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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 29, 2022 6:00am-9:00am BST

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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. good morning. our headlines today: anger at the treatment of fans at the champions league final in paris. the match is delayed. some supporters claim they were sprayed with pepper spray and prevented from entering the ground. we have been in the queue since quarter— we have been in the queue since quarter past six. i have bad asthma and i_ quarter past six. i have bad asthma and i have — quarter past six. i have bad asthma and i have been teargas to twice. thousands — and i have been teargas to twice. thousands and thousands of fans getting _ thousands and thousands of fans getting teargas _ thousands and thousands of fans getting teargas with _ thousands and thousands of fans getting teargas with tickets. - thousands and thousands of fans| getting teargas with tickets. they been _ getting teargas with tickets. they been treated _ getting teargas with tickets. they been treated like _ getting teargas with tickets. they been treated like animals. - getting teargas with tickets. they been treated like animals. it's - getting teargas with tickets. they been treated like animals. it's a i been treated like animals. it's a disgrace —
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real madrid claim the tropy — viniciuer�*s second—half goal is enough to clinch it for the spanish side. so a bad night for liverpool and supporters here in paris — now the the club is calling for an investigation into how its fans were treated. in other news, russia's ambassador to the uk says moscow will not use nuclear weapons in the war against ukraine. and could we see the return of pounds and ounces in the shops? a review of the laws on imperial measurements is announced. hello. it is a sundae of sunshine and showers for many today and with and showers for many today and with a cool _ and showers for many today and with a cool northerly wind temperatures will be _ a cool northerly wind temperatures will be a _ a cool northerly wind temperatures will be a little disappointing for this time of year. all the details coming — this time of year. all the details coming up — this time of year. all the details coming up shortly. good morning. it's sunday may 29. our main story. liverpool football club have called for an investigation into the security arrangements of last night's champions league final, after thousands of fans were stopped from gaining access to the ground. police fired tear gas and pepper
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spray at supporters, as some attempted to climb over the security barriers, delaying kick—off for more than half an hour. liverpool went on to lose 1—0 to real madrid. our sports correspondentjohn watson is in paris this morning. good morning, the morning after the night before. disappointment on the pitch. questions are being asked about the organisation around and outside the stadium as well? absolutely. and that investigation thatis absolutely. and that investigation that is being called for by liverpool football club following the treatment of their fans by french police here last night. some fans are queued for hours outside the turnstiles but were exposed to pepper spray and teargas as police tried to quell a swelling number of fans being held at those stadium entry points at the stade de france last night. as you said there, the much delayed by 36 minutes. those
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fans, very little communication as to why they were being allowed entry into the stadium last night and the claims by uefa that the lateness was due to the late arrival of fans didn't reflect the number of fans who benefit hours to gain access last night. liverpool said in a statement there is, the greatest match european football, supporters should not have to experience the scenes we witness tonight. uefa themselves said in a statement that themselves said in a statement that the turnstiles at the liverpool and became blocked by thousands of fans who had bought fake tickets which did not work. it certainly overshadow what was meant to be a celebration of sport, a celebration of football, in what is the biggest game in european club football, where liverpool lost 1—02 real madrid, who won the trophy for a 14th time. deanjohnson dean johnson reports. deanjohnson reports. these are scenes any football fan will find uncomfortable. inlet scenes any football fan will find uncomfortable.—
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scenes any football fan will find uncomfortable. ., ., , . uncomfortable. not what you expect to see at the — uncomfortable. not what you expect to see at the biggest _ uncomfortable. not what you expect to see at the biggest european - to see at the biggest european football final in 2022. dozens of supporters, frustrated and angry after the french police reach quickly for teargas as they struggle to get everyone to their seats on time. chaotic scenes of fans say they feared for their safety, despite having queued for hours. i despite having queued for hours. i have really bad asthma and i have been tier gassed twice. i have really bad asthma and i have been tier gassed twice.— been tier gassed twice. i was struggling — been tier gassed twice. i was struggling. thousands - been tier gassed twice. i was struggling. thousands and i been tier gassed twice. i was struggling. thousands and thousands of fans— struggling. thousands and thousands of fans up— struggling. thousands and thousands of fans up there. getting tier gassed _ of fans up there. getting tier gassed. with tickets. they been treated — gassed. with tickets. they been treated like animals.— gassed. with tickets. they been treated like animals. uefa blame thousands of _ treated like animals. uefa blame thousands of liveable _ treated like animals. uefa blame thousands of liveable fans - treated like animals. uefa blame thousands of liveable fans with i treated like animals. uefa blame i thousands of liveable fans with fake tickets blocking the turnstiles. but supporters said a poor organisation was not good enough. tom was there with his disabled son, harry. the treatment of _ with his disabled son, harry. tie: treatment of supporters by with his disabled son, harry. ti9 treatment of supporters by uefa and the police is an absolute disgrace. they were indiscriminately pepper spraying people lining up with
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tickets who had arrived to a half hours before kickoff at the stadium and then getting charged by riot police with shields, again, having to shield my son away. an absolute disgrace. to shield my son away. an absolute disurace. : :, , :, disgrace. away from the stadium, the afternoon was — disgrace. away from the stadium, the afternoon was full _ disgrace. away from the stadium, the afternoon was full of _ disgrace. away from the stadium, the afternoon was full of joyful _ afternoon was full of joyful positivity and confidence in the crowd at the liverpool fan park. but concern over the delay gave way to the attention of the match. and ultimately the disappointment of the final whistle. there was more teargas in the streets as they left. within like two minutes of the final whistle, they tier gassed everybody. this is where liverpool's season ends. but this club and its supporters always somehow show their hope never dies. danjohnson, bbc
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news. it certainly overshadowed the matter of course _ it certainly overshadowed the matter of course which we saw a delay to kickoff, _ of course which we saw a delay to kickoff, that 36 minute delay before the two _ kickoff, that 36 minute delay before the two teams came out to actually tregin— the two teams came out to actually begin the _ the two teams came out to actually begin the final and really for liverpool it caps off will will be a disappointing evening, when you consider— disappointing evening, when you consider that in the space of six days— consider that in the space of six days they— consider that in the space of six days they have lost the two trophies they would have wanted most, the prender— they would have wanted most, the premier league title being won by manchester city by single point, then losing the champions league final against real madrid in any ntanner— final against real madrid in any manner they did last night. a team which _ manner they did last night. a team which always seems to produce the best on— which always seems to produce the best on the biggest stage under cotour— best on the biggest stage under colour agility, best on the biggest stage under colouragility, has best on the biggest stage under colour agility, has won the trophy for another— colour agility, has won the trophy for another time. 14 trophies for reat— for another time. 14 trophies for real madrid. that goal by colours is junior— real madrid. that goal by colours is junior silty— real madrid. that goal by colours is junior silly at last night. and he isjunior— junior silly at last night. and he isjunior silly at last night. andy swisse is the story. both on it was the toughest _ andy swisse is the story. both on it was the toughest of _ andy swisse is the story. both on it was the toughest of nights. - andy swisse is the story. both on it was the toughest of nights. sodium money agonisingly close to the
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breakthrough, denied only by tivo core 12. but come the second half it was real madrid that struck. tear gassed spoke the celebrations and row were roaring. could liverpool respond? they couldn't find a way past caudwell. the man of the match performance by the real madrid goalkeeper as his team held on for victory. delayed for them at a record 14 champions league title. for liverpool, itjust wasn't record 14 champions league title. for liverpool, it just wasn't to record 14 champions league title. for liverpool, itjust wasn't to be. these boys an outstanding season. these boys an outstanding season. the two competitions we couldn't win, we didn't win for the smallest possible margin. one point, 1—0. so what does it say? just that on the day, or you know, they were one point better. that says nothing about us. :, ~:,
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point better. that says nothing about us. :, a, :, :, about us. real madrid, then, another troh for about us. real madrid, then, another trophy for the — about us. real madrid, then, another trophy for the collection. _ about us. real madrid, then, another trophy for the collection. but - about us. real madrid, then, another trophy for the collection. but for - trophy for the collection. but for liverpool, a season of so many highs has ended in disappointed. —— disappointment. huge questions, i think i will certainty— huge questions, i think i will certainly be asked of the organisers of tast— certainly be asked of the organisers of last night's match, uefa. why, the reason — of last night's match, uefa. why, the reason for the delay in kickoff, the reason for the delay in kickoff, the late _ the reason for the delay in kickoff, the late arrival of fans, the message _ the late arrival of fans, the message without have to supporters inside _ message without have to supporters inside the _ message without have to supporters inside the stadium, when clearly many— inside the stadium, when clearly nrany fans— inside the stadium, when clearly many fans had been queueing for around _ many fans had been queueing for around three hours to gain entry. it was in _ around three hours to gain entry. it was in stark— around three hours to gain entry. it was in stark contrast to what we saw last night _ was in stark contrast to what we saw last night. and also questions of the heavy—handed use of teargas and pepper— the heavy—handed use of teargas and pepper spray to keep back the swelling — pepper spray to keep back the swelling number of fans being kept the turnstiles by security staff. it made _ the turnstiles by security staff. it made no — the turnstiles by security staff. it made no sense, really, last night, when _ made no sense, really, last night, when you — made no sense, really, last night, when you consider that many were gueueing — when you consider that many were queueing patiently. but the approach was used. uefa will be some serious questions over that and the policing of the _ questions over that and the policing of the approach last night. hence why liverpool are calling for an
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investigation into the treatment of their fans. — investigation into the treatment of their fans, which certainly overshadowed what was meant to be, as i overshadowed what was meant to be, as i say, _ overshadowed what was meant to be, as i say, a _ overshadowed what was meant to be, as i say, a celebration of football, one of— as i say, a celebration of football, one of the — as i say, a celebration of football, one of the moments in the footballing calendar, the champions league _ footballing calendar, the champions league final. and instead of talking about _ league final. and instead of talking about the _ league final. and instead of talking about the football and events on the bitch. _ about the football and events on the bitch. it _ about the football and events on the bitch. it is _ about the football and events on the pitch, it is matters of the pitch and in — pitch, it is matters of the pitch and in the _ pitch, it is matters of the pitch and in the lead up to the kickoff last night— and in the lead up to the kickoff last night which is in the spotlight this morning. last night which is in the spotlight this morning-— last night which is in the spotlight this morning. indeed disappointing in more ways _ this morning. indeed disappointing in more ways than _ this morning. indeed disappointing in more ways than one. _ this morning. indeed disappointing in more ways than one. thank- this morning. indeed disappointing| in more ways than one. thank you, john, with the latest from paris. john, with the latest from paris. john will be with us for analysis during the morning. it is john will be with us for analysis during the morning.— john will be with us for analysis during the morning. it is nine past six. we during the morning. it is nine past six- we move _ during the morning. it is nine past six. we move on. _ russia's ambassador to the uk has said he does not believe moscow will use tactical nuclear weapons in the war against ukraine. speaking to the bbc�*s sunday morning programme, andrei kelin insisted such weapons would be used only if russia faced an existential threat. our diplomatic correspondent caroline hawley has more. an exercise involving nuclear weapons carried out by russia just before it invaded ukraine, and
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apparent warning to the west. russia has the world's biggest news get there after all, so when vladimir putin made an announcement at the start of the war, because global alarm. as the war in ukraine escalated, there were fears that recorded president putin could actually use but russia's ambassador to the uk has a deadly threat for now. :, : : :, to the uk has a deadly threat for now. :,: ::, : ., to the uk has a deadly threat for now. : :, :, , :, now. tactical nuclear weapon is not used in conflicts _ now. tactical nuclear weapon is not used in conflicts like _ now. tactical nuclear weapon is not used in conflicts like that _ now. tactical nuclear weapon is not used in conflicts like that at - now. tactical nuclear weapon is not used in conflicts like that at all. - used in conflicts like that at all. so you do not believe that will happen? — so you do not believe that will happen? i don't. so you do not believe that will happen? idon't. can so you do not believe that will happen? i don't. can you categorically say that it will not happen? — categorically say that it will not happen? we categorically say that it will not ha en? ~ :, categorically say that it will not ha en? : ., ., , categorically say that it will not hauen? :, :, i, : happen? we have a very strict provision _ happen? we have a very strict provision over _ happen? we have a very strict provision over the _ happen? we have a very strict provision over the use - happen? we have a very strict provision over the use of - happen? we have a very strict i provision over the use of tactical nuclear weapons, and it is mainly when the existence of the state is in danger. it has nothing to do with the current situation. but in danger. it has nothing to do with the current situation.— the current situation. but russia is still determined _ the current situation. but russia is still determined to _ the current situation. but russia is still determined to show _ the current situation. but russia is still determined to show the - the current situation. but russia is still determined to show the world | still determined to show the world its military might, the potential reach of its destructive power. these are images released by the russian defence ministry of the
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apparently successful of it's russian defence ministry of the apparently successful of its range over 600 miles. you can see the full interview on sunday morning at 9am on bbc one. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv for us this morning. james, these are slightly gentler words from the ambassador and there have been further calls for putin to engage in negotiations — will president zelensky want to talk? i think it tells us a lot about the war where — i think it tells us a lot about the war where we are talking about the ruling _ war where we are talking about the ruling out _ war where we are talking about the ruling out of tactical nuclear weapons _ ruling out of tactical nuclear weapons as gentler language. but many— weapons as gentler language. but many ukrainians would be believing a singte _ many ukrainians would be believing a singte word _ many ukrainians would be believing a single word that comes out of the kremlin, — single word that comes out of the kremlin, ever since the 24th of february— kremlin, ever since the 24th of february or the eight years of war that preceded that. i think we are seeing _ that preceded that. i think we are seeing russia through everything at ease _ seeing russia through everything at ease wes— seeing russia through everything at ease. wes fang seeing donetsk, surrounded now, familiar siege tactics — surrounded now, familiar siege tactics being adopted by the russians. but it isn't clear, and this is— russians. but it isn't clear, and this is what— russians. but it isn't clear, and this is what the question of
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tactical— this is what the question of tactical nuclear weapons comes in, we are _ tactical nuclear weapons comes in, we are clear— tactical nuclear weapons comes in, we are clear if russia will want to escalate — we are clear if russia will want to escalate things after that. yes they have shrunk their ambitions and moved — have shrunk their ambitions and moved to— have shrunk their ambitions and moved to the east, but they are now looking _ moved to the east, but they are now looking to _ moved to the east, but they are now looking to take the whole of the eastern — looking to take the whole of the eastern donbas region. overnight we have seen— eastern donbas region. overnight we have seen more missile strikes in other— have seen more missile strikes in other regions, and the north—east, and in _ other regions, and the north—east, and in the — other regions, and the north—east, and in the south, which is adding to the uncertainty. well vladimir putin stop? _ the uncertainty. well vladimir putin stop? should be eastern donbas region— stop? should be eastern donbas region fall to the russians? well that impudence you didn't stop there or witi— that impudence you didn't stop there or will he _ that impudence you didn't stop there or will he want to take more? some russian _ or will he want to take more? some russian state tv this week has been quoted _ russian state tv this week has been quoted as _ russian state tv this week has been quoted as saying we will be coming back for— quoted as saying we will be coming back for kyiv. and the invaders will occupy _ back for kyiv. and the invaders will occupy a _ back for kyiv. and the invaders will occupy a fifth of ukraine, now. they occupv _ occupy a fifth of ukraine, now. they occupy a _ occupy a fifth of ukraine, now. they occupy a huge land corridor from the south _ occupy a huge land corridor from the south to— occupy a huge land corridor from the south to the — occupy a huge land corridor from the south to the east. so it isn't clear what _ south to the east. so it isn't clear what witi— south to the east. so it isn't clear what will happen next, but ukraine is desperate for more heavy weaponry from the _ is desperate for more heavy weaponry from the west is it struggles to contain — from the west is it struggles to contain the russian advance in the s. y :, , contain the russian advance in the 5. james with the latest in kyiv, thank you _
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president biden will travel to the city of uvalde in texas later today, where a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers at a primary school last week. he'll be meeting survivors and the families of some of those who died. the us leader has urged more cross—party support for tighter gun control following the shooting. our central america correspondent will grant has this report. after the most terrible week in its history, uvalde is preparing for two things: to bury its children and to receive the president. the victims�* families are only concerned with the first, making preparations for a day which no parent can bear to imagine. the horrific attack on an elementary school by a teenager under semiautomatic weapon has made that nightmare reality for them. as president biden�*s motor grade drives only streets of uvalde, they will come across these, small, impromptu tributes to victims, set up around the city. this is a community deep
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in morning, torn apart by what happened. joe biden knows he must tread carefully here to balance sympathy with asking the difficult questions. this has brought the gun control debate back into sharp focus. before his trip, the president reiterated his position that changes but necessary and possible. brute that changes but necessary and ossible. ~ ::, :, that changes but necessary and ossible. ~ :, :, :, that changes but necessary and ossible. :, :, :, :, , possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know. possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know- but — possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know- but we _ possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know. but we can _ possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know. but we can make _ possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know. but we can make america i possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, l i know. but we can make america safe —— safer. we can protect the lives of our people and our children. so i called on americans to join hands and make your voices heard, to work together to make this nation what it can and should be. but together to make this nation what it can and should be.— can and should be. but he has his work cut out. _ can and should be. but he has his work cut out. bipartisan - can and should be. but he has his work cut out. bipartisan support | can and should be. but he has his| work cut out. bipartisan support is increasingly difficult to find on any major issue in the united states these days. ongoing control it is almost impossible. the nra convention in houston, his predecessor, donald trump,
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reiterated the republican line: that the main issues are school security and mental health, not guns. inner—city lesley brennan of hope, president biden hopes to show solidarity and empathy as a man who has lost children of his own to the victims�* families. the larger issue of how such brutality could have been prevented may simply be put on hold during a moment�*s silence. will grant, bbc news, uvalde, texas. a clean—up operation is underway in a marina in torquay, after superyacht burst into flames and sank there yesterday. the 85 foot vessel was carrying 8,000 litres of fuel, which the environment agency fears could escape into the surrounding waters. a major incident was declared and nearby beaches and roads were evacuated. holidaymakers have faced travel chaos and severe delays at airports, train stations and ferry terminals,
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at the start of the half—term break. easyjet and tiu have cancelled dozens of flights, while long queues have also been seen at london�*s st pancras station. our correspondent tim muffett is there for us this morning. tim, what�*s the situation there now? good morning to you. this weekend for many of us marks the start of the half term holidays and as you say right now it is quiet at st pancras here in the eurostar terminal. pancras here in the eurostar terminal-— pancras here in the eurostar terminal. , , , terminal. yesterday they were very lona terminal. yesterday they were very long queues _ terminal. yesterday they were very long queues snaking _ terminal. yesterday they were very long queues snaking their- terminal. yesterday they were very long queues snaking their way - terminal. yesterday they were very l long queues snaking their way along the road behind me, notjust holidaymakers but many liverpool fans on their way to paris for the champions league final and we are sure we will see many of them returned today, it will be a miserable journey indeed. when returned today, it will be a miserablejourney indeed. when it comes to the roads, by the end of today the rac predict that this
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weekend, around 17 million leisure journeys will have taken place and we have seen some pretty heavy traffic on some routes. yesterday the m5 heading towards the south—west was particularly heavy and also roads leading into dover in kent. there were big queues waiting fairies. the kent resilience forum counted 700 lorries, that is a community coalition of organisations, they counted 700 lorries in one particular queue. holidaymakers as well and, of course, liverpool fans as well. so a grim start to manyjourneys. for many people, thousands, in fact, it is our travel that will be a big issue. on thursday easyjet announced 200 flights had been cancelled because of it issues and then late on friday night the airline announced the between now and june six around another 200 flights will be cancelled. and that has thrown
