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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 28, 2022 10:00pm-10:31pm BST

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struggled to get into the stadium amid scenes of chaos. footage showed supporters stuck outside the stade de france — and police apparently using pepper spray against some fans. thousands and thousands of fans out there, getting tear—gassed, with tickets. treating them like animals. it's a disgrace. we've seen this before. it isa it is a risk to health. the game is still ongoing. we'll have the very latest on tonight's action, and disruption. also on tonight's programme... as russia makes further gains in eastern ukraine, france and germany appeal directly to president putin to hold serious
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talks to stop the war. and delays for travellers at dover, and elsewhere, a champions league final between liverpool and real madrid kicked off tonight following a 36 minute delay or stop there were reports of chaotic scenes, with large numbers of liverpool fans with tickets facing long delays to get into the stadium. there were reports of some police officers using pepper spray on the crowd. european football's governing body uefa described the delay as a security issue. it was described chaos, liverpool
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fans arriving at the stade de france for one of sport's showpiece events. despite queueing for hours, thousands could not get in. severe congestion outside the ground, which the police struggled to cope with. amid queues and bottlenecks, tear gas and pepper spray were used by police. many fans said they feared for their safety. the kick—off was eventually delayed for what organisers describe as security reasons. we organisers describe as security reasons. ~ . , , reasons. we have been studied in this queues _ reasons. we have been studied in this queues is _ reasons. we have been studied in this queues is quarter _ reasons. we have been studied in this queues is quarter past - reasons. we have been studied in this queues is quarter past six. i i this queues is quarter past six. i have been tear—gassed twice. thousands and thousands of fans out there. _ thousands and thousands of fans out there, getting tear gas, with tickets _ there, getting tear gas, with tickets. treating them like animals. it is tickets. treating them like animals. it is a _ tickets. treating them like animals. it is a disgrace. inside the ground, the gaps showed how many fans were having problems getting in. it was not until more than half an hour after the scheduled start that finally liverpool and real madrid emerged, so how would the toilet build—up affect them �*s it was liverpool that made the brighter start, mohammed sala forcing an early save from thibaut courtois
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before sadio mane went even closer, only the brilliance of the real madrid keeper and it would work denied him, so near to an opening or “p denied him, so near to an opening or up soon it was real madrid's turn to threaten. karim benzema finding the net only for it to be ruled out for offside, but was it? after lengthy scrutiny, finally var agreed and it was goalless at the break. and we can go live now to andy. what's the latest? we would normally have expected a match they have finished by now but because of that delayed kick—off there is still about 20 minutes to play. i can tell you that in the last few minutes, real madrid have taken the lead. the goal coming from vinicius taken the lead. the goal coming from viniciuer. it is currently liverpool 0—i viniciuer. it is currently liverpool 0—1 real madrid. it has
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been very tight, very tense, so much at stake for both teams, liverpool hoping to win their third trophy of the season after winning the league cup and the fa cup, whereas real madrid are looking to win their 14th champions league title, which would extend their record. if these scores are level at the end of 90 minutes then we could still have extra time, we could still have a penalty shoot—out, so there could be plenty more drama to come, but at the moment, liverpool have plenty of work to do, they are trailing real madrid. it is liverpool 0—i work to do, they are trailing real madrid. it is liverpool 0—1 real madrid. it is liverpool 0-1 real madrid. . ~' , ., madrid. it is liverpool 0-1 real madrid. . ~' �* , madrid. it is liverpool 0-1 real madrid. . �* ,, as we've heard, thousands of liverpool fans have travelled to paris. danjohnson is with some of them. dan. we are six miles away from the stade de france but there are tens of thousands of liverpool fans, perhaps 30,000-40,000 without thousands of liverpool fans, perhaps 30,000—40,000 without tickets, gathered at this fan park that has been created for people to watch on big screens. the atmosphere here all
