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tv   Newswatch  BBC News  May 28, 2022 3:45am-4:01am BST

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newswatch of correspondence to newswatch with damning to the world of journals, specifically those of the bbc. julie baker's e—mail was typical. —— journalists. and cath roberts asked: sue gray's report dominated much of the output on the news channel. she interviewed down the line the former head of the home civil service, the former head of the home civilservice, lord the former head of the home civil service, lord kerslake. civil service, lord kersla ke. as civil service, lord kerslake. as you've seen before news was, though standing outside number 10 can get distracted in the middle of interviews. its middle of interviews. its conclusions _ middle of interviews. its conclusions are - middle of interviews. its conclusions are absolutely damning, in my view, and, for me, the issue was never about fines, it was about... me, the issue was never about fines, it was about. . ._ fines, it was about... lord
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kerslake. _ fines, it was about... lord kerslake, just _ fines, it was about... lord kerslake, just want - fines, it was about... lord kerslake, just want to - kerslake, just want to interrupt, i want is a over my shoulder we can see the prime minister returning to downing street. he isjust pulling up behind us at the moment. boris johnson, should you not resign today? will you resign? borisjohnson today? will you resign? boris johnson obviously today? will you resign? borisjohnson obviouslyjust returning are not making any further comment. the presenter did apologise to her guest for interrupting the interview, but they didn't change the view of james little. now, the government's decision in 2january frees now, the government's decision in 2 january frees the now, the government's decision in 2january frees the license fee for the next two years meant the bbc had an annual shortfall of £285 million. and
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we discovered on thursday what savings the corporation plans in order to plug the gap. they include the scrapping of the original current deal for —— first round we are england which was a replacement for the programme inside out. the domestic news channel and the international racing world news will merge into a single channel and some of the world services foreign—language services foreign—language services will go online only. those plans were greeted with dismay by some viewers, with joanna writing that she's... meanwhile this thought was posted. and chris expressed concern over continuing erosion to bbc output. well, with me now is the
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manager in charge of the news division, jonathan munro, the interim director of bbc news. thank you for coming on as was. 0n merging the news channels, surely uk licence fee players —— has need a focused news service, how do you do that if you are serving a world audience at the same time? we are making _ audience at the same time? - are making sure that the vp is get the service they need, covering the uk annie wells. what we are doing, socially, in these proposals are taking two separate news channels who already have quite a lot of shared output, especially around certain times of the day or certain stories that are relevant to both services and rather than havejewmacro rather than have jewmacro channels rather than havejewmacro channels that have shared output, will have one channel that has the ability to split apart, so when there are stories that aren't relevant overseas but are for the uk audiences, we will do exactly that. that might be certain times of day, it might be around certain types of stories, so the quality and depth ofjournalism that we are delivering to the uk licence fee payer is absolutely baked into the thinking, we want to deliver the best of the bbc to
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the news channel audience. it the news channel audience. it is interesting to think about it. he regularly complain us. we had one that we read out there, that the mozgov that they get a weekends, they don't think it works.— think it works. we're really roud think it works. we're really proud of — think it works. we're really proud of the _ think it works. we're really proud of the fact _ think it works. we're really proud of the fact that - think it works. we're really proud of the fact that we . think it works. we're really i proud of the fact that we can bring global coverage on a scale no other news organisation has into the uk. that is a strength of the bbc is the fact that we have got here is a lovely well, colleagues working in all sorts of different environments going back to the domestic audience. we do need to work harder to make those stories for different audiences that are separate. we have some lessons on how to do that. but overall the principle of being proud of ourforeign coverage the principle of being proud of our foreign coverage coming into the uk and proud of our uk coverage to overseas audiences is what we want to build on. we have talked _ is what we want to build on. we have talked about digital first as part of these changes, prioritising online output, but many older viewers and listeners aren't digital and they are the ones who tend to watch tv bulletins and the ones who tend to be that licence fees. , .,