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many holidays into disarray with stories of weddings and funerals being missed and it will be a very tricky start to many trips. tui, the travel group, has also announced some cancellations as well. the major problem is that during the pandemic, many staff were lost from their companies and recruiting people to meet the demand is not easy to often security checks need to take place, special training as well. so, sadly, it seems that there is no quick fix if you are travelling somewhere you can try to check out the journey before you set off and best of luck.— off and best of luck. thank you, tim, we off and best of luck. thank you, tim. we will— off and best of luck. thank you, tim, we will talk— off and best of luck. thank you, tim, we will talk more - off and best of luck. thank you, tim, we will talk more about i off and best of luck. thank you, | tim, we will talk more about this during the programme this morning. good luck to them all. here�*s louise with a look at this morning�*s weather. yesterday you were spot on when you said that sunshine and clouds it was on and off all afternoon yesterday. it was lovely when the sun came out. it was lovely when the sun came out. it was lovely when the sun came out. it was warm and very nice and beautiful day down across the
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south—west of devon and cornwall in particular. slightly different story today and i will add insult to injury with those traffic and travel issues. the weather is not playing ball today either. cool for the time of year, i�*m afraid, plenteous scattered showers because yesterday�*s high—pressure is starting to drift away the far north—west allowing this influence of low pressure and the squeeze on the isobars against the wind strength is starting to pick up. it comes from the northerly direction so cooler air source is now starting to infiltrate across the country. it is also driving a few scattered showers of the north—eastern north—east scotland running down through that east coast you can see where most showers have been so far and one or two arejust where most showers have been so far and one or two are just pushing through the north—west into east wales as we speak. certainly more cloud around today and as we go through the afternoon though showers will tend to become more widespread across the country. a different story and it will feel disappointingly cool for a time of
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year. we may well not see double figures into the northern isles but generally through scotland around 11- 14 generally through scotland around 11— 14 celsius. a brisk northerly wind and a few sharp showers. all the rail and perhaps has fewer showers but the further west you are the best of any shelter. into england, well, it looks likely and across wales that we will continue to see showers. atop 16 and some showers don�*t have the south—west could be heavy and widespread into the afternoon so a totally different story in comparison to what we had yesterday. during the early hours we will continue to see a few showers but those temperatures will fall away so a chilly start to monday in one or two rural frost areas we could see a little bit of light frost first thing in the morning. as we go into monday we keep cloudy skies and we keep plenty of showers going as well. monday will be a similar story, a cool day, cloudy with sharp showers and great news for gardeners and growers out there,
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while two areas starting to be desperate but how much rain you will see is still subject to question. some showers may be escaped altogether but the temperatures again 11— 16 degrees. low pressure is still with us on tuesday and this little frontal system will enhance the showers to the far north—west so we keep the cloud. early morning sunshine in the south perhaps displaced by showers later on. temperatures will be a degree also hire here if we get the sunshine with highs of 18 degrees and as we look ahead to the all—important bank holiday weekend, still some uncertainty but at the moment it looks likely that on the whole not too bad. just a little bit warmer, a great deal of usable weather out there. just a risk of short sharp showers. thank you, louise. the london fire brigade has made major changes to the way it deals with blazes in high—rise buildings, following the grenfell tower fire five years ago. the inquiry into the disaster made several recommendations on how the force can improve its policies,
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procedures and equipment — and most of them have now been implemented. our reporter karl mercer has been to see a training exercise in action. this is london fire brigade�*s leaders training. they are training firefighters and control staff of how to get people out of burning tower glass —— blocks. we were invited to the disused block in north london to see what has changed since the grenfell tower fire nearly five years ago. much has. the brigade now has new appliances with longer ladders, some the tallest in europe. there is new technology for fire safety guides and saw fsg as they call it. fire safety guides and saw fsg as they call it— they call it. this is the fsg app that we have _ they call it. this is the fsg app that we have developed. - they call it. this is the fsg app that we have developed. one | they call it. this is the fsg app i that we have developed. one call they call it. this is the fsg app - that we have developed. one call is coming as you can see and it lists
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all calls coming in. we have the premises, the floor and what the status of the fsg is. this column shows what our crews are currently doing sue can see that we have five crews committed to deal with incoming calls. i crews committed to deal with incoming calls.— crews committed to deal with incoming calls. crews committed to deal with incomin: calls. :, , incoming calls. i went into the base at grenfell and _ incoming calls. i went into the base at grenfell and i _ incoming calls. i went into the base at grenfell and i found _ incoming calls. i went into the base at grenfell and i found an _ incoming calls. i went into the base at grenfell and i found an officer i at grenfell and i found an officer there _ at grenfell and i found an officer there writing the names and flat numbers— there writing the names and flat numbers of those people trapped on the watt— numbers of those people trapped on the wall with pencil because so many people _ the wall with pencil because so many people were trapped in that incident that we _ people were trapped in that incident that we had run out of space on our boards _ that we had run out of space on our boards to— that we had run out of space on our boards to capture that information. he's a _ boards to capture that information. he's a good — boards to capture that information. he's a good guy and he was distraught that he had to do that 'ust distraught that he had to do that just as _ distraught that he had to do that just as colleagues are done previously. i made a promise to myself— previously. i made a promise to myself that i never wanted to see a london _ myself that i never wanted to see a london firefighter in that position again— london firefighter in that position again without the kid on the policy to deat— again without the kid on the policy to deal with it.— to dealwith it. inside, firefighters _ to dealwith it. inside, firefighters have - to dealwith it. inside, firefighters have new. to deal with it. inside, - firefighters have new tools as to deal with it. inside, _ firefighters have new tools as well. fire curtains to block off the smoke in stairwells. and there are smoke hoods for those being rescued to protect them for up to 15 minutes as
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they are let out of the building. more than 1000 blocks in london the brigade now says people should evacuate because the fire safety concerns. that was not the case at grenfell. ~ :, :, , :, :, grenfell. we were not ready for a catastrophic _ grenfell. we were not ready for a catastrophic building _ grenfell. we were not ready for a catastrophic building failure - grenfell. we were not ready for a catastrophic building failure of. catastrophic building failure of that nature, the complete failure of regulation and what i am sure about now is that with this exercise in this training and this kit we are. so i think it is a recognition of all the lessons we have learned. although listening we have done and we have done it because, quite frankly, we owe it to those people who lost their lives.— who lost their lives. drones have been as well. _ who lost their lives. drones have been as well. another _ who lost their lives. drones have been as well. another tool - who lost their lives. drones have been as well. another tool to - who lost their lives. drones have l been as well. another tool to help identify whether firing victims are. and control room officers are able link up to witnesses phones. i willi link up to witnesses phones. i will show you- — link up to witnesses phones. i will show you- so _ link up to witnesses phones. i will show you. so they _ link up to witnesses phones. i will show you. so they can _ link up to witnesses phones. i will show you. so they can see - link up to witnesses phones. i will show you. so they can see how i link up to witnesses phones. i will i show you. so they can see how fires are developing- _ show you. so they can see how fires are developing. the _ show you. so they can see how fires are developing. the changes - show you. so they can see how fires are developing. the changes had . show you. so they can see how fires are developing. the changes had to| are developing. the changes had to come. the brigade was heavily criticised by the first phase of the grenfell enquiry. that
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criticised by the first phase of the grenfell enquiry.— criticised by the first phase of the grenfell enquiry. that awful night. peole grenfell enquiry. that awful night. people were _ grenfell enquiry. that awful night. people were inside _ grenfell enquiry. that awful night. people were inside the _ grenfell enquiry. that awful night. people were inside the tower - grenfell enquiry. that awful night. people were inside the tower and | people were inside the tower and speaking to the control room and those messages were not being passed on to those on the ground, there was this communication and so forth and so that is why i support both financially and offering support to the fire service to actual lessons are learned. the fire service to actual lessons are learned-— the fire service to actual lessons are learned. , :, , ., are learned. many have been and the learnin: , are learned. many have been and the learning. they _ are learned. many have been and the learning. they say. — are learned. many have been and the learning, they say, will _ are learned. many have been and the learning, they say, will continue. - you just hope that enhanced safety is the only good thing to have come out of that horrendous tragedy. that anniversary is _ out of that horrendous tragedy. trust anniversary isjust a out of that horrendous tragedy. trust anniversary is just a couple out of that horrendous tragedy. trust anniversary isjust a couple of anniversary is just a couple of weeks away now. let�*s take a look at today�*s papers. the observer has a photo of disappointed liverpool fans on its front page. the image shows supporters with their tickets to the champions league final outside the ground in paris last night, where kick off was delayed by more than half—an—hour, amid reports of some fans being targeted by police with tear gas. the sunday telegraph leads with reports that the prime minister wants to "name and shame" petrol stations that are failing to pass the fuel
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duty cut introduced in march. sources told the paper mrjohnson has "expressed fury" that the 5p—a—litre cut is failing to materialise at the pumps. "meghan to heal rift with sick dad", reads the headline in the sunday mirror. the paper says the duchess of sussex has reached out to her unwell father following his recent release from hospital. and the mail on sunday reports that the government is set to reintroduce the crown symbol on pint glasses and launch. a consultation on when and where imperial measurements can be used, to coincide with the queen�*s platinum jubilee celebrations. it talks a lot about the fact that although the eu wanted us to have metric measurements, which we do in many cases, we live in a hybrid, don�*t we? we still talk about people
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being 6—foot two, quite often, we give weight in stones. being 6-foot two, quite often, we give weight in stones.— being 6-foot two, quite often, we give weight in stones. although much ofthe give weight in stones. although much of the younger _ give weight in stones. although much of the younger generation _ give weight in stones. although much of the younger generation don't. - of the younger generation don�*t. people under 35 don�*t really know about stones, do they? they are all kilograms. this is the sunday son. lots of photos across lots of papers this morning. that is prince william proudly wearing his red tunic and rehearsing the platinum jubilee trooping the colour. this ceremony was acting as a full dress rehearsal for thursday�*s trooping the colour. the duke of cambridge willjoin prince charles and princess and to inspect the troops and charles will be standing in for his mother, the queen, who has episodic mobility problems that we have been healing about. —— hearing about. looking forward to that long weekend, tuning in to look at that. find forward to that long weekend, tuning in to look at that.— in to look at that. and this is inside the — in to look at that. and this is inside the sunday _ in to look at that. and this is inside the sunday mirror - in to look at that. and this is inside the sunday mirror this morning. bruce stevenson is ten and his father as a lorry driver but obviously technically, as a
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mechanic, is quite able because what he has done is created a replica of an ac cobra sports car that can do about 200 miles an hour, the real thing. this is made from a mobility scooter. it has a top speed of about ten miles an hour and this is bruce at the wheel. they are now working on a land rover as well. that is fantastic. they made the fibreglass body, the replica of the car and there is bruce behind the wheel. bruce looking super smug. as you would, wouldn�*t you? this bruce looking super smug. as you would, wouldn't you?— would, wouldn't you? this is apparently — would, wouldn't you? this is apparently so _ would, wouldn't you? this is apparently so good - would, wouldn't you? this is apparently so good on - would, wouldn't you? this is apparently so good on the i would, wouldn't you? this is i apparently so good on the tools would, wouldn't you? this is - apparently so good on the tools he is helping to do the land rover model. ~ :, :, :, , :, :, model. what a lovely thing to do with our model. what a lovely thing to do with your father. _ model. what a lovely thing to do with your father. fantastic. - cast your mind back to some of your main achievements at six years old. that was a long time ago. did you have any achievements at that age? it might have been something like learning to ride a bike or swimming underwater. for ryino salisbury, he�*s taking on a rather bigger challenge and is heading to thejunior world golf championships, despite only playing on a course three times.
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shelley phelps has been to meet him. he must be some player. meet six—year—old ryino. the superstar golfer who was about to take on some of the best in the world. he has been swinging a golf club since he was in nappies, making his father, who also coaches him, proud. brute was in nappies, making his father, who also coaches him, proud. we did a lot of hand — who also coaches him, proud. we did a lot of hand eye _ who also coaches him, proud. we did a lot of hand eye co-ordination - a lot of hand eye co—ordination where i would throw a ball at him and he would whack it with his little plastic club. ihis and he would whack it with his little plastic club.— little plastic club. his skills cuickl little plastic club. his skills quickly developed - little plastic club. his skills quickly developed from - little plastic club. his skills i quickly developed from hitting plastic golf balls around the house. so what is his favourite shot? abs, so what is his favourite shot? chip in. that is my favourite. driving. basically, all of them. his talent is even caught the attention of the former world number one, justin rose. of the former world number one, justin rose-— of the former world number one, justin rose. , , :,, :, justin rose. justin rose here and i am hearing — justin rose. justin rose here and i am hearing fantastic— justin rose. justin rose here and i am hearing fantastic things - justin rose. justin rose here and i am hearing fantastic things aboutl am hearing fantastic things about your golf game. keep it up. i used to play golf with your father any does know what he�*s talking about so
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make sure you listen and keep having fun. , :, :, : ~' make sure you listen and keep having fun. , make sure you listen and keep having fun. :" , :, make sure you listen and keep having fun. , :, , make sure you listen and keep having fun. good luck, body. now he is off to the junior— fun. good luck, body. now he is off to the junior world _ fun. good luck, body. now he is off to the junior world golf _ to the junior world golf championships to thejunior world golf championships in san diego after coming second a british qualifier. despite having only played on the golf course three times. shelley phelps, bbc news.— golf course three times. shelley - phelps, bbc news._ better at phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the are of phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the age of six — phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the age of six than _ phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the age of six than i _ phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the age of six than i could _ phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the age of six than i could ever - phelps, bbc news. amazing! better at the age of six than i could ever be. - the age of six than i could ever be. and he�*s enjoying it, that is important. at 6.30 will be talking about the champions league and it has been a big week for sport across the board. let�*s run you through some of that. wigan warriors came from behind to win the challenge cup yesterday, in the most incredible of finishes. they... go on. go on. they beat huddersfield giants 16—14 and adam wild watched all the drama unfold at the tottenham hotspur stadium. a new location, the same historic
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occasion. the 125 years the challenge cup final has been robbie lee�*s bonus moment. in tottenham for the first time, it is time for huddersfield or wigan to make history. the giants brought their own for good measure. wigan not quite themselves in the first half. chris mcqueen with the sidestep at huddersfield held the halftime bell. there had been spaced before, wigan heading back at speed, achieve field lighting the final. as quickly as that space appeared, so it disappeared. still, mcgilvery didn�*t really need any, somehow finding a way through, huddersfield finding a way through, huddersfield finding a way back in front. the tightest gap, the finders margin, but this would
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be wigan�*s finest hour. just minutes remaining, marshall with the game�*s biggest moment, breaking giant hearts. on the day, history is made in tottenham. it is the wagon warriors who take the game�*s grandest prize. —— wigan warriors. challenge cup winners 2022. there was late drama in the european champions cup final as well, as la rochelle came back to beat leinster in the final minutes of the game. the irish side were leading by 21 points to 17, before this try sealed the victory for la rochelle. this is the first time they�*ve won the competition, becoming the fourth french team to do so. charles leclerc took pole position for his home race in the monaco grand prix. the ferrari driver dominated the race and ended fractionally clear of team—mate carlos sainz.
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championship leader max verstappen will start in fourth position and lewis hamilton is in eighth. port vale will be back in league one next season, afterfive years playing in english football�*s bottom division. the staffordshire club beat mansfield 3—0 in the league two play—off final. former mansfield player, mal benning wrapped it up late in the second half, scoring vale�*s third goal of the match. mansfield were down to ten men by that stage. wrexham are co—owned by film stars ryan reynolds and rob mcelhenney but it was luke waterfall who provided the hollywood ending for grimsby in their national league play—off semi—final. he scored a late winner in extra time to beat wrexham 5—4. grimsby is nowjust one game away from a return to the football league. we heard about disappointment for the rugby league team at huddersfield, but what�*s being called the richest
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game in football takes place today — when huddersfield town and nottingham forest meet at wembley for the championship play—off. the prize is a place in the premier league said to be worth at least £170 million to the winner. yesterday, we featured forest and this morning, we�*re hearing form some of huddersfield town�*s key players. come on! jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. _ come on! jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. it— come on! jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. it is— come on! jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. it is special, - come on! jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. it is special, i- town midfielder. it is special, i think, the bondi bill with this club, with everyone involved, to get over the line one more time. we are getting on in our region. it could be my last chance, and i want to make the most of it and i want to try to do the club proud and give the fans what they want. brute try to do the club proud and give the fans what they want.- try to do the club proud and give the fans what they want. we go into names and the fans what they want. we go into games and i — the fans what they want. we go into games and i don't _ the fans what they want. we go into games and i don't think _ the fans what they want. we go into games and i don't think the - the fans what they want. we go into games and i don't think the other i games and i don't think the other team _ games and i don't think the other team knows what information we will play, team knows what information we will play. who _ team knows what information we will play. who is — team knows what information we will play, who is playing where and i feel that —
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play, who is playing where and i feel that is the advantage we have ever teams. feel that is the advantage we have everteams. everybody feel that is the advantage we have ever teams. everybody going in the same _ ever teams. everybody going in the same direction and for us, one more game, _ same direction and for us, one more game, and _ same direction and for us, one more game, and the dream becomes a reality _ game, and the dream becomes a reali . :, ~' game, and the dream becomes a reali . :, ,, :, :, : reality. you think of the head coach as the professor. _ reality. you think of the head coach as the professor. why _ reality. you think of the head coach as the professor. why do _ reality. you think of the head coach as the professor. why do you - reality. you think of the head coach as the professor. why do you call. reality. you think of the head coach j as the professor. why do you call in that? �* ::, , as the professor. why do you call in that? �* :: , ., as the professor. why do you call in that? �* , :, :, , as the professor. why do you call in that? �* , :, as the professor. why do you call in that? , :, :_ that? because the man has so many lans u- that? because the man has so many plans op his — that? because the man has so many plans up his sleeve _ that? because the man has so many plans up his sleeve and _ that? because the man has so many plans up his sleeve and if— that? because the man has so many plans up his sleeve and if one - plans up his sleeve and if one doesn't — plans up his sleeve and if one doesn't work, you know there is a second _ doesn't work, you know there is a second one — doesn't work, you know there is a second one. if that one doesn't work, _ second one. if that one doesn't work, there is another one, etc. for him, _ work, there is another one, etc. for him. he _ work, there is another one, etc. for him. he is _ work, there is another one, etc. for him, he is 1—of—a—kind.| work, there is another one, etc. for him, he is 1-of-a-kind._ him, he is 1-of-a-kind. i know how bi will him, he is 1-of-a-kind. i know how big will be — him, he is 1-of-a-kind. i know how big will be the _ him, he is 1-of-a-kind. i know how big will be the support _ him, he is 1-of-a-kind. i know how big will be the support that - him, he is1-of-a-kind. i know how big will be the support that all- him, he is 1-of-a-kind. i know how big will be the support that all the l big will be the support that all the fans are going to bring us because if i put all the people that are here usually in the stadium, it will be exactly the same or even more. i know how much they are helping us every time that they are giving their support. every time that they are giving theirsupport. i every time that they are giving their sopport-— every time that they are giving their support. i haven't played at wembley- _ their support. i haven't played at wembley- i've — their support. i haven't played at wembley. i've been _ their support. i haven't played at wembley. i've been there - their support. i haven't played at wembley. i've been there twice. | their support. i haven't played at - wembley. i've been there twice. i've watched _ wembley. i've been there twice. i've watched the chelsea fa cup game.
