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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 28, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. real madrid hasjust won the champions league final with a 1—0 score against liverpool. the match was delayed by more than half an hour as fans struggled to get into the stadium. footage showed supporters stuck outside the stade de france and police apparently using pepper spray against some fans. president biden renews his appeal for tighter gun control following the texas elementary school massacre. there's too much violence,
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too much fear, too much grief. protests erupt in rio dejaneiro after a video of a black man being asphyxiated in the back of a police car goes viral. and france and germany urge president putin to engage in peace talks as russia continues its offensive in eastern ukraine. hello, and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. real madrid has won the uefa champions league final, beating liverpool 1—0 at the stade de france in paris. these are the live shots from outside the stadium, thousands of fans trying
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to leave the grounds. there we are. there are the live shots you can see there. these were the scenes before kick—off, which was delayed by more than half an hour as fans struggled to get inside. there were reports that police tried to hold off fans trying to force their way into the stade des france, with some officers using pepper spray. let's hear from a fan. we've been stuck at this gate since quarter past 6pm. i got really bad asthma, and i've been tear gassed twice. i'm really, really struggling. in the last few minutes, uefa has released a statement. it says...
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that was a statement from ua for. our correspondent danjohnson joined us from the fanzone near the stadium when the match was under way. he told us this about the delay. kick—off delayed by 35—40 minutes because of access issues around the stade des france. we've seen some videos on social media of some fans trying to get away from being tear gassed by the french police. not quite clear exactly
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what led to those delays and those access problems, but certainly everybody who should've been wasn't in the ground at the original kick—off time. and it looks like some fans may have managed to get into the stadium without tickets. that's why the french police is saying that they needed to send in more officers to try to actually differentiate who in the crowd had tickets, who was eligible to come forward, but we've seen some complaints from fans about not enough gates being opened, about not being able to get close enough to the ground from the station. so, some access problems which caused that delay to kick—off. with me now is roopa vyas, who is a big liverpool fan and an ambassador for hergametoo, a group who raise awareness about sexism in football. thank you forjoining us here on bbc news. the statement from uefa, what
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you make of the report? i news. the statement from uefa, what you make of the report?— you make of the report? i think that was an ongoing _ you make of the report? i think that was an ongoing issue _ you make of the report? i think that was an ongoing issue that _ you make of the report? i think that was an ongoing issue that is - you make of the report? i think that was an ongoing issue that is to - you make of the report? i think that was an ongoing issue that is to be i was an ongoing issue that is to be expected — was an ongoing issue that is to be expected with these _ was an ongoing issue that is to be expected with these big _ was an ongoing issue that is to be expected with these big events. l expected with these big events. it happens _ expected with these big events. it happens probably around - expected with these big events. it happens probably around the - expected with these big events. iti happens probably around the world and especially— happens probably around the world and especially for— happens probably around the world and especially for an _ happens probably around the world and especially for an event - happens probably around the world and especially for an event as - happens probably around the world and especially for an event as big l and especially for an event as big as the _ and especially for an event as big as the champions _ and especially for an event as big as the champions league - and especially for an event as big as the champions league final. l and especially for an event as big. as the champions league final. sol think_ as the champions league final. sol think that _ as the champions league final. sol think that is — as the champions league final. sol think that is an _ as the champions league final. sol think that is an issue _ as the champions league final. sol think that is an issue they— as the champions league final. sol think that is an issue they need - as the champions league final. sol think that is an issue they need to i think that is an issue they need to address— think that is an issue they need to address but— think that is an issue they need to address but i don't— think that is an issue they need to address but i don't think- think that is an issue they need to address but i don't think that - think that is an issue they need to address but i don't think that was| address but i don't think that was the cause — address but i don't think that was