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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 28, 2022 5:00pm-5:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 5pm... people travelling abroad are facing disruption at airports, stations and on the roads as the half—term getaway begins. dramatic pictures from torquay marina, where a large fire has broken out on a superyacht. more conservative mps publicly declare they have no confidence in the prime minister after sue gray's report into lockdown parties in downing street. former us president, donald trump, dismisses calls for gun reform days after 19 children and two teachers were killed by a teenage gunman in texas. liverpool and real madrid fans descend on paris to support their teams in the final of european club football's most prestigious prize.
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iam i am live at the start of france, the gates are open, kick—off three hours for what could be one of the great champions league finals. good afternoon. people are facing huge disruption to their travel plans as the half—term break gets under way. dozens of flights have been cancelled and there have been long delays at ports and on the roads, as well as cross—channel services. and there are warnings that the disruption is likely to continue for more than a week. let's take you through the latest developments. easyjet is cancelling more than 200 flights over the next ten days
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from gatwick airport, insisting it needs to in order "to provide reliable services over this busy period". there have been long queues at london's st pancras station for eurostar services across the channel as families head to disneyland paris and football fans try to get to the french capital ahead of the champions league final. and people are being urged to check the latest advice before travelling to the port of dover, where there are huge tailbacks as hundreds of lorries queue to get through. tourists, however, are being given priority. earlier i spoke to lisa minot, the sun's travel editor, who says staff cuts have caused the delays. u nfortu nately unfortunately it is down to staffing issues and easyjet, like many other airlines through the pandemic, had no income at all, billions in outgoings and they took the decision to make a lot of staff redundant. those staff, they imagined would
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come back when the schedules came back and travel was possible, but those staff have found otherjobs. it is not highly paid and the hours are anti—social so over the last two years perhaps they have found other jobs and that means they don't have the same number of crew coming back on board as quickly as they thought and they have to train new crews and that takes time and also in terms of vetting and security reasons. i think this is the reason we have the problem. the industry as a whole, airports as well, they have issues with this and they have tried to fly before they can walk and they don't have the staff to have the full schedules they are trying to run. an schedules they are trying to run. an interesting way of putting it, trying to fly before they can work. i suppose the contraction was so severe in the industry that people thought they could ease back in and from where you sit, is it fair to say maybe the industry somewhat underestimated how the recovery would pan out?—
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would pan out? they did underestimate _ would pan out? they did underestimate it - would pan out? they did underestimate it and - would pan out? they did l underestimate it and they would pan out? they did - underestimate it and they should would pan out? they did _ underestimate it and they should not have been selling flights. these are flights people have booked that are on the schedules. it really is a case that they put all of these flights back on and they could see huge demand, the minute the restrictions were lifted, people perhaps had not travelled for two years and were desperate to go on holidays and see friends and family, so the flights were in the system and people booked and then realise they did not have the crew to actually have those flights going out as they should. hence the cancellations. easyjet point out that normally there would be for hundred and 25 flights every day coming out of gatwick and the next ten days and they have cancelled just 20 for, but 20 for flights every day for ten days, that is 36,000 people who have had to organise new flights and cancel troops. and that is not great for the travelling public to have any kind of confidence in the industry. that raises the question of prices. they are already going up because of
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external factors, inflation and fuel costs. if you add the kind of lack of supply and a big demand, that is also going to push up prices further, notjust for passengers having to rebook flights, they are booking at the last minute, but presumably into the summer season? that is right and we will have to appreciate that airlines have made virtually no money, they have lost billions over the last couple of years and they are going to have to increase flights and will have increased staffing costs and costs increased staffing costs and costs in terms of fuel. we are going to have to accept that is the case. i think if people are prepared to accept flights are more expensive if they run, they are on time and not delayed and they run, they are not cancelled. that is why we have this perfect storm this weekend with flights being cancelled at such a busy period, even though those easyjet customers are due compensation, it will not be any