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day has been absolutely amazing, really lively, really positive. the sun has been shining. lots of police out on the streets but everybody here has been very well behaved. that real madrid goaljust a few minutes ago stunt people here. but the mood is still positive. they are wishing on their team, and there was a huge confidence among the crowd earlier this afternoon. they thought their team could do enough to reverse that result of four years ago when real madrid came away with the cup. liverpool have so much proud european history. they still have the belief that their team can do it. there isjust over 20 minutes left. do it. there is “ust over 20 minutes left. . ~' , ., , do it. there is “ust over 20 minutes left. . ~ , . left. thank you very much, dan johnson left. thank you very much, dan johnson in _ left. thank you very much, dan johnson in paris. _ the leaders of france and germany have made a joint appeal to president putin to hold seroius talks with the ukrainian president, volodymyr zelensky, as russia claims to have made strategically significant gains. ukraine has warned it may have to withdraw from severodonetsk — the easternmost city
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it still controls. it comes as the russian ambassador to the uk told the bbc that moscow will not use tactical nuclear weapons in the battle for ukraine. our world affairs correspondent caroline hawley reports. russian forces in action in eastern ukraine, where they are making advances. moscow says its forces have captured the town of lyman, an important railway hub, and the key city of severodonestk is now in its sights. translation: if the occupiers think that lyman and severodonetsk - will be theirs, they are wrong. donbas will be ukrainian. but, this is the kind of firepower russia is bringing to bear on the region and, after three months of war, ukraine wants more help from the west to resist. today, president putin spoke to his french and german counterparts, who urged him to hold direct and serious negotiations with ukraine to end the conflict. remember this moment at the start of the war,
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when president putin alarmed the world by announcing he had put russia's nuclear deterrent forces on high alert. russia has the world's biggest nuclear arsenal, and this exercise just before the invasion involved nuclear weapons, but the bbc has been told that it is unlikely to use them in ukraine. do you believe that there could be the use of a tactical nuclear weapon in the war in ukraine? no. tactical nuclear weapon in accordance with the russian military doctrine is not used in conflicts like that. so, you do not believe that will happen? i don't think so. can you categorically say it will not happen? we have very strict provision on the issue of the use of tactical nuclear weapon, and it is mainly when the existence of the state is in danger. it has nothing to do with the current operation. but russia does still want to display its military might to the world.
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here, a missile is test fired, that president putin says can travel at nine times the speed of sound, its range over 600 miles. the images released today by russia's defence ministry carry a message of the potential reach of its destructive power. caroline hawley, bbc news. you can see the full interview with russian ambassador tomorrow at 9am on bbc one. president biden has urged americans to "make their voices heard" as he renewed his appeal for tighter gun controls. it follows the massacre at a school in texas, in which 19 children and two teachers died. meanwhile, the former us president, donald trump, and other leading republicans have dismissed calls for gun reform, saying the shooting was a reason to arm, not disarm. 0ur north america correspondent barbara plett usher reports. just days ago, children cowered on the floor in this school as a killer armed with assault rifles stalked their classroom. the latest victims of
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a uniquely american tragedy. president biden addressed the parents�* heartbreak at a speech at a graduation ceremony. he will be visiting the town tomorrow. those parents are literally preparing to bury their children. in the united states of america, to bury their children. there's too much violence, too much fear. too much grief. the massacre thrust the issue of gun control back into national focus. gun rights activists say they were horrified by the violence. but the national rifle association went ahead with its convention in texas, supported by its high—profile champion. like others, he insisted the solution had nothing to do with guns. the existence of evil in our world is not a reason to disarm law—abiding citizens who know how to use their weapon and can protect a lot of people. the existence of evil is one of the very best reasons to arm law—abiding citizens.