the cause of— address but i don't think that was the cause of what _ address but i don't think that was the cause of what happened - address but i don't think that was i the cause of what happened today, especially — the cause of what happened today, especially from _ the cause of what happened today, especially from what _ the cause of what happened today, especially from what i _ the cause of what happened today, especially from what i heard - the cause of what happened today, especially from what i heard from i especially from what i heard from fans and — especially from what i heard from fans and reports _ especially from what i heard from fans and reports from _ especially from what i heard from| fans and reports from well— known journalists — fans and reports from well— known journalists as _ fans and reports from well— known journalists as well. _ fans and reports from well— known journalists as well. i— fans and reports from well— known journalists as well. i think - fans and reports from well— known journalists as well. i think there . journalists as well. i think there is something _ journalists as well. i think there is something wrong _ journalists as well. i think there is something wrong with - journalists as well. i think there is something wrong with the - journalists as well. i think there l is something wrong with the way journalists as well. i think there - is something wrong with the way that the european — is something wrong with the way that the european authorities _ is something wrong with the way that the european authorities deal- is something wrong with the way that the european authorities deal with i the european authorities deal with english _ the european authorities deal with english football— the european authorities deal with english football fans. _ the european authorities deal with english football fans. 0k, - the european authorities deal with english football fans.— english football fans. ok, let's start off first _ english football fans. ok, let's start off first at _ english football fans. ok, let's start off first at what _ english football fans. ok, let's start off first at what you - english football fans. ok, let's start off first at what you have | start off first at what you have been told from spans and sports journalist. what have they told you they experienced and heard? from what i they experienced and heard? from what i know _ they experienced and heard? from what i know people _ they experienced and heard? from what i know people were _ they experienced and heard? from what i know people were there around two or— what i know people were there around two or three _ what i know people were there around two or three hours _ what i know people were there around two or three hours before _ what i know people were there around two or three hours before kick—off- two or three hours before kick—off trying _ two or three hours before kick—off trying to— two or three hours before kick—off trying to gain— two or three hours before kick—off trying to gain access _ two or three hours before kick—off trying to gain access and - two or three hours before kick—off trying to gain access and i- two or three hours before kick—off trying to gain access and i was - two or three hours before kick—offl trying to gain access and i was told that turnstiles— trying to gain access and i was told that turnstiles were _ trying to gain access and i was told that turnstiles were closed - trying to gain access and i was told that turnstiles were closed so - trying to gain access and i was told| that turnstiles were closed so there was only _ that turnstiles were closed so there was only one — that turnstiles were closed so there was only one gate _ that turnstiles were closed so there was only one gate instead - that turnstiles were closed so there was only one gate instead of- that turnstiles were closed so there was only one gate instead of six - that turnstiles were closed so there was only one gate instead of six inl was only one gate instead of six in one area — was only one gate instead of six in one area and _ was only one gate instead of six in one area. and obviously— was only one gate instead of six in one area. and obviously this - was only one gate instead of six in one area. and obviously this led .
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one area. and obviously this led to overcrowding — one area. and obviously this led to overcrowding and _ one area. and obviously this led to overcrowding and people _ one area. and obviously this led to overcrowding and people being - overcrowding and people being punched — overcrowding and people being punched and _ overcrowding and people being punched and then _ overcrowding and people being punched and then i— overcrowding and people being punched and then i know- overcrowding and people being punched and then i know laterl overcrowding and people being . punched and then i know later on tear gas— punched and then i know later on tear gas was— punched and then i know later on tear gas was used. _ punched and then i know later on tear gas was used. there - punched and then i know later on tear gas was used. there were i tear gas was used. there were children— tear gas was used. there were children in— tear gas was used. there were children in these _ tear gas was used. there were children in these crowds. - tear gas was used. there were | children in these crowds. there tear gas was used. there were - children in these crowds. there were some _ children in these crowds. there were some disabled — children in these crowds. there were some disabled