government has finally come to their senses and adopted labour's policy for a windfall tax to give help to people that need it. but i do have to ask, what on earth took them so long when it was blindingly obvious to everybody else that this was absolutely necessary? so that was labour. the message from the government this morning is that the economy will get through the current cost of living crisis, that the government has the tools to do things like bring inflation down. however, there is that question about how long energy prices are going to remain high, something that will continue well into next year. and the chancellor this morning has left open the door
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to another support package, potentially next year if these high prices continue. that does make some conservatives a bit uncomfortable because it will add more to the debt. there was an interesting moment when rishi sunak was talking to our colleagues on radio 4 this morning. he when told the today programme he was first and foremost a pragmatist who was looking at the current situation and reacting. a couple of minutes later, he also said he was first and foremost a fiscal conservative, and it sometimes feels at the moment like those two ideologies are conflicting with one another and rishi sunak is facing that battle between trying to keep taxes low and largely failing, and having to react to the cost of living crisis. nick eardley reporting. ijust want to bring you some comments we have had from borisjohnson, the prime minister, that what is going on in ukraine and the russian advances in
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east and in the donbas region in particular. borisjohnson says vladimir putin is making slow but palpable progress in the donbas region. i'm afraid that putin, at great cost to himself in the russian military, is continuing to chew through ground in donbas. he is continuing to make gradual slow, but palpable progress. therefore, it is vital that we keep supplying ukrainian militarily. that is what borisjohnson has been saying. ukraine's president, volodymyr zelensky, has said the eastern donbas region could become uninhabited as a result of russia's offensive aimed at capturing more territory there. in his latest online video, mr zelensky said moscow seemed intent on reducing cities to ashes. severodonetsk — which the russians are trying to encircle — is coming under heavy attack. 0ur correspondentjoe inwood is in kyiv with the latest. the mood music of these statements,
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both from the president and his advisers and regional politicians, really is changing. there is an understanding or even an acceptance that the towns like severodonetsk and lysychansk, two crucial cities in that part of the donbas, are really coming under pressure. we understand there is intense fighting on the outskirts of severodonetsk and in the last ten minutes, the russian forces have claimed they have taken a crucial village just outside slaviansk that they have been fighting over for a while. so the screws are being tightened on ukrainian forces in the region. we have heard about astonishing levels of aerial bombardment, artillery fire and missiles coming in. that is why president zelensky has used this phrase about trying to make the region uninhabitable, burning it to the ground. he even went further in his address, using the word genocide to describe what is happening in the donbas, to suggest that the russians are not only killing his people,
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but moving in their own. so a really grim assessment from the ukrainian president. we are also seeing that mr zelensky has been talking again about the food crisis because of the blockade of ukraine by sea. he says the world is now facing a globalfamine because of this? absolutely. it is notjust president zelensky who has said that. david beasley of the world food programme has said this is going to see a "hellscape" on earth, was his phrase from a couple of days ago, all because of that blockade of the black sea and the port of 0desa by the russians. liz truss, the british foreign secretary, accused the russians of holding the world's poor to ransom using their blockade. the problem is that you have got about 20 million tonnes of grain stuck in ukrainian warehouses, and that needs to get out. a lot of it does go to the world's poorest people.
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this is often described as the breadbasket of europe, but actually, it is the breadbasket of the developing world because large amounts of that grain are brought up by the world food because large amounts of that grain are bought up by the world food programme. 50% of the world food programme's grain comes from ukraine, now it is all stuck, 20 million tonnes are stuck in warehouses. they need to export 18 million tonnes by the end of the year. although some can get out by road and rail, it is really only via the black sea ports that they can get out in the quantities needed. so we are seeing the impacts of this war in europe being felt around the world and it really is going to get worse as more planting seasons are missed, as more grain isn't exported. the world's poorest people are going to feel the consequences of this invasion. 0n the 25th anniversary of nato—russia pact that ended 40 years of cold war our security correspondent frank gardner has been giving us the latest from the perspective of nato. despite the upbeat assessments we are given every day by the ukrainian ministry of defence and other analysts, the
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fact is that the russians are using overwhelming force of artillery and missile strikes and air strikes to encircle the ukrainian forces. they have been steadily taking village after village. most of these names are ones of places that you and i probably haven't heard of, but they are steadily encircling the ukrainian forces that have been defending there, moving towards their goal of taking over the whole of the donbas, the luhansk and donetsk regions. and russia will almost certainly annex them the way it has done with crimea, but it will be annexing a wasteland, as president zelensky has said. you can see the way this is going to go. the russians initially bit off far more than they could chew. they were beaten in the north and it was a stalemate in the south. they couldn't go any further than near kherson in the south. but they have now concentrated their forces on the eastern russian—speaking districts and they were probably then announce
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a ceasefire offer which will leave theirforces in place. and ukraine will say no, so it will drag on. frank, you were recently in the baltics, and they are among russia's neighbours who are fearful at the moment that they could be next? that's right, i was up at a security conference in tallinn and all the baltic states, latvia, lithuania, estonia and poland, are very concerned that if president putin prevails, if he succeeds in his aims in ukraine, essentially bringing that country to heel, as it were, and annexing parts of it, they worry that they could be next, not this year, but possibly the year after. and they're calling on nato ahead of the coming nato summit in madrid at the end ofjune, they're calling on nato to increase its reinforcements on the border. they are saying it's better to do this
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now, when the baltics are peaceful, than at a time of crisis when russian units are moving towards the border, because then you have a very tense trigger situation. nato has already increased its presence on those borders. britain has added a second battle group size to the battle group that it leads in estonia. and there are other reinforcements, but they are still short of air defence. let's be honest, the russian army is still, despite its losses in ukraine, it is so huge that if they chose to cross that border, any nato presence on the borders would simply be a trip wire to bring in america and then it would start to go global. so it is there as a deterrent. it is not going to defeat a big russian armoured thrust. it is there to say, "don't do this. "don't take on nato, because then you trigger article 5 and then it is the third world war".
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frank gardner, our security correspondent. more now on the shooting in texas, where it's emerged that the man who shot and killed 19 children and two teachers at a school in texas entered the building unhindered through an unlocked door. danya bacchus, cbs news correpondent is with us from uvalde. speak details are emerging of the death of the husband of irma garcia, one of the two teachers killed by the gunman. what can you tell us about that? joe garcia was here just yesterday morning, paying tribute to the growing memorial you see behind me. there are 21 crosses for the 19 children and two teachers who lost their lives. it has now grown with flowers. he was here yesterday morning and then we got word yesterday afternoon that he passed away, apparently suffered from a heart attack. family members sayjoe
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garcia and irma garcia were high school sweethearts. they were married for 25 years, and he losing his wife was too much to bear. he died of a broken heart. the two left behind four children, so in a matter of days, those children lost their mother and father.— of days, those children lost their mother and father. also, accusations and more evidence _ mother and father. also, accusations and more evidence emerging - mother and father. also, accusations and more evidence emerging that. mother and father. also, accusations | and more evidence emerging that the police were pretty slow in handling this whole situation in going into the school to stop the attacker? that's right. here in uvalde, there is of course grief and now on top of that grief, there is growing anger and criticism about law enforcement�*s response to the shooting. we have even seen videos from people who were waiting in the parking lot. as soon as they heard about the shooting and their children, they came to the school. some of them said they could hear the gunshots while they were in the
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parking lot and they felt that law enforcement took too long to go inside the school. we do know, based on a spokesperson from the texas department of public safety, they said the gunmen did walk through the school through an unlocked door, was inside for more than an hour before a tactical team was able to get inside the building and kill him. finally, of course the school shooting has yet again highlighted the whole issue of gun control in the whole issue of gun control in the united states. what is the latest on that?— the united states. what is the latest on that? ., , latest on that? right now, the big thin we latest on that? right now, the big thing we are _ latest on that? right now, the big thing we are focusing _ latest on that? right now, the big thing we are focusing on - latest on that? right now, the big thing we are focusing on is - latest on that? right now, the big thing we are focusing on is that i thing we are focusing on is that this weekend, there is going to be an nra convention. the nra is a gun lobby in the united states. it is a gun rights group that is pretty large. this convention is supposed to take place in texas. the governor of texas was supposed to speak. he has now pulled out of a speaking engagement and is going to send a pre—recorded message instead. there
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are republican texas lawmakers who are republican texas lawmakers who are expected to attend. former president donald trump is expected to be in attendance. but we are also hearing that there are going to be some protesters who are going to be there. of course, many of those people say it is time for us in the united states to enact some new gun laws and tougher restrictions on people being able to purchase guns. danya bacchus, cbs news correspondent in uvalde. i'm joined now by mick north, a british gun control advocate whose five—year—old daughter sophie was a victim of the dunblane primary what are your thoughts after yet another school shooting in the united states? do you think gun control laws will ever be changed in the us to reduce the sheer volume of weapons there are in that country?
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after so little action after so many tragedies, it's hard to be optimistic about significant changes to gun laws in the united states. there was a time shortly after dunblane when i thought that if americans saw what was achieved in britain after dunblane, a ban on handguns, they would rush to introduce new legislation and tighten their own gun laws. but in many ways, the reverse has happened. it appears that in a lot of states, the gun laws have simply become more and more lax. it's very difficult to see how they will go about changing things, even after yet another shooting in a school. it things, even after yet another shooting in a school.- things, even after yet another shooting in a school. it has become so ideological— shooting in a school. it has become so ideological in _ shooting in a school. it has become
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so ideological in the _ shooting in a school. it has become so ideological in the united - shooting in a school. it has become so ideological in the united states, | so ideological in the united states, theissue so ideological in the united states, the issue of gun control, as a political battleground. it the issue of gun control, as a political battleground.- political battleground. it has become very _ political battleground. it has become very political- political battleground. it has become very political and i political battleground. it 1:3 become very political and polarised. 0ver become very political and polarised. over the last 20 years, it appears that very few people, or certainly very few in positions of power, are able to look objectively at the cause of this horrendous carnage of gun violence in america, tens of thousands of people losing their lives every year. if they could only compare themselves and look at what happens in countries like the uk, canada, australia, have tighter gun laws and much lower levels of gun violence, they would know that the way forward is to restrict access to guns and not keep making it easier to have them. figs
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guns and not keep making it easier to have them. $5 i guns and not keep making it easier to have them-— to have them. as i said in the introduction, _ to have them. as i said in the introduction, your— to have them. as i said in the introduction, your daughter i to have them. as i said in the i introduction, your daughter was to have them. as i said in the - introduction, your daughter was a victim of the dunblane school massacre. in terms of gun laws in the uk, are you satisfied that they are as strict as they could be, or would you like to see them further tightened? i would you like to see them further tiahtened? ~ , tightened? i think there is never room for complacency. - tightened? i think there is never room for complacency. we - tightened? i think there is never room for complacency. we in . tightened? i think there is never| room for complacency. we in our network are still trying to make sure there are no loopholes. 0ne network are still trying to make sure there are no loopholes. one of our aims sure there are no loopholes. one of ouraims since the sure there are no loopholes. one of our aims since the handgun ban was introduced was to make sure it was never reversed, that there was no chipping away of that. we know it because of the in august that there are circumstances in which some people are still able to get guns when they should never have them. there should be ways of dealing with that. but in general, over the last
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25 years, britain has moved in the right direction and made public safety a top priority and not allowed our gun laws to be dictated by a small minority who enjoy shooting. by a small minority who en'oy shootinu. , , ., by a small minority who en'oy shootin. , , ., ., , by a small minority who en'oy shootin. , , ., ., ~ , shooting. dunblane was, thankfully, a rari in shooting. dunblane was, thankfully, a rarity in terms _ shooting. dunblane was, thankfully, a rarity in terms of _ shooting. dunblane was, thankfully, a rarity in terms of school _ a rarity in terms of school shootings in the uk, incredibly rare. but in the united states, it has become a pattern, hasn't it? they seem to happen very regularly. what goes through your mind when you see these horrific events in the united states? i see these horrific events in the united states?— see these horrific events in the united states? ., ., , , ~ united states? i am always shocked, but never surprised. _ united states? i am always shocked, but never surprised. as _ united states? i am always shocked, but never surprised. as i _ united states? i am always shocked, but never surprised. as i say, - united states? i am always shocked, but never surprised. as i say, they i but never surprised. as i say, they have never done a significant amount to change things. after each one, there was a lot of talk and prayers and tears. but with a few weeks
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passing, they move on. the attempts that were made, for example, byjoe biden when he was vice—president, along with president 0bama after the sandy cook massacre in 2012, were just blocked by politicians in congress. and until many on the republican side particularly, change their attitude towards guns and reject the money they take from organisations like the nra, there is little way forward for the americans. i am worried that a so—called caring nation doesn't care enough. this is a major cause of death. in fact, enough. this is a major cause of death. infact, it enough. this is a major cause of death. in fact, it is the major cause of death amongst under 20s, gun violence.