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seeing _ watched the chelsea fa cup game. seeing my— watched the chelsea fa cup game. seeing my family there will be crazy and it— seeing my family there will be crazy and it will— seeing my family there will be crazy and it will make me a bit emotional, i and it will make me a bit emotional, ithink~ _ and it will make me a bit emotional, i think. hopefully that i get nervous. _ i think. hopefully that i get nervous, i suppose. of i think. hopefully that i get nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but— nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but we — nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but we know— nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but we know how _ nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but we know how hard - nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but we know how hard it - nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream but we know how hard it will be and i feel that i know what we can do and nobody can really stop us. that is huddersfield. - really stop us. that is i huddersfield. yesterday really stop us. that is - huddersfield. yesterday we really stop us. that is _ huddersfield. yesterday we induce you to nottingham forest. big game stop commentary on bbc radio 5 and both local radio stations. best stop commentary on bbc radio 5 and both local radio stations.— both local radio stations. best of luck to both _ both local radio stations. best of luck to both clubs. _ both local radio stations. best of luck to both clubs. now - both local radio stations. best of luck to both clubs. now it - both local radio stations. best of luck to both clubs. now it is - both local radio stations. best of| luck to both clubs. now it is time for the travel show. this week on the travel show, a resurrection in bavaria. i found the role of playing jesus to be very exhausting. every day after the play, you are really exhausted because it is a very demanding day. 50 years of interrail. very relevant today in terms of the greenness and sustainability, and also that wonderful thing
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— slow travel. and, a night in the best house in belfast. not only am i staying in the same house, i�*m actually going to be sleeping in the very room that he had as a child. this week, i�*m in northern ireland�*s capital city, belfast, recently the subject of a big feature film about the childhood
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of the actor, director kenneth brannagh, but i am here to find out more about another of the city�*s famous sons. you may guess who that is if you look at the statue behind me. first though, we are in germany to see an incredible, once—in—a—decade performance of a play staged by a whole village. in 1634, the people of oberammergau recreated the suffering, death and resurrection of christ, in thanks for being spared from the plague. they promised to repeat it every ten years, and did so until coronavirus forced its abandonment in 2020. well, it�*s back and we went to bavaria to see it on its opening weekend. everyone in the village comes together. the youngest will be on stage and the oldest at 96 years old. everyone comes to the theatre, you get to know each other, their children grow into this tradition. it is a tradition that we have had almost 400 years, and that is something very special because it
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brings people together. if you are born here, or you stay here for years, you have a right to be a member of the play. i bring together. we're really all different groups. in the village, all people are together — a member of a church, even muslims, poor people, rich people, i bring together all people. 2500 costumes made and designed, all of the 2500| costumes are made here . in our costume department, worked for two years on it. the fabrics are from
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all over the world. i we have lots of images to show from the old testament, - and so there is a lot _ of transformation of backstage we have to build. singing in german. our team of technicians are 40 people. - the passion play are very important for oberammergau. we have about 5500 people living here, and about 1300 people are playing with working here, and make everything around the theatre. we play 110 days, and we have about a half—million people visiting oberammergau around this time. i play a singer in the choir
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for 40 days from this 110 days. it�*s hard for me as the mayor, because i have to really work much. my name is ursula burkart, i'm playing the part of claudia, the wife of pilate. i was three times mary, once mary magdalene. this is my home, i grew up with the passion play and it's important. it's a social meeting, it's important to be part of this. you are very early affected to this. i mean, which child has the possibility to be part of it this here on a huge stage? of course, the role ofjesus is really exhausting. so we have over 100 plays, we play five times a week, and i play half of the plays. and every day after the play, you�*re really exhausted
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because it�*s a very demanding day. it�*s like a five—and—a—half hour play. you�*re 20 minutes on the cross, and you have a lot of text in the first part of the play. in the second part, it�*s more physically and it�*s, you know, it�*s very tough. my first remembrance to the passion play is when i was two years old. my father was a roman soldier at this time and he was riding on a horse, and i with my grandfather out in the passion play theatre. in 2000, i wasjudas. in 2010 i was caiaphas, and now this time i am pontius pilate. it's such a small village, it's a big effort to put such a big play on the stage, and everybody is working together and it is a very special experience for everybody who takes
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part in the play. you could not do this every year, but every ten, it's ok. i work in the hotel, so the advantage is if people in the theatre nobody's in the hotel so, i can go to the stage. what i like about the play because it�*s not something old, it�*s important in our world today. the message ofjesus is universal. to be good to the others, to help those who are outside of the community, or he talks about poverty, he talks about diseases, it talks about war. it points to the problems that we have today. i don�*t know if the role has changed me. i always try to be nice to others, but i don�*t know if i�*m a better person, but i try.
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you can catch the passion play all the way through to october. and, if bavaria is on for the coming months, bear some of these things in mind. oktoberfest is back after a two—year hiatus. the wiesn, as it�*s known locally, started as a simple wedding celebration for bavarian royalty in 1810. it�*s now a major folk festival, attracting millions of visitors from across the world, and sees over a million gallons of beer drunk each year. fancy putting on your lederhosen or dirndl? then make your way to munich any time between september 17 and october 3rd, later this year. til the cows come home as an annual festival that promises to keep the party going...until the cows come home, literally.
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each september in the bavarian alps, cattle are brought down to the villages from their mountain meadows. this traditional event is called viehscheid. the cows are treated like celebrities on the way back home to their owners. the locals dress up in traditional costumes and celebrate the event with oom—pah music, beer and traditionalfood. some of the best views are the fairytale—esque neuschwanstein castle can be seen from the marienbrucke bridge, however, the bridge has been closed for over one year due to structural problems. but, good news is on the horizon as, this month, renovation works began and tourists can expect to check out the views again from this summer. still to come on the travel show: simon is here celebrating 50 years of the european interrail pass.
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there was the added attraction of night trains, which provided somewhere for you to rest your head, if not necessarily sleep as the train clattered across europe. waiting to receive was might best! and they say, "never meet your heroes," but what about sleeping in their beds? i am in belfast for a trip that ten—year—old mejust wouldn�*t have believed. i wonder what he would have made of this? so, don�*t go away. from the arctic to the mediterranean, from the far west of ireland to the far east of turkey, for half a century, interrail has unlocked europe for millions of rail travellers.
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in 1972, widespread international travel was beyond the reach of the average european. the budget airlines were decades away. then, the international union of railways decided to celebrate its 50th anniversary by coming up with a special travel ticket for under 21s. pay £32 and you could wander almost anywhere you wanted on the railways of europe for a month! interrail proved an instant success, opening up the countryside, the cities, the coasts of a continent for barely more than a return airfare between london and paris. for low—budget travellers, there was the added attraction of night trains, which provided somewhere for you to rest your head, if not necessarily sleep as the train clattered across europe. and perhaps because of spending
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endless days and nights on trains, not every interrailer was renowned for their impeccable personal hygiene. in 1972, when interrail began, steam trains weren�*t museum pieces as they are here at the bluebell railway in sussex. they were actually running scheduled services in parts of eastern europe, and even france. since then, of course, europe has had a revolution on the railways, with some expresses travelling at over 300 kilometres an hour. and, interrail has been transformed as well, now open to anyone of any age. and, forget the old paper pass, interrail now comes as a smart phone app. but, before you jump on—board, here are some things to look out for. the fastest trains in italy,
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spain and france require you to pre—book a seat, and pay a supplement of 10 euros 01’ more. yes, even though you have already got a interrail pass. and, since brexit, the 3 month pass could push the british traveller slightly over than multi—day limit for the so—called schengen area. using as much as you legally could would mean no visit to those countries for 90 days, before or afterwards. depending on where you�*re going, interrail could prove a false economy. in eastern europe, portugal, and on the classic trains of europe, ordinary tickets are very cheap. and, in luxembourg, all public transport is free. so, how to make the most of an interrail pass? i�*m going to meet the railway historian and writer, christian wolmar.
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christian, i give you a interrail pass valid for one month — the traditional, original interrail. where are you going to go? oh, i am going to the farther reaches of eastern europe, you know, into kind of deep forest, you would probably see some bears. you�*ll go to the back end of romania, the odd places in bulgaria — all those places which, you know, were closed to us until the fall of the berlin wall, and are still somewhat mysterious. we�*re celebrating the 50th anniversary of interrail, but isn�*t itjust a bit of railway nostalgia? very relevant today and terms of the greenness, the sustainability, and also that wonderful thing — slow travel. you know, we don�*t want to kind of have to rush everywhere, go to some ghastly airport. whereas, on the train, you go there slowly, and the scenery changes gradually, the weather changes gradually, and you get there feeling good.
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for me, the greatest virtue of interrail is serendipity — making things up as you go along, changing your plans on a whim or a whispered recommendation from a fellow train traveller. i�*ll be back on the rails of europe this summer and i hope to see you on board. to end this week, i�*m in belfast, the capital of northern ireland, on a pilgrimage to visit the childhood home of a bit of a hero of mine. he was among the �*60s biggest sporting stars, so influential that one of the city�*s airports is actually named after him. it�*s wet and it�*s gloomy but this is where one of the world�*s greatest ever footballers, george best, honed his skills. here in northern ireland, the saying goes maradona good,
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pele better, george best. waiting to receive was mighty best. he simply walked the ball into the net! cheering and applause. what a goal! united in the lead! he was a key part of the iconic manchester united team that in 1968 became the first english side to win the european cup. ..president of the european union football association handed it over. and off the pitch, he wasjust as famous for his glamorous, hard—partying lifestyle which led to the nickname the fifth beatle. george best had changed sides. and it all began here, in belfast�*s cregagh estate, where fans now have the chance to stay at his childhood home. hello, you must be peter. iam. welcome to george best�*s house. come on on in. thank you very much. wow!
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so, this is the main room. uh-huh. the bests would have lived in this house from 1948, so we�*ve recently put the house back to as it would�*ve been in 1961, when george first went over to manchester as a 15—year—old in search of fame and fortune. so, that�*s his mother. yes, the photograph, then, shows george with his mother, annie, and this photograph was taken on his parent�*s 25th silver wedding anniversary, so they would�*ve been stood in this very room. i mean, this is a 20th—century legend, icon and he would�*ve been here and this picture was there. wow. how easy was it to source this kind of furniture? just came from a number of sources, local charity shops, antique dealers, etc. the bests were the only family to live in this house.
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george�*s mother ann died in 1978 but his father, dickie, lived here for 60 years, until his death in 2008. so, this is the kitchen. this is the kitchen, yes. again, done as it would�*ve been in 1961. it�*s very much retro—fied, so we have the belfast sink here and even the modern units like the fridge—freezer have got a retro feel about them. wow! this isn�*t from 1961, though, is it? no, you can eat those and be safe. the house was bought by a local non—profit group called eastside partnership and, in its new retro—furnished state, is now available as a holiday rental. so, all of the proceeds that we get from the use of this house are used to support other community projects in east belfast. tourists have come here and tell me what their reaction has been like. oh, the reaction�*s been fantastic. a lot of manchester united fans would stay here, but also just local people who just want the opportunity
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to see the house and stay in the house as well. so, peter�*s gone and here i am. this retro stuff is incredible. i mean, this was a guy who i�*d pretty well worshipped as a child so to be in his house — this shrine, really — it�*s throwing me, to be honest with you. this year, the partnership has introduced an audio tour, featuring memories from george�*s sister barbara. when mum and dad first moved in, it was much smaller... but peter has gone one better for my stay and organised a visit from barbara herself... there�*s a picture there. ..together with george�*s childhood friend robin. that�*s me. yeah? yeah. and there is you—know—who.
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what do you think, barbara, of the idea that people can come here and stay the night? in his later years, george suffered a very public battle with alcoholism. but up until his death in 2005, this house was always a refuge. 16 burren way here in the cregagh estate was where he was brought up and this was where he felt safe. we tried to protect him, and george knew that when he came here, he wasn�*t open to the media scrutiny that he would have been across the water — isn�*t that right, barbara? yes, yes, yes, yes. he felt safe, yeah. yes.
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light globe buzzes. right, well, it�*s night—time and it feels a bit intrusive but, anyway, this is obviously one of the bedrooms that the family lived in. but not only am i staying in the same house, i�*m actually going to be sleeping in the very room that he had as a child. it�*s a kind of medium—sized room, the kind of room that any 12—year—old, 13—year—old boy would have, i guess. i wonder what he would�*ve made of this. hopefully, he would�*ve found it quite funny. right, it�*s time for me to get some sleep, although i�*m not completely tired yet. i need some reading material. and i think this
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should do the trick. goodnight. well, i�*ve got to be honest, that was a peculiar experience and waking up this morning was like being in a time warp. very strange. but looking ahead, it looks like we�*ve got another great programme coming up next week. as queen elizabeth celebrates 70 years on the throne, i�*m at scotland�*s balmoral castle. 1853, queen victoria laid the foundation stone, and this is when they started the build of the balmoral castle that we have today. i think someone described it as a piece of bavaria plunked into the middle of the scottish forestland? exactly! so please do try and join us for that. and don�*t you can follow our travel show social media accounts on facebook and twitter, and catch up with past episodes on the iplayer.
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right now, i�*m tempted to see if any of that best magic has worn off on me, and have a little kick about in the garden. but until next week, from me and everyone else here in belfast, it�*s goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today: anger at the treatment of fans at the champions league final in paris, the match is delayed — some supporters claim they were tear gassed and prevented from entering the ground. we have been in the queue since quarter past six. i have bad asthma and they have been teargas twice. thousands and thousands of fans out there _ thousands and thousands of fans out there getting tear gassed, with tickets — there getting tear gassed, with tickets. it is a disgrace.
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real madrid lift the tropy for the 14th time — viniciuer�*s second half goal clinching it for the spanish side. so a bad night for liverpool here in paris — now the the club is calling for an investigation into how it�*s fans were treated. russia�*s ambassador to the uk says moscow will not use nuclear weapons in the war against ukraine. could we see the return of pounds and ounces in the shops? a review of the laws on imperial measurements is announced. hello. it is a sundae of sunshine and showers for many today and with and showers for many today and with a cold _ and showers for many today and with a cold northerly when the temperatures are going to be a little _ temperatures are going to be a little bit — temperatures are going to be a little bit disappointing. —— sunday. all the _ little bit disappointing. —— sunday. all the details coming up shortly. good _ all the details coming up shortly. good morning. it�*s sunday may 29. our main story. liverpool football club have called for an investigation into the security arrangements of last night�*s champions league
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final, after thousands of fans were stopped from gaining access to the ground. police fired tear gas and pepper spray at supporters, as some attempted to climb over the security barriers — delaying kick off for more than half an hour. liverpool went on to lose 1—0 to real madrid. our sports correspondentjohn watson is in paris this morning. good morning. questions this morning about events of the pitch? absolutely. and significantly vehicle — absolutely. and significantly vehicle that has come for liveable for the _ vehicle that has come for liveable for the investigation by uefa into the treatment of their fans. it all started _ the treatment of their fans. it all started when hours before kick—off, hundreds _ started when hours before kick—off, hundreds if— started when hours before kick—off, hundreds if not thousands of liveable _ hundreds if not thousands of liveable vans were being kept back and as _ liveable vans were being kept back and as numbers swelled, it was then that french — and as numbers swelled, it was then that french police used tear gas and pepper— that french police used tear gas and pepper spray to keep the numbers back~ _ pepper spray to keep the numbers back. liveable said in a statement this is— back. liveable said in a statement this is the — back. liveable said in a statement this is the greatest match and european _ this is the greatest match and european football, supporters should not have _ european football, supporters should not have experienced the scenes we witness _ not have experienced the scenes we witness tonight. uefa themselves
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said that _ witness tonight. uefa themselves said that the turnstiles at the liveable — said that the turnstiles at the liveable and became blocked by thousands of fans who had purchase fake tickets which didn't work. from what i _ fake tickets which didn't work. from what i could — fake tickets which didn't work. from what i could see last night i saw a small— what i could see last night i saw a small number of people getting access— small number of people getting access to the stadium, evading security. — access to the stadium, evading security, so you can imagine it was because _ security, so you can imagine it was because they did not have tickets. i think— because they did not have tickets. i think at— because they did not have tickets. i think at that point before kick—off, perhaps. _ think at that point before kick—off, perhaps, security and organisers became — perhaps, security and organisers became spooked and were perhaps concerned — became spooked and were perhaps concerned we could see a repeat of scenes _ concerned we could see a repeat of scenes that — concerned we could see a repeat of scenes that we saw unfold ahead of the euro— scenes that we saw unfold ahead of the euro 2020 final with fans gaining — the euro 2020 final with fans gaining access to wembley. but there was a _ gaining access to wembley. but there was a tack— gaining access to wembley. but there was a lack of coherent strategy to deal with— was a lack of coherent strategy to deal with the numbers of fans who were _ deal with the numbers of fans who were then — deal with the numbers of fans who were then building up at the turnstiles. as organised prevented them _ turnstiles. as organised prevented them from — turnstiles. as organised prevented them from gaining entry, perhaps concerned — them from gaining entry, perhaps concerned to separate those who did and did _ concerned to separate those who did and did not— concerned to separate those who did and did not have tickets. liveable fans. _ and did not have tickets. liveable fans. as _ and did not have tickets. liveable fans. as far— and did not have tickets. liveable fans, as faras and did not have tickets. liveable fans, as far as i could see, were doing _ fans, as far as i could see, were doing what— fans, as far as i could see, were doing what they were being asked to do, doing what they were being asked to do. but _ doing what they were being asked to do. but a _ doing what they were being asked to do, but a lack of communication as
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to why— do, but a lack of communication as to why they— do, but a lack of communication as to why they were not being allowed in. it certainly overshadowed what was a _ in. it certainly overshadowed what was a huge — in. it certainly overshadowed what was a huge note for the club. when you think— was a huge note for the club. when you think about the match, european cup final. _ you think about the match, european cup final. of— you think about the match, european cup final, of course, one that they were _ cup final, of course, one that they were on— cup final, of course, one that they were on the — cup final, of course, one that they were on the wrong time of losing to real madrid. and johnson reports on what we _ real madrid. and johnson reports on what we saw unfold before kick—off last night — these are scenes any football fan will find uncomfortable — and not what you expect to see at the biggest european final in 2022. thousands of supporters, frustrated and angry after the french police reached quickly for the teargas, as they struggled to get everyone to their seats on time. chaotic scenes. fans say they feared for their safety, despite having queued for hours. i�*ve got really bad asthma and i have been tear gassed twice. i was really, really struggling. thousands and thousands of fans up there, getting tear gassed, with tickets. treating them like animals.