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who tend to be that licence fees. , . h, fees. yes, there are some peeple. — fees. yes, there are some peeple. of— fees. yes, there are some people, of course, - fees. yes, there are some people, of course, who i fees. yes, there are some | people, of course, who are members of the audience or list usually capable, less digitally equip and others, of course thatis equip and others, of course that is the case and it will be the case where a very long time to come. changing habits is a slow but nonetheless very entrenched pattern among audiences and we need, as an organisation, to move some of our resources, not all of them, but some of them to those areas where audiences are growing. for example, if you take, this week, when rishi sunak, the chancellor made announcements about money for heating bills, fuel bowls in the uk, that story alone had more people going to a news website about 10 million people in the same day than the news channel would reach in the average week. when you see that that's the way that audiences are behaving, that audiences are behaving, that gap is growing, not widening, between diesel consumption and what we call linear consumption, people sitting down watching a traditional channel, doesn't mean it is going away completely, but the gap is widening, so when we got finite resources, when you referred to in your introduction, we need
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to prioritise the areas where the audiences are growing. world service languages, part of this digitalfirst world service languages, part of this digital first policy, will see some of those wild first language services go to online only, digital only, aren't you worried about losing aren't you worried about losing a lot of global audiences by doing that, who aren't online? some of the language services are already digital only, in fact. not all of them have what we call linear outputs right now, radio or television, so thatjenny will accelerate the next few months and years. that is because, again, that is where the audiences are moving. might there be a short—term loss in what we call reach, the number of people coming to our journalism? as possible, if we get too far ahead of the market, but in the longer run thatis market, but in the longer run that is where the audiences will be on a sustainable basis. and if we're not moving into those markets, overseas and in the uk, we are actually then going to see long—term decline and that is the thing we want to avoid. . ., . to avoid. the director-general told the house _ to avoid. the director-general told the house of _ to avoid. the director-general told the house of lords - to avoid. the director-general told the house of lords select committee earlier this week that bbc has lost 1200 staff in
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about 18 months and he said more would be leaving. at what point does it get too much to be able to sustain a proper news service? i be able to sustain a proper news service?— be able to sustain a proper news service? i think that is a really important _ news service? i think that is a really important balance - news service? i think that is a really important balance we i really important balance we have got to strike. we have to make sure that even if we take us out of the system for reasons to do with the funding that you mentioned and, of course, inflation right now, so we do have a real cost control operation going on a bbc, we are spending public money, after all, are spending public money, afterall, it are spending public money, after all, it is important for us to recognise that quality products, whether in use or elsewhere, requires a certain level of resilience and skills in the star. actually, by converting the model of the news channel we actually making a little bit less output overall, so we are not stretching our staff to more with fewer people, we are actually reducing the amount of hours that we produce in, for example, television broadcast news. so, overall, but is a challenge that we really accept, we have really got to make sure that the polity and the skills behind the quality is delivered and therefore do a little bit less with fewer people. little bit less with fewer --eole. ~ ,
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people. will there be management - people. will there be management job - people. will there be l management job cuts? people. will there be - management job cuts? you people. will there be _ management job cuts? you will managementjob cuts? you will be managing fewer people after all. ~ , . . all. we will be managing fewer --eole. all. we will be managing fewer peeple- kim — all. we will be managing fewer people. kim davis— all. we will be managing fewer people. kim davis said - all. we will be managing fewer people. kim davis said overall| people. kim davis said overall across the whole of the bbc, around a thousand, we haven't said yet, because we don't know yet precisely where the divisions will be, x number of people in this areay number of people in this areay number of people in this area, that are still under way. so we don't know what grade or seniority those posts will be. jonathan, thank yom — those posts will be. jonathan, thank you. before _ those posts will be. jonathan, thank you. before we - those posts will be. jonathan, thank you. before we go, - thank you. before we go, viewers of the news channel on tuesday morning might have had a surprise, if they were looking at the techer, the banner at the bottom of the screen which features scrolling news headlines or, in this case, something very different. after a slow state, he eased through in straight sets and is one step closer to reaching week two of a grand slam for the verso. lydia campbell, bbc news. . . , ., news. the defending champion, novak djokovic _ news. the defending champion, novak djokovic is _ news. the defending champion, novak djokovic is also _ news. the defending champion, novak djokovic is also through l novak djokovic is also through after_ novak djokovic is also through after beating japan's kishida nishioka. . ., after beating japan's kishida nishioka. . . ., nishioka. the claim that manchester _ nishioka. the claim that manchester united - nishioka. the claim that manchester united are l nishioka. the claim that - manchester united are rubbish doesn't smack of bbc