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thank you forjoining us. nick knowles, a british gun control advocate who five—year—old daughter sophie was a victim of the dunblane massacre. —— mick north. six soldiers and a veteran have been arrested on suspicion of drugs and money laundering offences. the ministry of defence says they were detained across the uk during a planned operation by the royal military police. let's get more on this from our correspondent, sean dilley. tell us more. the store is developing _ tell us more. the store is developing and _ tell us more. the store is developing and we - tell us more. the store is developing and we know. tell us more. the store is| developing and we know a tell us more. the store is - developing and we know a bit more tell us more. the store is _ developing and we know a bit more at this stage, having spoken to defence sources, we understand that around 6:30am on wednesday at the barracks in aldershot, the royal military police carried out searches and at the same time roughly in winter, another property had a visit, not just from the rmp but they were supported as it other parts of the uk by local police forces. later and across the day, north wales and
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northern ireland also saw houses searched. we know that the ranks of those involved within the irish guards, the six serving soldiers as opposed to the veteran who was a member of the coldstream guards, we know they range from the rank of guardsman through to sergeant. this is going to be very scrutinised. these are only allegations but they will be scrutinised because the irish guards are due to lead the trooping the colourfor irish guards are due to lead the trooping the colour for the queen's jubilee celebrations on thursday although the ministry of defence say anyone involved in this investigation is not going to be involved. they say the army will not tolerate fraudulent or illegal activity but it would not be appropriate to comment while the investigation continues.— appropriate to comment while the investigation continues. thank you for “oininu investigation continues. thank you forjoining us- _ this month brings an end to coventry�*s title as the uk's city of culture, after hosting a year long festival of events. today we're at the reel store — the uk's first permanent immersive gallery — where our corrrespondent trish adudu has been keeping
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across what the city has to offer. and a warning — she's in an environment that may have some flashing images. good to speak to you again, ben. yes, for any city of culture, the big question is, what is going to be the last event? coventry has had a great year but it has to leave a legacy. don'tjudge a basement by its cover because i am here in the basement of the old coventry evening telegraph, in the reel store, which is called that because it is where all the printing happened when the papers would get to all the coventry residents but take a look, forget the grey wall and take a look at theirs. this is incredible. martin, theirs. this is incredible. martin, the chief executive of city of culture, this space isjust the chief executive of city of culture, this space is just so unique, tell us about it. it is amazing. — unique, tell us about it. it is amazing, isn't _ unique, tell us about it. it is amazing, isn't it? _ unique, tell us about it. it is amazing, isn't it? we - unique, tell us about it. it is amazing, isn't it? we have l unique, tell us about it. it 3 amazing, isn't it? we have converted the basement into this extraordinary new digital art gallery, taking paper to pixels, new media in an old
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space. we paper to pixels, new media in an old sace. ~ ~ ., ., , space. we know digital is so important — space. we know digital is so important and _ space. we know digital is so important and like - space. we know digital is so important and like you - space. we know digital is so important and like you say, | space. we know digital is so - important and like you say, from print to digital, isn't this the future, we are told? absolutely, we reckon this — future, we are told? absolutely, we reckon this is _ future, we are told? absolutely, we reckon this is an _ future, we are told? absolutely, we reckon this is an exciting _ future, we are told? absolutely, we reckon this is an exciting new- future, we are told? absolutely, we reckon this is an exciting new art . reckon this is an exciting new art form and we are excited to premiere it in coventry at the end of the city of culture year. teiiii it in coventry at the end of the city of culture year.— it in coventry at the end of the city of culture year. tell us about the exhibition, _ city of culture year. tell us about the exhibition, because _ city of culture year. tell us about the exhibition, because this - city of culture year. tell us about the exhibition, because this will i the exhibition, because this will last until the autumn but there will be other exhibitions, who is this buy? be other exhibitions, who is this bu ? , , , , be other exhibitions, who is this bu ? , , ,, ., be other exhibitions, who is this bu? , ., ., be other exhibitions, who is this bu? .,., buy? this is by an amazing turkish american artist _ buy? this is by an amazing turkish american artist who _ buy? this is by an amazing turkish american artist who is _ buy? this is by an amazing turkish american artist who is basically - buy? this is by an amazing turkish | american artist who is basically the superstar in this world so we are so proud he has collaborated with us on the opening exhibition. what you are seeing are 2 million images sourced from nasa, so it is a sense of space and i'm not going to pretend i know how the technology works. it is extraordinary artificial intelligence and obviously it is a wonderful machine which comes up with extraordinary imagery so it is really one. what i hear there are 14 different lasers that are picturing all this on this incredible canvas. a lot of work has gone into it and like you say, this will be a permanent space.- like you say, this will be a permanent space. like you say, this will be a ermanent sace. ., , permanent space. that is right, we will start with — permanent space. that is right, we will start with this _ permanent space. that is right, we will start with this exhibition - permanent space. that is right, we will start with this exhibition and i will start with this exhibition and we will follow up with some more
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global exhibitions but ultimately, we want to support local, regional and uk artist to create amazing work for their space in the future so this is the beginning of something very exciting for the city. fits this is the beginning of something very exciting for the city.- very exciting for the city. as chief executive. _ very exciting for the city. as chief executive. it _ very exciting for the city. as chief executive, it has _ very exciting for the city. as chief executive, it has probably - very exciting for the city. as chief executive, it has probably been l very exciting for the city. as chief executive, it has probably been a j executive, it has probably been a very stressful time doing city of culture in the middle of the pandemic. what has it been like for you personally? it pandemic. what has it been like for you personally?— you personally? it has been challenging _ you personally? it has been challenging but _ you personally? it has been challenging but my - you personally? it has been i challenging but my goodness, you personally? it has been - challenging but my goodness, i'm so glad the city had this opportunity. 0ther glad the city had this opportunity. other cities around the country have really struggled with the visitor economy and the cultural sector has had a really terrible time so we have had an opportunity to recover may be faster than other cities and the artists and communities have really come out and show their best this year and we are really excited to see what is coming next. qm. this year and we are really excited to see what is coming next. 0k, and of course. — to see what is coming next. 0k, and of course. the _ to see what is coming next. 0k, and of course, the new— to see what is coming next. 0k, and of course, the new city _ to see what is coming next. 0k, and of course, the new city of _ to see what is coming next. 0k, and of course, the new city of culture i of course, the new city of culture is announced next week, any tips as to who will get the next ten year? it is going to be one of four, isn't it? that is as much as i know. you know all the _ it? that is as much as i know. you know all the insider _ it? that is as much as i know. you know all the insider stuff. he knows, i'm sure! , what is next? i
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knows, i'm sure! ,what is next? i am staying in city, i am knows, i'm sure! ,what is next? i am staying in city, lam here knows, i'm sure! ,what is next? i am staying in city, i am here to see the start of the legacy piece, it is really important we start a ten year change programme in the city, when the city gets to be city of culture, myself and some of the timor—leste to see us into the next stage. i hear that you have a really, truly immersive experience, you have to have the music so cue the music, quick, take a look! dramatic music. that's amazing! wow! you could have your own show. that is definitely an immersive experience. it looks pretty immersive, anyway. it is wonderful! _ pretty immersive, anyway. it is wonderful! come _ pretty immersive, anyway. it 3 wonderful! come and join us! come to coventry! we wonderful! come and 'oin us! come to covent ! ~ ., ., ., wonderful! come and 'oin us! come to covent l~ ., ., ., , wonderful! come and 'oin us! come to covent l~ ., ., �* coventry! we would love to but i'm afraid we have _ coventry! we would love to but i'm afraid we have got _ coventry! we would love to but i'm afraid we have got some _ coventry! we would love to but i'm afraid we have got some more i coventry! we would love to but i'm| afraid we have got some more news coventry! we would love to but i'm i afraid we have got some more news to bring people. maybe next time! thank you forjoining us.
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you're watching bbc news. health workers in lebanon have launched the start of a two—day strike yesterday over banking restrictions which have severely impacted their ability to function. the union of private hospital owners in beirut and the north said that health centres participating in the strike would only allow emergency cases and dialysis patients. workers have staged a protest outside the central bank in beirut�*s hamra district. in spain, the lower house of parliament has passed a bill that would make it easierfor rape victims to prosecute their attackers. also known as the "only yes means yes" bill, it still needs to be approved by the senate, and comes as spain's lawmakers have approved a raft of measures in defence of women's rights. the bbc�*s azadeh moshiri has this report. the wolfpack case, the crime that shocked spain, and saw both women and men pour out onto the streets in anger for years to come.
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when pamplona celebrated its famed running of the bulls event, it was anything but festive. an 18—year—old woman was gang raped by five men. but a spanish court ruled they were only guilty of sexual abuse, and sentenced them to nine years injail. why? because the court ruled neither violence nor intimidation had been used, and central to the case was the fact the defendant had not said no while they raped her. after sustained pressure from the public and politicians, the supreme court convicted the men for rape and increased their sentence. next time, it won't be so hard, say spain's legislators. thanks to a new law, victims will no longer have to prove they suffered violence or intimidation. it is all about consent and whether they said yes. translation: the feminist movement
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makes history again. _ we owed it to each of the victims. we owed it to ourselves. and most likely it will be one of the most important rights that we can leave to our daughters for the present and future. 0nly yes is yes, and long live the women's fight. the far—right party vox disagrees, arguing it is too difficult to prove consent and that the law could become a tool for revenge. it still needs to be approved by the senate, but for the thousands who took to the streets, this ruling is far overdue. azadeh moshiri, bbc news. the care quality commission has told nottingham university hospitals nhs trust it must make "significant and immediate improvements" to its maternity services over concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to mothers and babies to make immediate improvements. the health care regulator also commented on serious staffing and cultural problems.
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the trust says it's working hard to make improvements. joining me now is senior midwife donna 0ckenden, who also led an inquiry into maternity failings in shropshire. she is to chair a review of services in nottingham. thank you forjoining us. the cqc have issued a safety warning this morning to the nottingham trust. what does that mean exactly? explain to parents and people who use the services there what this means. 50 services there what this means. so ou services there what this means. sr you will services there what this means. 5r you will know that i was only appointed as chair yesterday so i don't yet have detailed information about the trust. but clearly, there are really serious concerns that need very urgent action and the trust will be fully aware of that from the detailed cqc report. i think that families now need to feel that they are listened to, that their concerns have been heard and
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that change is going to happen and is going to happen quickly. but what i think i also need to say to you is that in the trust, there will be hundreds of midwives, obstetricians, neonatologist, who are giving their all to the local population to provide safe and compassionate care and i think we must remember that. but should parents be worried? i suppose that is the question. so but should parents be worried? i suppose that is the question. 50 i suppose that is the question. so i think the way _ suppose that is the question. 5r i think the way that i would look at it is clearly, nottingham now is in very sharp focus. the trust have a very sharp focus. the trust have a very clear plan that they must work towards. families who are concerned should feel able to speak out. in my 30 odd years, you know, in and around maternity services, i have never seen maternity services to be so high profile, at the top of everyone �*s agenda, so families should feel that if they speak out, they have concerns, they will be listened to. fits
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they have concerns, they will be listened to-_ they have concerns, they will be listened to. as i mentioned, you lead the inquiry _ listened to. as i mentioned, you lead the inquiry into _ listened to. as i mentioned, you lead the inquiry into maternity i lead the inquiry into maternity failings in shropshire and you are going to build on that experience, presumably, with this inquiry? 50. presumably, with this inquiry? so, es, it presumably, with this inquiry? so, yes. it was — presumably, with this inquiry? so, yes. it was an _ presumably, with this inquiry? 5c, yes, it was an honour presumably, with this inquiry? 5ti, yes, it was an honour and presumably, with this inquiry? 5tr, yes, it was an honour and privilege to lead maternity service review in shropshire with my independent review team. my team are made up of midwives and doctors from across england, from leeds to plymouth, and i have not had time to talk to them properly yet but clearly, many of them will be joining properly yet but clearly, many of them will bejoining me on this review team. them will be 'oining me on this review team.— them will be “oining me on this review team. ., ., , ., ., review team. how long is it going to take, do review team. how long is it going to take. do you — review team. how long is it going to take, do you think? _ review team. how long is it going to take, do you think? i _ review team. how long is it going to take, do you think? i don't - review team. how long is it going to take, do you think? i don't know i take, do you think? i don't know et. i take, do you think? i don't know yet- i think _ take, do you think? i don't know yet. i think there _ take, do you think? i don't know yet. i think there needs - take, do you think? i don't know yet. i think there needs to i take, do you think? i don't know yet. i think there needs to be i take, do you think? i don't know yet. i think there needs to be a i yet. i think there needs to be a balance between getting timely results. i think that there needs to be an emphasis on learning in the here and now, so that if we find issues of concern, we immediately alert the trust to that so that learning can occur. but at the same time, there needs to be that balance that the piece of work needs to be
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done well. so those are the two things i have got in mind as i take on, as! things i have got in mind as i take on, as i am honoured to take on this huge responsibility. in on, as i am honoured to take on this huge responsibility.— huge responsibility. in terms of this country _ huge responsibility. in terms of this country as _ huge responsibility. in terms of this country as a _ huge responsibility. in terms of this country as a place - huge responsibility. in terms of this country as a place to i huge responsibility. in terms of this country as a place to have l huge responsibility. in terms of| this country as a place to have a baby, i think it is fair to say it is one of the safest places in the world to have a baby but parents will have concerns after what we saw in shropshire, and the very fact that you are running another investigation now into maternity services. ., ., , services. you are absolutely right, the uk is one _ services. you are absolutely right, the uk is one of— services. you are absolutely right, the uk is one of the _ services. you are absolutely right, the uk is one of the safest - services. you are absolutely right, the uk is one of the safest places| the uk is one of the safest places in the world to have a baby and women and families should feel confident about that. i think that our clinicians, our midwives and obstetricians, anaesthetists, everyone on the ground who are a part of the maternity team are ever better at spotting concerns, at realising when things are not going well and acting rapidly. women should feel confident that if they have got concerns, they will be listened to, and we should remember that the uk is one of the safest places in the world to have a baby.
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it is a stressful time for the parents involved in nottingham, i supposed but it is also quite a stressful time for the staff who are going to be under the spotlight, under your spotlight, now. yes. under your spotlight, now. yes, absolutely _ under your spotlight, now. yes, absolutely but _ under your spotlight, now. yes, absolutely but what _ under your spotlight, now. yes, absolutely but what i _ under your spotlight, now. yes, absolutely but what i would i underyour spotlight, now. 1a: absolutely but what i would say, first of all, to the parents, they has been incredibly brave, having suffered grief that for most of us would be absolutely unimaginable that you know, they kept campaigning to ensure that this review took place. they deserve full credit for that. in terms of the staff, what i would say to them is, my team are made up, i call them ordinary doctors and midwives or the ground but they are not ordinary at all, i think they are brilliant. so we will listen. we want to engage with staff on the ground in nottingham trust and i hope that i will get that invitation to meet with those staff as soon as possible. at]!!! invitation to meet with those staff as soon as possible.— as soon as possible. all right, donna 0ckenden, _ as soon as possible. all right, donna 0ckenden, good i as soon as possible. all right, donna 0ckenden, good luck. as soon as possible. all right, i donna 0ckenden, good luck with
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as soon as possible. all right, - donna 0ckenden, good luck with your work and thank you so much for taking the time to talk to us. thank ou. last week, the footballer jake daniels became the first active professional in the uk men's game for more than 30 years to announce he was gay. the blackpool striker said he had been inspired to speak out by another young player in australia — josh cavallo — who came out last year. the bbc�*s shaimaa khalil went to meetjosh and heard the advice he's been giving to jake. i was emotionally quite sad, but on the outside i looked happy and i wanted to change that and i couldn't be authentic. something was holding me back, and that was my truth. eight months ago, josh cavallo made an announcement that changed his life, and had a ripple effect around the world. there's something personal that i need to share with everyone. i'm a footballer, and i'm gay. what was the... what was the turning point for you that you said to yourself, "do you know what? i'm going to come out. i'm going to speak my truth"? it's exhausting. you know, iwas... i went through all my youth career
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and i started my professional career in the closet. and that's acting 24/7. you know, that's when i'm at training, acting like someone i'm not. having exhausting conversations of making up lies of who you're hanging out with or you've got a girlfriend, you haven't got a girlfriend or "what are you doing on the weekend?" it's constant lies, and the pressure of also being a professional footballer on top of that — it's really... it's really bad. last week, jake daniels became the first british professional male footballer to come out in more than 30 years. josh was his inspiration. to know that i've influenced someone in such a small space of time, it's phenomenal to see. i'm just really excited that, through my story, it's changing lives. have you spoken to him? how is he doing? yeah, i speak to him quite frequently now. he's very excited and everything's still new for him. and i can have someone i can talk to now and relate — and we just get each other because we went through the same story, just in different countries. what was your advice to him, your main advice to him? it is a work in progress and it's
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not always going to be happy days. there's going to be days that are quite gloomy, as well, but he's prepared for that. my main advice for him is to embrace who you are and just to enjoy it. and, mate, you've opened a new chapter. this is your new life, so go out there and live it! singing. the adelaide united fans have embraced josh's courage. he's been overwhelmed by the response. no—one blinked, if you want to put it as simply as that, but we were full of love and support for him. it's something that, like, i you feel that shouldn't need to happen in this day and age, but it has so much power- behind it when it happens. like, it's not the older players, j it's not someone middle—aged, it's someone that's fresh into life i and they're so comfortable coming out with it, so it's pretty cool. since coming out, he tells me he's become more confident on the pitch, but it hasn't all been easy. there is games where i have been booed before or have heard something that's quite homophobic and does hurt me. but, look, at the end of the day, i put that aside and i remember, for one bad person i have, i have 1,000 good people. you said that other athletes,
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other players are living in silence. and i'm wondering, after you came out, did any of them reach out to you and ask you for help? yeah. definitely. in all sports around the world — whether it's from water polo to track—and—field sports, to football, to afl in australia — a lot of athletes have reached out to me. and everyone's at different stages and journeys in their life — you know, some people are ready to come out and some people just want to ask questions and, you know, i want the kids that are growing up now, that are in primary school, high school, and identifying themselves as gay, not to turn away from the sport, because i would hate to hear that the next messi or ronaldo is gay and turns away from football. i'm really excited to go overseas and this is the first... it's been an extraordinary time for the 22—year—old. he's just wrapped up the season here, and he tells me about his ambitions for the future. my dream is to go and play in the uk, in england, and that's something that i've been training for for my whole life. so if the opportunity comes up, you know, i would love to head to the championship or a league 1
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team and to show the uk what i've got — this aussie battler over here! geetanjali shree has become the first indian writer to win the international booker prize. her novel tomb of sand, a family saga set in the shadow of the partition of india, follows an 80—year—old woman after the death of her husband. it was the first hindi—language book to be shortlisted for the £50,000 prize. we can now speak to the winner, geetanjali shree is with us. many, many congratulations, what an achievement. what was your reaction when you had heard you had one. —— you heard that you had won? i was completely — you heard that you had won? i was completely stupefied _ you heard that you had won? i was completely stupefied and - you heard that you had won? i was completely stupefied and i - you heard that you had won? i —" completely stupefied and i thought that maybe i had heard wrong but of course i had not. it was absolutely wonderful. it is still sinking in. i bet it is. well, many, many
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congratulations, a fantastic achievement and for people who have not read the book, just give us a very brief synopsis of what it is about and may be why it is important, why you feel it is important? it important, why you feel it is important?— important, why you feel it is imortant? , , ' . important? it is extremely difficult to tive a important? it is extremely difficult to give a synopsis _ important? it is extremely difficult to give a synopsis of— important? it is extremely difficult to give a synopsis of a _ important? it is extremely difficult to give a synopsis of a book i important? it is extremely difficult to give a synopsis of a book that i to give a synopsis of a book that size, but... ithink to give a synopsis of a book that size, but... i think it is a book which, where the main protagonist looks from the outside, she looks like a very ordinary family person, an elderly person, in an indian joint family, butjust an elderly person, in an indian joint family, but just as an elderly person, in an indian joint family, butjust as all of us have many, many persons in one, she is also, you know, made up of many different identities and many different identities and many different things that have happened in life, ordinary and extraordinary, and those are the stories that come together and, you know, they bring in their wake stories about