fans _ children in these crowds. there were some disabled fans in _ children in these crowds. there were some disabled fans in these - children in these crowds. there were some disabled fans in these crowds. children in these crowds. there were some disabled fans in these crowds i don't _ some disabled fans in these crowds i don't think— some disabled fans in these crowds i don't think any— some disabled fans in these crowds i don't think any sort _ some disabled fans in these crowds i don't think any sort of— some disabled fans in these crowds i don't think any sort of care _ some disabled fans in these crowds i don't think any sort of care was - don't think any sort of care was taken _ don't think any sort of care was taken lry— don't think any sort of care was taken try any— don't think any sort of care was taken by any authorities - don't think any sort of care was taken by any authorities in - don't think any sort of care was taken by any authorities in the i taken by any authorities in the area — taken by any authorities in the area. �* taken by any authorities in the area. . , ., taken by any authorities in the area. . i. _, taken by any authorities in the area. . i. ., area. and your comment about european _ area. and your comment about european attitudes _ area. and your comment about european attitudes to - area. and your comment about european attitudes to british i area. and your comment about. european attitudes to british fans. word is that stem from? i european attitudes to british fans. word is that stem from?— european attitudes to british fans. word is that stem from? i think it's an ongoing — word is that stem from? i think it's an ongoing issue. _ word is that stem from? i think it's an ongoing issue. we _ word is that stem from? i think it's an ongoing issue. we have - word is that stem from? i think it's an ongoing issue. we have all- an ongoing issue. we have all experienced it— an ongoing issue. we have all experienced it on _ an ongoing issue. we have all experienced it on european. an ongoing issue. we have all- experienced it on european travels previously, — experienced it on european travels previously, so _ experienced it on european travels previously, so they— experienced it on european travels previously, so they are _ previously, so they are automatically - previously, so they are automaticallyjust- previously, so they are _ automaticallyjust heavy— handed. previously, so they are _ automaticallyjust heavy—handed. i automatically just heavy— handed. i think— automatically just heavy— handed. i think they've — automatically just heavy— handed. i think they've got— automaticallyjust heavy—handed. i think they've got some _ automaticallyjust heavy—handed. i think they've got some sort - automaticallyjust heavy—handed. i think they've got some sort of - think they've got some sort of agenda, — think they've got some sort of agenda, some— think they've got some sort of agenda, some sort— think they've got some sort of agenda, some sort of- think they've got some sort of| agenda, some sort of previous mihdset— agenda, some sort of previous mindset against— agenda, some sort of previous mindset against british - agenda, some sort of previous mindset against british fans. l agenda, some sort of previous . mindset against british fans. and they use — mindset against british fans. and they use this _ mindset against british fans. and they use this as _ mindset against british fans. and they use this as an _ mindset against british fans. and they use this as an excuse, - mindset against british fans. and they use this as an excuse, theyl mindset against british fans. and i they use this as an excuse, they use their power— they use this as an excuse, they use their power rather— they use this as an excuse, they use their power rather to _ they use this as an excuse, they use their power rather to help _ they use this as an excuse, they use their power rather to help fans - they use this as an excuse, they use their power rather to help fans and i their power rather to help fans and have them — their power rather to help fans and have them enjoy— their power rather to help fans and have them enjoy their— their power rather to help fans and have them enjoy their day, - their power rather to help fans and have them enjoy their day, they i have them enjoy their day, they usually— have them enjoy their day, they usually are _ have them enjoy their day, they usually are the _ have them enjoy their day, they usually are the opposite - have them enjoy their day, they usually are the opposite and i have them enjoy their day, they. usually are the opposite and they cause _ usually are the opposite and they cause trouble _ usually are the opposite and they cause trouble when _ usually are the opposite and they cause trouble when what - usually are the opposite and they cause trouble when what should i usually are the opposite and they. cause trouble when what should have been an _ cause trouble when what should have been an amazing _ cause trouble when what should have been an amazing day _ cause trouble when what should have been an amazing day for _ cause trouble when what should have been an amazing day for everybody. i been an amazing day for everybody. suppose there you are alluding to the legacy of british fans and those