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goodin compensation, it will not be any good in terms of wanting to get away because any flights that are remaining might be hugely expensive and they won't be able to afford the flights that possibly are still available. ~ ., ., available. lisa minot, the travel editor for the _ available. lisa minot, the travel editor for the sun. _ firefighters are battling to extinguish a fire which has broken out on a superyacht in torquay marina. these dramatic pictures were taken from a drone and show billowing smoke from the 85 foot yacht as firefighters try to get the blaze under control. the fire service says it contains 8000 litres of diesel, which is why they have evacuated the marina and nearby beaches, never mind the horrible fumes. they're asking to keep doors and windows shut. and keep doors and windows shut. and keep clear. there have been no reported injuries at this time. police have not said who owns the yacht but say there is no direct
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threat to life but they are concerned about the risk of fuel becoming explosive so they have to becoming explosive so they have to be cautious on that. tens of thousands of football fans have converged on paris, where liverpool face real madrid in the champions league final in three hours' time. liverpool are looking to end the season with a third trophy and their spanish opponents are aiming to win the most prestigious prize in european club football for a 14th time. let's speak to 0lly, now who's outside the stade de france in saint—denis. what is the atmosphere lie? we are starting to see the numbers building up starting to see the numbers building up as people start to get ready to go into the stadium?— go into the stadium? absolutely terrific because _ go into the stadium? absolutely terrific because the _ go into the stadium? absolutely terrific because the gates - go into the stadium? absolutely terrific because the gates are i go into the stadium? absolutely . terrific because the gates are open, three hours ahead of kick—off in the 67th european cup final and between these teams, real madrid with 13 and liverpool with six. two of the greats of this competition. you can probably hear that it is good—natured, mostly real madrid good—natu red, mostly real madrid fans good—natured, mostly real madrid fans passing the walkway into the
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75,000 capacity stadium. a few liverpool fans coming through as well. he is definitely real madrid! good—natured. and i think everybody is so excited to have a ticket. 20,000 officially for liverpool, 20,000 officially for liverpool, 20,000 for real madrid and then uefa distribute 23,000 amongst member associations, sponsors, partners, 12,000 went on general sale globally and both teams command a huge global audience. these tickets, some people paid through the roof for them. but after a couple of flat champions league finals over the pass few seasons, this has the makings of something very special indeed. filly something very special indeed. olly foster in the _ something very special indeed. 0lly foster in the stad to france in paris, we will talk to you later. the line is a little bit choppy. because of others people moving around. hopefully it will be
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steadier when we talk later. more conservative mps have publicly confirmed that they have sent in letters of no confidence in the prime minister following sue gray's critical report of parties and gatherings at downing street during covid lockdowns. one of them — anne marie morris, the mp for newton abbott in devon — has onlyjust had the tory whip restored to her after losing it injanuary. 0ur political correspondent charlotte rose told me more. the reason that she had the whip removed and to expand to people what that means, it is a form of discipline for mps if they don't do what they are totally. to have the whip removed means you are effectively no longer a member of the parliamentary party. she had taken away injanuary because effectively she supported labour in a vote they held calling for a cut to vat on energy bills. the whip was taken away and that meant she was not able to submit a letter of no confidence in borisjohnson because she no longer technically counted as