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partition and stories about the family, and stories about the partition of many different kinds, notjust partition of many different kinds, not just the two partition of many different kinds, notjust the two countries, india and pakistan, that they become, but also partitions of many other kinds like between the young and the old, partition between gender and so on and so forth. so itjust brings together many different stories through the evolution of this main protagonist character. and i think the important thing about the book is the pluralistic nature of the world that she inhabits and that is something i think a lot of us really believe in, live by, swear by and are feeling, that it is now perhaps
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endangered. find are feeling, that it is now perhaps endangered-— are feeling, that it is now perhaps endantered. . , ., endangered. and the 'udges have said that the book _ endangered. and the 'udges have said that the book is i endangered. and the judges have said that the book is engaging _ endangered. and the judges have said that the book is engaging and - endangered. and the judges have said that the book is engaging and funny i that the book is engaging and funny and utterly original and at the same time, it is urgent and timely because it is a protest against the destructive impact of borders and boundaries, whether that is between religions, countries, or genders. is that how you see it?— that how you see it? yes, absolutely, _ that how you see it? yes, absolutely, certainly. iti that how you see it? yes, | absolutely, certainly. it is, that how you see it? yes, i absolutely, certainly. it is, well, i think it is often quite hilarious, and i think that makes it all the more poignant, saying serious things absolutely seriously is perhaps not the best way of focusing on them and in this sort of light way of delivering them, actually, the heaviness and seriousness of a lot of those things comes to the fore much better. so i do think that
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works and i like what the jury said about the book! i works and i like what the “my said about the book!i works and i like what the “my said about the book! i think this is your third book, — about the book! i think this is your third book, is _ about the book! i think this is your third book, is that _ about the book! i think this is your third book, is that right? - about the book! i think this is your third book, is that right? what i about the book! i think this is your third book, is that right? what arei third book, is that right? what are your plans after this incredible achievement? it your plans after this incredible achievement?— your plans after this incredible achievement? , , ,., ., ~' achievement? it is my fifth book. i'm so achievement? it is my fifth book. i'm so sorry! _ achievement? it is my fifth book. i'm so sorry! that's _ achievement? it is my fifth book. i'm so sorry! that's fine, - achievement? it is my fifth book. i'm so sorry! that's fine, this i achievement? it is my fifth book. i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is i i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is m fifth i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is my fifth novel _ i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is my fifth novel and _ i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is my fifth novel and i _ i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is my fifth novel and i am - i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is| my fifth novel and i am working i'm so sorry! that's fine, this is i my fifth novel and i am working on another one. i have it more or less ready but one of my writer friends says that after it is ready, you can tinker with it for some more time so i am still tinkering with it and one of these days i hope to give it to the publisher. find of these days i hope to give it to the publisher.— of these days i hope to give it to the tublisher. . , ., , the publisher. and in terms of being an international _ the publisher. and in terms of being an international book _ the publisher. and in terms of being an international book that _ the publisher. and in terms of being an international book that was i an international book that was translated into english, i mean, thatis translated into english, i mean, that is a great achievement as well, isn't it, to get their message of the book and the essence of the book across in another language? yes. across in another language? yes, absolutely- _ across in another language? yes, absolutely- i— across in another language? yes, absolutely. i think _ across in another language? yes, absolutely. i think it _ across in another language? yes, absolutely. i think it was - across in another language? yes, absolutely. i think it was a - across in another language? is: absolutely. i think it was a huge achievement, which, you know, came into my life because of the wonderful translator that i got,
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daisy rockwell. so certainly, the book saw a new world, it could enter a new world and another cultural mill you —— another cultural milieu so it is absolutely wonderful. and the message it is giving is that there is also literature sitting in areas which have not been seen before and it is worthwhile going in search of that literature because i certainly, there are going to be riches there.— certainly, there are going to be riches there. fantastic to talk to ou, riches there. fantastic to talk to you. geetanjali _ riches there. fantastic to talk to you, geetanjali shree, - riches there. fantastic to talk to you, geetanjali shree, thank- riches there. fantastic to talk to | you, geetanjali shree, thank you very much and many congratulations on winning the international booker prize for tomb of sand. on winning the international booker prize for tomb of sand.— on winning the international booker prize for tomb of sand. thank you so much. one of the founding members of the electronic pop band depeche mode, andrew fletcher,
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has died at the age of 60. they had a string of hits in the 1980s — including just can't get enough and new life. in a statement the band said they were "shocked and filled with overwhelming sadness" with the loss of their "dear friend, family member, and bandmate". # ijust # i just can't # ijust can't get enough # ijust can't get enough lyric # ijust can't get enough lyric lamp # ijust can't get enough lyric lamp lyric lamp # wees slip and slide as we fall in love # and i just love # and ijust can't seem to get enough of you... scientists in chile believe they may have found the worlds oldest tree. known as rhe great—grandfather, the patagian cypress could be more than 5,000 years old with a four metre thick trunk — beating the current record holder by around 600 years.
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you're watching bbc news. hello. a lot sunnier out there across the southern half of the country compared with yesterday and it is pretty strong sunshine at that. whilst we will see some sunshine further north, still the chance of a few showers coming through on quite a brisk wind today. that split in the weather is because we have high pressure trying to build in from the south and west, keeping things dry, but on the edge of it, parts of scotland, especially, this is where the breeze coming down from the north—west makes it feel rather chilly. frequent showers in the north and west too, maybe the odd heavy one as well. the odd shower in northern ireland and northern england, maybe as far south as the peak district and snowdonia but actually, many, in fact most, will stay dry. the further south you are, the bluer the skies will be. temperatures lifting up to around 21 or 22 celsius. that extra bit of sunshine today though is adding to increases in pollen levels across england and wales and it is worth noting that uv levels will be especially
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strong across parts of central and southern england and wales today, too. we finish the day on a fine note for many. still showers going across northern scotland, they will become fewer in number. 0vernight, one or two could drift and clip the eastern coast of england but most will have a dry night with clear skies and it will be a fresher night than in the past few nights, temperatures in rural areas away from towns and cities could get down to around four or five. into the weekend, we start on a sunny note but it will gradually turn cooler and the chance of showers returning a bit more widely as we go into sunday. let's start with saturday first of all, though, because plenty of sunshine to begin with. there will be a bit more cloud down eastern districts of england, north—east scotland, an isolated chance of a shower here. but most places will be dry. a bit of cloud building up but some good, long sunny spells for many. sheltered from the breeze, 18 degrees in south—west scotland, so warmer than today, 18, 19, may be 20 in south—west england and south wales. that is that, though, the milder air gets pushed out of the way,
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high pressure moves off towards iceland and we have more of a polar influence as we go into sunday. those winds coming down from the north or north—east and a drop in temperature brings a lot more cloud with it as well and a scattering of showers. some will stay dry through the day, especially the further west you are, but in that breeze, it will feel distinctly chilly, in northern and eastern scotland and eastern england. elsewhere, temperatures down relative to saturday. if you are off to radio 1's big weekend, which gets under way later today, sunday is looking the cooler day of the weekend and cloudy as well but before we get there, plenty of dry and sunny weather, too. take care.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling and these are the latest headlines. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. we've erred on the side of making it universal because i think the scale of the shock is such that it will impact a very large number of people. tens of millions of households need that support, so i think that's the right approach. labour welcomes the move but criticises the government's response to the crisis saying it called for a windfall tax on oil companies months ago. the chancellor, the prime minister were resisting it, and saying that it would deter investment, that it was un—conservative, but it wouldn't raise enough money, but it would be silly to provide additional help.
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a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. families now need to feel that they are listened to, that their concerns have been heard and that change is going to happen and is going to happen quickly. going to happen and is going to happen quickly. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting, as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. and it emerges that the husband of one of the teachers killed by the attacker in texas, died of a heart attack shortly after dropping off flowers at her memorial. ukraine warns that russia's offensive in donbas could result in the region becoming uninhabited. it's been more than 40 years since abba's last tour, but they finally performed
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onstage again last night — in digital form as abba—tars. economists are warning that the treasury is likely to face further calls to help people pay their energy bills into next year — despite the chancellor unveiling a 15 billion pound support package. industry analysts are predicting that the price cap for england, scotland and wales will remain around 2000 eight hundred pounds when it is re—calculated in april 2023. we'll hear from the chancellor in a moment — who says the treasury does have the "tools" to help families. under the package of support all households, regardless of income, will receive a grant of £400 towards their energy bills. plans for loans have been abandoned.
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on top of that, those on the lowest incomes, around 8 million households, will receive a one—off payment of £650. and pensioner households, receiving the winter fuel allowance, will also receive an extra one—off payment of £300. people receiving disability benefits which are not means tested, will also receive an extra payment of £150. part of the cost will come from a temporary windfall tax of 25 %, on the profits of energy companies — expected to raise £5 billion a year and which could last until 2025. labour said the chancellor had finally been forced to adopt its policy of a windfall tax, an idea that's also been backed by other opposition parties. andrew plant reports. under pressure to act, the government's support is a mix of universal payments and help targeted at the most vulnerable. we will send directly, to around eight million
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of the lowest—income households, a one—off cost—of—living payment of £650. the chancellor said they want to help those for whom the struggle is too hard, amid the cost—of—living crisis. under the new measures, all households in the uk will get £400 this october to help with energy bills. the poorest households will also get an additional payment of £650. there'll be a one—off disability cost—of—living payment of £150, and pensioners entitled to the winter fuel allowance will get £300. the government says, in total, the measures provide support worth £15 billion. direct debit and credit customers will have the money credited to their account, while customers with prepayment meters will have the money applied to their meter, or via a voucher. speaking to the bbc, rishi sunak
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said he wanted to provide support for all households. we know this is a squeeze on ordinary working families, and whilst i can't solve every problem — no government could — we want to show that we are on people's side and where we can try and ease the burden a bit, we will. but people in bristol had mixed reactions about whether it would make a difference to them. i heard you mention £400, but they reckon it's going to go up by £800, so £400 isjust not going to cut it. they do not target things properly, and that's what angers me. - i will see how much i will get, and if i'm 0k...i will put some of it into a savings pot. so where will the money come from? the chancellor says a tax on oil and gas firms who have benefited from globally high prices would raise around £5 billion. for the remaining 10 billion, that's still unclear. today it feels like the chancellor has finally realised the problems that the country are facing. a windfall tax was an idea they had
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previously rejected, but something labour had been calling for. they welcomed the u—turn, but said they were disappointed by how long it's taken. leading economists say the chancellor is doing a lot for those on the lowest incomes, but some worries remain. what about those families who are just above the means—tested benefit level? they might be quite peeved that people looking very much like them are getting a lot of money and they're not. the question now is, will this be the last time the chancellor has to intervene? andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. let's head to westminster and speak to our political correspondent nick eardley. and speak to our political there and speak to our political has been a lot of pressur the there has been a lot of pressure on the chancellor to come up with a package. labour have been calling for that windfall tax for months now. a number of tory mps have been knocking on the door of the treasury and saying we have to do something to help constituents and the package
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that the chancellor announced yesterday has been widely welcomed, actually. particularly by those who wanted him to do things to help the most vulnerable households in particular, those extra payments from people on benefits, for people on disability benefits. they have been really welcomed by many around westminster. have a listen to the chancellor on bbc breakfast this morning where he was explaining how he reached that decision. i morning where he was explaining how he reached that decision.— he reached that decision. i have alwa s he reached that decision. i have always said _ he reached that decision. i have always said we _ he reached that decision. i have always said we stood _ he reached that decision. i have always said we stood ready i he reached that decision. i have always said we stood ready to i he reached that decision. i have | always said we stood ready to do more to support people and i said that back earlier in the spring. the thing we were waiting for was to have more certainty and clarity about what would happen to energy bills in the autumn and therefore we could appropriately scale and size the support we were providing and we just heard this week from 0fcom, the independent energy regulator who set those prices and the price cap, their views of what prices would be in the autumn and that allowed us to
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provide the support with more certainty. untilwe provide the support with more certainty. until we knew what those bills would be we could not size support appropriately. there is a strong argument to tax these profits fairly given energy companies are making extraordinary profits as a result of impart russia's invasion of ukraine. what we wanted to do is take the time to get it right so we could continue to incentivise investment so that the way we are doing this is with a new very generous investment relief so that those companies who do invest more will pay less tax. they're making a transition over time but in the short—term we do need to rely on natural gas, for example. we are fortunate to have supplies that are home and the events of the last few months reminders of the importance of energy security so we want to see
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investment in that sector and that was spelt out by the prime minister. that is something we would welcome. that is something we would welcome. that is something we would welcome. that is the government's pitch and for most opposition mps and many tories, whole package has been widely welcomed. really interesting figures this morning, the think tank that looks into low income households, they reckon that the package the chancellor has announced so far this year, the ones earlier this year and the one earlier will offset 83% of the rising energy prices, even higherfor some prices, even higher for some low—income prices, even higherfor some low—income households. the government will point to that and say, look, we are helping. in terms of the windfall tax element of it, there is some disquiet within the conservative party, it is fair to say, about the way the government has gone about that. the fact that the tories voted against it last
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week but have announced they would do it albeit with a different name. i know, for example, the business secretary is worried about the announcement by bp that it is going to look again at investments in the north sea as a result of the windfall tax but the broad picture, the big picture is that most mps are really happy there is support there to help households struggling with the cost of living. labour, though, say it should have come a bit earlier. have a listen to the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves. it is clear labour _ chancellor, rachel reeves. it is clear labour winning _ chancellor, rachel reeves. it 3 clear labour winning the battle of ideas because this is something i have been calling for, kier starmer has been calling for for months and months and at every stage the treasury minister, the prime minister were resisting it and saying that it would deter investment, it was under conservative, it wouldn't raise enough money, it would be silly to
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provide additional help and yesterday we had a full 180 degrees turn which is very welcome because we all know that there are pensioners turning off their heating because they are worried about how they are going to pay the bills. you've got mums and dads skipping meals because they want to ensure that their children get three proper meals a day and you have got working families who thought they were doing all right but are now worried about how they will pay for a new school uniform or any additional expenses so it is welcome that the government have finally come to their senses and adopted labour's policy for windfall tax to give help to people thatis windfall tax to give help to people that is needed. i do have to ask what on earth took them so long when it was blindingly obvious to everyone else that this was necessary. everyone else that this was necessary-— everyone else that this was necessa . , necessary. there is the wider t uestion necessary. there is the wider question of— necessary. there is the wider question of what _ necessary. there is the wider question of what the - necessary. there is the wider question of what the next i necessary. there is the wider| question of what the next few necessary. there is the wider - question of what the next few months and potentially the next few years looks like and the chancellor was
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saying this morning he is confident that the uk has the tools to get through the cost of living crisis, to battle inflation, to try and bring costs under control. he did, however, leave open the possibility that there might be more support next year, if energy prices don't go down by saying that he always stands ready to help and if you look at his track record, he has always been there with support for households if they need it but we now know exactly what that is going to look like over the autumn. it will mean hundreds of pounds for every household and more for those households struggling the most. thank you very much. thank you very much. the resolution foundation independent think tank focused on improving the living standards to
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those on middle incomes. thank you very much forjoining us. can you just tell us a bit more on what you have been doing with the figures and your analysis and how the support falls. ., ., , your analysis and how the support falls, ., , , , falls. today we sell, yesterday, in fact, it has _ falls. today we sell, yesterday, in fact, it has been _ falls. today we sell, yesterday, in fact, it has been a _ falls. today we sell, yesterday, in fact, it has been a long _ falls. today we sell, yesterday, in fact, it has been a long night. i fact, it has been a long night. yesterday was of the chancellor filling the gaps of his previous support that was an answer if we think back to february and in the spring statement he announced support that helps partly with the energy packages. that was more to the middle of the income distribution of people with earnings of the national insurance and original £200 energy bills and what we saw yesterday was the chance of the providing support to households on low incomes to particularly heavily affected by the energy bill increase because they are low income households. they spend more as a proportion of their income on energy bills. , ., , ., ., ,
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proportion of their income on energy bills. , ., , , bills. one phrase that has been used this morning. _ bills. one phrase that has been used this morning, what _ bills. one phrase that has been used this morning, what has _ bills. one phrase that has been used this morning, what has been - this morning, what has been announced today will help people not to be as more badly off as they might be, as they might be with the support but it won't make anyone better off. what is your perspective on the impact it will have? so better off. what is your perspective on the impact it will have?- on the impact it will have? so what we can see — on the impact it will have? so what we can see is. _ on the impact it will have? so what we can see is, on _ on the impact it will have? so what we can see is, on average, - on the impact it will have? so what we can see is, on average, the i on the impact it will have? so what | we can see is, on average, the very bottom of the income distribution, the combined package of measures that the chancellor has announced over the last few months will be offsetting somewhere between 90 and “p offsetting somewhere between 90 and up to 100% of their energy bills. however there is a lot of rough justice going on here. people with largerfamilies and justice going on here. people with larger families and particularly with perhaps less insulated homes, we'll probably see energy bills going up by more than the price cap. that price cap is just a typical family energy bill. and in those circumstances they might find still they need to find extra money to pay energy bills this winter.—
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energy bills this winter. energy bills are only — energy bills this winter. energy bills are only a _ energy bills this winter. energy bills are only a part _ energy bills this winter. energy bills are only a part of - energy bills this winter. energy bills are only a part of the i energy bills this winter. energy i bills are only a part of the picture in terms of the cost of living. that is exactly right. _ in terms of the cost of living. that is exactly right. we _ in terms of the cost of living. trust is exactly right. we are expecting inflation to go up as more low—income households spend money on food. that might be of a 10% for those households. the extra money the chance finance will help offset but does not provide support to help food and other essentials. ititti’ith but does not provide support to help food and other essentials.— food and other essentials. with that level of inflation, _ food and other essentials. with that level of inflation, what _ food and other essentials. with that level of inflation, what is _ food and other essentials. with that level of inflation, what is your i level of inflation, what is your perspective on what could happen going forward in terms of prices go up, energy prices go up, it is likely they won't start coming down soon so there is than the help that feeds into the system, prices go up again, it is a cycle, potentially. what do you think?— again, it is a cycle, potentially. what do you think? there is an issue here about timing _ what do you think? there is an issue here about timing so _ what do you think? there is an issue here about timing so the _ what do you think? there is an issue here about timing so the benefit i here about timing so the benefit system is designed to keep up with price increases however, that is on an annual cycle so this april we saw
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benefits go up by 3% to inflate inflation last year, completely out of date. by next april, the chancellor confirmed yesterday it will go up by the full inflation amount can iron a half percent, and that will help households and benefits going into next year. however, untilthen benefits going into next year. however, until then there is a bit of a gap and that is why we have seen the support announced today. going forward, the bank of england expects inflation to stop coming down next year so that should help ease the cost of living crisis as that benefit increase comes in. however, there is a lot of uncertainty here and it is very unclear if oil prices will start coming down next year. there is a lot of uncertainty about ukraine, for example, and that means the chancellor needs to be ready to provide even more support next year. thank you very much. the headlines on bbc news.