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british teams and the violence that we used to see. how has the game changed? i we used to see. how has the game chanced? ~ �* , we used to see. how has the game chanced? ,, �*, . ., changed? i think it's changed massively- — changed? i think it's changed massively. we _ changed? i think it's changed massively. we don't - changed? i think it's changed massively. we don't see - changed? i think it's changed massively. we don't see the | changed? i think it's changed i massively. we don't see the scenes we used _ massively. we don't see the scenes we used to— massively. we don't see the scenes we used to see, _ massively. we don't see the scenes we used to see, especially... - massively. we don't see the scenes we used to see, especially... we i we used to see, especially... we should _ we used to see, especially... we should not— we used to see, especially... we should not at— we used to see, especially... we should not at events _ we used to see, especially... we should not at events like - we used to see, especially... we should not at events like this. i i should not at events like this. i don't _ should not at events like this. i don't think— should not at events like this. i don't think that _ should not at events like this. i don't think that is _ should not at events like this. i don't think that is an _ should not at events like this. i don't think that is an ongoing l should not at events like this. i i don't think that is an ongoing issue and i've _ don't think that is an ongoing issue and i've never— don't think that is an ongoing issue and i've never had _ don't think that is an ongoing issue and i've never had to _ don't think that is an ongoing issue and i've never had to experience i and i've never had to experience anything — and i've never had to experience anything like _ and i've never had to experience anything like that. _ and i've never had to experience anything like that. so _ and i've never had to experience anything like that. so i - and i've never had to experience anything like that. so i don't i and i've never had to experience i anything like that. so i don't know why they— anything like that. so i don't know why they are — anything like that. so i don't know why they are sort _ anything like that. so i don't know why they are sort of— anything like that. so i don't know why they are sort of stuck- anything like that. so i don't know why they are sort of stuck in i anything like that. so i don't know why they are sort of stuck in the l why they are sort of stuck in the past _ why they are sort of stuck in the past and — why they are sort of stuck in the past and still— why they are sort of stuck in the past and still using _ why they are sort of stuck in the past and still using that - why they are sort of stuck in the past and still using that sort i why they are sort of stuck in the past and still using that sort of. past and still using that sort of agenda — past and still using that sort of agenda against _ past and still using that sort of agenda against us. _ past and still using that sort of agenda against us.— past and still using that sort of agenda against us. let's turn to the name and agenda against us. let's turn to the game and that _ agenda against us. let's turn to the game and that disappointing - agenda against us. let's turn to the game and that disappointing result| game and that disappointing result for you as a liverpool fan and the thousands who have been watching as well. real madrid, deserved winners, how did liverpool play? i well. real madrid, deserved winners, how did liverpool play?— how did liverpool play? i thought we -la ed all how did liverpool play? i thought we played all right- _ how did liverpool play? i thought we played all right. he _ how did liverpool play? i thought we played all right. he started - how did liverpool play? i thought we played all right. he started off- played all right. he started off strong — played all right. he started off strong and of— played all right. he started off strong and of my— played all right. he started off strong and of my hopes - played all right. he started off strong and of my hopes were. played all right. he started off- strong and of my hopes were quite hi-h strong and of my hopes were quite high coming — strong and of my hopes were quite high coming into— strong and of my hopes were quite high coming into the _ strong and of my hopes were quite high coming into the game. - strong and of my hopes were quite high coming into the game. we i strong and of my hopes were quitel high coming into the game. we had our chances — high coming into the game. we had our chances and _ high coming into the game. we had our chances and unfortunately i high coming into the game. we had our chances and unfortunately for l our chances and unfortunately for us, their— our chances and unfortunately for us, their keeper— our chances and unfortunately for us, their keeper was— our chances and unfortunately for us, their keeper was there - our chances and unfortunately for us, their keeper was there a i our chances and unfortunately for . us, their keeper was there a man of the match — us, their keeper was there a man of the match and _ us, their keeper was there a man of the match. and we _ us, their keeper was there a man of the match. and we just _ us, their keeper was there a man of the match. and we just could - us, their keeper was there a man of the match. and we just could not. the match. and we just could not get past him _ the match. and we just could not get past him real— the match. and we just could not get past him. real madrid, _ the match. and we just could not get past him. real madrid, someone i the match. and we just could not get| past him. real madrid, someone said