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uefa blamed thousands of liverpool fans with fake tickets blocking the turnstiles. but supporters said organisation wasn�*t good enough. tom was there with his disabled son, harry. the treatment of supporters by uefa and the police is an absolute disgrace. today, indiscriminately pepper spraying people lining up, with tickets, who had arrived two and a half hours before kickoff at the stadium, and then getting charged by riot police with shields. again, having to shield my son away — an absolute disgrace. away from the stadium, the afternoon was full of joyful positivity and confidence in the crowd at the liverpool fan park. but concern over the delay gave way to the attention of the match. and ultimately the disappointment
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of the final whistle. and there was more teargas in the streets as they left. within like two minutes of the final whistle, they tear gassed everybody. this is why all the fans went that way. this is where liverpool�*s season ends. but this club and its supporters always somehow show their hope never dies. dan johnson, bbc news. yes, that much obviously delayed by 36 minutes — yes, that much obviously delayed by 36 minutes. when i got under way liveable _ 36 minutes. when i got under way liveable had great chances in the first half— liveable had great chances in the first half to put them into the lead but it _ first half to put them into the lead but it was— first half to put them into the lead but it was a single goal in the second — but it was a single goal in the second half by real madrid that saw them clench the trophy for a record 14th time — them clench the trophy for a record 14th time. the manager lifting the trophy— 14th time. the manager lifting the trophy for— 14th time. the manager lifting the trophy for a fourth time. that is also _ trophy for a fourth time. that is also a _ trophy for a fourth time. that is also a record. the liveable and jurgen — also a record. the liveable and jurgen klopp, arguably they have misted _ jurgen klopp, arguably they have misted on tour that would have wanted — misted on tour that would have wanted most, the criminally total totalenergies champions league title _ totalenergies champions league title. they still have the two
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domestic trophies to that name and what has _ domestic trophies to that name and what has been a remarkable season for them. _ what has been a remarkable season for them, falling short of the final hurdle. _ for them, falling short of the final hurdle. as— for them, falling short of the final hurdle, as andy swiss reports. both on and off the pitch it was the toughest of nights. sadio mane agonisingly close to the breakthrough, denied only by courtois. but come the second half it was real madrid that struck. viniciuer spoke the celebrations and i’ow were roaring. could liverpool respond ? they couldn�*t find a way past courtois. the man of the match performance by the real madrid goalkeeper as his team held on for victory. delight for them and a record 14 champions league title. for liverpool, itjust wasn�*t to be. these boys an outstanding season. the two competitions we couldn�*t win, we didn�*t win for the smallest
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possible margin. one point, 1—0. so what does it say? just that on the day, or you know, they were one point better. tonight, madrid was one point better. that says nothing about us. for real madrid, then, another trophy for the collection. but for liverpool, a season of so many highs has ended in disappointment. andy swiss, bbc news, stade de france. . , :, , andy swiss, bbc news, stade de france. ,, , :, , , :, france. questions will be asked of uefa, the justification _ france. questions will be asked of uefa, the justification for- france. questions will be asked of uefa, the justification for the - uefa, the justification for the delay— uefa, the justification for the delay last night, which they said was due — delay last night, which they said was due to the late arrival of fans. it was due to the late arrival of fans. it was _ was due to the late arrival of fans. it was clearly not the case when you saw 70 _ it was clearly not the case when you saw 70 fans — it was clearly not the case when you saw 70 fans being kept back at the stadium _ saw 70 fans being kept back at the stadium entry points. i think a lack of communication, breakdown and security. _ of communication, breakdown and security, poor policing, and a heavy— handed approach with security, poor policing, and a heavy—handed approach with the use of teargas— heavy—handed approach with the use of teargas and pepper spray liveable fans was _ of teargas and pepper spray liveable fans was not the last thing you want to see _ fans was not the last thing you want to see our— fans was not the last thing you want to see our young children, young fans being — to see our young children, young fans being exposed to things like
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that when they simply want to turn up that when they simply want to turn up and _ that when they simply want to turn up and enjoy a game of football. events— up and enjoy a game of football. events in— up and enjoy a game of football. events in the buildup certainly overshadowing what happened on the pitch in— overshadowing what happened on the pitch in the game last night, which has led _ pitch in the game last night, which has led to— pitch in the game last night, which has led to those calls from liveable for an _ has led to those calls from liveable for an investigation to come down from _ for an investigation to come down from uefa — for an investigation to come down from uefa into the treatment of their— from uefa into the treatment of their fans — from uefa into the treatment of their fans in from uefa into the treatment of theirfans in the from uefa into the treatment of their fans in the lead up to the european _ their fans in the lead up to the european cup final last night. thank you very much, john, back to you in paris a little later in the programme. you in paris a little later in the programme-— you in paris a little later in the programme. you in paris a little later in the rouramme. , , russia�*s ambassador to the uk has said he does not believe moscow will use tactical nuclear weapons in the war against ukraine. speaking to the bbc�*s sunday morning programme, andrei kelin insisted such weapons would be used only if russia faced an existential threat. our diplomatic correspondent caroline hawley has more. an exercise involving nuclear weapons carried out by russia just before it invaded ukraine — an apparent warning to the west. russia has the world�*s biggest nuclear arsenal,
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so when vladimir putin made an announcement at the start of the war, it caused global alarm. as the war in ukraine escalated, there were fears that a cornered president putin could actually use them, but russia�*s ambassador to the uk has played down the threat for now. tactical nuclear weapons in accordance with russian military doctrine are not used in conflicts like that at all. so you do not believe that will happen? i don�*t. can you categorically say that it will not happen? we have a very strict provision over the use of tactical nuclear weapons, and it is mainly when the existence of the state is endandered. it has nothing to do with the current situation. but russia is still determined to show the world its military might, the potential reach of its destructive power. these are images released by the russian defence ministry
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of the apparently successful test launch of a missile — its range over 600 miles. the russian ambassador, you can see the full interview. that�*s on sunday morning programme at 9am today on bbc one. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv for us this morning. james these are softer words from the ambassador and there have been further calls for putin to engage in negotiations — will president zelensky want to talk? he isn't eager use his words. he has admitted _ he isn't eager use his words. he has admitted that any kind of ceasefire or for— admitted that any kind of ceasefire or for this — admitted that any kind of ceasefire or for this war to stop would probably— or for this war to stop would probably come from some kind of negotiation. the reason being that ukraine _ negotiation. the reason being that ukraine doesn't have the means on its own— ukraine doesn't have the means on its own to — ukraine doesn't have the means on its own to force the russians out themselves completely. and russia doesn't _ themselves completely. and russia doesn't look like they will pull out anytime _ doesn't look like they will pull out anytime soon for a change of heart or change — anytime soon for a change of heart or change of leadership. it is in all likelihood going to come some kind of— all likelihood going to come some kind of deal, but president
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zelensky's thinking is look at what is happening in the donbas region. the russians are continuing to launch— the russians are continuing to launch assault after assault on cities. — launch assault after assault on cities, cities whether russians have tried to _ cities, cities whether russians have tried to use — cities, cities whether russians have tried to use improve supply lines and numerical advantage to try to surround — and numerical advantage to try to surround these locations and it sounds — surround these locations and it sounds familiar to many in this war, to surround — sounds familiar to many in this war, to surround the locations and bombard _ to surround the locations and bombard them into submission. the issue _ bombard them into submission. the issue around whether russia will escalate — issue around whether russia will escalate things isn't really resolved. it is unclear what vladimir— resolved. it is unclear what vladimir putin is thinking. should the eastern donbas region fall, and that seems to be what the russians are throwing everything out at the moment. — are throwing everything out at the moment, will he stop there? overnight we have seen missile attacks— overnight we have seen missile attacks in— overnight we have seen missile attacks in the north—east in kharkiv. _ attacks in the north—east in kharkiv, in the north—east, and in the city— kharkiv, in the north—east, and in the city of— kharkiv, in the north—east, and in the city of mikolaev in the south. despite _ the city of mikolaev in the south. despite russia concentrating its efforts— despite russia concentrating its efforts in— despite russia concentrating its efforts in the east, i think that
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says— efforts in the east, i think that says something to the approach as a whole. president biden will travel to the city of uvalde in texas later today, where a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers at a primary school last week. he�*ll be meeting survivors and the families of some of those who died. the us leader has urged more cross—party support for tighter gun control following the shooting. our correspondent will grant has this report. after the most terrible week in its history, uvalde is preparing for two things: to bury its children and to receive the president. the victims�* families are only concerned with the first, making preparations for a day which no parent can bear to imagine. the horrific attack on an elementary school by a teenager armed with a semiautomatic weapon has made that nightmare reality for them. as president biden�*s motorcade drives along the streets of uvalde, he will come across these — small, impromptu tributes to victims set up around the city. this is a community deep in morning,
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torn apart by what happened. and mr biden knows he must tread carefully here to balance sympathy with asking the difficult questions. this attack has brought the issue of gun control debate back into sharp focus in the us. before his trip, the president reiterated his position that change is necessary and possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know. but we can make america safer. we can finally do what we need to do to protect the lives of our people and our children. so i call on americans tojoin hands and make your voices heard, to work together to make this nation what it can and should be. however, he has his work cut out. bipartisan support is increasingly difficult to find on any major issue in the united states these days — on gun control, it is almost impossible.
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at the nra convention in houston, his predecessor, donald trump, reiterated the republican line: that the main issues are school security and mental health, not guns. in a city largely bereft of hope, president biden hopes to show solidarity and empathy, as a man who has lost children of his own, to the victims�* families. the larger issues of how such brutality could have been prevented may simply be put on hold during a moment�*s silence. will grant, bbc news, uvalde, texas. a consultation will be launched this week on when and where imperial measurements can be used, as part of plans to reshape uk law after brexit. the review has been previously announced by the government, but has been timed to coincide with the queen�*s platinum jubilee. let�*s speak now to our political correspondent pete saull. pete, what more do we know? some might say it is time to distract from other issues. this has
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been law for more than two decades now with market traders and shops showing things in kilos and other measurements. if they want to they can put things in pounds and ounces theyjust need to make sure that it is in metric as well and this is something the government has been talking about for some time. in the conservative manifesto they announced they would be a review in september last year and now we�*re going to get that review. a consultation, as you say, starting on to coincide with the queens jubilee and this is part of a review of existing eu legislation but the government says to try and boost a cut to red tape. but people care more about what things cost right now rather than the measurements and it has been claimed that this is the government trying to weaponised nostalgia, mp, has called on the prime minister to resign over the party gate saga as if to say oh, look, i see the government�*s dead
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cat committee is busy. a clean up operation is underway in a marina in torquay, after superyacht burst into flames and sank there yesterday. the 85 foot vessel was carrying 8000 litres of fuel, which the environment agency fears could escape into the surrounding waters. a major incident was declared and nearby beaches and roads were evacuated. here�*s louise with a look at this morning�*s weather. we were talking about the fact that it is a four—day bank holiday towards the end of this week for the platinum jubilee. is towards the end of this week for the platinumjubilee. is it towards the end of this week for the platinum jubilee. is it too soon to be looking ahead and wondering what the weather will be like? it will never be straightforward, will it? it will always keep us on our toes. at the moment it looks quite promising. there could be a few showers around the generally there
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will be a lot of lovely dry weather and a little warmer than today. all in all, fingers crossed, i think it looks more positive. keep watching the forecast because, as i say, computer models are disagreeing at the moment and they will keep us on our toes over the next few days. for the time being i will start off with a glass half full a sunny start for some with sunny spills around, you can see showering cloud developing in your absence you and this is what may await because there are some showers around at the moment. it is a grand gloomy start across the north north coast of the moment. it is because the high pressure we had yesterday is moving away and we are under the influence of low pressure now and there is quite a squeeze on the isobars down the north sea so a stronger cooler wind source developing today and that will dry some showers at the moment because you can see chiefly down on that east coast we have one or two pushing through more closely as we speak. forthe
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pushing through more closely as we speak. for the remainder of the day today looks likely we will see a cluster of showers on and off through the afternoon. this is a snapshot at four o�*clock in the afternoon and you can see in scotland cloudy with a few scattered showers for those temperatures just the maximum of 14 degrees. northern ireland might mist most of the showers and it will stay largely dry. across england and wales not be clever it, sunshine and showers, some escape them altogether but others down through the west country was a sharp ones, maybe even funded by the end of the afternoon. and a top temperature of 16 degrees. as we go through the early hours of monday morning we keep some of the showers going but the temperature will fall away. single figures quite widely, actually started model to spots and we could see some low single figures as well. that is worth bearing in mind but we also —— almost had a repeat performance as we enter into monday, again a cloudy day with showers around and some showers are heavy and possibly fundy that makes hungary as we move through the afternoon. the temperatures will be
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disappointing for this time of year. 11-16 disappointing for this time of year. 11— 16 degrees so just underpar. low pressure still dominates the story as we move into tuesday which means that we keep some unsettled weather. we see more organise showers developing into the far north—west so here is where we are likely to see the wettest of the story. even after some early morning sunshine across central and southern areas it will continue to see some showers here. top temperatures will be a little warmer, 18 degrees and that will set the trend for the end of the week. this is the bank holiday as we move towards the bank holiday weekend. drierwasjust as we move towards the bank holiday weekend. drier wasjust a little warmer but still the potential of sharp showers. certainly is not straightforward. thank you, louise. you canjust imagine all straightforward. thank you, louise. you can just imagine all those showers and in together. you might be hoping to get a broad over the half term break. holidaymakers heading abroad for the half term break have been
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faced with travel chaos, amid severe delays at airports, ferry terminals and train stations across england. these were the scenes at st pancras station yesterday. meanwhile, airlines easyjet and tui have cancelled dozens of flights and there were significant delays at the port of dover. we can now talk to lisa francesca nand, a traveljournalist and host of the big travel podcast. good morning and thank you for getting up early to talk to us. is it possible to generalise and say why we are seeing these problems? with easyjet in particular we had a staffing issue. many people left the industry in the industry has been struggling over the pandemic and many people had left the industry and then had people off sick with covid and they said theyjust could not get the staff. but now they have an it problem last week and they say they are cancelling flights to provide a reliable service. ironic that they are cancelling flights to provide a reliable service. iii
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that they are cancelling flights to provide a reliable service.- provide a reliable service. if you are caught _ provide a reliable service. if you are caught op — provide a reliable service. if you are caught up in _ provide a reliable service. if you are caught up in this _ provide a reliable service. if you are caught up in this situation, i are caught up in this situation, many people might be on a package holiday, the flight might be linked to a hotel booking somewhere or you may be doing something else but what are your rights? have you sorted out if you are caught up in it? the are your rights? have you sorted out if you are caught up in it?— if you are caught up in it? the good news is that — if you are caught up in it? the good news is that they _ if you are caught up in it? the good news is that they legally _ if you are caught up in it? the good news is that they legally have - if you are caught up in it? the good news is that they legally have to i news is that they legally have to compensate you if they cancelled less than seven days before you go and legally have to get you another flight. but emotionally and logistically it does not always work like that. we have reports of people going to manchester by checking into their flight and saying oh, going to manchester by checking into theirflight and saying oh, it is cancelled but we will get one when a gap week and 20 hours trying to travel and then being sent home. i travel and then being sent home. i travel with young children and it is a huge amountjust to get to the airport. the emotional side of things, and to get there and find yourflight has been things, and to get there and find your flight has been cancelled, that would be awful. you your flight has been cancelled, that would be awful.— your flight has been cancelled, that would be awful. you mention gatwick, ou're would be awful. you mention gatwick, you're down — would be awful. you mention gatwick, you're down in — would be awful. you mention gatwick, you're down in brighton, _ would be awful. you mention gatwick, you're down in brighton, that - would be awful. you mention gatwick, you're down in brighton, that is - you�*re down in brighton, that is your nearest big airport and manchester has had some well chronicled problems with getting people through security and
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everything else but if you are actuallyjust everything else but if you are actually just caught everything else but if you are actuallyjust caught up in the melee of people and your flight is going on you miss it, you have no recourse, do you?- on you miss it, you have no recourse, do you? not really, no. you will either _ recourse, do you? not really, no. you will either have _ recourse, do you? not really, no. you will either have to _ recourse, do you? not really, no. you will either have to go - recourse, do you? not really, no. you will either have to go home i recourse, do you? not really, no. i you will either have to go home but i have reports of people from gatwick going to tenerife and the next time they can get on is one weeks time and of course people do not have that flexibility to change their plans. they have work and school thought is not always so easy. school thought is not always so eas . ~ :. . school thought is not always so eas . ~ :, , :, easy. what is view in the travel industry. _ easy. what is view in the travel industry. it _ easy. what is view in the travel industry, it was _ easy. what is view in the travel industry, it was always - easy. what is view in the travell industry, it was always expected that there would be a bounce back as the pandemic eased. do they accept that maybe they haven�*t quite anticipated how big the bounceback might be? i anticipated how big the bounceback miaht be? ~ . might be? i think it is quite curious- — might be? i think it is quite curious. you _ might be? i think it is quite curious. you think- might be? i think it is quite curious. you think they - might be? i think it is quite| curious. you think they have might be? i think it is quite - curious. you think they have had all this time to prepare and why haven�*t they been preparing but they say that the restrictions were lifted and that was sprung on them and they
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just have not had time to train people. it takes time to train people. it takes time to train people and you want your staff to be well—trained, don�*t you? people have left the industry do not necessarily want to return. they are training people are more supposedly get ok and we thought it would be ok in time for half term. bud and we thought it would be ok in time for half term.— time for half term. and how long does it take _ time for half term. and how long does it take to _ time for half term. and how long does it take to train? _ time for half term. and how long does it take to train? i've - does it take to train? i�*ve interviewed people about security stuff in the screening that has to be done et cetera. how long does it take to hire somebody into a job like that before they can actually start doing it? it like that before they can actually start doing it?— like that before they can actually start doing it? it takes months and months. i have _ start doing it? it takes months and months. i have been _ start doing it? it takes months and months. i have been looking - start doing it? it takes months and months. i have been looking at - start doing it? it takes months and months. i have been looking at job months. i have been looking atjob adverts online and ground staff, some only get £10 an hour and it just does not look like an attractive industry for people. during the pandemic i met pilots that met pilots when our delivery drivers or gardeners. there are other people waiting for some
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clearance in the hope is that by the summer things will be back to normal, hopefully. igrate summer things will be back to normal, hopefully. summer things will be back to normal, hoefull . ~ :, : :, ,, normal, hopefully. we touched on st pancras and — normal, hopefully. we touched on st pancras and obviously _ normal, hopefully. we touched on st pancras and obviously there - normal, hopefully. we touched on st pancras and obviously there have - pancras and obviously there have been many people going to paris, is that expected? other railroads expected to ease?— that expected? other railroads expected to ease? over the bank hohda expected to ease? over the bank holiday we _ expected to ease? over the bank holiday we expect _ expected to ease? over the bank holiday we expect delays - expected to ease? over the bank holiday we expect delays and - holiday we expect delays and cancellations and issues on the trains, don�*t we? i myself took that route i was reporting live for the bbc last time i was travelling out for issue when we had the same issues and they delayed the train in the end. so we expect that sort of thing and it is not as bad going to the trains as it is going all the way to the airport and packing everything that goes along with it. so there will be delays but hopefully those people get moving eventually. pare
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hopefully those people get moving eventuall . : , :, :, hopefully those people get moving eventuall . : :, :, hopefully those people get moving eventuall. :, :, :, eventually. are you going away over the bank holiday? _ are you going away over the bank holiday? i normally go to spain where my parents live my children want to go to liverpool on the train tomorrow and they are excited about that. thank you very much indeed for talking to us. quite grateful to you. its. talking to us. quite grateful to oh. �* ., ., , . talking to us. quite gratefulto ou. :, :: talking to us. quite grateful to you. a fantastic choice, liverpool. 26 minutes _ you. a fantastic choice, liverpool. 26 minutes past _ you. a fantastic choice, liverpool. 26 minutes past seven. _ you. a fantastic choice, liverpool. 26 minutes past seven. a - you. a fantastic choice, liverpool. 26 minutes past seven. a story i you. a fantastic choice, liverpool. i 26 minutes past seven. a story close to my heart now. with the increase in popularity of brasseries and bars, it can be more and more difficult to find a traditional do you prefer a knees up? quiet solo durin: all do you prefer a knees up? quiet solo during all across _ do you prefer a knees up? quiet solo during all across the _ do you prefer a knees up? quiet solo during all across the spectrum. - one man has now taken his own passion for an authentic pint a little bit father — by taking on the restoration of historic pubs
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in durham, to restore them to theirformer glory. paul mooney has been to meet him. once these things are gone, 200 more years of history wiped out in an instance, unfortunately they are gone for good. unfortunately they are gone for aood. : :. unfortunately they are gone for aood. : :, :,, , good. and we have lost this feeling of walkinu good. and we have lost this feeling of walking into _ good. and we have lost this feeling of walking into a _ good. and we have lost this feeling of walking into a publican's - good. and we have lost this feeling of walking into a publican's house. | of walking into a publican�*s house. and that�*s what is, a public house. what distresses me more our heritage pubs, those with original untouched interiors, most people understand that pubs are disappearing at an alarming rate one source put it at 40 pubs a week closed and are not coming back. but it is notjust nostalgia. it can make business sense as well. : , . :, sense as well. absolutely. we have had to come _ sense as well. absolutely. we have had to come here _ sense as well. absolutely. we have had to come here early _ sense as well. absolutely. we have had to come here early to - sense as well. absolutely. we have had to come here early to avoid - sense as well. absolutely. we have had to come here early to avoid the masses. but every heritage pub that i have been to is usually
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chockablock and loved by the local community. bud chockablock and loved by the local community-— chockablock and loved by the local communi .: :, :, community. and paul as amanda put his money his _ community. and paul as amanda put his money his mouth _ community. and paul as amanda put his money his mouth is. _ community. and paul as amanda put his money his mouth is. 14 _ community. and paul as amanda put his money his mouth is. 14 miles - community. and paul as amanda put his money his mouth is. 14 miles of i his money his mouth is. 14 miles of road he has his own major restoration project. road he has his own ma'or restoration ro'ect. : ::, :, restoration pro'ect. welcome to the miners arms — restoration project. welcome to the miners arms in. _ restoration project. welcome to the miners arms in. a _ restoration project. welcome to the miners arms in. a fertile _ miners arms in. a fertile imagination is required because we have a of work to do. first up is the taproom. bigger than the bar and our next room is the parlour room this will be the best room in the pub and there certainly will not be any runnels here. the pub and there certainly will not be any runnels here.— any runnels here. the pub will be restored using _ any runnels here. the pub will be restored using all _ any runnels here. the pub will be restored using all plans _ any runnels here. the pub will be restored using all plans from - any runnels here. the pub will be | restored using all plans from 1888 and is a bit of a load landmark in the local area.— the local area. interestingly enou~h, the local area. interestingly enough, three _ the local area. interestingly enough, three days -- - the local area. interestingly| enough, three days -- some the local area. interestingly - enough, three days -- some of the enough, three days —— some of the old maps that we�*ve got, it is the only building here in the crosswords and originally built we believe in 1750 as a coaching.—
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1750 as a coaching. including a victorian beer _ 1750 as a coaching. including a victorian beer engine. - 1750 as a coaching. including a victorian beer engine. it - 1750 as a coaching. including a victorian beer engine. it has i 1750 as a coaching. including a i victorian beer engine. it has been restored and _ victorian beer engine. it has been restored and i _ victorian beer engine. it has been restored and i believe _ victorian beer engine. it has been restored and i believe it _ victorian beer engine. it has been restored and i believe it will - victorian beer engine. it has been restored and i believe it will be i restored and i believe it will be one amongst the very few working in the whole of the country. and a bell push system. it will ring a bell and wave the flag on one of the windows here and that will correspond to the room with a button is pressed. this been difficult _ room with a button is pressed. this been difficult finding skilled craftsmen who are able to reinstate these wonderful little items into these wonderful little items into the pub. but the key thing is it is being done properly and it will be a faithful reproduction of the original pub. igrate faithful reproduction of the original pub.— faithful reproduction of the oriainal ub. . :, :, , original pub. we are not rushing an hinu original pub. we are not rushing anything and — original pub. we are not rushing anything and i — original pub. we are not rushing anything and i would _ original pub. we are not rushing anything and i would like - original pub. we are not rushing anything and i would like it- original pub. we are not rushing anything and i would like it to i original pub. we are not rushing | anything and i would like it to be historically accurate. that anything and i would like it to be historically accurate.— anything and i would like it to be historically accurate. that is your favourite report _ historically accurate. that is your favourite report of _ historically accurate. that is your favourite report of the _ historically accurate. that is your favourite report of the morning, | favourite report of the morning, isn�*t it? i could watch a lot more of that. paul smith, i salute your work. they are a big part of british heritage, aren�*t they?! the sunday
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morning programme is here at nine o�*clock. clive is in the hot seat. what is on the programme? good morning. there were in ukraine seems to have entered a new phase with momentum shifting towards russia. i have been speaking to vladimir putin�*s man in london, the russian ambassador in the uk. i showed him evidence of alleged russian war crimes. with their response to the ambassador, we will have analysis from moscow, with steve rosenberg, and hear injeremy bowen, who will be live from the donbas region, that was hotly contested region of the whole campaign. as more conservative mps called the pm to resign after sue gray�*s report, i speak to that northern ireland secretary, and the party chair, and northern ireland secretary, and the party chair, and all northern ireland secretary, and the party chair, and all that northern ireland secretary, and the party chair, and all that is northern ireland secretary, and the party chair, and all that is comin- party chair, and all that is coming up party chair, and all that is coming up at nine o�*clock. do stay with us. more to come.