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warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting , as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. the healthcare regulator has ordered an nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to mothers and babies to make immediate improvements. the care quality commission told nottingham university hospitals nhs trust it must make "significant and immediate improvements" to its maternity services — and it had serious staffing and cultural problems. the trust says it's working hard to make improvements. we spoke to donna 0ckenden earlier, the senior midwife — who led the inquiry into the shrewsbury and telford hospital trust and will chair a review of services in nottingham.
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there are really serious concerns that need urgent action and the trust will be fully aware of that from the detailed ctc report. i think that families now need to feel that they are listened to. that their concerns have been heard and that change is going to happen and is going to happen quickly. but what i think i also need to say to you is that in the trust, there will be hundreds of midwives, obstetricians, who are giving their all to the local population to provide safe and compassionate care and i think you must remember that. police in texas are facing criticism over their response to a mass shooting at a primary school which left 19 children and two teachers dead. witnesses say officers hestitated to confront the killer during the situation in uvalde. barbara plett usher reports. this is what the centre
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of town looks like two days after a massacre. a marker for every one of the 19 children and two of their teachers. some came from outside uvalde to show solidarity. there was even a brief visit by the duchess of sussex, meghan markle — she laid flowers at the cross for an eight—year—old boy. jackie would have turned ten next month, but she'd already found her own voice, her uncle said. jackie was the life of our family. she had just recently received her first communion. so she was on fire. she felt like a rock star. he says his brother argued with police on that day, demanding that they move faster to storm the school and stop the gunman. he wanted to go in there and charge this guy, but they wouldn't let him. "you guys going to do yourjob? do something! you know, you got 20 guys over there, standing, doing nothing. just get in there!" he goes, "you need to go back, scoot back."
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"no, we're not going to scoot back. you want to arrest us, arrest us, but we're not... we're not... you know, we're here. i'm not going to go anywhere until i see my baby!" the authorities defended their response to the shooting. they tried to provide answers, but many questions remain. a troubling undercurrent to a tragedy that is still unfolding. you got to understand, we're getting a lot of information we're trying to track down and see what is true — we want to vet it. with the latest news that the broken—hearted husband of a teacher who was killed had died of a heart attack, adding to the unimaginable pain here. there are so many bouquets now — we've seen those mounds of flowers grow throughout the day — and quite a few children here, as well. there is a memorial at the school, but this really feels like a safe space for the community to grieve and to remember. silva did not lose a loved one, but her world was shaken by those who did. we're part of the community and it's people that, one time or another, we have been together in a baseball game, and a football game, and a city event, and it'sjust
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children from our community and... we're here and i have the blessing to have my children with me, and these families don't. it is the hardest of the hard realities that have changed this town forever. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas. danya bacchus is a cbs news correpondent in uvalde. she explained how the issue has once again highlighted the issue of gun control. vibe now the big thing that we are focusing on here is that this weekend there is going to be an nra convention. the nra has a gun lobby here in the united states, gun rights group that is pretty large. this commercial space to take place in texas. the governor of texas was supposed to speak. he has now pulled out of a speaking engagement and is going to send a pre—recorded message instead. there are a republican
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texas lawmakers who are expected to be in attendance. former president donald trump is expected to be in attendance but we're also hearing there was going to be some protesters, too. counter protesters who are going to be there, of course many of those people saying it is time for us to hear in the united states, to enact some new gun measures and tougher restrictions on people being able to practice guns. i'm joined now by ben wallace wells, a writer at the new yorker who has been writing about gun—control and the nra for over 30 years. what is happening to the debate about gun ownership over the 30 years you have been writing about it? i'm hoping that message is going to vanish of your screen and that it is not going to cut us off. can you see a message? i is not going to cut us off. can you see a message?— is not going to cut us off. can you see a message?_ it i is not going to cut us off. can you see a message?_ it is| see a message? i can't, no. it is currently — see a message? i can't, no. it is currently right — see a message? i can't, no. it is currently right across _ see a message? i can't, no. it is currently right across your i
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see a message? i can't, no. it is currently right across your face l currently right across your face unfortunately. if you could... i'm not sure if it is our end or your end. sorry about this. no, don't worry, don't worry. it is our end. so sorry. we can see your face now. just go ahead then. in terms of what has happened with gun ownership over the 30 years that you have been writing about it?— the 30 years that you have been writing about it? yeah, i mean, you know, on writing about it? yeah, i mean, you know. on every _ writing about it? yeah, i mean, you know, on every metric— writing about it? yeah, i mean, you know, on every metric we've - writing about it? yeah, i mean, you know, on every metric we've seen i writing about it? yeah, i mean, you i know, on every metric we've seen gun ownership in the united states grow. since the year 2000, against sales have tripled in the united states put up not only that the types of guns sold have grown. far more common to be semiautomatic weapons, military style weapons, you know, it is much easier to get guns now. there are fewer restrictions separating people from buying guns.
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not at all coincidentally during that same period of time, the number of suicides from guns, the number of homicides committed with guns, the number of mass killings, this horrifying event in texas. it is at or near all—time highs. it has been pretty unstinting, you know, escalation in gun violence and in the human and public health effects of guns. the human and public health effects of tuns. ., . ., ., ., of guns. how much of a, sort of debate happens _ of guns. how much of a, sort of debate happens that _ of guns. how much of a, sort of debate happens that is - of guns. how much of a, sort of| debate happens that is reflective of guns. how much of a, sort of. debate happens that is reflective of the different areas of interest groups? 0bviously, the different areas of interest groups? obviously, the people. there is the polling, family that indicates that a majority of americans would support changes to gun law, we have from the politicians that they want that. is it the nra alone that is blocking that, what is the situation? i think
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there are basically _ that, what is the situation? i think there are basically two _ that, what is the situation? i think there are basically two things i that, what is the situation? i think there are basically two things that | there are basically two things that are going on. the first is the nra is incredibly important. it is the gun lobby here in the united states. it is very well centralised and organised with gun manufacturers and they have been able to make themselves into a real political force with tens of millions of members. a lot of money that they can use for campaign contributions. they had become a real central aspect of the republican party coalition and have made themselves and their message, which is, you know restrictions on guns ever, i really caught part of the republican party apparatus. the second, though, is trickier. to combat. in seoul. and that is the nra has had a good psychological insight which is that at the same time at moments like this when the public outcry, when the pressure from liberal politicians and the democratic party for gun control that its most intense, the fear is in the public
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of violence, the desire among many, many people to own a gun themselves to protect themselves also go up and so during moments like this, after sandy hook, during the pandemic moments of stress we see gun sales skyrocket. and one thing that the nra has done very effectively over the years and its public messaging and its publications is to promote a gun is notjust a weapons of self—defence. to remind some people that a gun is what they might turn to when they are scared.— that a gun is what they might turn to when they are scared. thank you ve much to when they are scared. thank you very much for— to when they are scared. thank you very much forjoining _ to when they are scared. thank you very much forjoining us. _ to when they are scared. thank you very much forjoining us. thank- to when they are scared. thank you | very much forjoining us. thank you. thank you. ukraine's president, volodymyr zelensky, has said the eastern donbas region could become uninhabited as a result of russia's offensive aimed at capturing more territory there. in his latest online video, mr zelensky said moscow seemed intent on reducing cities to ashes. severodonetsk — which the russians are trying to encircle — is coming under heavy attack.
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0ur correspondentjoe inwood is in kyiv with the latest.but, the mood music of these statements, both from the president and his advisers and regional politicians, really is changing. there is an understanding or even an acceptance that the towns like severodonetsk and lysychansk, two crucial cities in that part of the donbas, are really coming under pressure. we understand there is intense fighting on the outskirts of severodonetsk and in the last ten minutes, the russian forces have claimed they have taken a crucial village just outside slaviansk that they have been fighting over for a while. so the screws are being tightened on ukrainian forces in the region. we have heard about astonishing levels of aerial bombardment, artillery fire and missiles coming in. that is why president zelensky has used this phrase about trying to make the region uninhabitable, burning it to the ground. he even went further in his address, using the word genocide to describe what is happening in the donbas, to suggest that the russians are not
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only killing his people, but moving in their own. so a really grim assessment from the ukrainian president. six soldiers and a veteran have been arrested on suspicion of drugs and money laundering offences. the ministry of defence says they were detained across the uk during a planned operation by the royal military police. three of them remain in custody. let's get more on this from our correspondent, sean dilley. further dramatic scenes on wednesday morning. it was 6:30am when the royal military police called there. roughly simultaneously in windsor, the police and the local area searched a property there. north wales and northern ireland had properties searched. all in connection with the six serving irish guards and the veteran from
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the coldstream guards. the allegations, they are serious. they are related to allegations that supply and conspiracy to supply drugs and money lending offences. we do know that three of those individuals in custody. so, i mean, obviously, we don't know who the individuals involved are, what their duties might have been. the individuals involved are, what their duties might have been.— duties might have been. the irish guards themselves _ duties might have been. the irish guards themselves have - duties might have been. the irish guards themselves have been i duties might have been. the irishl guards themselves have been very active in afghanistan and iraq. we know that those detained to a serving range from guardsmen through to sergeant so, typically, people would recognise the world over the irish guards by the iconic bearskin hats and the red tunics because, not only do they do the trooping the colour and card royal palaces, they haven't a really important role, that regiment, thursday, they are due to do the trooping the colour for the queen'sjubilee celebrations. the ministry of defence have said the six current
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irish guards people involved in this will not be involved in the trooping the colour on thursday. they say, as one would imagine, the army does not tolerate fraudulent or illegal activity but about the investigation is ongoing into these allegations it would be inappropriate for them to comment further.— thank you. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. some pretty strong sunshine today across parts of wales, central and southern england. sunny spells further north, too, but we will see more in the way of showers, scotland especially. they have been blowing through on quite a brisk wind so far today and it will continue through the afternoon. the odd shower in northern ireland and maybe one or two in northern england, maybe as far south as the peak district and snowdonia but the vast majority stay dry. the bluer the skies and the further south you are, 21 the high. a cool 12 or 13 in northern scotland. tonight, many showers will fade, the odd one might clip down through the eastern coasts of england into the morning and a bit of a breeze here, but with winds falling lighter elsewhere it is going to be a fresh night with temperatures in rural areas as low as four or 5 degrees. this is what it will feel
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like in towns and city centres. but a cracking start to the weekend as far as sunshine is concerned. we will see a bit more cloud bubbling up through the day, more especially in northern and eastern areas, outside chance of a shower but the vast majority will be dry. a noticeable breeze will make it feel cooler along some eastern coasts. see you soon.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling and these are the headlines. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. labour welcomes the move but criticises the government's response to the crisis saying it called for a windfall tax on oil companies months ago. a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting, as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. and it emerges that the husband of one of the teachers killed by the attacker in texas, died of a heart attack shortly after dropping off flowers at her memorial. ukraine warns that russia's offensive in donbas could result in the region becoming uninhabited.
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sport now, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. england's cricketers are gearing up to face new zealand next week in what will be the start of a new era for the test side. ben stokes captains them at lords for the first time as the black caps arrive for a three—match series. stokes replacesjoe root who stood down after defeat in the west indies. it will also be a first test for new head coach brendan mccullum. get the team to first and _ head coach brendan mccullum. get the team to first and foremost _ head coach brendan mccullum. get the team to first and foremost and - head coach brendan mccullum. get the team to first and foremost and you i team to first and foremost and you understand the guys and work out how they work, and not imposed, but try to put a bit of that positivity across the group as well and obviously ben stokes and myself have a relationship which needs to get going pretty quickly as well, so once we do that, i think we are able to build from there but i'm under no illusions, it's a big job. to build from there but i'm under no illusions, it's a bigjob. it's to build from there but i'm under no illusions, it's a big job. it's a good time to take over and everyone is ready for change and to do things slightly differently and i think
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thatis slightly differently and i think that is where my skills sit. liverpool and real madrid supporters are arriving in paris ahead of tomorrow's champions league final. the spanish champions won when the two sides met in the 2018 final, butjurgen klopp says his squad has evolved since then. he's been speaking to bbc breakfast�*s sally nugent. we grew together. we grew together, with fantastic people. they are young, but in the future it will be a i0y young, but in the future it will be a joy to follow them, what they are doing because they are so smart and in the future when we meet again, they will have business and families in six or seven kids, all these things, it's such a colourful and fantastic group. i really am blessed. we are really blessed that we brought them all together. it is an open group that other players can join us and some believe us, but the court will stay and together with the people at liverpool, we are quite powerful. liverpool will fly to paris later today. real madrid have already arrived at their hotel
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in the french capital. france striker karim benzema's appearance keeping their supporters happy. but liverpool defender andy robertson hopes it's liverpool fans in full voice, come the final whistle. all you want to do when you play for any club, you want to first of all do it for yourself and do it for family but you want to do it for the fans as well. you know, the fans are so important at any club and this club especially. you know, the amount of fans we've got, and the amount of expectations they have as well and the fact that we've been able to live up to that has been special and we just need to continue to do that. and we know the only way to make them happy is by winning trophies and like i said, we hope to have another one on saturday. in october last year, adelaide united'sjosh cavallo became the first top—flight footballer in the men's game to come out as gay. the 22—year—old has now inspired others to follow suit. recently, he's been offering his support to blackpool�*s jake daniels, who at 17 years old, is the uk's only openly gay active male professional footballer.