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a tory mp. she hasjust been readmitted to the party. she counts again and she says she has resubmitted that letter. that takes us up to eight mps we know about who have submitted letters since the sue gray report was published. we have submitted letters since the sue gray report was published.— gray report was published. we know other mps said _ gray report was published. we know other mps said a _ gray report was published. we know other mps said a few— gray report was published. we know other mps said a few months - gray report was published. we know other mps said a few months ago i gray report was published. we know. other mps said a few months ago that they had submitted letters. the reality is, we don't actually know how many other letters have stayed submitted, how many other letters may have been submitted and dare i suggest the idea, whether there might be mps who have said, i submitted a letter, but they have not done that because either currying favour with the public. we never currying favour with the public. - never get told! you are right. what we need to be clear about is because we need to be clear about is because we are finding out about something of these now it does not mean these letters are new. two people who have in recent days said they have put in
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a letter have actually said, it went in a few months ago. we are not necessarily getting any closer to the 50 for letters that would trigger a leadership ballot. we could be very close question one thing that is worth noting is that even though we did not know about these and they may not be new, we have clearly reached a point with the publication of the sue gray report were enough mps feel angry enough about borisjohnson and his leadership and the government and how it is performing that there are willing to say they have put in letters even if they have done this before and not told us. charlotte rose. the former us president, donald trump, and other leading republicans have dismissed calls for gun reform, days after 19 children and two teachers were killed by a teenager with an assault rifle in texas. speaking at the national rifle association gun lobby convention in houston, mr trump said the massacre in uvalde was a reason to arm, not disarm. this report from our correspondent, sanchia berg. just days ago, children cowered
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in their classroom here in uvalde as an armed man came in and started shooting. by the time police stormed in, 19 children and two teachers had been killed. as families grieve and try to understand what happened, some politicians are weighing in. in houston, 300 miles away, former president donald trump condemned the shooting and said the answer was to arm teachers. surely we all agree our schools should not be the softest target, our schools should be the single hardest target in our country. applause. and that's why, as part of a comprehensive school safety plan, it's time to finally allow highly trained teachers to safely and discreetly concealed carry. let them concealed carry. he was speaking at the annual meeting of the national rifle association. 0utside, protesters gathered,
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some in t—shirts spattered with red, calling for tighter gun control. i don't have a problem with anybody owning a gun, but i do believe that assault rifles were never meant for civilians. back in uvalde, officials have now acknowledged police made grave mistakes. 0fficers wrongly thought the gunman had barricaded himself in. they took time to organise an operation. while children in other classrooms escaped, those under attack were calling emergency services, whispering into their phones. the revelations have angered the state's governor. the information that i was given turned out, in part, to be inaccurate. i am absolutely livid about that. ruben heard shots and found out later his great granddaughter had been killed. where was the police that were supposed to be there to protect them kids? where was he? at first they said he was there,
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he confronted the shooter. and now they are retracting, and saying they are not. i've been watching tv all day, and i watch it at night, until 12 o'clock, wondering why, why, why? that's all i can tell you. 0n the national stage, the shootings amplified the gun—control debate. but for the families here, the prevailing emotions are shock and grief. sanchia berg, bbc news. the first case of monkeypox has been detected in latin america. the world health organisation says it expects the number of infections to continue to rise. argentina's health ministry says the first confirmed case is a man who recently travelled from spain. about 200 monkeypox infections have now been detected in countries outside africa, where the disease is usually found. wendy urquhart reports.
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the latest laboratory to confirm a case of monkeypox outside of africa. reportedly a ao—year—old man who recently returned from spain to argentina where residents reacted to the news. translation: where is this going? for example this pandemic, is it going to end or not? i think this is going to continue and they will come one after the other, all the time, unless we become more conscientious. i hope that it is not something that involves to be more and more complicated for our everyday life. of the 200 cases recorded recently, around half in the uk where the health security agency says monkeypox patients should avoid any contact with their pets for 21 days. virologists fear that the virus could get into domestic animals and ping—pong between them and humans. cases are also mounting in spain, one of over 20 countries where the disease has spread. but the message from the world health organization