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it's taking our babies! the convention was a target for growing outrage over mass shootings with assault weapons, and over the fierce opposition to gun control in the republican party. here in uvalde people say something has to be done, but they are reluctant to get into the bitter partisan debate over gun restrictions. and they are consumed with the process of grieving, planning funerals now that will start to take place in the coming days. the sorrow here is mixed with anger over mistakes made by the police. this man, ruben mata montemayor, heard the gunshots from a distance. he found out later they'd killed his great—granddaughter. where was the police that's supposed to be there to protect those kids? why, why, why? there are no answers here. they are beseeching a higher power to help them. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas. travel has been disrupted in parts of the country after airlines cancelled flights
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at the start of the half—term break. the companies tui and easyjet apologised, blaming a range of issues, including air traffic restrictions. there were queues at the port of dover too as liverpool fans heading to paris joined other holidaymakers heading across the channel. 0ur correspondent simonjones reports. the great getaway is not so great when you're stuck in queues at dover. football fans and half—term holiday makers faced delays of several hours. charlotte nobbs was trying to hitchhike her way to see family in france after exhausting other options. i was supposed to go and fly this morning back to france. my flight got cancelled so i did a bit of off the top of my head, took a train to dover and hoped i could hitchhike my way back home. well, not home technically, but... lots of disruption. lots of disruptions. how are you feeling? tired. we're only from maidstone, so it's 45 minutes' drive. and it's taken us about six and a half hours, seven hours. seven and a half hours. _
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seven and a half hours now, sorry. seven and a half hours to get to this point. as well as a big increase in tourist traffic, p&0 are running a reduced ferry service after sacking 800 workers earlier this year, and there are now increased post—brexit checks. it's adding up to a bit of a perfect storm here in dover. hundreds of lorries were also trying to cross the channel. the coast guard was brought in to distribute food and drink to those delayed. people were queueing around the block for eurostar services at st pancras in london but some won't get away at all. easyjet has cancelled more than 200 flights over the next ten days. rob gore and his three children boarded their tui flight to turkey only for it to be cancelled. he faces missing a family wedding. they've been heartbroken, and when the news was announced on the plane by the pilot, the kids just burst into tears. notjust ours, but every other kid on there. airlines, airports, ports and ferry companies are apologising for the disruption, but are warning there may be more difficult days ahead.
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simonjones, bbc news, dover. with all the sport now, here's lizzie greenwood hughes at the bbc sport centre. real madrid still leading liverpool when i can zero in the champions league final. in the rest of the sport... wigan have won this year's rugby league challenge cup — narrowly beating huddersfield 16—14 to extend their win record in the competion to 20. adam wild reports from the tottenham hotspur stadium. wigan, wigan! a new location, the same historic occasion. for 125 years, the challenge cup final has been rugby league's grandest moment. in tottenham for the very first time, a chance for either wigan or huddersfield to make history. pressure, well, plenty, but the giants brought their own for good measure. ricky leutele bursting through for the game's opening try.
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leutele the first to score! ahead until half—time. but from the restart, space where there hadn't been space before. wigan hitting back at speed, jai field lighting up this final. the fireworks have begun! as quickly as the space appeared, though, so it disappeared. still, jermaine mcgillvary didn't really need any. somehow finding a way through the tightest gap, the finest margin, but this would be wigan�*s finest hour. just minutes remaining, liam marshall with the game's biggest moment, breaking giant hearts. and so on a day history is made in tottenham, it is the wigan warriors who take home the game's grandest prize. challenge cup winners 2022.
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adam wild, bbc news, at the tottenham hotspur stadium. charls le clerc has pole position for tomorrow's fi monaco grand prix — his home race. but he was denied a possible record—breaking lap in monte carlo after a crash ended qualifying early. le clerc�*s rival, championship leader max verstappen, will start from fourth. but once again lewis hamilton was way off the pace. a last gasp try denied leinster a record—equalling 5th european champions cup title. after leading for most of the match in marseilles, leinster were worn down by a determined la rochelle side — who scored in the 79th minute — to win their first major trophy. the bbc sport website as news of keely hodgkinson that you win in the 800 metres in oregon tonight. back to you, martin. —— martine.