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i'm really excited and i'm proud, because that's the point of my story and what i did, for people like jake and what i did, for people like jake and people around the world that i don't know personally that can relate to my story and feel connected when i don't even know them. it's really exciting to see someone follow in my footsteps and i can have someone i can talk to now and relate, and wejust can have someone i can talk to now and relate, and we just get each other because we went through the same storyjust in different countries. my main advice is to embrace who you are and enjoy it. mate, you have opened a new chapter, this is your new life, go out there and live it. it's honestly crazy and for me it was like getting reborn and rebirth, so it's a similar feeling forjake and i know the exciting times he has head, so i'm very excited for the both of us and we are only at the start of our careers. that's all the sport for now. and you can get more at the bbc sport website. this month brings an end to coventry�*s title
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as the uk's city of culture, after hosting a year long festival of events. today we're at the reel store — the uk's first permanent immersive gallery — where our corrrespondent trish adudu has been keeping across what the city has to offer. and a warning — she's in an environment that may have some flashing images. 0h, she was in an environment that might have had flashing images but now she is at war memorial park. no flashing images there. yes, i do get around, as you know. but i am here at war memorial park and it is fantastic. we are going to be losing our tenure as city of culture and we are gutted, but what a fantastic way to end it with radio one's big weekend and as you can see, radio 1 have a stage here and if you can't get to coventry, all of the tickets are sold out, and they will be broadcasting the big weekend throughout the three days and it starts today and goes through to sunday and i tell you, it's going to be magnificent, look at that big stage, you will see the likes of ed
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sheeran, calvin harris, harry styles k s i, it's going to be wonderful. a huge stage and somebody who promised up huge stage and somebody who promised up a summers —— a sum of surprises and promise big events would come to commentary because of city of culture is the creative director. this is incredible, isn't it? it’s this is incredible, isn't it? it's so amazing — this is incredible, isn't it? it's so amazing and _ this is incredible, isn't it? it's so amazing and we worked for three years— so amazing and we worked for three years to _ so amazing and we worked for three years to bring the event of the city and we've — years to bring the event of the city and we've had to fight off stiff competition because other cities have _ competition because other cities have wanted it but it's amazing that we have _ have wanted it but it's amazing that we have it _ have wanted it but it's amazing that we have it here and what a treat the people _ we have it here and what a treat the people of— we have it here and what a treat the people of coventry are in for. 60% on tickeis— people of coventry are in for. 60% on tickets when two people from the city and _ on tickets when two people from the city and radio! have been in the city and radio! have been in the city for— city and radio! have been in the city for two — city and radio! have been in the city for two weeks now doing workshops in schools, training the next generation of broadcasters and presenters— next generation of broadcasters and presenters and radio technicians and people _ presenters and radio technicians and people that are going to work on festivals — people that are going to work on festivals like this in the future and it's— festivals like this in the future and it's such an amazing collaboration. what is it like to be the chief—
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collaboration. what is it like to be the chief head at a city of culture? is it pressure? do you have to work hard on thinking about big events? we work hard behind the scenes to make it happen and they don'tjust p0p up make it happen and they don'tjust pop up under pr. irate make it happen and they don't 'ust pop up under mfi make it happen and they don't 'ust pop up under pr. we have a massive team of people _ pop up under pr. we have a massive team of people who _ pop up under pr. we have a massive team of people who work— pop up under pr. we have a massive team of people who work really, i team of people who work really, really _ team of people who work really, really hard and since last year when we opened — really hard and since last year when we opened with coventry moves and the terry— we opened with coventry moves and the terry hall sessions on the walk and all— the terry hall sessions on the walk and all through the year we have had some _ and all through the year we have had some major— and all through the year we have had some major highlights and it's not over yet — some major highlights and it's not over yet. there is still the assembly festival gardens and we have opened the real store and you can see _ have opened the real store and you can see daniel is more and so much going _ can see daniel is more and so much going on _ can see daniel is more and so much going on it�*s — can see daniel is more and so much auoin on. �* , , can see daniel is more and so much uuoinon. h , . , , ., going on. it's been a trying year because of— going on. it's been a trying year because of the _ going on. it's been a trying year because of the pandemic - going on. it's been a trying year because of the pandemic with l going on. it's been a trying year i because of the pandemic with the going on. it's been a trying year - because of the pandemic with the ups and downs and self isolating, so how have you managed with that? jn and downs and self isolating, so how have you managed with that? in every challenae have you managed with that? in every challenge their _ have you managed with that? in every challenge their opportunities - have you managed with that? in every challenge their opportunities and - have you managed with that? in every challenge their opportunities and we | challenge their opportunities and we tried to _ challenge their opportunities and we tried to be _ challenge their opportunities and we tried to be optimistic and do the best we — tried to be optimistic and do the best we can for the city so we can deliver— best we can for the city so we can deliver on— best we can for the city so we can deliver on promises and i think last year we _
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deliver on promises and i think last year we still delivered a massive programme of events and this year we have a _ programme of events and this year we have a big _ programme of events and this year we have a big programme of events but they are _ have a big programme of events but they are for— have a big programme of events but they are for bigger audiences because _ they are for bigger audiences because people can gather and come together— because people can gather and come together and just enjoy art out in the open — together and just enjoy art out in the open and it is exciting. the next city will — the open and it is exciting. the next city will be _ the open and it is exciting. tue: next city will be announced the open and it is exciting. tt;e: next city will be announced next tuesday. what advice would you give to them? just enjoy it because this is a once—in—a—lifetime adventure that will never happen again and whoever wins, and i wish them all the best of luck, they will deserve it and do something amazing and they will keep evolving what city of culture should be and putting communities at the centre as well. would you ever imagined we would be stood here in the war memorial park about to post a massive music festival? it about to post a massive music festival? , ., ., about to post a massive music festival? , . . . ., . festival? it is amazing. we are a music city _ festival? it is amazing. we are a music city and — festival? it is amazing. we are a music city and we _ festival? it is amazing. we are a music city and we have - festival? it is amazing. we are a i music city and we have the godiva festival— music city and we have the godiva festival every year which brings in 60.000 _ festival every year which brings in 60,000 people so it's amazing we have the _ 60,000 people so it's amazing we have the radioi big weekend and there _ have the radioi big weekend and there is_ have the radioi big weekend and there is a — have the radioi big weekend and there is a platform for local talent
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with the _ there is a platform for local talent with the bbc introducing stage and it's also_ with the bbc introducing stage and it's also a — with the bbc introducing stage and it's also a great way of promoting all of— it's also a great way of promoting all of the — it's also a great way of promoting all of the brilliant talent coming from _ all of the brilliant talent coming from the — all of the brilliant talent coming from the city, from scar and two tone _ from the city, from scar and two tone to — from the city, from scar and two tone to pop— from the city, from scar and two tone to pop and rap and everything in between. it's very exciting. what about you? — in between. it's very exciting. what about you? you _ in between. it's very exciting. what about you? you have _ in between. it's very exciting. what about you? you have taken - in between. it's very exciting. “wast about you? you have taken us in between. it's very exciting. histagt about you? you have taken us through the year, but where are you going to go off to? t the year, but where are you going to to off to? ., ., ., the year, but where are you going to no offto? ., ., ., ., ., go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach. but — go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach. but i'm _ go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, but i'm going _ go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, but i'm going to _ go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, but i'm going to stop - go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, but i'm going to stop for. go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, but i'm going to stop for a l beach, but i'm going to stop for a while, _ beach, but i'm going to stop for a while, seriously and i need to take in everything we have done and reflect — in everything we have done and reflect and i will think about what iwill— reflect and i will think about what twill do _ reflect and i will think about what i will do next. i will still be working _ i will do next. i will still be working with the trust on all of the evaluations and story and make sure we wrap _ evaluations and story and make sure we wrap it _ evaluations and story and make sure we wrap it up and hand over to the next _ we wrap it up and hand over to the next city~ — we wrap it up and hand over to the next ci . ~ , ., ., ., next city. well, before we hand over to the next — next city. well, before we hand over to the next city. _ next city. well, before we hand over to the next city, coventry _ next city. well, before we hand over to the next city, coventry has - to the next city, coventry has certainly enjoyed hosting city of culture and what an incredible year it has been. it culture and what an incredible year it has been-— it has been. it has gone fast. more than a year — it has been. it has gone fast. more than a year since _ it has been. it has gone fast. more than a year since we _ it has been. it has gone fast. more than a year since we were - it has been. it has gone fast. more than a year since we were talking l than a year since we were talking about the announcement. fantastic.
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tributes have been paid to the actor ray liotta, who has died aged 67. the hollywood star was best known for his role as gangster henry hill in martin scorsese's goodfellas. he passed away in his sleep while on location filming in the dominican republic. greg mckenzie has more laughter. it's a good story, it's funny, you're a funny guy. it's widely considered one of the greatest films of all time. seen here playing the real—life mobster henry hill — the movie that shot ray liotta to stardom — martin scorsese's goodfellas. the 1990s hit revolutionised the gangster genre. it received heaps of critical and commercial success, and went on to win six academy award nominations and one win after its release. you're leaving your car? he watches the car for me. it's easier... it was a career—defining role in the famous single—take
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copacabana nightclub scene — a long, continuous shot by a single camera ofjust under three minutes. it's better than waiting in line. in paying tribute to the actor, the film's director, martin scorsese, issued a statement saying ray liotta was so uniquely gifted, so adventurous, and so courageous as an actor. ray liotta did other great films after this — playing corrupt cops or law—enforcement officers — often drawing on his real—life experience and tough upbringing
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to enhance his character's toughness. the 67—year—old was born in newjersey, and had been abandoned at an orphanage before being adopted. put one right here. kevin costner co—starred in the 1989 movie field of dreams a year before he landed the role in goodfellas. costner said he will always be shoelessjoe jackson in his heart, and says what happened that moment in the film was real — "god gave us that stunt, now god has ray." it was ray liotta's publicist who confirmed the actor's death — saying the movie star had died in his sleep in the dominican republic. he was there filming his latest movie, dangerous waters. he leaves behind his daughter and fiancee. greg mckenzie, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news...
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warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting, as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. from street parties to parades, people will be taking to the streets up and down the uk next week to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne. at broadlands primary school in hereford the bunting's been up for weeks. our reporter fiona lamdin has been to see it. bell rings. oyez!
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onjune 2nd here at porlock, there'll be a very special celebration marking the queen's 70 years at the head of her realms and this great nation! here in a pocket of west somerset, the village of porlock is already buzzing. we managed within three or four hours to clothe the whole place in all the red, white and blue and the flags that you see. so there's a tremendous amount of willingness and excitement. the landlord's knitted the pub's bunting. next door, the estate agent's switched to selling corgis. and regalflowers are being planted up. and behind the scenes, this is thejubilee planning team. they've been meeting weekly for months. do you want to put these on? next week, the entire village will dress up to parade down the high street. led by terry, who's being the queen. well, that's the thing about it. you get all excited beforehand,
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but when you put the outfit on, when your tablecloth isn't your tablecloth but your royal dress and everybody looks at you and applauds, then you suddenly put on the right voice and you put the hand wave and everybody responds. so you suddenly start to feel regal, you see. while the rest of the village are busy baking, making sure there's enough cake for the feast. purple for the queen. it's a very regal colour and it seems to have been adopted as the colour for the platinum jubilee. so i'm just practising and seeing whether it can look quite good on a cupcake. and in windsor, just across the road from the castle, the queen's neighbours in this retirement village are busy making jubilee decorations. many of them were in london for the coronation 70 years ago. margaret and john, who've been married for 66 years, are seeing if they can spot him. being in the raf, he lined the route. what i remember the most is being on parade for the coronation. i was part of the royal air force
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regiment who lined the routes. it was just an amazing occasion. and patricia remembers, as a child, she'd frequently bump into the royal family in stjames's park. prince charles as a baby, he was exactly two years younger than my brother, he used to be taken out for walks by a nanny with a detective with one of the corgis. my brother once was on a tricycle, shot around the corner and went straight into the royal pram. so the baby prince charles was leaning out looking at him and my brother was looking up and the crowd were sort of amused and my mother was hugely embarrassed! shall we see if we've got too much here? back in somerset, final adjustments for this special queen's guard. and a gift for all the children in the village, in the hope this next generation always remembers her majesty's seven—decade reign and the celebrations which marked it. god save the queen! fiona lamdin, bbc news.
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in sub—saharan africa, over 100 million children are missing out on education — more than anywhere else in the world — and the un is warning the numbers will rise in the next five years. part of the problem is a shortage of classrooms. the bbc has been given exclusive access to the first 3d—printed school in madagascar, only the second in the world. joanne whalley has this report. it's moving. the first layer. i can't believe it.— it's moving. the first layer. i can't believe it. this is maggie, who set no _ can't believe it. this is maggie, who set up her— can't believe it. this is maggie, who set up her own _ can't believe it. this is maggie, who set up her own ngo - can't believe it. this is maggie, who set up her own ngo when| can't believe it. this is maggie, i who set up her own ngo when she can't believe it. this is maggie, - who set up her own ngo when she was a teenager. her ideas to use the 3d technology to improve access to education. starting madagascar. t education. starting madagascar. i was adopted from china when i education. starting madagascar. t was adopted from china when i was about 18 months old and from a poor village, so i really relate to the
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people and the villages here, and if you have access to school, a lot more opportunities arise from that. one in five primary school aged children are not getting an education in madagascar. part of the problem is that classrooms are overcrowded and some pupils have to travel long distances to reach a school. t travel long distances to reach a school. , ., ., g; , travel long distances to reach a school. , ., ., , school. i first heard of 3d printing about seven _ school. i first heard of 3d printing about seven years _ school. i first heard of 3d printing about seven years ago _ school. i first heard of 3d printing about seven years ago and - school. i first heard of 3d printing about seven years ago and i - school. i first heard of 3d printing i about seven years ago and i thought we could use this technology to build schools faster. her we could use this technology to build schools faster.— build schools faster. her first ro'ect build schools faster. her first project is _ build schools faster. her first project is here _ build schools faster. her first project is here at _ build schools faster. her first project is here at the - build schools faster. her first i project is here at the university build schools faster. her first - project is here at the university in central madagascar. the next 3d printed schools will be for children. the team printed a school in malawi last year and said that process uses 60% less material than normal. ., , process uses 6096 less material than normal. ., , , process uses 6096 less material than normal. . , , ., normal. that printer is fed from the . um . normal. that printer is fed from the -um- that normal. that printer is fed from the pump that you _ normal. that printer is fed from the pump that you have _ normal. that printer is fed from the pump that you have here, - normal. that printer is fed from the pump that you have here, and - normal. that printer is fed from the pump that you have here, and the l pump that you have here, and the water— pump that you have here, and the water you — pump that you have here, and the water you have here and the mix, the cement— water you have here and the mix, the cement mix _ water you have here and the mix, the cement mix and the ink you have here _ cement mix and the ink you have here when — cement mix and the ink you have here. when we start printing its going _ here. when we start printing its going to — here. when we start printing its going to be extremely quick to build as welt~ _
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going to be extremely quick to build as welt~ h_ going to be extremely quick to build as well. s ., ., ., , as well. a third of the wall has been printed _ as well. a third of the wall has been printed now. _ as well. a third of the wall has been printed now. welcome i as well. a third of the wall has| been printed now. welcome to as well. a third of the wall has - been printed now. welcome to our school. total print time was about 18 hours, and then for the carbon emissions, it reduced it by up to 50%, and mainly the waste reduction comes with the walls. the 5096, and mainly the waste reduction comes with the walls.— comes with the walls. the 3d printer and technicians _ comes with the walls. the 3d printer and technicians are _ comes with the walls. the 3d printer and technicians are expensive - comes with the walls. the 3d printer and technicians are expensive and i and technicians are expensive and this school cost $300,000. at the cost will come down as more are built. 30 undergraduate students will be able to study in the school. the un says some african countries will have 20% more school aged children in the next five years as populations rise. technology could help ease some of that pressure on school infrastructure. we help ease some of that pressure on school infrastructure.— school infrastructure. we are very interested to _ school infrastructure. we are very interested to see _ school infrastructure. we are very interested to see what _ school infrastructure. we are very interested to see what lessons . school infrastructure. we are very i interested to see what lessons there are from _ interested to see what lessons there are from the applications of 3d technology. it's very important for governments to be prepared, to be aware _ governments to be prepared, to be aware of— governments to be prepared, to be aware of the costs and to know how they can _ aware of the costs and to know how they can deploy such tools to catch up they can deploy such tools to catch up and _ they can deploy such tools to catch up and maybe leapfrog some of the
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challenges that they currently face. it's been more than do years since their last tour, but last night swedish pop legends abba hit the stage once more — well, sort of. the band have created digital versions of themselves as they were in their heyday — and these so—called abba—tars are performing with live musicians in london. our entertainment correspondent colin paterson went along to watch the show. the waiting was over. # so when you're near me, darling, can't you hear me? # sos... more than do years after the last abba concert, they returned to the stage last night — albeit in digitalform, looking like they did in their 1970s heyday. the uncannily life—like abba avatars played 20 songs, including sos and mamma mia, kate moss was seen heading to the dance floor surrounded by bouncers, and the audience loved it. something you've never seen before and you'll be, like...they�*re looking around everywhere.