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�*s hello. this is breakfast with nina warhurst and roger johnson. we�*ve been reflecting on last night�*s champions league final this morning, after thousands of liverpool fans were stopped from gaining access to the ground. let�*s get more on on this with our correspondentjohn watson — he�*s in paris this morning. high drama all around? good morning to both of you- _ high drama all around? good morning to both of you. it _ high drama all around? good morning to both of you. it was _ high drama all around? good morning to both of you. it was indeed. - high drama all around? good morning to both of you. it was indeed. those l to both of you. it was indeed. those events— to both of you. it was indeed. those events affecting liveable fans who failed _ events affecting liveable fans who failed to _ events affecting liveable fans who failed to gain access into the stadium _ failed to gain access into the stadium before kick—off last night, held at— stadium before kick—off last night, held at some entry points for at least _ held at some entry points for at least a — held at some entry points for at least a couple of hours, then there was the _ least a couple of hours, then there was the heavy— handed least a couple of hours, then there was the heavy—handed use of pepper spray— was the heavy—handed use of pepper spray and _ was the heavy—handed use of pepper spray and tear gas by some of the french— spray and tear gas by some of the french police to try and keep some fans back— french police to try and keep some fans back as the numbers swelled. but questions will be asked by uefa over the _ but questions will be asked by uefa over the treatment of those fans. that is— over the treatment of those fans. that is something liveable football club are _
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that is something liveable football club are calling for. wes morgan a lot about — club are calling for. wes morgan a lot about that, the treatment of those _ lot about that, the treatment of those fans, but what about those watching — those fans, but what about those watching was home? many were gathering back home in liverpool in the hope _ gathering back home in liverpool in the hope that their side may have been _ the hope that their side may have been able — the hope that their side may have been able to win a seventh european title after— been able to win a seventh european title after a _ been able to win a seventh european title after a brilliant season, considering they were challenging for silverware on four fronts, in both— for silverware on four fronts, in both domestic cup competitions, then the premier— both domestic cup competitions, then the premier league title, losing the european _ the premier league title, losing the european cup here, losing to real madrid _ european cup here, losing to real madrid 1—0. matt grovelling was watching. with the sun setting on another season, liveable fans turned entry into enfield for the final so long the campaign full of promise. read fans had a ready back to winners, the league and fa cups, and that the champions league was down to a two horse race. taste champions league was down to a two horse race. ~ :, :, :, horse race. we got to the end and we're going _ horse race. we got to the end and we're going to _ horse race. we got to the end and we're going to win _ horse race. we got to the end and
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we're going to win tonight. - horse race. we got to the end and we're going to win tonight. this i horse race. we got to the end and we're going to win tonight. this is| we�*re going to win tonight. this is the game. we�*re going to win it. iii the game. we're going to win it. if winter night it will be an exceptional season. so yes, fingers crossed _ exceptional season. so yes, fingers crossed we — exceptional season. so yes, fingers crossed we can do something quite tonight~ _ crossed we can do something quite toniaht. : , :, : :, :, , tonight. agery watched on. early chance after— tonight. agery watched on. early chance after chance. _ tonight. agery watched on. early chance after chance. most - tonight. agery watched on. early| chance after chance. most seller. sadio mane a. but at halftime, still 0-0. i sadio mane a. but at halftime, still 0-0. “ sadio mane a. but at halftime, still 0-0. 4' , : :, :, 0-0. i think in the second half we will come out _ 0-0. i think in the second half we will come out and _ 0-0. i think in the second half we will come out and go _ 0-0. i think in the second half we will come out and go forward - 0-0. i think in the second half we i will come out and go forward again. it has died off now. we have had a few chances. i think we should have put one _ few chances. i think we should have put one of— few chances. i think we should have put one of them away. ijust so we went— put one of them away. ijust so we went to _ put one of them away. ijust so we went to live — put one of them away. ijust so we went to live to regret it afterwards.— went to live to regret it afterwards. �* afterwards. but as day turned toni . ht, afterwards. but as day turned tonight. the _ afterwards. but as day turned tonight, the red _ afterwards. but as day turned tonight, the red tide - afterwards. but as day turned tonight, the red tide turned l afterwards. but as day turned - tonight, the red tide turned white. real madrid now finding form in france then heartbreak. real madrid stayed strong over the final whistle bringing pain in paris, agony in
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aintree. it bringing pain in paris, agony in aintree. . :. bringing pain in paris, agony in aintree. , :, ., bringing pain in paris, agony in aintree. , :, :, :, aintree. it is hard, it hurt a lot. i am heartbroken. _ aintree. it is hard, it hurt a lot. i am heartbroken. absolutely i i am heartbroken. absolutely heartbroken. i think we'll be fine next _ heartbroken. i think we'll be fine next season. to heartbroken. i think we'll be fine next season.— heartbroken. i think we'll be fine next season. :, , , :, next season. to see us come back, to sa we next season. to see us come back, to say we were — next season. to see us come back, to say we were upset _ next season. to see us come back, to say we were upset that _ next season. to see us come back, to say we were upset that we _ next season. to see us come back, to say we were upset that we haven't - say we were upset that we haven't won all— say we were upset that we haven't won all four — say we were upset that we haven't won all four trophies _ say we were upset that we haven't won all four trophies says - say we were upset that we haven'tj won all four trophies says enough. thats— won all four trophies says enough. that's is— won all four trophies says enough. that's is enough. _ won all four trophies says enough. that's is enough. we _ won all four trophies says enough. that's is enough. we still- won all four trophies says enough. that's is enough. we still had - won all four trophies says enough. that's is enough. we still had two| that's is enough. we still had two trophies _ that's is enough. we still had two trophies this— that's is enough. we still had two trophies this season. _ that's is enough. we still had two trophies this season. 50 - that's is enough. we still had two trophies this season.— trophies this season. so two trophies. — trophies this season. so two trophies. a _ trophies this season. so two trophies, a good _ trophies this season. so two trophies, a good season - trophies this season. so two trophies, a good season by. trophies this season. so two i trophies, a good season by any standard, but for liverpool, for this team, it could be remembered more for the cups they left behind. matt gravelling, bbc news. a note there will be remembered for nights before kick—off. a note there will be remembered for nights before kick-off.— nights before kick-off. henry, you are caught — nights before kick-off. henry, you are caught op _ nights before kick-off. henry, you are caught up on _ nights before kick-off. henry, you are caught up on it _ nights before kick-off. henry, you are caught up on it last night. - nights before kick-off. henry, you| are caught up on it last night. what was your— are caught up on it last night. what was your reading of what unfolded? the incompetence of the authorities, lack of leadership, support stewarding, please being touchy. they were indiscriminately going on spring pepper spray and then teargas through the fence as to whether the liverpool fans were. i was in the
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stadium, the press box when they made diverse announcements, about the game being delayed because of the game being delayed because of the late arrival of fans. the fans did not arrive late. they were arriving on time. fans want to get to the ground early and some of them were queueing for two and a half, three, three to half hours to get in. because of the strange invigoration of the stade de france, that was exacerbated by some of the blocks that the gendarmes had put in place. we are fortunate we aren�*t talking about a major disaster. football fans often face the blame in situations like these. liverpool are calling — in situations like these. liverpool are calling for an investigation into what— are calling for an investigation into what happened last night. how do you _ into what happened last night. how do you see — into what happened last night. how do you see this one play out now? what _ do you see this one play out now? what do _ do you see this one play out now? what do you think uefa's response will be? _ what do you think uefa's response will be? , ,:, , will be? their response will robabl will be? their response will probably be _ will be? their response will probably be to _ will be? their response will probably be to try - will be? their response will probably be to try to - will be? their response will probably be to try to blame i will be? their response will. probably be to try to blame the fans. they have already talked about baked tickets. andy robertson, i think it was earlier saying that he got a ticket from the club to one of
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his friends and people are claiming that it was a fake. they came from the club, from uefa, that wasn�*t a fake. we have to be clear eyed and there were one or two, maybe one or two more ticketless fans who did try and get in, but the people i saw coming of the fans were predominantly local kids and obviously there is an extra sensitivity when you have liverpool fans being pushed into a small area, up fans being pushed into a small area, up against the fence. i think uefa will come out and try to pin the blame on the fans, but in the builder to the game, they have been talking about how important fans are. rememberwhat talking about how important fans are. remember what they were like, the games behind closed doors with no fans. the way fans are treated should be front and centre to any match like this because nobody wants to go back to matches behind closed doors. fans are vital and they were treated so poorly. talking to fans i was amazed by how patient they were, particularly when they were being pepper sprayed and you had little kids, ten—year—old girls turning
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around to their parents and saying please take me home.— around to their parents and saying please take me home. terrible images that we have — please take me home. terrible images that we have seen. _ please take me home. terrible images that we have seen. some _ please take me home. terrible images that we have seen. some up _ that we have seen. some up liverpool's season for us. they came so close _ liverpool's season for us. they came so close to _ liverpool's season for us. they came so close to what would be a historic quadruple — so close to what would be a historic quadruple. two trophies that they have missed out on in the space of six days _ have missed out on in the space of six days. how do you sum up what they have — six days. how do you sum up what they have achieved and how they will be feeling _ they have achieved and how they will be feeling this morning? there they have achieved and how they will be feeling this morning?— be feeling this morning? there will be feeling this morning? there will be feelin: be feeling this morning? there will be feeling heartbroken, _ be feeling this morning? there will be feeling heartbroken, clearly - be feeling heartbroken, clearly concerned for the fans. i think that puts any game into perspective. you have to celebrate real madrid�*s achievements. carlo angelotti is now deservedly feted as one of the greatest coaches of all time. liverpool will bottled the pain and go again next season.— go again next season. fascinating stuff as always. _ go again next season. fascinating stuff as always. great _ go again next season. fascinating stuff as always. great to - go again next season. fascinating stuff as always. great to speak i go again next season. fascinating stuff as always. great to speak to i stuff as always. great to speak to you. _ stuff as always. great to speak to you. henry — stuff as always. great to speak to you, henry. henry winter, sports editor— you, henry. henry winter, sports editorat_ you, henry. henry winter, sports editor at the times. we will wait and see — editor at the times. we will wait and see how uefa response to calls from the _ and see how uefa response to calls from the liverpool football club into how — from the liverpool football club into how the fans were treated last night _ into how the fans were treated last night i_ into how the fans were treated last night. i think it is fair to say,
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everything _ night. i think it is fair to say, everything that did go wrong —— could _ everything that did go wrong —— could go— everything that did go wrong —— could go wrong did go wrong. a lack of communication to fans waiting to .et of communication to fans waiting to get in _ of communication to fans waiting to get in as— of communication to fans waiting to get in as of— of communication to fans waiting to get in as of the reasons why they would _ get in as of the reasons why they would be — get in as of the reasons why they would be included entry. uefa has claimed _ would be included entry. uefa has claimed of— would be included entry. uefa has claimed of cause that it was down to those _ claimed of cause that it was down to those supporters arriving late as to why the _ those supporters arriving late as to why the match was delayed. clearly that wasn't because we saw liverpool fans and _ that wasn't because we saw liverpool fans and as _ that wasn't because we saw liverpool fans and as we have heard of his well waiting for hours to try and .ain well waiting for hours to try and gain access to the stadium, which, as we _ gain access to the stadium, which, as we know. — gain access to the stadium, which, as we know, is the national stadium of france. _ as we know, is the national stadium of france, isn't it? it has many major— of france, isn't it? it has many major tournaments, of france, isn't it? it has many majortournaments, many of france, isn't it? it has many major tournaments, many major competitions, yet last night everything that could go wrong seemingly did go wrong. and sadly this morning it is those images, isn't _ this morning it is those images, isn't it. — this morning it is those images, isn't it. of— this morning it is those images, isn't it, of young level fans who were _ isn't it, of young level fans who were there _ isn't it, of young level fans who were there last night to enjoy the game _ were there last night to enjoy the game with their family and friends being _ game with their family and friends being exposed to pepper spray and teargas. _ being exposed to pepper spray and teargas, and it is those images, sadly. _ teargas, and it is those images, sadly, which are etched on the memory— sadly, which are etched on the memory here in paris this morning. john. _ memory here in paris this morning. john. thank— memory here in paris this morning. john, thank you very much. back with you in paris later in the programme.
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we will bring you some of the other big sports stories of the weekend. adam worldwatch huddersfield at the tottenham hotspur stadium. 425 yea rs, years, the challenge cup final has been rugby league�*s grandest moment. in tottenham for the first time, it is time for huddersfield or wigan to make history. pressure, plenty. the giants brought their own for good measure. ricky bertelli breaking through for the first try. —— leutele. wigan not quite themselves in the first half. out of step, chris mcqueen with the sidestep but huddersfield held the halftime bell. there had been space before, wigan heading back at speed,
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achieve field lighting the final. as quickly as that space appeared, though, so it disappeared. still, germaine mcgilvery didn�*t really need any, somehow finding a way through, huddersfield finding a way back in front. the tightest gap, the finest margin, but this would be wigan�*s finest hour. just minutes remaining, liam marshall with the game�*s biggest moment, breaking giant hearts. and so, on the day, history is made in tottenham. it is the wigan warriors who take home the game�*s grandest prize, challenge cup winners, 2022. adam wild, bbc news. there was late drama in the european champions cup final, as la rochelle came back to beat leinster in the final minutes of the game. the irish side were leading
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by 21 points to 17, before this try sealed the victory for la rochelle. this is the first time they�*ve won the competition, becoming the fourth french team to do so. charles leclerc took pole position for his home race in the monaco grand prix. the ferrari driver dominated the race and ended fractionally clear of team—mate carlos sainz. championship leader max verstappen will start in fourth position and lewis hamilton is in eighth. port vale will be back in league one next season, afterfive years playing in english football�*s bottom division. the staffordshire club beat mansfield 3—0 in the league two play—off final. former mansfield player, mal benning wrapped it up late in the second half, scoring vale�*s third goal of the match. when you first trip to the story, clark, the manager, he comes from mansfield, actually, but his daughter, ellie, mansfield born and
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bred, died a few months ago at the age of 18. he was given compassionate leave and only came back after a phased return to work at the end of the season. and yesterday fans of both clubs had a pause for a minute at wembley in memory of his daughter, which is really touching. apparently spent the last five minutes of the game with tears welling down his cheeks, not surprising. it with tears welling down his cheeks, rrot surprising-— not surprising. it isn't and shows the strength _ not surprising. it isn't and shows the strength of— not surprising. it isn't and shows the strength of the _ not surprising. it isn't and shows the strength of the community i not surprising. it isn't and shows| the strength of the community of football at like that. wrexham are co—owned by film stars ryan reynolds and rob mcelhenney but it was luke waterfall who provided the hollywood ending for grimsby in their national league play—off semi—final. he scored a late winner in extra time to beat wrexham 5—4. grimsby is nowjust one game away from a return to the football league. what�*s being called the richest game in football takes place today — when huddersfield town and nottingham forest meet at wembley for the championship play—off. the prize is a place in the premier league — said to be worth at least £170 million to the winner.
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yesterday, we featured nottingham forest and this morning, we�*re hearing form some of huddersfield town�*s key players. jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. it is special, i think, the bond i�*ve built with this club, the fans, with everyone involved, to get over the line one more time. getting on now, you know what i mean? it could be my last chance, and i want to make the most of it and i want to try to do the club proud and give the fans what they want.
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sorba thomas, huddersfield town winger. we go into games and i don't think the other team knows what formation we will play, who is playing where and i feel that is the advantage we have over teams. everybody going in the same direction and for us, one more game, and the dream becomes a reality. you think of the head coach, carlos corberan, as the professor. why do you call him that? because the man has so many plans up his sleeve and if one doesn't work, you know there is a second one. if that one doesn't work, there is another one, etc. for him, he is one—of—a—kind. carlos corberan, head coach, huddersfield town. i know how big will be the support that all the fans are going to bring us because if i put all the people that are here usually in the stadium at wembley, it will be exactly the same or even more. i know how much they are helping us every time that they are giving their support. i haven't played at wembley. i've been there twice. i've watched the chelsea fa cup game.