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hello. this is bbc news. more conservative mps have confirmed publicly that they've submitted letters of no confidence in borisjohnson, in the wake of the partygate report. more than half a dozen tories have urged the prime minister to step down, since the senior civil servant, sue gray, published her full findings earlier this week, on lockdown gatherings in and around downing street. 0ur political correspondent ben wright has more. the mp for rutland and melton, the mp for brian, he has said he can no
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longer defend the indefensible and anne—marie morris who put in a letter at the beginning of the year and had the tory whip withdrawn because she voted with labour on a big vote, and she has resubmitted that letter, that is bringing the number 28 of tory mps that want to bring a vote no confidence. —— brings then i'm better eight. —— brings then i'm better eight. —— brings then i'm better eight. —— brings the number two... the only person that knows is sir graham brady, the chairman of the 1922 committee and he tells nobody. it is a parlour game westminster loves to play but beyond the publicly debate —— declared people, the result we are left guessing about. how likely is it that we will get to a leadership contest? if how likely is it that we will get to a leadership contest?— a leadership contest? if you had asked me that _ a leadership contest? if you had asked me that a _ a leadership contest? if you had asked me that a few _ a leadership contest? if you had asked me that a few months - a leadership contest? if you had| asked me that a few months ago a leadership contest? if you had - asked me that a few months ago and
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partygate asked me that a few months ago and pa rtygate was asked me that a few months ago and partygate was brewing, and it was hot, before the met investigated, it felt like there was a move to trigger a no—confidence vote by the dynamics now feel different. sue gray's report has come and gone, we have had rishi sunak�*s statement in the commons offering £15 billion package to try to help people with a gust of living, my sense is that right now today, boris johnson's future, as tory leader, feels a bit more secure than it did a week ago but politics remains really volatile. there are two by elections coming up next month, a lot of tory mps will see how the party does in those. it will be fascinating. 0ther tory mps might decide that it is time for a confidence vote but right now, i think borisjohnson feels a little less perilous than he did a few days ago. vladimir putin says that
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russia is open to resuming negotiations with ukraine. he spoke to french president, emmanuel macron and german chancellor 0laf scholz, in a phone call this morning. he told the two leaders that supplying arms to ukraine was dangerous and risked destablising the region. ukraine says any agreement with russia cannot be trusted. they have both blamed each other for peace talks breaking down in late march. earlier, we spoke to the former ukrainian prime minister, volodymyr groysman, to ask how ukraine will keep feeding its people going forward if they can no longer harvest their grain. translation: here, we are not alone. we must not ameliorate the situation from the view of ukraine itself. because here, we are all together in the one boat. and the threat which comes from putin is much wider thanjust
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the territory of ukraine. if we imagine that he was successful and he prevented his original plan of conquering ukraine after four days, what would have happened? we would have seen his killers on the eastern borders of nato and the european union. and i see that western governments and western societies, they all understand that it is not only up to ukraine to fight this evil, but for all of us, altogether. if we discuss the topic you asked about, about food, then it is also right to say that putin's actions are provoking a global food crisis, because annually, ukraine harvested 80 million tonnes of grain.
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for our internal needs, we only needed 20 million tonnes. the other 60 million, they were exported to other countries, and it was enough to cover the needs of 500 million population outside ukraine. so, indeed, there might be problems and effects which will not only hamper ukraine but also other countries which used to buy ukrainian food. just look at what putin is doing. he is trying to destabilise the media and take it under control. so it is really a priority for the democratic world to stop putin because i believe he is a neofascist. we need every kind of efforts, economic, political, diplomatic,
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to eventually get rid of putin and to free russia of putin, and we need to be together and we need to use all possible means. vladimir grossman, the former prime minister of ukraine. let's look now at one of the impacts of the war in ukraine. hundreds of thousands of young russians have left their country — many because they oppose the war. many of them ended up in armenia — a country in the south caucasus which russian citizens can enter without visas. but not everyone feels safe in armenia, which is russia's strategic partner in the region — rayhan demytrie reports.(tx next) a p°p�*up a pop—up russian wedding in this remote armenian town. most of the guests have fled russia. the groom
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used to make animation films. after getting arrested for opposing the russian invasion of ukraine, he and his bride made a life changing decision. i his bride made a life changing decision. . ., ., ,., decision. i had never thought about movin: decision. i had never thought about moving abroad _ decision. i had never thought about moving abroad seriously _ decision. i had never thought about moving abroad seriously but, - decision. i had never thought about moving abroad seriously but, yes, | moving abroad seriously but, yes, now, i don't think i can come back. if you ask about the future, nobody knows. also, ithink if you ask about the future, nobody knows. also, i think it is dangerous for me and my wife to go back because i think we are on a list. it is a list of so—called traitors and some, in the words of vladimir putin, for russians who do not back his war in ukraine. kalina was punished with two weeks in prison for attending an anti—war rally in st petersburg. for attending an anti-war rally in st petersburg.— for attending an anti-war rally in st petersburg. they try to give you this feelin: st petersburg. they try to give you this feeling that _ st petersburg. they try to give you this feeling that actually _ st petersburg. they try to give you this feeling that actually you - st petersburg. they try to give you this feeling that actually you are i this feeling that actually you are nobody here and your voice is