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oh, my god, when they did dancing queen, it was spectacular. what they put into this show is mind—blowing. it was so real, it was so alike, - it was better than i even expected. at the end, the members also came land it wasjust a dream come true. | absolutely, it looked so realistic, it really does. so clear — the lighting is fantastic. it just was fantastic. they were just awesome. absolutely awesome. they were there! they were there on screen. it was just the best ever. did you cry at any point? i cried four times! what got you? seeing agnetha's face. so a lot of happy punters. and during the show, abba were sitting two rows behind me. during dancing queen, i turned around and saw frida looking out over the audience with a huge, beaming smile. cheering. and earlier on the red carpet, i'd spoken to the whole group. agnetha, frida, what made you change your mind and decide to work with abba again?
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i've dreamed of this for years! we love our music. we love to sing. we love the material that benny and bjorn write... excellent, and it's a challenge. abba has never left us, in my heart. in our hearts. so it was not so...difficult decision, because the music is a part of us. how was the experience for you of seeing yourself as your younger self? it's amazing because, in a way, you look at yourself on stage. it's so well done, so you think, actually, it's real people standing up there, performing, and then you're sitting, yourself, watching yourself! it's a very extraordinary feeling, it's hard to describe, i must say! i think the only way - to understand what this is, you have to come and see it. yeah.
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it's sort of a non—explainable. we've tried this for two years, to explain what it is, what it. will be, but that's impossible. you need to go and see it. i think it's a new experience for all of us and it will be so exciting tonight because i haven't seen anything. and i think you can safely say that nobody�*s ever seen anything like this because this is a first — this is pushing boundaries. the first reviews are in, and are very positive. there's already talk of a plan for the show to run in london for at least three years. and abba say they know of other major acts who are already thinking of copying their idea of copying themselves. colin paterson, bbc news, the abba arena. on the 125th anniversary of bram stoker's dracula, the record for the largest gathering of people dressed as vampires has been broken. it happened last night
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at whitby abbey, where a total of 1369 people attended the event in north yorkshire dressed as dracula. that breaks the previous record of 1039 set in virginia in 2011. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. hello. a lot sunnier out there across the southern half of the country compared with yesterday and it is pretty strong sunshine at that. whilst we will see some sunshine further north, still the chance of a few showers coming through on quite a brisk wind today. that split in the weather is because we have high pressure trying to build in from the south and west, keeping things dry, but on the edge of it, parts of scotland, especially, this is where the breeze coming down from the north—west makes it feel rather chilly. frequent showers in the north and west too, maybe the odd heavy one as well. the odd shower in northern ireland and northern england, maybe as far south as the peak district and snowdonia but actually, many, in fact most, will stay dry. the further south you are, the bluer the skies will be. temperatures lifting up to around 21 or 22 celsius. that extra bit of sunshine today
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though is adding to increases in pollen levels across england and wales and it is worth noting that uv levels will be especially strong across parts of central and southern england and wales today, too. we finish the day on a fine note for many. still showers going across northern scotland, they will become fewer in number. overnight, one or two could drift and clip the eastern coast of england but most will have a dry night with clear skies and it will be a fresher night than in the past few nights, temperatures in rural areas away from towns and cities could get down to around four or five. into the weekend, we start on a sunny note but it will gradually turn cooler and the chance of showers returning a bit more widely as we go into sunday. let's start with saturday first of all, though, because plenty of sunshine to begin with. there will be a bit more cloud down eastern districts of england, north—east scotland, an isolated chance of a shower here. but most places will be dry. a bit of cloud building up but some good, long sunny spells for many. sheltered from the breeze, 18 degrees in south—west scotland, so warmer than today, 18, 19, may be 20 in south—west england and south wales.
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that is that, though, the milder air gets pushed out of the way, high pressure moves off towards iceland and we have more of a polar influence as we go into sunday. those winds coming down from the north or north—east and a drop in temperature brings a lot more cloud with it as well and a scattering of showers. some will stay dry through the day, especially the further west you are, but in that breeze, it will feel distinctly chilly, in northern and eastern scotland and eastern england. elsewhere, temperatures down relative to saturday. if you are off to radio 1's big weekend, which gets under way later today, sunday is looking the cooler day of the weekend and cloudy as well but before we get there, plenty of dry and sunny weather, too. take care.
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this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling and these are the latest headlines. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. we've erred on the side of making it universal because i think the scale of the shock is such that it will impact a very large number of people. tens of millions of households need that support, so i think that's the right approach. labour welcomes the move but criticises the government's response to the crisis saying it called for a windfall tax on oil companies months ago. the chancellor, the prime minister were resisting it, and saying that it would deter investment, that it was un—conservative, but it wouldn't raise enough money, but it would be silly to provide additional help.
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a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. families now need to feel that they are listened to, that their concerns have been heard and that change is going to happen and is going to happen quickly. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting , as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. and it emerges that the husband of one of the teachers killed by the attacker in texas, died of a heart attack shortly after dropping off flowers at her memorial. with more than 200 cases of monkeypox confirmed globally by health officials, the world health organization says "quick action" is needed to contain outbreaks. ukraine warns that russia's offensive in donbas could result in the region becoming uninhabited. it's been
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more than do years since abba's last tour, but they finally performed onstage again last night — in digital form as abba—tars. economists are warning that the treasury is likely to face further calls to help people pay their energy bills into next year — despite the chancellor unveiling a 15 billion pound support package. industry analysts are predicting that the price cap for england, scotland and wales will remain around 2000 eight hundred pounds when it is
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re—calculated in april 2023. we'll hear from the chancellor in a moment — who says the treasury does have the "tools" to help families. under the package of support all households , regardless of income , will receive a grant of £400 towards their energy bills. plans for loans have been abandoned. on top of that, those on the lowest incomes, around 8 million households, will receive a one—off payment of £650. and pensioner households, receiving the winter fuel allowance, will also receive an extra one—off payment of £300. people receiving disability benefits which are not means tested, will also receive an extra payment of £150. part of the cost will come from a temporary windfall tax of 25 %, on the profits of energy companies — expected to raise £5 billion a year and which could last until 2025. labour said the chancellor had finally been forced to adopt its policy of a windfall tax, an idea that's also been backed by other opposition parties. andrew plant reports. under pressure to act, the government's support is a mix of universal payments and help targeted at the most vulnerable.
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we will send directly, to around eight million of the lowest—income households, a one—off cost—of—living payment of £650. the chancellor said they want to help those for whom the struggle is too hard, amid the cost—of—living crisis. under the new measures, all households in the uk will get £400 this october to help with energy bills. the poorest households will also get an additional payment of £650. there'll be a one—off disability cost—of—living payment of £150, and pensioners entitled to the winter fuel allowance will get £300. the government says, in total, the measures provide support worth £15 billion. direct debit and credit customers will have the money credited to their account, while customers with prepayment meters will have the money applied to their meter, or via a voucher.
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speaking to the bbc, rishi sunak said he wanted to provide support for all households. we know this is a squeeze on ordinary working families, and whilst i can't solve every problem — no government could — we want to show that we are on people's side and where we can try and ease the burden a bit, we will. but people in bristol had mixed reactions about whether it would make a difference to them. i heard you mention £400, but they reckon it's going to go up by £800, so £400 isjust not going to cut it. they do not target things properly, and that's what angers me. - i will see how much i will get, and if i'm ok...i will put some of it into a savings pot. so where will the money come from? the chancellor says a tax on oil and gas firms who have benefited from globally high prices would raise around £5 billion. for the remaining 10 billion, that's still unclear. today it feels like the chancellor
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has finally realised the problems that the country are facing. a windfall tax was an idea they had previously rejected, but something labour had been calling for. they welcomed the u—turn, but said they were disappointed by how long it's taken. leading economists say the chancellor is doing a lot for those on the lowest incomes, but some worries remain. what about those families who are just above the means—tested benefit level? they might be quite peeved that people looking very much like them are getting a lot of money and they're not. the question now is, will this be the last time the chancellor has to intervene? andrew plant, bbc news, in bristol. our political correspondent nick eardley explained what had prompted rishi sunak to take action — described by some as 'un—conservative'. there has been a lot of pressure on the chance that you come up with a package, labour have been calling for that windfall tax for months
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now. a number of tory mps have been knocking on the door of the treasury and saying, we have to do something to help constituents. in the package that the chancellor announced yesterday afternoon has been pretty widely welcomed, actually. particularly by those who wanted him to do things to help the most vulnerable households in particular. those extra payments for people on benefits, disability benefits, they have been really welcomed by many around westminster. have a listen to the chancellor on bbc breakfast this morning where he was explaining how he had reached that decision. t haste he had reached that decision. i have alwa s he had reached that decision. i have always said — he had reached that decision. i have always said that _ he had reached that decision. i have always said that we _ he had reached that decision. i have always said that we stood _ he had reached that decision. i have always said that we stood ready - he had reached that decision. i have always said that we stood ready to l always said that we stood ready to do more to support people and i did that earlier in the spring. the thing we were waiting for was to have more certainty and clarity about what would happen to energy bills in the autumn and therefore we could appropriately scale and size the support we were providing. we just had this week from ofcom, the
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independent regulator who sets those energy prices and the price cap, their view of what bills would be in their view of what bills would be in the autumn and that allowed us to provide the support with more certainty. energy is the driver of the increase bills that people are seeing and until we knew, or not you knew perfectly but had a better sense of what those bills would be wicked and size our support appropriately. there is a strong argument to tax these profits fairly given that energy companies are making extraordinary profits as a result of prices that are elevated in part due to russia's invasion of ukraine and so there is an argument to tax profits fairly but what he wanted to do was take the time to get it right so that we could take in time to incentivise investment. the way we are doing this as with any very generous investment relief so that those companies who do invest more will pay more tax. when making a transition to net zero overtime but we do need to rely on gas, for example and we are fortunate to have supplies of that
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at home and the events of the last few months reminders of the importance of energy security so we want to see investment in that sector. that has been spelt out by the prime minister and that is something we would welcome. that is the government's _ something we would welcome. that is the government's pitch _ something we would welcome. that is the government's pitch and _ something we would welcome. that is the government's pitch and i - something we would welcome. that is the government's pitch and i have - the government's pitch and i have got to say that, for most opposition mps and for many tories, this whole package has been widely welcomed. really interesting figures from the resolution foundation this morning. the think tank that looks into things like how low income households are dealing with the cost of living. they reckon that the packages that the chancellor has announced so the ones earlier this year and the one yesterday will offset 83% of the rising energy prices, even higher than for some low income households of the government will point to that and say, look, we are helping and in terms of the windfall tax element of it, there is some disquiet within the conservative party, think it is
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fair to say, but the way the government has gone about that. firstly the fact that tories voted against it last week but have announced they would do it this week albeit with a different name. the business secretary is worried about the announcement by bp that it is going to look again at its investments in the north sea as a result of this windfall tax. but the broad picture, the big picture is that most mps are really happy ever support there to help households who are struggling with the cost of living. labour, though, so it should have come a earlier. have a listen to the shadow chancellor, have come a earlier. have a listen to the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves. it to the shadow chancellor, rachel reeves. , . ., ., reeves. it is clear labour winning the battle of _ reeves. it is clear labour winning the battle of ideas _ reeves. it is clear labour winning the battle of ideas because - reeves. it is clear labour winning the battle of ideas because this i reeves. it is clear labour winning j the battle of ideas because this is something that i've been calling for, something that i've been calling for. kier— something that i've been calling for, kier starmer has been calling for, kier starmer has been calling for for— for, kier starmer has been calling for for months and months now. at every— for for months and months now. at every stage. — for for months and months now. at every stage, the chancellor was resisting — every stage, the chancellor was resisting it and saying it would
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deter— resisting it and saying it would deter investment, it was un—conservative, it wouldn't raise enough _ un—conservative, it wouldn't raise enough money, it would be silly to provide _ enough money, it would be silly to provide additional help and yesterday we had a full 180 degrees turn which _ yesterday we had a full 180 degrees turn which is very welcome because we all— turn which is very welcome because we all know— turn which is very welcome because we all know that there are pensioners who are turning off the heating _ pensioners who are turning off the heating because they are worried about— heating because they are worried about how they're going to pay the bills _ about how they're going to pay the bills. you've got mums and dads skipping — bills. you've got mums and dads skipping meals because they want to ensure _ skipping meals because they want to ensure that their children get three proper— ensure that their children get three proper meals a day and you've got working _ proper meals a day and you've got working families or thought they were _ working families or thought they were doing all right but are now worried — were doing all right but are now worried about how they are going to pay for— worried about how they are going to pay for a _ worried about how they are going to pay for a new school uniform or any additional— pay for a new school uniform or any additional expenses so it is welcome that the _ additional expenses so it is welcome that the government have finally come _ that the government have finally come to— that the government have finally come to their senses and adopted labour's _ come to their senses and adopted labour's policy for windfall tax to - ive labour's policy for windfall tax to give help— labour's policy for windfall tax to give help to people who need it but i do have _ give help to people who need it but i do have to ask, what on earth took them _ i do have to ask, what on earth took them so _ i do have to ask, what on earth took them so long — i do have to ask, what on earth took them so long when it was blindingly obvious— them so long when it was blindingly obvious to _ them so long when it was blindingly obvious to everybody else that this was absolutely necessary.-
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was absolutely necessary. there is the wider question _ was absolutely necessary. there is the wider question of _ was absolutely necessary. there is the wider question of what - was absolutely necessary. there is the wider question of what the - was absolutely necessary. there is | the wider question of what the next few months and potentially the next few months and potentially the next few years looks like and the chancellor was saying this morning he is confident that the uk has the tools to get through the cost of living crisis, to battle inflation, to try to bring costs under control for households. he did, however, leave open the possibility that there might be more support next year if energy prices don't go down by saying he always stands ready to help and if you look at his track record he has always been there with support for households if they need it. but we now know exactly what thatis it. but we now know exactly what that is going to look like over the autumn. it is going to mean hundreds of pounds for every household and even more for those households who are struggling the most. the healthcare regulator has ordered an nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to mothers and babies to make immediate improvements. the care quality commission told nottingham university hospitals nhs trust it must make "significant and immediate improvements"
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to its maternity services — and it had serious staffing and cultural problems. the trust says it's working hard to make improvements. we spoke to donna 0ckenden earlier, the senior midwife — who led the inquiry into the shrewsbury and telford hospital trust and will chair a review of services in nottingham. there are really serious concerns that need urgent action and the trust will be fully aware of that from the detailed ctc report. i think that families now need to feel that they are listened to. that their concerns have been heard and that change is going to happen and is going to happen quickly. but what i think i also need to say to you is that in the trust, there will be hundreds of midwives, obstetricians, who are giving their all to the local population to provide safe and compassionate care and i think you must remember that. uk health officials have reported another 20 children have been diagnosed with hepatitis,
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bringing the total number who've been affected to 2—hundred and 22. the uk health security agency says it is still investigating a strong link with a common virus which rebounded after the pandemic, but is also looking at other factors. let me bring you some breaking news on covid. the number of infections continues to full. i will bring you the latest stats. around 1.0 million people. it is about 14% down on 1.2 million the week before. about 2% of the population or one in 60 people and thatis population or one in 60 people and that is down from one in 50, the week before. that is down from one in 50, the week before. the headlines on bbc news. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least
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another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting, as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. good afternoon. england's cricketers are gearing up to face new zealand next week and what will be the start of a new era for the test side. ben stokes captained at lord's for the first time. he replacesjoe vert who stood down after defeat in the west indies. there also be a first test for the new head coach. get the team together first and foremost and
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start to understand, work out how they work. try to not impose but try to put a little bit of that positively across the group as well and obviously stokes and myself have got a relationship which needs to keep going pretty quickly as well. so once we do that than i think we will be able to build from there but i am under no illusions, it is a big job but it is a good time to take over. everyone is ready for change, everyone is ready to do things slightly differently. liverpool and real madrid supporters are arriving in paris ahead of the champions league final. the spanish side one in the 2018 final but the manager has been speaking to bbc breakfast. we grew together. they are fantastic people. they're young but in the future they will be a joy to follow them and what they're doing because they are so smart. in the future, when we meet again, be so successful in business, have families, six, seven kids. such a colourful and
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fantastic group. i really, i seven kids. such a colourful and fantastic group. i really, lam really blessed. we are really blessed that we bought them altogether. it is an open group and other players canjoin altogether. it is an open group and other players can join us in some levers but the coil will stay and together with the people at liverpool we are quite powerful. last year adelaide united player became the first top—flight player to come out as gay. the 22—year—old has inspired others to follow suit. recently he has been offering his support to blackpool�*s jake daniels who, at 17 years old, is the uk's only openly gay active male professional footballer. t’m only openly gay active male professional footballer. i'm really excited and _ professional footballer. i'm really excited and purpose _ professional footballer. i'm really excited and purpose that - professional footballer. i'm really excited and purpose that is - professional footballer. i'm really excited and purpose that is the i excited and purpose that is the point of my story is for people like jake and people around the world that i don't know personally that can relate to my story and can feel connected when i don't even know them. it's really exciting to see someone, you know, follow my footsteps and i can have someone i can talk to now in the late and we just get each other because he went
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to the same story, just in different countries. my main advice is to embrace who you are just enjoy it and you have opened a new chapter. this is your new lives to go out there at the bit. it's honestly crazy, for me it was like i was getting reborn in rebirth so it is a similarfeeling forjake getting reborn in rebirth so it is a similar feeling forjake and i know the exciting times he has got a head. so, yeah, i'm very excited for the both of us. we are only the start that is of the sport for now. the world health organization has called for "quick action" to be taken to contain outbreaks of monkeypox. the disease appears to be transmitted by close contact with an infected person who has blisters on their skin. symptoms are similar to smallpox but normally much less severe, and most people recover within three or four weeks. more than 20 countries where the virus is not endemic have now reported outbreaks. there have been more than 200 confirmed or suspected infections reported worldwide but mostly ineuropean countries. finland and ireland are the among the latest countries to report their first cases. let's hear more now from the world health organisation
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during a special briefing this morning at the united nations. we know that it requires close contact between people. also we know that objects can be contaminated but we would like to know a lot more about the risk and the patterns for transmission. we are afraid that it will be spared in the community but currently it is very hard to assess this risk. we think that, if we put in place measure now, we probably can contain this easily so that is why we are making this briefing today and we are trying to raise the awareness because we are at the very, very beginning and we have a good window of opportunity to stop the transmission now. of opportunity to stop the transmission now. police in texas are facing criticism over their response to a mass shooting at a primary school which left 19 children and two teachers dead. witnesses say officers hestitated
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to confront the killer during the situation in uvalde. barbara plett usher reports. this is what the centre of town looks like two days after a massacre. a marker for every one of the 19 children and two of their teachers. some came from outside uvalde to show solidarity. there was even a brief visit by the duchess of sussex, meghan markle — she laid flowers at the cross for an eight—year—old boy. jackie would have turned ten next month, but she'd already found her own voice, her uncle said. jackie was the life of our family. she had just recently received her first communion. so she was on fire. she felt like a rock star. he says his brother argued with police on that day, demanding that they move faster to storm the school and stop the gunman. he wanted to go in there and charge this guy, but they wouldn't let him. "you guys going to do yourjob? do something!