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seeing my family there will be crazy and it will make me a bit emotional, i think. hopefully that i get nervous, i suppose. of course i can dream, but we know how hard it�*s going to be and i feel that i know what we can do and nobody can really stop us. here�*s louise with a look at this morning�*s weather. . early bird caught the worm this morning with lots of sunshine around for some although not all of us and there is a change to the story today because i think there will be a lot more in the way of showers. some of you may be going hooray because the gardens are getting desperate, aren�*t they? looking at what happens across the north coast, this was
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shared about one hour ago with you scattered showers. it�*s not rain, it is showers today and it is on the cool side as well because the high—pressure is drifting away allowing the northerly wind to strengthen that that drives in the cold air and also frequent showers coming off the north sea. this is a story over the last few hours. you can see just where they are sitting and also one or two through the cheshire gap as well. as we go through the afternoon we do expect showers to become more widespread so this is a snapshot at four o�*clock and you can see the school day, 9— 11 degrees along the east coast, 14 into a scotland and there will be some showers to go with it. showers are few and far between the northern ireland, not really reaching you but for the bulk of england and wales will be 20,000 scattered showers, frequent heavy ones down to the south—west at the end of today. not all of us will see the showers but we will have more cloud than
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yesterday and it will be cooler. as we go through the evening we keep showers going, the temperatures will fall away, single figures for many so a chilly start monday morning, low single figures in one or two few parts. a little light frost as well but as we go through the day on monday, plenty of cloud will develop, plenty of showers develop once again and some of these could turn slow—moving as the windfall lighter and once again it could be quite heavy with thunderstorms. 11— 16 degrees, still below par for the time of year. the low pressure stays with us and we see a weather front developed through north—west which will enhance the rain. some sunshine through central and southern areas and that may help lift the temperature is just a touch but still, we cannot rule out the triggering of some showers into the afternoon as well. highs on tuesday
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of 18 degrees, if we get the sunshine, but it does look likely for the remainder of the week that the story might quieten down. fingers crossed please stay tuned into the forecast for the bank holiday weekend because there is still some uncertainty but at the moment it looks like it will be a tad warmer and a little drier. four days of bank holiday. there has to be a chance of a drop of rain in there somewhere. it will keep us on our toes, there somewhere. it will keep us on ourtoes, i there somewhere. it will keep us on our toes, i am sure. now on breakfast, it�*s time for click. bbc�*s grandstand theme plays on your marks...get set...go!
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can you believe that it�*s exactly ten years since this site was just getting ready to host the 2012 olympic games? it feels like it was yesterday, but this olympic stadium was alive with the roars of the crowd, cheering on the athletes. time flies. and when you plan a site like this — indeed, when you spend all of that money — it�*s important to plan a legacy — how the place can be put to good use once the games have finished. and the park is still thriving with football, swimming, cycling and generallyjust being a nice place to come. and in a weird way, the same is true for olympic athletes who only usually get to compete at that level for the first part of their careers. takejessica ennis—hill, who gave us so many great moments — even winning gold in the 2012 heptathlon. yeah, and, infact, she ran the entire distance that we�*ve just walked in 12.5 seconds while jumping over stuff. and her career still took
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more twists and turns after that with injuries, a remarkable return after her pregnancy to win at the world championships and then, taking silver in brazil. and since retiring from competitive sport, she, like the whole park, is looking to the next thing. now, it�*s still connected to sport, as you�*d expect, and it�*s also connected to women�*s health — specifically menstruation. periods aren�*t something that�*s always openly talked about and discussed even less in relation to exercise, butjessica�*s new app hopes to help women work out better around their cycle, so shiona mccallum�*s been to meet her to find out more. training hard in the gym, building strength and getting a sweat on. but what if you�*re on your period? one occasion, i was at the junior european championships and i rememberjust running that 800 metres, thinking, "i�*m trying to run for a gold medal here,
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"but i�*m also very aware that i�*ve just started my period." ijust rushed off the track and felt like i couldn�*t have — ijust didn�*t absorb that amazing, like, gold medal moment. jess ennis—hill was at the top of her sport. olympic and world champion in the heptathlon, she had physios, dietitians and coaches looking at all aspects of her training programme, but nobody looked at when she was menstruating. i always remember it being an awkward conversation, so i had a male coach and it was predominantly a male environment and i remember, yeah, just having those small conversations of, you know, "i�*m on my period" or "i�*m a bit tired" or "i�*m not feeling 100%" but never feeling fully confident about having that more open conversation about how i felt and how it was making me feel when i trained. but it�*s notjust athletes
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that this affects. women make choices about training around their periods all the time. sometimes, you want to rest and other times, you want to run. that�*s because we have different hormone levels at different times of the month. our menstruation cycle is split into four different phases. they are period, follicular, luteal and premenstrual. each phase is determined by the two main hormones, oestrogen and progesterone, which are at differing levels, depending on where in the cycle you are. using this information as a guide, jess decided the best way to get her message across to women who want to keep fit was an app. after a couple of months of inputting your period data, the algorithm begins to recognise what phase of the menstrual cycle you�*re in and gives you tailored fitness options from things like yoga to high—intensity workouts. so, you do roughly a minute of that
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and then we could go into some core, so can position yourselves on the mat. so, does your period affect your ability to exercise? well, the team atjennis thinks so, and it�*s something their users are keen to know more about. as a 45—year—old woman, i knew very little about the way my body works and i decided to learn about that. it seems to still be a taboo to talk about periods and menopause and things like that and i think that�*s changing, and i want to be part of that. perhaps we don�*t know as much about our bodies as we should, but the area is still extremely under—researched and the academic studies which have been done may not be reliable. 42% of the research was actually low quality, so what we do have, the majority of it was kind of low quality in terms of they weren�*t really looking at the menstrual cycle hormones in the way that they should in terms of blood sampling and those gold standard methods, so kind of not only do
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we have a research gap, but we have this quality issue as well. so, moving forward, not only do we need to increase the kind of quantity of research we�*re getting, but we also need to make it better, so we can get to those sort of more accurate conclusions on female physiology. there are a lot of more popular apps available, like fitrwoman, flo and clue, so women now have more tech at their disposal than jess ever had. i think there�*s often that misconception that because i�*m at the forefront of it, that it�*s all about elite training and that kind of higher level of moving your body. where, actually, it�*s not about that at all. it�*s about every woman having the opportunity to just tap into their rhythm. do you think you would have been a better athlete had you trained in accordance with your periods? it�*s a really good question. i think that i would�*ve been able to train smarter. i think that when you get to a certain level, everything, every small, incremental change is hugely important. and i think that maybe if i would�*ve spent more time understanding particularly when to push myself in the strength room,
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for example, in that follicular phase, then perhaps i would�*ve, you know, built more lean muscle and become stronger and, who knows, that may have affected my performance in a positive way. now, spencer, what can you tell me about dogs' noses? um...they are wet. that's true. they're also unique. so, you know how in some parts of the world, dogs are microchipped in case someone loses their dog? yes. well, here�*s another idea. chris fox has been to norway to find out about it. we�*ve always had a nose for a good pet tech story, so when i found a company developing phone—based face id for dogs, i knewjust where to come to test it out — somewhere with lots of dogs. until now, the usual way
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we identify dogs is with microchipping — in some countries, it�*s even the law — but a company from south korea has developed an app that can identify dogs a little less invasively. all right then! yup! on this phone, i�*ve got petnow, which is using the dog�*s nose print to identify the dog. just like you can use a fingerprint with a human to identify them, a dog�*s nose print is very similar as well. so, let�*s get to know this dog. come here! whoop! it turns out it�*s actually quite hard to get huskies
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to sit still for any length of time, especially when you�*re trying to scan their nose. show me your nose! it takes the phone a few seconds to take pictures of the dog�*s nose and analyse them in the cloud. it also saves the pictures it takes to the phone�*s camera roll, so you can enjoy them later. in the end, with a bit of help from professional husky musher nicholas, i was able to get a successful scan. ah, yes, it�*s found it. ok, and the app is now telling me that this is emma — and not only that, it�*s showing me that emma has been reported as missing, and it�*s telling me where she was reported missing, and i can share my location with the owner, so they can be reunited. obviously, emma is not really a lost dog — the huskies had been logged in the app so we could see if it can tell them apart. unlike a microchip, which could be cut out of a stolen dog,
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you can�*t really remove a dog�*s nose — not without spoiling the dog — and by using the phone�*s camera to scan, anyone, in theory, can check a stray dog without any specialist equipment. back at base, i spoke to petnow to find out why they�*d settled on nose prints for dog recognition. there may be paws or ears or iris, but some dogs really hate showing their paws or their ears. but the nose is exposed all the time, and after a dog becomes six months old, the nose print stays their entire life, so we believe that it is the best part for identification. what inspired you to make a nose print recognition app? in south korea, the number of dogs and cats which are lost or abandoned are also increasing. the vet bills are not standardised in south korea, and some owners are simply not willing to pay the, like, high bills when their dogs or cats become really sick. some of them choose to abandon them on the street. so, we wish to build up a world without lost or abandoned animals. some kennel clubs already use dog nose prints as a form of id, but petnow hopes its app
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will become mandatory in south korea to help reduce the number of dogs that are abandoned by pet owners when a big vet�*s bill arrives. to do that, they�*ll need the backing of government and a huge marketing push, so that everybody, including people who don�*t own a dog, knows about the app and how to use it. that was chris. he�*s always good at sniffing out a story, isn�*t he? i did ask her not to do that, i promise. listen, let�*s leave it there for the short version, shall we? if you�*d like to see more from us, you can find it on iplayer, where the full—length version of click is waiting for you right now. thank you very much for watching. bye— bye.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with rogerjohnson and nina warhurst. our headlines today... anger at the treatment of fans at the champions league final in paris. the match is delayed, tear gas is used and supporters prevented from entering the ground. we have been studied in this queue since _ we have been studied in this queue since quarter past six, i've got really— since quarter past six, i've got really bad _ since quarter past six, i've got really bad asthma and i have been tear gassed twice.— tear gassed twice. really struggling- _ tear gassed twice. really struggling. thousands i tear gassed twice. really. struggling. thousands and tear gassed twice. really _ struggling. thousands and thousands of fans— struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out— struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out there, _ struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out there, getting _ struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out there, getting tear - struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out there, getting tear gas, i of fans out there, getting tear gas, with tickets — of fans out there, getting tear gas, with tickets. treating _ of fans out there, getting tear gas, with tickets. treating them - of fans out there, getting tear gas, with tickets. treating them like - with tickets. treating them like animals — with tickets. treating them like animats its— with tickets. treating them like animals. it's a _ with tickets. treating them like animals. it's a disgrace. - real madrid lift the tropy for the 14th time — viniciuer�*s second half goal clinching it for the spanish side so a bad night for liverpool here in paris — now the the club is calling for an investigation into how its fans were treated.
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russia�*s ambassador to the uk says moscow will not use nuclear weapons in the war against ukraine. could we see the return of pounds and ounces in the shops? a review of the laws on imperial measurements is announced. it's it�*s a day of sunshine and showers for many of us today. a cold northerly winds, temperatures are going to be a little bit disappointing for this time of year. all of the details coming up shortly. it�*s sunday, may 29th. our main story. liverpool football club have called for an investigation into the security arrangements of last night�*s champions league final, after thousands of fans were stopped from gaining access to the ground. police fired tear gas and pepper spray at supporters, as some attempted to climb over the security barriers — delaying kick off for more than half an hour. liverpool went on to lose 1—0 to real madrid.
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our sports correspondentjohn watson is in paris this morning. good morning. the morning after the night before, disappointment on the pitch and questions now about events of it? ,:, :, :, ,, ::, , of it? good morning. significantly, that coal from _ of it? good morning. significantly, that coal from liverpool _ of it? good morning. significantly, that coal from liverpool to - of it? good morning. significantly, that coal from liverpool to uefa i of it? good morning. significantly, | that coal from liverpool to uefa for that coal from liverpool to uefa for that investigation into how their fans were — that investigation into how their fans were treated last night, firstly — fans were treated last night, firstly being held up at an external checkpoint as they made their way to the stadium and at the turnstiles as well as— the stadium and at the turnstiles as well as they look to to gain access ahead _ well as they look to to gain access ahead of— well as they look to to gain access ahead of what was a huge game for the club _ ahead of what was a huge game for the club before police here used pepper— the club before police here used pepper spray and tear gas against all of— pepper spray and tear gas against all of those liverpool supporters trying _ all of those liverpool supporters trying to — all of those liverpool supporters trying to get in, many of them young fans _ trying to get in, many of them young fans. liverpool said this was the greatest — fans. liverpool said this was the greatest match, and is the greatest match _ greatest match, and is the greatest match in _ greatest match, and is the greatest match in european football, supporters should not have to experience the scenes we witnessed tonight~ _ experience the scenes we witnessed tonight. that's what they said in a statement — tonight. that's what they said in a statement yesterday evening and uefa saying _ statement yesterday evening and uefa saying the _ statement yesterday evening and uefa saying the turnstiles at the liverpool end became blocked by
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thousands of fans who purchased fake tickets _ thousands of fans who purchased fake tickets which did not work. it certainly _ tickets which did not work. it certainly overshadowed the game as danjohnson reports. dan johnson reports. these are scenes any football fan will find uncomfortable and not what you�*d expect to see at the biggest european final in 2022. thousands of supporters, frustrated and angry, after the french police reached quickly for the tear gas as they struggled to get everyone to their seats on time. chaotic scenes and fans saying they feared for their safety despite having queued for hours. i�*ve got really bad asthma and i�*ve been tear gassed twice. i was really, really struggling. thousands of thousands of fans out there getting tear gassed. with tickets. treating them like animals. uefa blamed thousands of liverpool fans with fake tickets blocking the turnstiles, but supporters said organisation wasn�*t good enough. tom was there with his disabled son harry.
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the treatment of supporters by uefa and the police, is an absolute disgrace today, indiscriminately pepper spraying people queuing up with tickets to get in the ground who arrived two and a half hours before kick off at the stadium and then getting charged by riot police with shields, again, having to shield my son out of the way. absolute disgrace. away from the stadium, the afternoon was full of joyful positivity and confidence in the crowd at the liverpool fan park. but concern over the delay gave way to the tension of the match, and ultimately, the disappointment of the final whistle. and there was more tear gas in the streets as they left. but within, like, two minutes or a final whistle, they tear gassed everybody, that�*s very all the fans went that way.
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and this is where liverpool�*s season ends. but this club and its supporters always somehow show their hope never dies. danjohnson, bbc news, paris. from what i could see last night there _ from what i could see last night there were moments where some young people. _ there were moments where some young people, presumably without tickets, had tried _ people, presumably without tickets, had tried to gain access, they had made _ had tried to gain access, they had made their— had tried to gain access, they had made their way past security outside the stadium and i think perhaps that prompted _ the stadium and i think perhaps that prompted the police to hold back some _ prompted the police to hold back some of— prompted the police to hold back some of those liverpool fans at the entrance _ some of those liverpool fans at the entrance points to the stadium but they're _ entrance points to the stadium but they're seemingly was a lack of communication, a lack of any clear guidance _ communication, a lack of any clear guidance structure and the policing last night— guidance structure and the policing last night seemingly ineffective and unfortunately it was the liverpool fans on _ unfortunately it was the liverpool fans on the receiving end who had up until kick—off, had done exactly what _ until kick—off, had done exactly what had — until kick—off, had done exactly what had been asked of them, waiting patiently— what had been asked of them, waiting patiently at the entrances to get into the — patiently at the entrances to get into the stadium. it overshadowed what was — into the stadium. it overshadowed what was meant to be a brilliant night _
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what was meant to be a brilliant night for— what was meant to be a brilliant night for liverpool, on the field, in the _ night for liverpool, on the field, in the hope of winning what would have been— in the hope of winning what would have been a seventh european title, they were _ have been a seventh european title, they were unable to do so losing 1—0 against _ they were unable to do so losing 1—0 against real madrid last night as andy— against real madrid last night as andy swiss reports. both on and off the pitch it was the toughest of nights. sadio mane agonisingly close to the breakthrough, denied only by courtois. but come the second half it was real madrid that struck. viniciuer sparking the celebrations and crowd were roaring. could liverpool respond ? they couldn�*t find a way past courtois. the man of the match performance by the real madrid goalkeeper as his team held on for victory. delight for them and a record 14th champions league title. for liverpool, itjust wasn�*t to be. these boys played an outstanding season. the two competitions we couldn�*t win, we didn�*t win
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for the smallest possible margin. one point, 1—0. so what does it say? just that on the day, or you know, they were one point better. tonight, madrid was one point better. that says nothing about us. for real madrid, then, another trophy for the collection. but for liverpool, a season of so many highs has ended in disappointment. as we know, the final was moved to the sta _ as we know, the final was moved to the sta difference from st petersburg, i don't think that can be used — petersburg, idon't think that can be used as— petersburg, i don't think that can be used as a reason for what happened last night, the claim from uefa that— happened last night, the claim from uefa that fans arriving late was the reason _ uefa that fans arriving late was the reason for — uefa that fans arriving late was the reason for the delay was in contrast to the _ reason for the delay was in contrast to the scenes before the start of the match, hundreds of thousands of fans queueing for hours to get into the stadium. it was badly organised, policing _ the stadium. it was badly organised, policing seemingly ineffective and
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in this— policing seemingly ineffective and in this case it was the liverpool fans— in this case it was the liverpool fans and — in this case it was the liverpool fans and many young fans who were on the receiving _ fans and many young fans who were on the receiving end with tear gas and pepper— the receiving end with tear gas and pepper spray being used. we saw andy robertson. _ pepper spray being used. we saw andy robertson, the liverpool defender, calling _ robertson, the liverpool defender, calling this organisation last night a complete shambles and it certainly has overshadowed events last night with liverpool football club now calling — with liverpool football club now calling on uefa without investigation into the treatment of their fans — investigation into the treatment of their fans last night. we, of course. _ their fans last night. we, of course, wait to hear what uefa will say. course, wait to hear what uefa will sa . :. ~' course, wait to hear what uefa will sa . :, ~ , :, course, wait to hear what uefa will sa. :, , course, wait to hear what uefa will sa. :, : say. thank you so much. the champions — say. thank you so much. the champions league _ say. thank you so much. the champions league final - say. thank you so much. the - champions league final originally was scheduled to be held in st petersburg but was moved because of the russian invasion of ukraine. disappointing result there for liverpool fans in more ways than one. russia�*s ambassador to the uk has said he does not believe moscow will use tactical nuclear weapons in the war against ukraine. speaking to the bbc�*s sunday morning programme, andrei kelin insisted such weapons would be used only if russia faced an existential threat. our diplomatic correspondent caroline hawley has more.