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is that this can be controlled. we are afraid that there will be spreading in community, but currently this is hard to assess as a risk, we think that if we put in place the right measures now, we probably can contain this easily. the who said a mass vaccination programme was not required. smallpox jabs could be given to close contacts of those affected. wendy urquhart, bbc news. we can return to the story of the fire in turkey. i'm nowjoined by david balmer, who lives in torquay and witnessed the fire. what did you see when you first realised something was wrong? i lizfe realised something was wrong? i live over the hill— realised something was wrong? i live over the hill from _ realised something was wrong? i l - over the hill from torquay harbour and my son spotted an enormous cloud of black smoke rising over the hill so we went to have a look and there
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was the cruiser ablaze, smoke coming out of it. ~ , was the cruiser ablaze, smoke coming outofit. ,, ., out of it. emergency services everywhere- _ out of it. emergency services everywhere- a _ out of it. emergency services everywhere. a lot _ out of it. emergency services everywhere. a lot of - out of it. emergency services everywhere. a lot of people | out of it. emergency services - everywhere. a lot of people normally are on the marina on a saturday afternoon, presumably at this time of year. where there are a lot of people around earlier when the fire broke out? , ., , ., broke out? yes. i was not there when it initially started _ broke out? yes. i was not there when it initially started but _ broke out? yes. i was not there when it initially started but there _ broke out? yes. i was not there when it initially started but there were - it initially started but there were lots of people around but the emergency services were keeping everybody well back. as far developed, they moved everyone further away in case of an explosion or toxic smoke coming from it and that sort of thing.— that sort of thing. they say there is 8000 litres _ that sort of thing. they say there is 8000 litres of _ that sort of thing. they say there is 8000 litres of diesel _ that sort of thing. they say there is 8000 litres of diesel on - that sort of thing. they say there is 8000 litres of diesel on board | is 8000 litres of diesel on board and when we look at the aerial pictures from the local news agencies, you can see the flames, mostly from this shot. it is agencies, you can see the flames, mostly from this shot.— mostly from this shot. it is pretty unpleasant _ mostly from this shot. it is pretty unpleasant. it _ mostly from this shot. it is pretty unpleasant. it was _ mostly from this shot. it is pretty unpleasant. it was blowing - mostly from this shot. it is pretty unpleasant. it was blowing awayl mostly from this shot. it is pretty - unpleasant. it was blowing away from
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the town centre, almost in the direction of painting. we did not smell the smoke ourselves. i would imaaine smell the smoke ourselves. i would imagine folks _ smell the smoke ourselves. i would imagine folks there _ smell the smoke ourselves. i would imagine folks there would - smell the smoke ourselves. i would imagine folks there would have - smell the smoke ourselves. i wouldl imagine folks there would have been able to smoke —— smell it. it will not make for a pleasant walk on the seafront. presumably the concerns in torquay is safety? i seafront. presumably the concerns in torquay is safety?— torquay is safety? i am sure it is. i went to torquay is safety? i am sure it is. i went to a _ torquay is safety? i am sure it is. i went to a shop _ torquay is safety? i am sure it is. i went to a shop quite _ torquay is safety? i am sure it is. i went to a shop quite away - torquay is safety? i am sure it is. i went to a shop quite away away| i went to a shop quite away away from the harbour later in the afternoon and they could smell the smoke. �* , ., afternoon and they could smell the smoke. �* ~ , afternoon and they could smell the smoke. �* y., 4' , y., ., , smoke. are you keeping your windows closed? police _ smoke. are you keeping your windows closed? police were _ smoke. are you keeping your windows closed? police were advising - smoke. are you keeping your windows closed? police were advising that - closed? police were advising that people around it need to keep the windows closed because the smoke is pretty great. we windows closed because the smoke is pretty great-— pretty great. we live in the epposite — pretty great. we live in the opposite direction, - pretty great. we live in the - opposite direction, fortunately. if the wind changes direction we will be shutting the windows.- the wind changes direction we will be shutting the windows. thank you very much- — be shutting the windows. thank you very much- good — be shutting the windows. thank you very much. good to _ be shutting the windows. thank you very much. good to speak - be shutting the windows. thank you very much. good to speak to - be shutting the windows. thank you very much. good to speak to you. i be shutting the windows. thank you i very much. good to speak to you. we will keep people up—to—date at home.