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nothing. kalina is not planning to stay in armenia. she doesn't feel safe here. some hotels were asked by the police for data russian guests and also just normal routine talks, i can feel how people can't really get what is going on, and they are on the side of my government, which actually punished me and all of my friends, so, no, i don't feel really safe. , , , , friends, so, no, i don't feel really safe. , ,, ,., safe. despite his close ties to moscow. _ safe. despite his close ties to moscow, more _ safe. despite his close ties to moscow, more than - safe. despite his close ties to moscow, more than one -- l safe. despite his close ties to . moscow, more than one -- 1000 moscow, more than one —— 1000 russians have entered arminius at the start of the war. this russians have entered arminius at the start of the war.— the start of the war. this woman found work _ the start of the war. this woman found work in _ the start of the war. this woman found work in this _ the start of the war. this woman found work in this cafe _ the start of the war. this woman found work in this cafe catering l the start of the war. this woman l found work in this cafe catering for russian expats. == found work in this cafe catering for russian expats.— found work in this cafe catering for russian expats._ i - found work in this cafe catering for. russian expats._ i don't russian expats. -- this man. i don't like what is —
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russian expats. -- this man. i don't like what is happening _ russian expats. -- this man. i don't like what is happening at _ russian expats. -- this man. i don't like what is happening at all. - russian expats. -- this man. i don't like what is happening at all. of- like what is happening at all. of course — like what is happening at all. of course i— like what is happening at all. of course i don't support it, it is war between — course i don't support it, it is war between brothers.— course i don't support it, it is war between brothers. back here, they aet between brothers. back here, they net on the between brothers. back here, they get on the newlyweds _ between brothers. back here, they get on the newlyweds have - between brothers. back here, they get on the newlyweds have put - between brothers. back here, they l get on the newlyweds have put aside their worries for the night. this get on the newlyweds have put aside their worries for the night.— their worries for the night. this is their worries for the night. this is the celebration _ their worries for the night. this is the celebration of _ their worries for the night. this is the celebration of life _ their worries for the night. this is the celebration of life and - their worries for the night. this is the celebration of life and the - their worries for the night. this is l the celebration of life and the ever changing circumstances of life. just a few months ago, these people were living in the comfort of their homes in russia and now they are among the of new emigres in armenia trying to make sense of this massive shift in their lives. �* ., ., , ., ., their lives. both of them plan to 0 en an their lives. both of them plan to open an animation _ their lives. both of them plan to open an animation studio - their lives. both of them plan to open an animation studio here l their lives. both of them plan to i open an animation studio here and begin life anew. the first case of monkeypox has been detected in latin america. the world health organization says it expects the number of infections to continue to rise. argentina's health ministry says the first confirmed case is a man who recently travelled from spain.
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about 200 monkeypox infections have now been detected in countries outside africa, where the disease is usually found. wendy urquhart reports. the latest laboratory to confirm a case of monkeypox outside of africa. reportedly a ao—year—old man who recently returned from spain to argentina where residents reacted to the news. translation: where is this going? for example this pandemic, is it going to end or not? i think this is going to continue and they will come one after the other, all the time, unless we become more conscientious. i hope that it is not something that involves to be more and more complicated for our everyday life. of the 200 cases recorded recently, around half in the uk where the health security agency says monkeypox patients should avoid any contact
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with their pets for 21 days. virologists fear that the virus could get into domestic animals and ping—pong between them and humans. cases are also mounting in spain, one of over 20 countries where the disease has spread. but the message from the world health organization is that this can be controlled. we are afraid that there will be spreading in community, but currently this is hard to assess as a risk, we think that if we put in place the right measures now, we probably can contain this easily. the who said a mass vaccination programme was not required. smallpox jabs could be given to close contacts of those affected. wendy urquhart, bbc news. it's exactly a0 years since the soldiers of 2 para were preparing for the first major land battle of the falklands conflict. the fight to re—capture goose green
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cost 18 british lives — including lieutenant colonel h jones — who was the most senior british officer to be killed in the falklands. he was posthumously awarded the victoria cross for his bravery. his widow sara jones has been remembering the events of 1982. steve humphrey has the story. i've got so many happy memories, but we were only married for 18 years, which is quite short, really, with a0 years since he went. you need to really hang on to all the happy memories. every year at this time, sara jones plants a tree to remember her husband, lieutenant colonel h jones vc. it's just a nice way to mark the anniversary of his death. gives you something to think of.
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in the years after her husband's death, sara,

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