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an exercise involving nuclear weapons carried out by russia just before it invaded ukraine — an apparent warning to the west. russia has the world�*s biggest nuclear arsenal, so when vladimir putin made an announcement at the start of the war, it caused global alarm. as the war in ukraine escalated, there were fears that a cornered president putin might actually use them, but russia�*s ambassador to the uk has played down the threat for now. tactical nuclear weapons in accordance with russian military doctrine are not used in conflicts like that at all. so you do not believe that will happen? i don�*t. can you categorically say that it will not happen? we have a very strict provision over the use of tactical nuclear weapons, and it is mainly when the existence of the state is endangered. it has nothing to do with the current situation. but russia is still determined
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to show the world its military might, the potential reach of its destructive power. these are images released by the russian defence ministry of the apparently successful test launch of a missile — its range over 600 miles. you can see the full interview on the sunday morning programme, at 9am today on bbc one. and clive myrie was the reporter who did the interview and he is presenting the programme this morning. our correspondentjames waterhouse is in kyiv there have been calls for president putin to engage in negotiations but will the ukrainian president to the fact that it will be in negotiations to end this war or at least _ negotiations to end this war or at least bring — negotiations to end this war or at least bring a ceasefire. president zetensky— least bring a ceasefire. president zelensky said he is not eager to engage — zelensky said he is not eager to engage with vladimir putin for the simple _ engage with vladimir putin for the
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simple reason that the war is especially raging in the east of this country, the eastern donbas region~ _ this country, the eastern donbas region the _ this country, the eastern donbas region. the russians have launched a number— region. the russians have launched a number of— region. the russians have launched a number of continuing assaults around a city— number of continuing assaults around a city which _ number of continuing assaults around a city which is continually finding itself _ a city which is continually finding itself surrounded. military experts say they _ itself surrounded. military experts say they think there is not much for richard _ say they think there is not much for richard to— say they think there is not much for richard to gain economically or in a military— richard to gain economically or in a military sense by taking this city other— military sense by taking this city other than to declare some kind of early— other than to declare some kind of early victory in this war because that is— early victory in this war because that is the — early victory in this war because that is the last major city not in russian — that is the last major city not in russian control in the region of luhansk~ — russian control in the region of luhansk. and vladimir putin has previously— luhansk. and vladimir putin has previously said it is this part of ukraine — previously said it is this part of ukraine which is his priority. what is not _ ukraine which is his priority. what is not clear— ukraine which is his priority. what is not clear which is what the discussion— is not clear which is what the discussion around tactical nuclear weapons — discussion around tactical nuclear weapons feeds into is whether vladimir— weapons feeds into is whether vladimir putin showed the donbas region— vladimir putin showed the donbas region fall, whether he will take it further. _ region fall, whether he will take it further, whether he will continue to take more _ further, whether he will continue to take more of ukraine. it's been another— take more of ukraine. it's been another night we have seen more
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missile _ another night we have seen more missile attacks, continually raising guestions — missile attacks, continually raising questions over what will happen next _ questions over what will happen next. , :. . questions over what will happen next. , :, , :, ,, questions over what will happen next. : :, , :, ,, questions over what will happen next. , :. . :. ~' , next. james, thank you. it is 8:12am- _ a consultation will be launched this week measurements can be used, as part of plans to reshape uk law after brexit. the review has been previously announced by the government, but has been timed to coincide with the queen�*s platinum jubilee. let�*s speak now to our political correspondent pete saull. pete, what more do we know? it's it�*s coinciding with thejubilee with some questioning if this is where the government focus should fall at the moment? it�*s where the government focus should fall at the moment?— fall at the moment? it's clear that eo - le fall at the moment? it's clear that people care _ fall at the moment? it's clear that people care more _ fall at the moment? it's clear that people care more the _ fall at the moment? it's clear that people care more the moment - fall at the moment? it's clear that i people care more the moment about how much things cost rather than the form of measurement those goods are in and there will be millions of people who have never experienced a time when everything was in imperial measurements. this was first introduced by the european union in the year 2000 so for more than 20 years now shops and market traders
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have had to display goods in metric measurements, they can if they want to also put them in pounds and ounces they just to also put them in pounds and ounces theyjust must ensure they are in grams and centimetres, that kind of thing. but this is something brexit campaigners have been calling forfor some time, it brexit campaigners have been calling for for some time, it was in the conservative party manifesto, they announced a review in september of last year and that review will get under way now on friday. it will look into what if anything actually needs to change year. some suggesting that this is a good thing, the conservative mpjohn redwood saying businesses should be free to choose how they do business, others are saying if we want to do more trade with the united states then perhaps this is a good thing because the americans still use the imperial system. others though are far more sceptical about it, the labour mp angela eagle has accused ministers this morning of weapon isaac nostalgia and others clearly feel this is something of a distraction tactic with the prime
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minister still under an awful lot of pressure over the partygate saga. one of the tory mps who has called on him to resign, tobias ellwood, said it looks as if the government �*s dead cat committee has been working hard again. 's dead cat committee has been working hard again.— 's dead cat committee has been working hard again. people will make their own minds _ working hard again. people will make their own minds up, _ working hard again. people will make their own minds up, peter, _ working hard again. people will make their own minds up, peter, thank - their own minds up, peter, thank you. president biden will travel to the city of uvalde in texas later today, where a gunman killed 19 children and two teachers at a primary school last week. he�*ll be meeting survivors and the families of some of those who died. the us leader has urged more cross—party support for tighter gun control following the shooting. our correspondent will grant has this report. after the most terrible week in its history, uvalde is preparing for two things: to bury its children and to receive the president. the victims�* families are only concerned with the first of those, making preparations for a day which no parent can bear to imagine. the horrific attack on an elementary school by a teenager armed
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with a semiautomatic weapon has made that nightmare a reality for them. as president biden�*s motorcade drives down the streets of uvalde, he will come across these — small, impromptu tributes to victims set up around the city. this is a community deep in mourning, torn apart by what happened. and mr biden knows he must tread carefully here to balance sympathy with asking the difficult questions. this attack has brought the gun control debate back into sharp focus in the us. before his trip, the president reiterated his position that change is necessary and possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know. but we can make america safer. we can finally do what we need to do to protect the lives of the people and our children. so i call on americans tojoin hands and make your voices heard, to work together to make this nation what it can and should be. however, he has his work cut out.
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bipartisan support is increasingly difficult to find on any major issue in the united states these days — on gun control, it�*s almost impossible. at the nra convention in houston, his predecessor, donald trump, echoed the republican line: that the main issues are school security and mental health, not guns. in a city largely bereft of hope, president biden hopes to show solidarity and empathy, as a man who has lost children of his own, to the victims�* families. the larger issues of how such brutality could have been prevented may simply be put on hold amid a moment�*s silence. will grant, bbc news, uvalde, texas. a clean up operation is underway in a marina in torquay, after a superyacht burst into flames and sank there yesterday. the 85—foot vessel was carrying 8,000 litres of fuel, which the environment agency fears could escape into the surrounding waters.
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a major incident was declared and nearby beaches and roads were evacuated. holidaymakers have faced travel chaos and severe delays train stations and ferry terminals, at the start of the half—term break. easyjet and tui have cancelled dozens of flights flights while long queues have also been seen at london�*s st pancras station. our correspondent tim muffett is there for us this morning. tim — what�*s the situation there now? this weekend for many of us marks the start of the half term holidays and here at the eurostar terminal it is pretty quiet, some people arriving but yesterday it was incredibly busy, there were long queues, of tourists and many liverpool fans, as well, on their way to paris for the champions league final and i am sure later today we will see many of them returning and it will be a pretty
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grim returnjourney, iam returning and it will be a pretty grim returnjourney, i am sure. itrutheh grim return 'ourney, i am sure. when it comes to — grim return journey, i am sure. when it comes to the _ grim return journey, i am sure. when it comes to the roads, _ grim return journey, i am sure. when it comes to the roads, the _ grim return journey, i am sure. when it comes to the roads, the rac - it comes to the roads, the rac estimates— it comes to the roads, the rac estimates by the end of today, round about _ estimates by the end of today, round about 17 _ estimates by the end of today, round about 17 million leisure journeys will have — about 17 million leisure journeys will have taken place this weekend. yesterday. — will have taken place this weekend. yesterday, there was a lot of heavy traffic— yesterday, there was a lot of heavy traffic reported on the m5 and m4 and on _ traffic reported on the m5 and m4 and on the roads leading into dover. queues _ and on the roads leading into dover. queues of— and on the roads leading into dover. queues of traffic formed in one q of lorries. _ queues of traffic formed in one q of lorries, more than 700 lorries were counted _ lorries, more than 700 lorries were counted by— lorries, more than 700 lorries were counted by the kent resilience forum. — counted by the kent resilience forum. a — counted by the kent resilience forum, a group of local organisations which come together to keep an _ organisations which come together to keep an eye on things going on there — keep an eye on things going on there. overnight, the port of dover said things — there. overnight, the port of dover said things were running smoothly but they— said things were running smoothly but they advised people to check before _ but they advised people to check before they arrived today to see what _ before they arrived today to see what the — before they arrived today to see what the situation was like but for many— what the situation was like but for many people, i think, air travel is going _ many people, i think, air travel is going to — many people, i think, air travel is going to be — many people, i think, air travel is going to be the main issue over the next couple — going to be the main issue over the next couple of weeks and thursday, easyjet _ next couple of weeks and thursday, easyjet cancelled 200 flights because of it problems and light on friday— because of it problems and light on friday night the airline said it would — friday night the airline said it
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would cancel around another 200 flights _ would cancel around another 200 flights between now and june the 5th, flights between now and june the 5th. a _ flights between now and june the 5th, a combination of reasons, they said. _ 5th, a combination of reasons, they said. airport— 5th, a combination of reasons, they said, airport handling work and runways— said, airport handling work and runways as well. and one of the main problem _ runways as well. and one of the main problem is. _ runways as well. and one of the main problem is. it— runways as well. and one of the main problem is, it seems, is during the pandemic— problem is, it seems, is during the pandemic manyjobs were cut and now, as demand _ pandemic manyjobs were cut and now, as demand forair pandemic manyjobs were cut and now, as demand for air travel researches again. _ as demand for air travel researches again, recruitment is a real issue. it again, recruitment is a real issue. it takes _ again, recruitment is a real issue. it takes time _ again, recruitment is a real issue. it takes time to train people up to .et it takes time to train people up to get the _ it takes time to train people up to get the security clearance in place and this— get the security clearance in place and this is— get the security clearance in place and this is no quick fix so the advice — and this is no quick fix so the advice is. _ and this is no quick fix so the advice is, we have heard it many times— advice is, we have heard it many times before, check before you travel _ times before, check before you travel and _ times before, check before you travel and best of luck!- travel and best of luck! good timinu ! travel and best of luck! good timing! you _ travel and best of luck! good timing! you got _ travel and best of luck! good timing! you got an _ travel and best of luck! good i timing! you got an unexpected glimpse of me and someone coming into tim �*s shot. it�*s only a 20 am. we can always trust louise to be nice and smooth,. be careful! i am about to go out a vision towards the
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end of the building. good morning. there is some sunshine around at the moment, not for all of us and we do not expect it to last. it is not as curious for some in comparison to yesterday, the shoma cloud already starting to threaten in northamptonshire and we�*ve had some showers this morning across the north norfolk coast, filtering in from the north sea. that is because the weather story is changing subtly. the high—pressure drifting away, more isobars running down through the north sea, the wind strengthening and coming from the north, coolidge, driving in some showers over the last few hours, this has been the recent radar. you see them running through the north sea, interacting with the north norfolk coast, one or two across the cheshire gap and through the afternoon these may become more widespread and we will start to see more cloud into the afternoon. collision afternoon, 9—11 across the east coast of scotland, 14 in western scotland, fewer in northern
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ireland, along the north sea coast we will see more showers and 12 or 13 degrees is the maximum. in the west country, we had some glorious blue sky and sunshine yesterday, frequent sharp and possibly thundery showers likely to develop this afternoon. some of those tending to fade through the evening and overnight. temperature is falling, quite a chilly night, comfortable night for getting a good nights sleep but it means a chilly start tomorrow and a cloudy start to the new working week. a lot of cloud around on monday, subtle change in wind direction, more of a north—westerly so more showers to the west on monday, cloudy day, some showers are slow moving, heavy and possibly thundery and again those temperatures a little bit disappointing but this time of year, 11-16 at the disappointing but this time of year, 11—16 at the very best. on tuesday, still dominated by this area of low pressure sitting across us and along the north—west flank of that we see this little weather system basically
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means it will enhance the showers, showers or longer spells of rain potentially at times. we will see more showers across england and wales, again another cloudy day but where sunshine comes through and with the wind easing, 18 degrees is not out of the question on tuesday. leading us into the bank holiday weekend. always a difficult one to predict at the best of times but a lot going on outdoors over the next few days. still some uncertainty as to what is happening but it looks likely to be a little bit more optimistic than initially thought so lots of dry weather, warmer, there could be some sharp showers developing in the south early in the bank holiday weekend. keep watching the forecast and we bank holiday weekend. keep watching the forecast and we will bank holiday weekend. keep watching the forecast and we will of bank holiday weekend. keep watching the forecast and we will of course keep you updated. we like how you measure our expectations, that�*s so important. taste measure our expectations, that's so im ortant. ~ :, measure our expectations, that's so imortant. ~ :, :, measure our expectations, that's so imortant. :, :, :, , :, important. we got a fairly doleful site. important. we got a fairly doleful site- people _ important. we got a fairly doleful site. people are _ important. we got a fairly doleful site. people are stopping - important. we got a fairly doleful site. people are stopping me - important. we got a fairly doleful site. people are stopping me in l important. we got a fairly doleful. site. people are stopping me in the street going _ site. people are stopping me in the street going what _ site. people are stopping me in the street going what about _ site. people are stopping me in the
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street going what about the - site. people are stopping me in the street going what about the street | street going what about the street party on sunday and i am like... no pressure! party on sunday and i am like... no ressure! . . : :. , party on sunday and i am like... no ressure! ,, : :, , :, pressure! especially in your neck of the woods. — pressure! especially in your neck of the woods, wherever— pressure! especially in your neck of the woods, wherever they -- - pressure! especially in your neck of the woods, wherever they -- you i the woods, wherever they —— you live, they will expect you to deliver the weather. i live, they will expect you to deliver the weather.- live, they will expect you to deliver the weather. i will be outdoors _ deliver the weather. i will be outdoors for _ deliver the weather. i will be outdoors for the _ deliver the weather. i will be outdoors for the picnic. - deliver the weather. i will be | outdoors for the picnic. come deliver the weather. i will be - outdoors for the picnic. come rain or shine. outdoors for the picnic. come rain orshine. it outdoors for the picnic. come rain or shine. . outdoors for the picnic. come rain or shine. , j~ :, the fashion retailer missguided is on the verge of collapse — with administrators potentially being called in tomorrow. the firm was founded in 2009 and grew to be one of the uk�*s biggest "fast fashion" businesses — but had to be rescued last year. maria malone is a fashion retail expert — and joins us now. lovely to see you. for those who do not know the brand, how would you sum it up? it�*s not know the brand, how would you sum itu? v not know the brand, how would you sum it up?— sum it up? it's fast fashion. with very young _ sum it up? it's fast fashion. with very young customers _ sum it up? it's fast fashion. with very young customers who - sum it up? it's fast fashion. with very young customers who likesl sum it up? it's fast fashion. with i very young customers who likes to wear _ very young customers who likes to wear something new every weekend, who want— wear something new every weekend, who want to stand out from the crowd
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and yet _ who want to stand out from the crowd and yet conform to the latest trends — and yet conform to the latest trends. forthe and yet conform to the latest trends. for the younger people who want to— trends. for the younger people who want to be — trends. for the younger people who want to be seen, the instagram generation, if you will. fast fashion meaning _ generation, if you will. fast fashion meaning something you might buy cheap and perhaps where once or twice, not an investment piece? the name derives _ twice, not an investment piece? the name derives from the idea of getting — name derives from the idea of getting a _ name derives from the idea of getting a trend into the customer, into the _ getting a trend into the customer, into the store or online very quickly— into the store or online very quickly so _ into the store or online very quickly so it's cutting that process of designing to retail, cutting it down _ of designing to retail, cutting it down so — of designing to retail, cutting it down so you can get it to market guicker. — down so you can get it to market quicker, that's where it came from but as— quicker, that's where it came from but as this — quicker, that's where it came from but as this connotation of you wear it once _ but as this connotation of you wear it once and — but as this connotation of you wear it once and chuck it,...— but as this connotation of you wear it once and chuck it,... there was a time, it once and chuck it,... there was a time. perhaps _ it once and chuck it,... there was a time, perhaps ten _ it once and chuck it,... there was a time, perhaps ten years _ it once and chuck it,... there was a time, perhaps ten years ago - it once and chuck it,... there was a time, perhaps ten years ago when i time, perhaps ten years ago when fast fashion, missguided, boo—hoo, those kinds of brand, we thought the high street will be buried forever and yet there�*s been something of a u—turn? and yet there's been something of a u-turn? :. . and yet there's been something of a u-turn? :, , ::, and yet there's been something of a u-turn? :,, ::, ,, , u-turn? there has come issues with this company _ u-turn? there has come issues with this company in _ u-turn? there has come issues with this company in particular, - u-turn? there has come issues with this company in particular, very - u-turn? there has come issues with this company in particular, very sad| this company in particular, very sad because _ this company in particular, very sad
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because they have a huge, strong, talent _ because they have a huge, strong, talent pool— because they have a huge, strong, talent pool in there, really good, young _ talent pool in there, really good, young employees, strong graduates, but the _ young employees, strong graduates, but the problem is really from the suppliers. — but the problem is really from the suppliers, and any good fashion retailer— suppliers, and any good fashion retailer relies on a strong relationship with their suppliers and people work very hard to develop these _ and people work very hard to develop these relationships and get the best service. _ these relationships and get the best service, price, quality, on—time delivery— service, price, quality, on—time delivery and missguided have failed to pay— delivery and missguided have failed to pay some of their suppliers, suppliers— to pay some of their suppliers, suppliers knocking on their door for their payment. and that is a really bad sign _ their payment. and that is a really bad sign when you cannot pay your suppliers— bad sign when you cannot pay your suppliers because that is what you rely on _ suppliers because that is what you rely on. but the other big thing with missguided is it failed to recognise how the customer is changing — recognise how the customer is changing and if you think about the rival up _ changing and if you think about the rival up the — changing and if you think about the rival up the road, they have diversified so they have bought different brands, brand is that we know. _ different brands, brand is that we know, some of the arcadia brands, for example, for different customers, different price points and quality levels so they diversified but with missguided,
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they stuck to the same customer and yet there _ they stuck to the same customer and yet there is— they stuck to the same customer and yet there is much more competition around _ yet there is much more competition around them and that customer is changing — around them and that customer is changing so they are increasingly wanting — changing so they are increasingly wanting to know where their goods have come — wanting to know where their goods have come from, increasingly interested in sustainability, there is a massive slow fashion movement, movement— is a massive slow fashion movement, movement around sustainability, upcycting. — movement around sustainability, upcycling, repairing fashion and culturally, we are more likely to repair— culturally, we are more likely to repair than— culturally, we are more likely to repairthan we culturally, we are more likely to repair than we probably were recently— repair than we probably were recently so you think about some of the television programmes we are looking _ the television programmes we are looking at. — the television programmes we are looking at, it's about repairing and treasuring — looking at, it's about repairing and treasuring things we already own and this idea _ treasuring things we already own and this idea of— treasuring things we already own and this idea of preowned clothing now is becoming quite acceptable and normal. — is becoming quite acceptable and normal, whereas it was once seen as second _ normal, whereas it was once seen as second hand. — normal, whereas it was once seen as second hand, now it's seen as really good _ second hand, now it's seen as really good quality and so what if someone has previously owned it, it is laundered, clean, fit to wear again. you have big — laundered, clean, fit to wear again. you have big retailers now welcoming preowned clothing, think of marks & spencer— preowned clothing, think of marks & spencer initiative recently to
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resell— spencer initiative recently to resell pre—worn children's clothing and that— resell pre—worn children's clothing and that iconic love island show which _ and that iconic love island show which is — and that iconic love island show which is now saying they are going to have _ which is now saying they are going to have the — which is now saying they are going to have the contestants preowned clothing — to have the contestants preowned clothing. previously missguided sponsored the show. so you can see and it— sponsored the show. so you can see and it had _ sponsored the show. so you can see and it had a — sponsored the show. so you can see and it had a massive impact on their profits. _ and it had a massive impact on their profits. you — and it had a massive impact on their profits, you can see how culturally we have _ profits, you can see how culturally we have shifted as consumers post covid _ we have shifted as consumers post covid in _ we have shifted as consumers post covid in particular because we learned — covid in particular because we learned how we could cope without buying _ learned how we could cope without buying lots of clothing during the pandemic or we boughtjog pants and we took— pandemic or we boughtjog pants and we look back to our wardrobe and be restyted _ we look back to our wardrobe and be restyled. we we look back to our wardrobe and be res led. ~ . we look back to our wardrobe and be res led. ~ , :, , restyled. we will see how things develop over _ restyled. we will see how things develop over the _ restyled. we will see how things develop over the next _ restyled. we will see how things develop over the next couple i restyled. we will see how things develop over the next couple of| develop over the next couple of days, missguided on the brink of collapse after being issued with a winding—up petition from creditors. this is something for star trek
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fans... ., :, ~ :, , this is something for star trek fans... ,, :, ::, , :, , this is something for star trek fans... ,,:, , :, , :, this is something for star trek fans... ,, :, _, , :, , :, fans... star wars fans! roger, you cannot mix — fans... star wars fans! roger, you cannot mix those _ fans... star wars fans! roger, you cannot mix those up! _ he first played thejedi master obi wan kenobi more in the star wars movie franchise — now ewan mcgregor is reprising the role on the small screen, for a new disney plus series. perhaps surprisingly though, it isn�*t the force perhaps surprisingly though, it isn�*t the force on the east coast of scotland. he�*s been speaking to entertainment reporter, david farrell. hello, star wars fans. thank you for all your incredible support and response to obi—wan kenobi. from shallow grave to trainspotting, ewan mcgregor�*s early career made him a household name. but when he picked up his lightsaber in 1999 for star wars: the phantom menace, it was that role that would change his life. you can�*t know what your life would have been without it, you know, cos it�*s just the way it went, but it must have done. for my career, it was the first huge sort of... ..the only real big franchise i�*ve ever been part of and just part of the legend. leave us alone.