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previously, _ past him. real madrid, someone said previously, real— past him. real madrid, someone said previously, real madrid _ past him. real madrid, someone said previously, real madrid don't - past him. real madrid, someone said previously, real madrid don'tjust- previously, real madrid don'tjust play finals. — previously, real madrid don'tjust play finals. they— previously, real madrid don'tjust play finals, they win _ previously, real madrid don'tjust play finals, they win finals - previously, real madrid don'tjust play finals, they win finals and i play finals, they win finals and unfortunately _ play finals, they win finals and unfortunately for _ play finals, they win finals and unfortunately for us _ play finals, they win finals and unfortunately for us we - play finals, they win finals and unfortunately for us we have l play finals, they win finals and i unfortunately for us we have seen it this season — unfortunately for us we have seen it this season ourselves. _ unfortunately for us we have seen it this season ourselves. we - unfortunately for us we have seen it this season ourselves. we have i this season ourselves. we have struggled — this season ourselves. we have struggled to _ this season ourselves. we have struggled to score _ this season ourselves. we have struggled to score goals - this season ourselves. we have struggled to score goals in- this season ourselves. we have| struggled to score goals in finals and we _ struggled to score goals in finals and we have _ struggled to score goals in finals and we have seen— struggled to score goals in finals and we have seen it _ struggled to score goals in finals and we have seen it again- struggled to score goals in finals i and we have seen it again tonight. i'm and we have seen it again tonight. i'm going — and we have seen it again tonight. i'm going to— and we have seen it again tonight. i'm going to leave _ and we have seen it again tonight. i'm going to leave it— and we have seen it again tonight. i'm going to leave it there - and we have seen it again tonight. i'm going to leave it there but i i'm going to leave it there but commiseration is on your team, liverpool, losing their chance to be champions, would have been the seventh champions of europe. thank you very much indeed, thank you. let's turn our attention to events in america. president biden has urged americans to "make their voices heard" as he renewed his appeal for tighter gun controls. it follows the massacre at a school in texas in which 19 children and two teachers died. meanwhile, the former us president, donald trump, and other leading republicans have dismissed calls for gun reform, saying the shooting was a reason to arm, not disarm. our north america correspondent barbara plett usher reports. just days ago, children cowered on the floor in this school
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as a killer armed with assault rifles stalked their classroom. the latest victims of a uniquely american tragedy. president biden addressed the parents�* heartbreak at a speech at a graduation ceremony. he will be visiting the town tomorrow. those parents are literally preparing to bury their children. in the united states of america, to bury their children. there's too much violence, too much fear, too much grief. the massacre thrust the issue of gun control back into national focus. gun rights activists said they were horrified by the violence, but the national rifle association went ahead with its convention in texas, supported by its high—profile champion. like others, he insisted the solution had nothing to do with guns. the existence of evil in our world is not a reason to disarm law—abiding citizens who know how to use their weapon and can protect a lot of people. the existence of evil is one of the very best reasons to arm
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law—abiding citizens. it's taking our babies! the convention was a target for growing outrage over mass shootings with assault weapons and over the fierce opposition to gun control in the republican party. here in uvalde, people say something has to be done, but they're reluctant to get into the bitter partisan debate over gun restrictions. and they're consumed with the process of grieving, planning funerals now that will start to take place in the coming days. the sorrow here is mixed with anger over mistakes made by the police. this man, ruben mata montemayor, heard the gunshots from a distance. he found out later they'd killed his great—granddaughter. where was the police that's supposed to be there to protect those kids? why, why, why? there are no answers here. they're beseeching a higher power to help them. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas.
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dewey cornell is a professor of education at the university of virginia who specialises in school safety. i asked him about that police delay at robb elementary school. we have a plague in the united states, a plague of gun violence. and there is a vaccine for the plague, but we don't have it, you have it in the uk and most of europe, and that's reasonable gun safety laws to limit access to firearms. and without that vaccine, we're at the mercy of this plague, and it doesn'tjust occur in schools. in fact, it occurs less often in schools and restaurants and stores than every other place. so, i don't want to give you the impression that schools are especially unsafe places. we have this plague everywhere, and we need to address it in more than just the schools. but they are extremely vulnerable and easy targets, aren't they? i mean, what went wrong?