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sport now, and a full round—up from the bbc sport centre. lots of rugby league and football and everything else to talk about. lots going on. good afternoon. under three hours to go now until kick—off in paris, liverpool are hoping to turn a good season into a great win. if they beat real madrid they'll be european champions for the seventh time in their history, with three trophies to parade in front of their fans tomorrow. around 60,000 liverpool supporters have made it to paris, the majority without a ticket, but all there to see if their team can beat the spanish champions and record 14—time winners real, who have already knocked out chelsea and manchester city en route to the final. can liverpool be the side to stop them? that's what we've been asking the fans in paris. i'm expecting a tough game. i do genuinely believe because the premier league is stronger than la liga so i think we have a stronger
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team than madrid but madrid have the habit, as we do in istanbul, of producing special magic in the champions league. i think anything can happen, it is whoever turns. at can happen, it is whoever turns. at the moment i feel quite confident stop i_ the moment i feel quite confident stop i think they will do all right. they— stop i think they will do all right. they will— stop i think they will do all right. they will score possibly two or 3—0, liverpooh _ they will score possibly two or 3-0, liverool. ., , _, liverpool. confident, it is coming home! go — liverpool. confident, it is coming home! go on. — liverpool. confident, it is coming home! go on, yes! _ confidence among the fans and plenty of optimism as well from robbie fowler. the striker won five trophies during his time at liverpool — sadly for him, not the champions league. speaking to 0lly foster earlier, he's feeling pretty certain about liverpool's chances of victory. i think liverpool will win comfortably, it is not me being blase about liverpool, although we are european royalty, let us be honest, i think with a little bit of luck along the way, but if liverpool start the way they can start games
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and they go about it in that way, i think this liverpool team is totally different to the one that played in the 2018 final and i cannot see nothing else but them winning. does that come into the minds of players, i know it is in the mind of mo salah after kyiv when he got roughed out of the game by sergio ramos. a lot has been made of that and i think it is a press narrative, where they put things into his head and i know he will answer in the way that he can, there is talk of revenge, it is not a revenge mission, it is a case of getting out there and showing people what you can do and that is what mo salah and liverpool football club will do. i don't think liverpool were quite ready then, they were relatively new into the tenure ofjurgen klopp, but they are more than ready now. to the challenge cup... wigan warriors came
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from behind to win the challenge cup final at the tottenham hotspur stadium. huddersfield giants were 111—12 up and on course for a first challenge cup win since 1953 until this try from liam marshall withjust four minutes remaining. harry smith with the perfect kick through and marshall did the rest. joy for wigan who win16—14 and clinch a 20th challenge cup but a first for nine years. it wasn't the prettiest, let's be honest. we have played in games this year where we have been better and lost. but it shows how mentally tough this team is it shows how mentally tough this team is to hang in there. mentally tough. resilient. that is all that matters, that is what we are trying to bring to the game. the simple things, that's all you have to do in finals. in qualifying for the monaco grand prix, home favourite charles leclerc secured pole position as ferrari
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locked out the front row. it's leclerc�*s fifth pole in seven races this season — and his second in a row around the twisty streets of the principality, which is his home. there was an anticlimactic end as sergio perez and carlos sainz crashed. they'll start third and second respectively, with championship leader max verstappen fourth. lewis hamilton starts down in eighth. that's all the sport for now. you can find more on all those stories on the bbc sport website. and plenty of build—up to the champions league final in paris. that's what we will be talking about one sportsday at 6:30pm. russian forces are continuing to make gains in eastern ukraine. troops, together with moscow—backed militia units, are reported to have taken another key city in the donbas region. meanwhile, vladimir putin has spoken to both french president emmanuel macron and german chancellor 0laf scholz, and was urged to hold "serious negotiations" with ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky. the russian leader said he was ready to look for ways to ship grain
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stuck in ukrainian ports. ukraine's president zelensky has repeated his assertion that his country will not give up territory for peace. i spoke to volodymyr groysman, the former prime minister of ukraine, and asked him about ukrainian priorities and perspectives when, as many suggest, the possibility is approaching of the russian invasion ending in a long, drawn—out stalemate. translation: i would like to say that ukraine _ translation: i would like to say that ukraine is _ translation: i would like to say that ukraine is not _ translation: i would like to say that ukraine is not only _ translation: i would like to say that ukraine is not only fighting i that ukraine is not only fighting for itself in this work, because i believe that ukraine and ukrainians are fighting to protect all of the democratic world, trying to protect all of the democratic world. because russia, if we also take into consideration that russia is a nuclear state, consideration that russia is a nuclearstate, it consideration that russia is a nuclear state, it poses a real threat to the democratic world. and