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you know, you got 20 guys over there, standing, doing nothing. just get in there!" he goes, "you need to go back, scoot back." "no, we're not going to scoot back. you want to arrest us, arrest us, but we're not... we're not... you know, we're here. i'm not going to go anywhere until i see my baby!" the authorities defended their response to the shooting. they tried to provide answers, but many questions remain. a troubling undercurrent to a tragedy that is still unfolding. you got to understand, we're getting a lot of information we're trying to track down and see what is true — we want to vet it. with the latest news that the broken—hearted husband of a teacher who was killed had died of a heart attack, adding to the unimaginable pain here. there are so many bouquets now — we've seen those mounds of flowers grow throughout the day — and quite a few children here, as well. there is a memorial at the school, but this really feels like a safe space for the community to grieve and to remember. silva did not lose a loved one, but her world was
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shaken by those who did. we're part of the community and it's people that, one time or another, we have been together in a baseball game, and a football game, and a city event, and it'sjust children from our community and... we're here and i have the blessing to have my children with me, and these families don't. it is the hardest of the hard realities that have changed this town forever. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas. danya bacchus is a cbs news correpondent in uvalde. she explained how the issue has once again highlighted the issue of gun control. the big thing we are focusing on here is there's going to be an nra convention. it is a lobby here in the united states. a gun rights group that is pretty large. this convention is supposed to take place in texas. the governor of texas was supposed to speak. he has been pulled out of a speaking engagement
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and will send a pre—recorded message instead. there are lawmakers expected to be in attendance. former president donald trump is expected to be in attendance but we're also hearing that there are going to be protesters, too. counter protesters who are going to be there. many of those people saying it is time for us here in the united states to enact gun measures, gun laws and tougher restrictions with people being able to purchase guns. ukrainian officials say ten people have been killed and 35 wounded by russian missile strikes against a national guard base in the eastern dnipro district. russian—backed separatist leaders claim they've captured the town of lyman —a key russian target, in the donbas region. meanwhile, ukraine's president, volodymyr zelensky, has said the eastern donbas region could become uninhabited as a result of russia's offensive aimed at capturing more territory there. in his latest online video, mr zelensky said moscow seemed
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intent on reducing cities to ashes. severodonetsk — which the russians are trying to encircle — is coming under heavy attack. the mood music of these statements, both from the president and his advisers and regional politicians, really is changing. there is an understanding or even an acceptance that the towns like severodonetsk and lysychansk, two crucial cities in that part of the donbas, are really coming under pressure. we understand there is intense fighting on the outskirts of severodonetsk and in the last ten minutes, the russian forces have claimed they have taken a crucial village just outside slaviansk that they have been fighting over for a while. so the screws are being tightened on ukrainian forces in the region. we have heard about astonishing levels of aerial bombardment, artillery fire and missiles coming in. that is why president zelensky has used this phrase about trying to make the region uninhabitable, burning it to the ground. he even went further in his address, using the word genocide to describe
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what is happening in the donbas, to suggest that the russians are not only killing his people, but moving in their own. so a really grim assessment from the ukrainian president. our security correspondent frank gardner has been giving us the latest from the perspective of nato. despite the kind of upbeat assessments that were given everyday by the uk of defence and other analysts, the fact is that the russians are using overwhelming false itinerary and what is called fires, missile strikes, air strikes to try and encircle ukrainian forces. they've been steadily taking village after village. most of these names are places that you and i haven't heard of. most of us. they are steadily encircling the ukrainian forces that have been defending there. moving towards their goal of essentially taking over the whole of the donbas. and
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essentially russia will annex than the way it has done with crimea but it will be annexing a wasteland, as president zelensky has said. and you can see pretty clearly the way this is going to go. the russians initially but far more than they could chew, beaten in the north and it was a stalemate in the south. i couldn't go any further than the south but they have now concentrated their forces on the eastern russian speaking districts and they will probably then announce a ceasefire which will leave their forces in place and ukraine will say, no, we don't accept that so it will drag on. it is not a good situation. six soldiers and a veteran have been arrested on suspicion of drugs and money laundering offences. the ministry of defence says they were detained across the uk during a planned operation by the royal military police. three of them remain in custody. our correspondent, sean dilley explained
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how the arrests began at the mons barracks in aldershot on wednesday morning. it was around 630 in the morning. buffy simultaneously in windsor. the police and the local area and the royal military police searched a property there. north wales also had property there. north wales also had property search all in connection with the six serving irish guards who were arrested and a veteran of the coldstream guards. the allegations, they are serious. they are related to allegations of conspiracy to supply drugs as well as money—laundering and lending offences. we do know that three of those individuals remain in custody. so, i mean, obviously, we don't know who the individuals involved are, what their duties would have been that the irish guards, what are they tasked with? me that the irish guards, what are they tasked with?— that the irish guards, what are they tasked with? ~ ., ,, ., j , tasked with? we do know they're very operational- — tasked with? we do know they're very operational. the _ tasked with? we do know they're very operational. the irish _ tasked with? we do know they're very operational. the irish guards - tasked with? we do know they're very operational. the irish guards have - operational. the irish guards have been very active in afghanistan and iraq. we know that those detained to
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a serving range from guardsmen through to sergeant so, typically, people would recognise the world over the irish guards by the iconic bearskin hats and the red tunics because, not only do they do the trooping the colour and guide royal palaces, they haven't really important role, that regiment. and they say they are due to the trooping the colour for the queen's jubilee celebrations ministry of defence have said those involved, the six current irish guards, guardsmen got people involved in this, will not be involved in trooping the colour on thursday. they say, as one would imagine, that the army doesn't tolerate fraudulent or illegal activity but while the investigation is ongoing into these allegations, it would be inappropriate for them to comment further. , ., ., ~i inappropriate for them to comment further. , ., ., ,, ., ., further. temper look at the weather. we have got — further. temper look at the weather. we have got some _ further. temper look at the weather. we have got some sunshine - further. temper look at the weather. we have got some sunshine across i we have got some sunshine across many parts of the country today. the difference is north—south, a few like. strong sunshine, high grass pollen levels across many parts of england and wales. for the north a
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bit more cloud. most showers that are coming in on that wind are across northern parts of scotland will top one or two possible for northern ireland, southern scotland and northern england where temperatures are going to be around the mid—teens, by the south with more sunshine it is going to be warmer. 21 degrees. a lovely afternoon and evening to come across wales, the middens, sudden infant. further north a lot of the showers of fade away overnight tonight. continuing across northern scotland. windy returning a bit lighter and with clear skies damages could be down to six or 7 degrees. that is how we start the weekend. many places dry and sunny to begin with. we'll see cloud tending to build up a little bit. in a two showers are possible across scotland, may be northern and eastern parts of england. many places will be dry. it cool a northerly piece of damages will be a little bit lower than today. heading into sunday, it continues to cool down. pick a cloud, more in the way of showers southern and eastern parts of the uk and that northerly breeze still in place. damages will be a lot lower. 12 degrees across eastern parts of
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scotland and eastern england.
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hello, this is bbc news. i'm joanna gosling and these are the headlines. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. labour welcomes the move but criticises the government's response to the crisis saying it called for a windfall tax on oil companies months ago. a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting, as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. and it emerges that the husband of one of the teachers killed by the attacker in texas, died of a heart attack shortly after dropping off flowers at her memorial.
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with more than 200 cases of monkeypox confirmed globally by health officials, the world health organization says "quick action" is needed to contain outbreaks. ukraine warns that russia's offensive in donbas could result in the region becoming uninhabited. # so when you're near me. # darling, can't you hear me? # sos. it's been more than do years since abba's last tour, but they finally performed onstage again last night — in digital form as abba—tars. this month brings an end to coventry�*s title as the uk's city of culture, after hosting a year long festival of events. today we're at the reel store — the uk's first permanent immersive gallery — where our corrrespondent trish adudu has been keeping across what the city has to offer. i am here at war memorial park and it is fantastic. we are going to be losing our tenure
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as city of culture and we are gutted, but what a fantastic way to end it with radio 1's big weekend and as you can see, radio 1 have a stage here and if you can't get to coventry, all of the tickets are sold out, and they will be broadcasting the big weekend throughout the three days and it starts today and goes through to sunday and i tell you, it's going to be magnificent, look at that big stage, you will see the likes of ed sheeran, calvin harris, calvin harris, harry styles, ksi, it's going to be wonderful. a huge stage and somebody who promised a summer of surprises and promised big events would come to commentary because of city of culture is the creative director. this is incredible, isn't it? it's so amazing and we worked for three years to bring the event of the city and we've had to fight off stiff competition because other cities have wanted it but it's amazing that we have it here and what a treat
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the people of coventry are in for. 60% on tickets when two people from the city and radioi have been in the city for two weeks now doing workshops in schools, training the next generation of broadcasters and presenters and radio technicians and people that are going to work on festivals like this in the future and it's such an amazing collaboration. what is it like to be the chief head at a city of culture? is it pressure? do you have to work hard on thinking about big events? we work hard behind the scenes to make it happen and they don't just pop up and appear. we have a massive team of people who work really, really hard and since last year when we opened with coventry moves and _ the terry hall sessions and the walk and all through the year we have had some major highlights and it's not over yet. there is still the assembly festival gardens and we have opened the real store and you can see daniel lismore
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and so much going on. it's been a trying year because of the pandemic with the ups and downs and self isolating, so how have you managed with that? in every challenge there are opportunities and we tried to be optimistic and do the best we can for the city so we can deliver on promises and i think last year we still delivered a massive programme of events and this year we _ have a big programme of events but they are for bigger audiences because people can gather and come together and just enjoy art out in the open and it is exciting. the next city will be announced next tuesday. what advice would you give to them? just enjoy it because this is a once—in—a—lifetime adventure that will never happen again and whoever wins, and i wish them all the best of luck, they will deserve it and do something amazing and they will keep evolving what city of culture should be and putting communities at the centre as well. would you ever imagined we would be stood here in the war memorial park about to post a massive
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music festival? it is amazing. we are a music city and we have the godiva festival every year which brings in 60,000 people so it's amazing we _ have the radioi big weekend and there is a platform for local talent with the bbc introducing stage and it's also a great way of promoting all of the brilliant talent coming from the city, from ska and two—tone to pop and rap and everything in between. it's very exciting. what about you ? you have taken us through the year, but where are you going to go off to? i need to go and lie on a beach, but i'm going to stop for a while, seriously and i need to take in everything we have done and reflect and i will think about what i will do next. i will still be working with the trust on all of the evaluations and storytelling
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and make sure we wrap it up and hand over to the— next city. well, before we hand over to the next city, coventry has certainly enjoyed hosting city of culture and what an incredible year it has been. the prime minister denied it would be inflationary and has been visiting _ be inflationary and has been visiting a _ be inflationary and has been visiting a training academy in county— visiting a training academy in county durham, and spoke about a range _ county durham, and spoke about a range of— county durham, and spoke about a range of things, so let's listen to what _ range of things, so let's listen to what he — range of things, so let's listen to what he had to say.— range of things, so let's listen to what he had to say. making sure we su ort what he had to say. making sure we sopport people _ what he had to say. making sure we support people through _ what he had to say. making sure we support people through tough - what he had to say. making sure we| support people through tough times as i said we would, and it is a big bazooka, £1200 for 8 million homes across the country, £300 extra for pensioners entitled to cold weather payments and another hundred £50 for people who are on disability benefits and of course putting more money to local government who are
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finding things tough. i'm not going to pretend this is going to fix everything immediately and there will still be pressures, but it is a substantial commitment by the government to get us through what will be, there will be an increase in energy prices around the world. what i think it will also help to do is get us through until i believe that prices will start to abate and we will be in a much stronger position. the reason will be in a strong position as we have so many people in work helping us, giving us the tax base we need to look after everybody else. a high wage, high employment economy. are you worried that spending 10 million more than you will raise from the windfall tax levy may be inflationary? we've looked at that carefully and the answer to that is no, because i
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don't think it will lead necessarily to more discretionary spending, simply because people's outgoings are going to go up and have been going up already as a result of the increased costs of energy and food, so it is intended to help, to match the needs of people right now and we can do it because we are in a strong economic position and we have loads of people in work, unemployment at the lowest level since 1974 which i don't think people would have predicted when we went into covid and lockdown, and what we are dealing with is the after—shocks of covid, the economic after—shocks, spiking energy prices and we have to get through it and we are using the fiscalfire get through it and we are using the fiscal fire power to get through it and we are using the fiscalfire power to do it get through it and we are using the fiscal fire power to do it and will come out strong at the other side. what's the difference between the labour party and conservative party on tax and spend? bier?r
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labour party and conservative party on tax and spend?— labour party and conservative party on tax and spend? very simple. when it comes to this _ on tax and spend? very simple. when it comes to this particular— on tax and spend? very simple. when it comes to this particular policy, - it comes to this particular policy, what it does is it is much more generous and this gives £1200 to 8 million households but also the levy is designed so that companies can offset investments they are making in new energy supply or green in new energy supply 0" green technology to the in new energy supply or green technology to the tune of 91p in the pound, so what i've been saying for months and months, if you listen carefully to my answers, we want to have a solution that protects people but also protects investment in the economy, because as we come through this, the way to fix the problem of inflation in energy prices is also to have more sustainable energy supply in the uk and that is why we
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are moving to 50 gigawatts of wind and nuclear and all the other investments we are making, but we need the private companies to do the same. ., ., ., ., , same. you mention the raft of help announced — same. you mention the raft of help announced by _ same. you mention the raft of help announced by the _ same. you mention the raft of help announced by the chancellor - announced by the chancellor yesterday. that is a temporary measure as he said, one of payment, so how will that help struggling families long term because it is a sticking plaster? hate families long term because it is a sticking plaster?— sticking plaster? we have to do stuff that is _ sticking plaster? we have to do stuff that is timely _ sticking plaster? we have to do stuff that is timely and it - sticking plaster? we have to do stuff that is timely and it is - sticking plaster? we have to do stuff that is timely and it is the | stuff that is timely and it is the right time to do it and targeted at those people, so three quarters of the homes that benefit will be the most vulnerable and overall third of the households in the uk will benefit from what we are doing, so it's a temporary thing because what you want is the lateral strength of the economy and peoples wages and employment to be continuing to power us forward and that will happen, but