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impartiality, and the rain everywhere did not meet with meteorological conditions on the day, so some viewers were left confused. john trappett was one of them. —— trafford. so what was going on? a couple of hours later all was revealed. as. of hours later all was revealed.— of hours later all was revealed. �* ., ,., revealed. a little earlier some of ou revealed. a little earlier some of you may — revealed. a little earlier some of you may have _ revealed. a little earlier some of you may have noticed - of you may have noticed something pretty unusual on the figure that runs along the bottom of the screen with news, making a comment about manchester united, and i hope that manchester united fans were offended by it. let me just explain what was happening. behind someone was training to learn how to use the techer and to put text on the techer and to put text on the techer and to put text on the techer so they were just writing random things, not in earnest, but that comment
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appeared stop so apologies if you saw the annual offended and you saw the annual offended and you are a fan of manchester united, but that was a mistake and it wasn't meant to appear on the screens —— ticker. that's life television for you. thank you for all your commas this week. if you want to share your opinions of what you hear on bbc news, e—mail news watch. 0r on bbc news, e—mail news watch. or you can on bbc news, e—mail news watch. 0ryou canfind on bbc news, e—mail news watch. or you can find us on twitter. you can call us. and do have a look for previous interviews on our website. that's all from us. rebecca jones will be here for more of your thoughts on bbc news coverage next week anai will be backin coverage next week anai will be back in a fortnight. goodbye. hello there. it was a warm and sunny day across the southern half of britain from friday, and we saw temperatures pretty widely across the south and south—east reach around 21 degrees. now, we're not going to see temperatures that high for quite a few days now. certainly into the weekend,
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things are set to turn cooler as we start to pick up a northerly breeze, we could even see a few showers as well. now, many places will be dry on saturday thanks to high pressure. but as this area of high pressure continues to push towards iceland, it will open the floodgates to this northerly wind, which is coming down from the arctic. so, for saturday, we start dry, on the cool side, there'll be plenty of sunshine around, but into the afternoon, clouds will develop, most across northern and eastern areas and we could see the odd shower here. northern scotland, down parts of eastern england could see the odd shower, too, but further south and west you are, the best of the sunshine and the best temperatures. we could see 19 or 20 degrees in south wales. but quite cool across north sea coasts, especially with that on—shore northerly breeze. now, through saturday night, most of the showers fade away, there could still be a few pushing into northern and eastern scotland, it does remain breezy. elsewhere, the winds will be light and the clearest skies with it all the cool night to come, i think, a range of around 5—8 degrees typically. sunday is looking cooler — we could see why —
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the blue hue extended its way southwards around this area of high pressure will be pushing towards iceland. so, it's going to feel quite disappointingly cool in fact across northern and eastern parts of the country throughout sunday. more cloud around generally across the country, and anywhere could catch a shower. they will be sunny spells in between but quite limited, i think a lot of places holding onto the cloud. it's going to be breezy in the north and east, that willjust make it feel even chillier, but lighter winds across the south—west. it's here where we'll see the highest temperatures again, 15, 16 degrees, disappointing for the time of year across northern and eastern scotland and eastern parts of england. into monday, we could see quite a bit of cloud around generally, we got a shallow area of low pressure across the uk, but there'll be barely any wind, so any showers that develop will be pretty slow—moving. sunshine will be quite limited, so that will affect the temperatures again. i think on the cool side, 11 to 1a or 15 degrees in the south. as we move into tuesday and wednesday, it's a similar sort of story with a slack air flow across the uk. i think most of the showers will tend to be across more northern and western areas through tuesday and wednesday, perhaps turning a bit drier
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and warmer in the south.
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this is bbc news. i'm rich preston. our top stories: more details have emerged from the school shooting in uvalde, texas. students repeatedly called 911 pleading for help as more than a dozen officers waited in the school's hallways for nearly an hour before entering the classroom. from the benefit of hindsight, where i'm sitting now, of course, it was not the right decision — it was the wrong decision. period. there is no — no excuse for that. man yells: 21 dead and you're gonna smile and laugh? - you got grandkids? protesters gather outside the annual meeting of the national rifle association, in texas as the convention continues inside. moscow's advance continues as russian—backed separatists claim they've captured a strategic town in north—eastern donbas.
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johnny depp's lawyers say accusations of domestic

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