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well, according to law enforcement authorities, the police arrived, but did not act. and there was a long delay before they took action. and, of course, when somebody suggested we arm teachers, why would we expect teachers to do a betterjob than 18 trained law enforcement officers? the solution is really not at the time of the shooting. at the time of the shooting, it is too late to prevent the violence. if we want to prevent violence, we have to start much before the shooter arrives at the door. we need to think about identifying individuals who are troubled and distressed. we find that most of these mass shooters leak their intentions. they post things, they talk to friends, family members are worried about them. people are concerned in these cases, but we don't follow through on those concerns. that's where we need threat assessment, multidisciplinary threat
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assessment teams can evaluate and intervene with individuals who are on a pathway to violence long before they show up with a gun. and in our research, we've found that we've been able to use threat assessment to intervene in many many cases. and who's in charge of those threat assessments? it is the fbi, the school? right, so threat assessment teams can operate at the school level, working primarily with students, and they can operate at the community level. in schools, they are a multidisciplinary team with mental health and the school resource officer. in the communities, they are operated by a collaboration between law enforcement and community mental health services. the death of a black man who was forced into a police car boot where a gas grenade was set off has sparked outrage in brazil. police stopped genivaldo de jesus santos in the street
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in the north—eastern city of umbauba on wednesday. this video footage shows two officers holding down the boot the man was in as thick smoke billowed from the car. an autopsy confirmed mr santos died of asphyxiation. pedro borges is the editor in chief of alma preta, a journalism agency specialising in racial issues. thank you for speaking to us at world news. remind us what happened last week and we us in the protest with talk it through the reaction from resilience? brute with talk it through the reaction from resilience?— with talk it through the reaction from resilience? ~ ., ., , from resilience? we had two events this week. from resilience? we had two events this week- we _ from resilience? we had two events this week. we had _ from resilience? we had two events this week. we had this _ from resilience? we had two events this week. we had this to _ from resilience? we had two events this week. we had this to happen i from resilience? we had two events this week. we had this to happen to genivaldo dejesus santos, a black man who was killed by two policemen in a gas chamber. and we had a huge
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police operation in rio dejaneiro that killed 26 people. so we are talking about a really violent week in brazil, but not a unique week. because we always face weeks and attacks like this here in brazil. you are saying not unique. does the police in brazil have a history of persecuting the black population? yes, we have this problem, this has to work a problem here in brazil. police brutality is especially against black people. we have one of the most violent police forces in the most violent police forces in the world, but we are in the south globally, you know, and we are facing eight really difficult government in brazil that all the time supports this police brutality.
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so, yes, we have a real historical and we have one of the most police violent in the world.— violent in the world. brazil is often seen — violent in the world. brazil is often seen as _ violent in the world. brazil is often seen as a _ violent in the world. brazil is often seen as a melting - violent in the world. brazil is often seen as a melting potl violent in the world. brazil is i often seen as a melting pot when it comes to ethnicities. what is the reality for black brazilians, and i'm thinking away from the police, in wider society?— i'm thinking away from the police, in wider society? every 23 minutes, a black person _ in wider society? every 23 minutes, a black person is — in wider society? every 23 minutes, a black person is killed _ in wider society? every 23 minutes, a black person is killed in _ in wider society? every 23 minutes, a black person is killed in brazil, i a black person is killed in brazil, so we are talking about what we call here in brazil a genocide. we are talking about a really historical and a really a crisis that we face in brazil. the police brutality is just one face of the huge problem that we have to deal with in our routine. but people face a really huge problem on health, education system, but in the security public, we face death all the time. so this