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what you need to do is help people cope now with the particular spike in energy prices that are predicted. you say you have helped people now, but there's an argument, isn't there? a degree families will not need the help and some people will get it with two households and get it more than once, so isn't this a policy which benefits people who are already wealthy at the expense of the taxpayer question no, ijust said, the overwhelming majority of the homes. the said, the overwhelming ma'ority of the homes. ., , ., , said, the overwhelming ma'ority of the homes.— said, the overwhelming ma'ority of the homes. ., , ., , ., the homes. the households that will benefit are those _ the homes. the households that will benefit are those most _ the homes. the households that will benefit are those most vulnerable. l benefit are those most vulnerable. it will be lost money, potentially. this is massively redistributed and we should look at what the iss and others have had to say about this, and the resolution foundation, it's and the resolution foundation, it's a massively redistributed fun. you talk about the _ a massively redistributed fun. you talk about the right thing to do, but the chancellor yesterday said yesterday he would donate his £400 to charity. will you do the same? mr;
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to charity. will you do the same? tj�*t arrangements are to charity. will you do the same? m1: arrangements are different because to charity. will you do the same? m1 arrangements are different because i live in a government flat. i think it is important that the people should recognise that these payments will not necessarily cover the increased cost fully. we cannot cover every single cost people will face. we have to be realistic about that. however, they will go a long way towards helping people. moving on slihtl . way towards helping people. moving on slightly. for more _ way towards helping people. moving on slightly. for more of— way towards helping people. moving on slightly. for more of your - way towards helping people. moving on slightly. for more of your mps i on slightly. for more of your mps have called for your resignation since the reporter. are you confident you have enough backing in the party to survive? yes. confident you have enough backing in the party to survive?— the party to survive? yes, but i thinki the party to survive? yes, but i think i gave _ the party to survive? yes, but i think i gave some _ the party to survive? yes, but i think i gave some pretty - the party to survive? yes, but i| think i gave some pretty vintage the party to survive? yes, but i - think i gave some pretty vintage and exhaustive answers on all of that subject the other day in the house of commons and then in a subsequent
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press conference. you of commons and then in a subsequent press conference.— press conference. you were aware of what was happening _ press conference. you were aware of what was happening so _ press conference. you were aware of what was happening so why - press conference. you were aware of what was happening so why did - press conference. you were aware of what was happening so why did you i what was happening so why did you tolerate the culture at that time? if you look at the answers i gave in the house over more than two hours. you don't feel people deserve it to hearing from you here in person question what you will be able to see i answer that very extensively andindeed see i answer that very extensively and indeed subsequently to representatives from your organisation in a further press conference.— organisation in a further press conference. s . ., conference. and what i also said that what we _ conference. and what i also said that what we want _ conference. and what i also said that what we want to _ conference. and what i also said that what we want to do - conference. and what i also said that what we want to do is - conference. and what i also said that what we want to do is focus j conference. and what i also said i that what we want to do is focus on driving jobs, that what we want to do is focus on drivingjobs, driving that what we want to do is focus on driving jobs, driving investment in this country and what we are doing todayis this country and what we are doing today is talking about getting people off welfare and into work. in one of the most remarkable things about what is happening today is we are helping people into gigabit
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broadband but we have 347,000 people off welfare and into work thanks to the way to work scheme. t off welfare and into work thanks to the way to work scheme.— the way to work scheme. i have an important question _ the way to work scheme. i have an important question here _ the way to work scheme. i have an important question here in - the way to work scheme. i have an important question here in the - important question here in the north—east. one of our viewers called mark who lives in county durham contacted us and is struggling with his bills, his energy bills, and he is currently, as we speak, at a car—boot sale selling possessions to help him get through to the end of the month. what can you say to mark and people like him who are really on the bones? to like him who are really on the bones? ., ~i like him who are really on the bones? ., ,, ., , , , bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say. — bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say. first _ bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say, first of— bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say, first of all, _ bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say, first of all, i _ bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say, first of all, i know - bones? to mark and everybody else, let me say, first of all, i know how. let me say, first of all, i know how tough it feels more people and it will continue and i can't pretend we are going to fix everything but we can certainly help, so for people like mark, what we are doing and people facing particular hardship, in addition to everything ijust said, the £1200 to 8 million homes. we do know this. if you are
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continuing to do more and people continue to struggle, we need more. that's right. and what we are also doing is another £500 million to local councils to help people like mark who are facing particular hardship. so my message to mark is we will help you in any way we can and we can't fix everything and we should not pretend that we can but what we will do is make sure we are in an economically robust position so we have people in a high wage, high skilljobs as we go forward and continue to invest in infrastructure and skills and technology and that is the best long—term solution. you is the best long-term solution. you had is the best long—term solution. you had phenomenal success in 2019 in parts of the northeast and brexit has been pushed through and the cost of living crisis is biting and your popularity has taken a hit in the polls. is this an area slipping away
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from you? mr; polls. is this an area slipping away from ou? i, t.. polls. is this an area slipping away from ou? g .,, , polls. is this an area slipping away from ou? g , ., ., from you? my 'ob is not to give any runnin from you? my job is not to give any running commentary _ from you? my job is not to give any running commentary on _ from you? my job is not to give any running commentary on politics, ii running commentary on politics, i have to get on and deliver the people of this country. borisjohnson talking about a range of issues including the cost of living crisis. the headlines on bbc news. warnings that the cost of living crisis will continue for at least another year if oil and gas prices do not fall. but the government insists its financial aid will help people cope. a nhs trust at the centre of concerns about avoidable deaths and injuries to babies has been told to make immediate improvements to its maternity services. tributes are paid to the 19 children and two teachers killed in the texas school shooting. as parents criticise the police for not taking faster action against the gunman. an autistic man is taking sainsbury�*s to court after he was stopped from bringing his cat into one of its stores to ease his anxiety. ian fenn says the pet is his support animal — but sainsbury�*s raised concerns over health and safety. our legal correspondent dominic casciani has been explaning why it could become a landmark case.
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whether it's hopping on the bus, doing the weekly shop... what would you like? you've got to have a look. or relaxing in the pub, chloe is always supporting ian through daily life's ups and downs. ian fenn has autism. busy and noisy environments trigger anxiety. he says he's trained chloe to help him cope. she's my companion, and my life is so much better with her at my side. i'm not alone any more. she brings structure to my life. she wakes me up in the morning. she tells me when to go to bed. you know, it's difficult to know how she feels about the relationship, but i feel that we're almost a team now. ian defines chloe as an assistance or service animal, a bit like a guide dog for the blind. he regularly writes in advance to somewhere he wants to visit to explain she's fulfilling what he says is an essential purpose, but she's not
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universally accepted, as he found in a local sainsbury�*s. excuse me, sir. you can leave the cat outside and come and shop. that's all right. ian thought he'd secured the supermarket�*s agreement to take chloe into the store. i ended up becoming quite upset, and i literally got to the point where i couldn't actually remember why i was in the store and what i needed to buy. i stayed in the house for two weeks before i... for two weeks? for two weeks until i got the confidence back to go out. he's now taking sainsbury�*s to court, claiming the supermarket has breached equality laws. in what could become a national test case, his lawyers will argue that chloe, like a guide dog, is an auxiliary aide essential for daily life. the key and fundamental principles are that service providers have a legal obligation to provide reasonable adjustments to accommodate disabled customers. but there's never been anything
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specific in relation to anything other than a support dog, in this country at least. if the law really is as grey and fuzzy as a tabby kitten, then judges will have to consider what makes an assistance animal. now sainsbury�*s says it's in the right. it has concerns about food hygiene and safety, but it's now asking environmental health officials for their opinion on chloe visiting. assistance or support animals have been a growing trend. this guide horse was allowed onto the metro in newcastle upon tyne, but in the united states, airlines urged washington to act after a passenger wanted to take this peacock onto a flight for emotional support. i'm not kidding. this woman is wrangling her peacock into the airport. the government there has introduced greater restrictions, ending what critics said had become animal anarchy in the skies. but what would you say to people who say, i understand the animal's desirable, but it's not really necessary for daily life?
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shouldn't you just leave chloe at home? i appreciate i'm a bloke wandering around with a cat, which is a bit unusual. what i want to be able to do is just run my life normally. when somebody says, "no, you can't because you have this auxiliary aid, this creature that is helping you," it's really upsetting. dominic casciani, bbc news. a spokesperson for sainsbury�*s said, 'while we understand customers need support in our stores, safety is our highest priority�*. the supermarket says it's working with environmental health to see if they can help mr fenn visit their stores without compromising food hygeine standards. it's been more than 40 years since their last tour, but last night swedish pop legends abba hit the stage once more — well, sort of. the band have created digital versions of themselves as they were in their heyday — and these so—called abba—tars are performing with live musicians in london.
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our entertainment correspondent colin paterson went along to watch the show. the waiting was over. # so when you're near me, darling, can't you hear me? # sos... more than 40 years after the last abba concert, they returned to the stage last night — albeit in digitalform, looking like they did in their 1970s heyday. the uncannily life—like abba avatars played 20 songs, including sos and mamma mia, kate moss was seen heading to the dance floor surrounded by bouncers, and the audience loved it. something you've never seen before and you'll be, like...they�*re looking around everywhere. oh, my god, when they did dancing queen, it was spectacular. what they put into this show is mind—blowing. it was so real, it was so alike, - it was better than i even expected. at the end, the members also came land it wasjust a dream come true. | absolutely, it looked so realistic, it really does. so clear — the lighting is fantastic.
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it just was fantastic. they were just awesome. absolutely awesome. they were there! they were there on screen. it was just the best ever. did you cry at any point? i cried four times! what got you? seeing agnetha's face. so a lot of happy punters. and during the show, abba were sitting two rows behind me. during dancing queen, i turned around and saw frida looking out over the audience with a huge, beaming smile. cheering. and earlier on the red carpet, i'd spoken to the whole group. agnetha, frida, what made you change your mind and decide to work with abba again? i've dreamed of this for years! we love our music. we love to sing. we love the material that benny and bjorn write... excellent, and it's a challenge. abba has never left us, in my heart. in our hearts.
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so it was not so...difficult decision, because the music is a part of us. how was the experience for you of seeing yourself as your younger self? it's amazing because, in a way, you look at yourself on stage. it's so well done, so you think, actually, it's real people standing up there, performing, and then you're sitting, yourself, watching yourself! it's a very extraordinary feeling, it's hard to describe, i must say! i think the only way - to understand what this is, you have to come and see it. yeah. it's sort of a non—explainable. we've tried this for two years, to explain what it is, what it. will be, but that's impossible. you need to go and see it. i think it's a new experience for all of us and it will be so exciting tonight because i haven't seen anything. and i think you can safely say that nobody�*s ever seen anything
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like this because this is a first — this is pushing boundaries. the first reviews are in, and are very positive. there's already talk of a plan for the show to run in london for at least three years. and abba say they know of other major acts who are already thinking of copying their idea of copying themselves. colin paterson, bbc news, the abba arena. some breaking news to bring you and we have heard that a tory mp has resigned his government responsibilities as a result of the stuart gray report into parties at downing street, the mp for eastleigh and i will reduce some of his statement. —— sue gray. i've always made clear like most of you that i was shocked and angered by the revelations when so many people across eastleigh followed the rules and sacrifice so many things on the need to stop the spread of
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coronavirus. we saw the best of everyone during the outbreak of the pandemic. the nhs performed under great pressure and communities came together to help those vulnerable people who needed assistance and i fundamentally believe that the government did the right thing in order to allow us to be one of the first countries to be out of lockdown. he says, revelations from the sue gray report that staff and cleaners were not treated properly was both disappointing and unacceptable. it's right that the prime minister apologised to staff and it clearly shows a culture in number ten that was distasteful and i'm glad that they have been several reforms that sue gray has welcomed. it is clear to me that a deep mistrust in both the government and conservative party has been created by these events, something that pains me personally and he said as a result he has decided to resign from his governmental responsibilities as part of the private secretary is part of the private secretary is part of the home office and we will bring you more on that later. the one o'clock news is coming up in a few moments. now for a look at the weather with darren. we will take a look at the forecast for the week and later on and let's
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focus on today. differences in north and south across the uk. across southern and, wales and more sunshine through the day but we have high uv levels and also high pollen levels, grass pollen at this time of the year and further north things are different in the levels are lower for a start and there is more cloud around as well and we've also seen some showers over the past few hours seeing showers coming in across northern scotland and some of those heavy and one or two showers possible further south across the country into northern ireland and northern england where temperatures will be around to the mid teens and further south is more sunshine on the windies and down it will feel warm up with temperatures 20 or 21 degrees were financed to the day are crossing the num wales and the showers further north most will fade away overnight with one or two continuing to affect the northern parts of scotland and a bit more cloud coming into northern ireland but otherwise clear skies and the winds are dropping so temperatures will be six or 7 degrees. the main story for the weekend continues to
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be this cooling down. there will be some sunshine but we could see a few showers around as well and we have high pressure tantalisingly close to the uk but it continues to sit to the uk but it continues to sit to the west and might retreat towards iceland and that is allowing the northerly winds to come our way and as those continue to blow through the weekend, so the air gets colder from the north. as we start the week and many places will start sunny and dry and we will see cloud building up dry and we will see cloud building up through the day a bit and it could give one or two showers, mainly northern scotland and northern and eastern parts of england but many places will have a drier day and a noticeable northerly breeze down the north sea coast and it will be cooler for many areas and it will be cooler for many areas and it could make 18 in the central belt of scotland and 19 in south wales. second half of the weekend sees falling pressures and it moves away and we see figure cloud that will give a few more showers, especially in southern and eastern areas but still with the northerly winds drawing down cooler air so temperatures will be lower for all
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of us and perhaps no better than 11 or 12 degrees in eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. the high pressure continues to pull away next week, lowering the pressure and that brings more cloud and possibly more showers.
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nottingham university hospitals nhs trust is ordered to improve its maternity services. the units are rated inadequate by the health watchdog after dozens of mothers and babies died or were injured. you put your faith that they are doing the right thing by you and your baby and... you trust them, because that is what they are there to do. why wouldn't you trust them? also this lunchtime: the prime minister admits cost of living measures announced by the chancellor yesterday would "not fix everything" by the chancellor yesterday would "not fix everything" for everyone, but was temporary support to help people through. police say the gunman who killed children and teachers at school in texas on tuesday entered the building unchallenged. liverpool chase a third trophy of season in the champions league final tomorrow with their fans very much in mind.

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