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ukrainians were able to stop this assault, which was moving from east to west. and it has to be our common goal and that is our common goal to win, to defeat this evil. and in order to be successful, there are three key points, three key priorities which will help us to win eventually. first, altogether, we need to destroy the military potential of russia. not only in ukraine but around the world. secondly, we need to send their economy into a deep economic knockout. and third, we need to cut off any help which they might get from third states, like belarus or china, et cetera. these priorities will help all of the democratic
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world, led by the united kingdom, united states, the european union, to destroy putin's regime, which is a real threat to the whole world. i had the privilege once of travelling ijy had the privilege once of travelling by train by kyiv to the western frontier. it took many hours overnight, even though the train thundered through the countryside at speed. it is an enormous country. it was once the breadbasket of europe and certainly of the former soviet union. that the harvest this year, much of it is stored in silos because men have gone to fight. how do you plant and harvest again for the future? and in that situation, how do you keep feeding in the middle of a war when russia is trying to cut you off from the outside world? translation: here, we are not alone- — outside world? translation: here, we are not alone. we _ outside world? translation: here, we are not alone. we must _
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outside world? translation: here, we are not alone. we must not _ are not alone. we must not ameliorate the situation from the view of ukraine itself. because here, we are all together in the one boat. and the threat which comes from putin is much wider thanjust the territory of ukraine. if we imagine that he was successful and he prevented his original plan of conquering ukraine after for what would have happened? we would have seen his killers on the eastern borders of the european union. and i see that western societies, they all understand that it is not only up to ukraine to fight this evil, but for all of us, altogether. if we discuss the topic you asked about, about food, then it is also right to say
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that putin's actions are provoking a global food crisis because that putin's actions are provoking a globalfood crisis because annually, ukraine harvested 80 million tonnes of grain for ukraine harvested 80 million tonnes of grainfor our ukraine harvested 80 million tonnes of grain for our internal needs we only needed 20 million tonnes. the other 60 million, they were exported to other countries, and it was enough to cover the needs of 500 million population outside ukraine. and so, indeed, there might be problems and effects which will not only hamper ukraine but also other countries, which used to buy ukrainian food. just look at what putin is doing. he is trying to destabilise the media and take it under control. it is really a
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priority for the democratic world to stop putin because i believe he is a neofascist. we need every kind of efforts, economic, political, diplomatic, to eventually get rid of putin and to free russia of putin, and we need to be together and we need to use all possible means. vladimir grossman, the former prime minister of ukraine. now, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe tells your story out... now on bbc news, nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe tells her own story, exclusively to emma barnett. imprisoned and kept apart from her husband, young daughter and home for six years, the story of nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe has moved people around the world. with her return to britain in march, alongside fellow detainee anoosheh ashoori, from confinement in an iranian prison, nazanin was finally reunited with her husband, richard, and daughter, gabriella, and has had the chance for face—to—face conversations
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with the politicians who eventually brokered her release. since being charged with plotting to overthrow the iranian regime in 2016, her story has always been told by others, whether it be her tirelessly campaigning husband, richard... we talked about it. we said how unacceptable it is and she needs to be released urgently. we'll look at what nazanin zaghari—ratcliffe. .. ..or incorrect comments from politicians. she was simply teaching people journalism, as i understand it. in this exclusive interview, nazanin tells her own story, and in her own words. nazanin, it is so lovely to be with you in person and to be able to talk with you today. thank you so much for coming to talk. what can you remember about the day of your arrest? i went to iran on march 17th 2016 to take my baby girl,

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