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police brutality happens like every day in brazil. we are all the time reporting cases like this one, but even when we are reporting cases in our routine, will he face something that happened to genivaldo dejesus santos, something that even us who are accustomed with that, we feel really, really bad and it really sorry for it what's going on here in brazil. ., ., ., ., brazil. pedro, we are to leave it there for now _ brazil. pedro, we are to leave it there for now but _ brazil. pedro, we are to leave it there for now but thank - brazil. pedro, we are to leave it there for now but thank you i brazil. pedro, we are to leave it| there for now but thank you very much for your time. thank you. thank ou. have much for your time. thank you. thank you- have a — much for your time. thank you. thank you- have a nice _ much for your time. thank you. thank you. have a nice night. _ the headlines on bbc news — real madrid wins the uefa champions league. the final was delayed by more than half an hour as fans struggled to get into the stadium, with some liverpool fans saying french police used pepper spray and tear gas as they tried to enter. president biden renews his appeal for tighter gun control following the texas elementary school massacre as former
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president donald trump dismisses calls for gun reform and says the shooting in uvalde was a reason to arm, not disarm. the leaders of france and germany have made a joint appeal to president putin to hold serious talks with the ukrainian president, volodymyr zelensky, as russia claims to have made strategically significant gains. ukraine has warned it may have to withdraw from severodonetsk, the easternmost city it still controls. it comes as the russian ambassador to the uk told the bbc that moscow will not use tactical nuclear weapons in the battle for ukraine. our world affairs correspondent caroline hawley reports. russian forces in action in eastern ukraine, where they're making advances.
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moscow says its forces have captured the town of lyman, an important railway hub, and the key city of severodonestk is now in its sights. translation: if the occupiers think that lyman and severodonetsk - will be theirs, they are wrong. donbas will be ukrainian. but this is the kind of firepower russia is bringing to bear on the region, and after three months of war, ukraine wants more help from the west to resist. today, president putin spoke to his french and german counterparts, who urged him to hold direct and serious negotiations with ukraine to end the conflict. remember this moment at the start of the war, when president putin alarmed the world by announcing he'd put russia's nuclear deterrent forces on high alert. russia has the world's biggest nuclear arsenal, and this exercise just before the invasion involved nuclear
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weapons, but the bbc�*s been told it's unlikely to use them in ukraine. do you believe that there could be the use of a tactical nuclear weapon in the war in ukraine? no. tactical nuclear weapon i in accordance with russian military doctrine is not used in conflicts like that. - so, you do not believe that will happen? i don't think so. can you categorically say it will not happen? we have very strict provision on the issues of the use i of tactical nuclear weapon, - and it is mainly when the existence of the state is in danger. it has nothing to do- with the current operation. but russia does still want to display its military might to the world. here, a missile is test—fired that president putin says can travel at nine times the speed of sound, its range over 600 miles. the images released today by russia's defence ministry carry a message of the potential reach of its destructive power. caroline hawley, bbc news.
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travel has been disrupted in parts of the country after airlines cancelled flights at the start of the half—term break. our correspondent simonjones reports. the great getaway is not so great when you're stuck in queues at dover. football fans and half—term holiday—makers faced delays of several hours. charlotte nobbs was trying to hitchhike her way to see family in france after exhausting other options. i was supposed to go and fly this morning back to france. my flight got cancelled, so i did a bit of off the top of my head, took a train to dover and hoped i could hitchhike my way back home. well, not home technically, but... lots of disruption. lots of disruptions. how are you feeling? tired. we're only from maidstone, so it's 45 minutes' drive. and it's taken us about six and a half hours, seven hours. seven and a half hours. seven and a half hours now, sorry. seven and a half hours to get to this point. as well as a big increase in tourist traffic, p&0 are running a reduced ferry service after sacking 800
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workers earlier this year, and there are now increased post—brexit checks. it's adding up to a bit of a perfect storm here in dover. hundreds of lorries were also trying to cross the channel. the coast guard brought in to distribute food and drink to those delayed. people were queueing around the block for eurostar services at st pancras in london, but some won't get away at all. easyjet has cancelled more than 200 flights over the next ten days. rob gore and his three children boarded their tui flight to turkey only for it to be cancelled. he faces missing a family wedding. they've been heartbroken, and when the news was announced on the plane by the pilot, the kids just burst into tears. notjust ours, but every other kid on there. airlines, airports, ports and ferry companies are apologising for the disruption, but are warning there may be more difficult days ahead. simonjones, bbc news, dover. colombians are heading to the polls on sunday to pick a new president. leading the polls is former
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guerrilla fighter gustavo petro, here on the left, focusing on the economy and renewable energy. he's expected to go head—to—head with right—wing candidate federico "fico" gutierrez, who's running on an anti—crime platform. but a third candidate, businessman rodolfo hernandez, has seen his popularity surge in the last month. he has the support of ingrid betancourt, a colombian politician who was kidnapped by farc rebels in 2002 and held captive for six years. mrs betancourt was herself a candidate in these elections. my colleague lucy grey has been finding out why she chose to stand down. i was working on uniting the centre for quite a long time. for two months, actually. and it was difficult because, as always, there are all type of interests involved. and ten days before the election, the polls, i decided to move and not to wait for the others to do
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the unity of the centre. so, i decided to back down from my candidacy and to support rodolfo hernandez, which is from the centre, the candidate that has the best options to go to second round and to beat both or one of the two extreme options that i consider could be very bad for our country. but the other major issues in this election, we've seen the pandemic has pushed more than 3 million colombians into poverty, hasn't it? this is one of the major issues that every candidate needs to be talking about, isn't it? yeah, and i think that rodolfo has the best way to deal with the problem. the problem in colombia is corruption. colombia, it's a rich country. we have a good economic and sound economic environment. but everything goes into corruption.
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all our taxes, the national budget goes into corruption. we need to stop that in order to serve the poor and to end poverty. we shouldn't have poor people in colombia because this is a big and wealthy and rich country. and what about the security situation? people will know you as having been held hostage for six years. is the situation now... you're not saying that that's the number one priority in terms of this election campaign, but is it still right up there? yeah, it's right up. especially because, if we elect rodolfo hernandez, we will avoid a war. actually, the two extremes will bring us to another situation of confrontation and violence. this is what we want to avoid. with the peace process we had, we have the farc, you are watching bbc news.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with ben rich. hello there. on saturday, the lion's share of the sunshine and warmth was found across the south and the west of the uk. temperatures were above 20 degrees in a few places, and at newquay in cornwall, beautiful blue skies overhead. further north and east, there was a bit more cloud and it did feel quite a lot cooler. and as we move through sunday, with high pressure to the north—west of us in low pressure to the north—east, that'll be driving quite a brisk northerly wind. and that will bring a rather cool feel for many. temperatures will be a little disappointing for the time of year. so, generally speaking, it will be rather cool through sunday, particularly where we have areas of cloud and some showers, which could be heavy and thundery. equally there will be some spells of sunshine in between, but we'll see showers from the word go across parts of wales, the midlands, some north sea coasts as well. showers drifting towards the south west of england, where they will turn heavy and thundery, and for many places, it will be rather cloudy. not least in the north east of scotland, where that cloud will produce some spots of rain.
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coupled with quite a brisk north or north—westerly wind, it will feel decidedly cool, just 9—11 degrees. maybe ia in glasgow. not too many showers for southern scotland orfor northern ireland. scattered showers across england and wales, especially for south west england and south wales, where some of the showers will be heavy and thundery into the afternoon. top temperatures 15—16 degrees. now, as we head through sunday night and into the early hours of monday, many of the showers in the south will clear, but at the same time will bring areas of cloud down across scotland. some showery rain with that, a few showers running down the east coast of england as well. and it's going to be quite a chilly night. temperatures widely down into single digits. one or two places 3—4 degrees briefly around dawn on monday. for monday, yes, we'll see some spells of sunshine, but often quite large amounts of cloud and some heavy, potentially thundery showers breaking out. just about anywhere could catch a shower. and those temperatures still a little below par, 11—16 degrees.
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now, as we look deeper into the coming week, this area of low pressure is going to wobble its way westwards, so that will bring some showers at times once again on tuesday, some heavy, thundery ones in places. signs are it will slowly dry out a little through the week, but there's still a bit of uncertainty about the jubilee weekend forecast.
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