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when the time comes, he must be trained. now ewan brings thejedi master to the small screen for a six—part one—off tv series, and he�*s delighted to be back. it was great to play him again. i really, really liked it. i mean, i couldn�*t have imagined it would have been so satisfying to play him again and it really was great. obi—wan kenobi was a true childhood dream for the perthshire actor. from his uncle, denis lawson, appearing in the franchise to ewan himself landing the role, it�*s a reality he thought was in a galaxy far, far away. my uncle denis had been in the first three. he played wedge antilles in the first three movies in the �*70s, and me and my brother, i remember mum and dad picking us up from school and we went to the big city from crieff, you know, and we went to see my uncle in a film which was sort of as exciting as anything had ever been before, but then it was also star wars, which just sort of blew our minds apart, and those films became so important to us that to then have a chance to go into them
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as an actor myself and to play the younger alec guinness, you know, it�*s all quite too much to imagine, really. and if you could have told a young ewan mcgregor back when you were at kirkcaldy tech and you were living in crieff that you�*d one day be obi—wan kenobi, what would you have said? imean, alli... all i wanted to do was just to be an actor like my uncle. since i was nine, that�*s all i wanted to do. but it�*s down to my mum and dad for supporting me and letting me leave school early and, you know, going to kirkcaldy when i was 16 to do that theatre arts course there in kirkcaldy tech, which changed my life really. i�*ve got a lot to be thankful for in terms of my mum and dad, that�*s for sure. david farrell, bbc news. we it is good. i did enjoy it, actually. it we it is good. i did en'oy it, actuall . . we it is good. i did en'oy it, “magi we it is good. i did en'oy it, moi we it is good. i did en'oy it, actuall . , :, _ :, actually. it is easy to get it mixed u -. actually. it is easy to get it mixed u. it actually. it is easy to get it mixed op- it was — actually. it is easy to get it mixed op- it was great. _ actually. it is easy to get it mixed up. it was great, i— actually. it is easy to get it mixed up. it was great, i really - actually. it is easy to get it mixed up. it was great, i really did - actually. it is easy to get it mixed| up. it was great, i really did enjoy up. it was great, i really did en'oy it. ithink up. it was great, i really did en'oy it. i think they �* up. it was great, i really did en'oy it. i think they are called i it. i think they are called inquisitors _ it. i think they are called
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inquisitors and _ it. i think they are called inquisitors and he - it. i think they are called inquisitors and he is - it. i think they are called inquisitors and he is on i it. i think they are called i inquisitors and he is on the it. i think they are called - inquisitors and he is on the run to hide from them. we�*ve been reflecting on last night�*s champions league final this morning after thousands of liverpool fans were stopped from gaining access to the ground. let�*s get more on on this with our correspondentjohn watson. john, i will ask you something. sorry! it was disappointment for liverool sorry! it was disappointment for liverpool on _ sorry! it was disappointment for liverpool on the _ sorry! it was disappointment for liverpool on the pitch, - sorry! it was disappointment for liverpool on the pitch, but - sorry! it was disappointment for liverpool on the pitch, but as i sorry! it was disappointment for i liverpool on the pitch, but as nina said, there are big questions this morning about the way things were handled before the game outside the stadium? . handled before the game outside the stadium? , :, :, handled before the game outside the stadium? , :, stadium? yes, good morning, both. i thinkfootball_ stadium? yes, good morning, both. i think football is _ stadium? yes, good morning, both. i think football is secondly _ stadium? yes, good morning, both. i think football is secondly secondary l think football is secondly secondary to what— think football is secondly secondary to what unfolded before the game. we have been— to what unfolded before the game. we have been reflecting on the treatment of those liverpool fans who are _ treatment of those liverpool fans who are trying to gain access to the stadium _ who are trying to gain access to the stadium before kick—off last night, many— stadium before kick—off last night, many were — stadium before kick—off last night, many were held for hours in an external— many were held for hours in an external checkpoint before being allowed — external checkpoint before being allowed to move closer towards the stadium. _ allowed to move closer towards the stadium, then it was at the turnstiles where they were held again~ — turnstiles where they were held again. and i think it was the result of some _ again. and i think it was the result of some local people here in paris,
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perhaps— of some local people here in paris, perhaps without tickets, who are trying _ perhaps without tickets, who are trying to — perhaps without tickets, who are trying to gain access, and i think that prompted the authorities and officials _ that prompted the authorities and officials are to hold at the liverpool fans back at that point, but there — liverpool fans back at that point, but there was no communication, perplexing, it's got to be said, then— perplexing, it's got to be said, then it — perplexing, it's got to be said, then it was the heavy—handed use of then it was the heavy—handed use of the pepper— then it was the heavy—handed use of the pepper spray and tear gas on those _ the pepper spray and tear gas on those liverpool supporters as at the numbers _ those liverpool supporters as at the numbers swelled are trying to gain access— numbers swelled are trying to gain access to _ numbers swelled are trying to gain access to the stadium as they were held back— access to the stadium as they were held back for a long period of time, some _ held back for a long period of time, some children caught up in it there. it some children caught up in it there. it was _ some children caught up in it there. it was some — some children caught up in it there. it was some unpleasant scenes for those _ it was some unpleasant scenes for those involved. we will be speaking to a fan _ those involved. we will be speaking to a fan who was caught up in it in a moment. — to a fan who was caught up in it in a moment, but as far as the match goes. _ a moment, but as far as the match goes, liverpool losing last night 1-0 to— goes, liverpool losing last night 1-0 to real— goes, liverpool losing last night 1—0 to real madrid, ending their hopes— 1—0 to real madrid, ending their hopes of— 1—0 to real madrid, ending their hopes of winning a seventh european title. hopes of winning a seventh european title we _ hopes of winning a seventh european title. we saw them pipped to the premier— title. we saw them pipped to the premier league title by manchester city, losing most big trophies in six days — city, losing most big trophies in six days. some fans watching close to home. _ six days. some fans watching close to home, matt graveling was with them _ to home, matt graveling was with them on _ to home, matt graveling was with them on a — to home, matt graveling was with them on a night which ended in disappointment.
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with the sun setting on another season, liverpool fans turned aintree into anfield for the final furlong of a campaign full of promise. red fans had already backed two winners — the league and fa cups — and now the champions league was down to a two—horse race. we got to the end and we�*re going to win tonight. this is the game. going to win it! if we win tonight, it will be an exceptional season so, yeah, fingers crossed we can do something quite special tonight. aintree watched on as liverpool were quickest out of the gate, early possession leading to chance after chance. salah. mane. but at half time, still 0—0. i think the second half we�*ll come out and we�*ll go for it again. i thought it started off well, we've had a few chances. i think we should have put one of them away. ijust hope we're not going to live to regret it afterwards. but as day turned to night,
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the red tide turned white — real now finding form in france. and then heartbreak. commentator: and they go ahead! klopp�*s men pushed. but real stayed strong. a final whistle bringing pain in paris, agony in aintree. to watch us lose like that just...just hurt a lot. it�*s tough to take. the better team lost tonight. i�*m absolutely heartbroken, absolutely heartbroken. i think we'll be fine next season. we'll come back. i mean, to say that we were upset that we haven't won all four trophies, that says enough. that says enough. you know, we've still got two trophies this season. so, two trophies — a good season by any standard, but for liverpool, for this team, it could be remembered more for the cups they left behind. matt groveling, bbc news. ——matt graveling, bbc news.
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phil was a fan who was caught up in it last _ phil was a fan who was caught up in it last night. — phil was a fan who was caught up in it last night, what happened? bad organisation, we got off the train at 630. _ organisation, we got off the train at 630, started _ organisation, we got off the train at 630, started trying _ organisation, we got off the train at 630, started trying to - organisation, we got off the train at 630, started trying to walk- organisation, we got off the train at 630, started trying to walk up| organisation, we got off the train. at 630, started trying to walk up to the ground. — at 630, started trying to walk up to the ground. we _ at 630, started trying to walk up to the ground, we found _ at 630, started trying to walk up to the ground, we found on _ at 630, started trying to walk up to the ground, we found on the - at 630, started trying to walk up to the ground, we found on the way. at 630, started trying to walk up to i the ground, we found on the way back it was— the ground, we found on the way back it was a _ the ground, we found on the way back it was a ten— the ground, we found on the way back it was a ten minute _ the ground, we found on the way back it was a ten minute walk. _ the ground, we found on the way back it was a ten minute walk. through - it was a ten minute walk. through all the _ it was a ten minute walk. through all the bottlenecks _ it was a ten minute walk. through all the bottlenecks and _ it was a ten minute walk. through. all the bottlenecks and nonexistent checks— all the bottlenecks and nonexistent checks they— all the bottlenecks and nonexistent checks they were _ all the bottlenecks and nonexistent checks they were stopping - all the bottlenecks and nonexistent checks they were stopping people i checks they were stopping people trying _ checks they were stopping people trying to — checks they were stopping people trying to get — checks they were stopping people trying to get to _ checks they were stopping people trying to get to the _ checks they were stopping people trying to get to the ground, - checks they were stopping people trying to get to the ground, it - checks they were stopping people| trying to get to the ground, it was probably— trying to get to the ground, it was probably 50 — trying to get to the ground, it was probably 50 minutes _ trying to get to the ground, it was probably 50 minutes to _ trying to get to the ground, it was probably 50 minutes to get - trying to get to the ground, it was probably 50 minutes to get to - trying to get to the ground, it was probably 50 minutes to get to the| probably 50 minutes to get to the turnstite — probably 50 minutes to get to the turnstile which— probably 50 minutes to get to the turnstile which then _ probably 50 minutes to get to the turnstile which then closed - probably 50 minutes to get to the turnstile which then closed whenl probably 50 minutes to get to the i turnstile which then closed when we .ot turnstile which then closed when we got to— turnstile which then closed when we got to the _ turnstile which then closed when we got to the title — turnstile which then closed when we got to the title so _ turnstile which then closed when we got to the title so it _ turnstile which then closed when we got to the title so it was _ turnstile which then closed when we got to the title so it was not - turnstile which then closed when we got to the title so it was not a - got to the title so it was not a pa rticula rly _ got to the title so it was not a particularly enjoyable - got to the title so it was not a - particularly enjoyable experience, to be _ particularly enjoyable experience, to be honest _ particularly en'oyable experience, to be honest.— to be honest. john, you're inside the stadium. _ to be honest. john, you're inside the stadium, the _ to be honest. john, you're inside the stadium, the message - to be honest. john, you're inside the stadium, the message came | to be honest. john, you're inside - the stadium, the message came that the stadium, the message came that the match— the stadium, the message came that the match was delayed because of fans are _ the match was delayed because of fans are turning up but different outside — fans are turning up but different outside when you can see the queues and numbers of fans waiting for hours _ and numbers of fans waiting for hours to— and numbers of fans waiting for hours to try to get in.— hours to try to get in. yes, this mornin: hours to try to get in. yes, this morning we — hours to try to get in. yes, this morning we should _ hours to try to get in. yes, this morning we should be - hours to try to get in. yes, this morning we should be basking| hours to try to get in. yes, this i morning we should be basking in hours to try to get in. yes, this - morning we should be basking in the afterglow of a one of the great sporting events. that is what it is, the champions league final, but there is an inescapable feeling during the course of it and
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certainly this morning that that has been a huge organisational and security failure and i know there will be an investigation, but there are lots and lots of really upset my disappointed, frustrated, angry people this morning that should have had one of the experiences of their lives last night.— had one of the experiences of their lives last night. what were some of the other expenses _ lives last night. what were some of the other expenses being _ lives last night. what were some of the other expenses being felt - lives last night. what were some of the other expenses being felt by i lives last night. what were some of| the other expenses being felt by the liverpoot— the other expenses being felt by the liverpool fans at euro web? tragically, we had young children fans caught — tragically, we had young children fans caught up— tragically, we had young children fans caught up in _ tragically, we had young children fans caught up in it. _ tragically, we had young children fans caught up in it. i— tragically, we had young children fans caught up in it. ithink- tragically, we had young children fans caught up in it. i think i- tragically, we had young children fans caught up in it. i think i was| fans caught up in it. i think i was quite _ fans caught up in it. i think i was quite fortunate _ fans caught up in it. i think i was quite fortunate on _ fans caught up in it. i think i was quite fortunate on the _ fans caught up in it. i think i was quite fortunate on the balance i fans caught up in it. i think i was| quite fortunate on the balance of things— quite fortunate on the balance of things there _ quite fortunate on the balance of things there is _ quite fortunate on the balance of things there is no _ quite fortunate on the balance of things there is no point - quite fortunate on the balance of things there is no point standing| quite fortunate on the balance of. things there is no point standing at a close _ things there is no point standing at a close game — things there is no point standing at a close game when— things there is no point standing at a close game when there _ things there is no point standing at a close game when there are - things there is no point standing at a close game when there are more| a close game when there are more people _ a close game when there are more people turning _ a close game when there are more people turning up _ a close game when there are more people turning up and _ a close game when there are more people turning up and the - a close game when there are more people turning up and the police i people turning up and the police started — people turning up and the police started to — people turning up and the police started to gassing _ people turning up and the police started to gassing people - people turning up and the police started to gassing people and ii started to gassing people and i believe — started to gassing people and i believe there _ started to gassing people and i believe there are _ started to gassing people and i believe there are children - started to gassing people and i believe there are children —— i started to gassing people and i- believe there are children —— closed the gate _ believe there are children —— closed the gate they— believe there are children —— closed the gate. they seemed _ believe there are children —— closed the gate. they seemed to - believe there are children —— closed the gate. they seemed to want - believe there are children —— closed the gate. they seemed to want to i believe there are children —— closed i the gate. they seemed to want to use the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear— the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear gas— the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear gas as — the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear gas as a — the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear gas as a primary— the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear gas as a primary thing - the gate. they seemed to want to use the tear gas as a primary thing and . the tear gas as a primary thing and i the tear gas as a primary thing and i don't _ the tear gas as a primary thing and i don't know— the tear gas as a primary thing and i don't know what _ the tear gas as a primary thing and i don't know what they _ the tear gas as a primary thing and i don't know what they were - i don't know what they were expecting. _ i don't know what they were expecting. -- _ i don't know what they were expecting, —— where - i don't know what they were expecting, —— where they. i don't know what they were i expecting, —— where they were expecting _ expecting, —— where they were expecting them _ expecting, —— where they were expecting them to _ expecting, —— where they were expecting them to go, - expecting, —— where they were expecting them to go, tear- expecting, —— where they werej expecting them to go, tear gas expecting, —— where they were - expecting them to go, tear gas are supposed — expecting them to go, tear gas are supposed to— expecting them to go, tear gas are supposed to be _ expecting them to go, tear gas are supposed to be for— expecting them to go, tear gas are supposed to be for crowd - expecting them to go, tear gas arel supposed to be for crowd dispersal, you couldn't — supposed to be for crowd dispersal, you couldn't go _ supposed to be for crowd dispersal, you couldn't go backwards - supposed to be for crowd dispersal, you couldn't go backwards becausel you couldn't go backwards because there _ you couldn't go backwards because there are _ you couldn't go backwards because there are people _ you couldn't go backwards because there are people behind _ you couldn't go backwards because there are people behind your- you couldn't go backwards because| there are people behind your trying to get— there are people behind your trying to get in. _ there are people behind your trying to get in. so— there are people behind your trying to get in, so where _ there are people behind your trying to get in, so where these _ there are people behind your trying to get in, so where these people i to get in, so where these people were _ to get in, so where these people were supposed _ to get in, so where these people were supposed to _ to get in, so where these people were supposed to go, _ to get in, so where these people
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were supposed to go, not - to get in, so where these people were supposed to go, not quite i to get in, so where these people - were supposed to go, not quite sure. it were supposed to go, not quite sure. it was _ were supposed to go, not quite sure. it wasjust— were supposed to go, not quite sure. it was just handled _ were supposed to go, not quite sure. it was just handled very, _ were supposed to go, not quite sure. it was just handled very, very - were supposed to go, not quite sure. it wasjust handled very, very badly. it wasjust handled very, very badly on pretty— it wasjust handled very, very badly on pretty much— it wasjust handled very, very badly on pretty much every— it wasjust handled very, very badly on pretty much every level. - it wasjust handled very, very badly on pretty much every level. it - it wasjust handled very, very badly on pretty much every level. it is- on pretty much every level. it is the third — on pretty much every level. it is the third of— on pretty much every level. it is the third of the _ on pretty much every level. it is the third of the last _ on pretty much every level. it is the third of the last five - on pretty much every level. it is. the third of the last five european cup final— the third of the last five european cup final is— the third of the last five european cup final is that _ the third of the last five european cup final is that i've _ the third of the last five european cup final is that i've been - the third of the last five european cup final is that i've been to. - the third of the last five european cup final is that i've been to. kyiv| cup final is that i've been to. kyiv was fine. — cup final is that i've been to. kyiv was fine, madrid _ cup final is that i've been to. kyiv was fine, madrid was _ cup final is that i've been to. kyiv was fine, madrid was fine, - cup final is that i've been to. kyiv was fine, madrid was fine, this i cup final is that i've been to. kyiv i was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even _ was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even close _ was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even close to _ was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even close to the _ was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even close to the same - was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even close to the same level. was fine, madrid was fine, this was not even close to the same level of organisation — not even close to the same level of organisation getting _ not even close to the same level of organisation getting on _ not even close to the same level of organisation getting on the - not even close to the same level of organisation getting on the ground| organisation getting on the ground is also _ organisation getting on the ground is also in _ organisation getting on the ground is also in madrid, _ organisation getting on the ground is also in madrid, i— organisation getting on the ground is also in madrid, i think— organisation getting on the ground is also in madrid, i think i- organisation getting on the ground is also in madrid, i think i had - organisation getting on the ground is also in madrid, i think i had myi is also in madrid, i think i had my ticket _ is also in madrid, i think i had my ticket checked _ is also in madrid, i think i had my ticket checked three _ is also in madrid, i think i had my ticket checked three times - is also in madrid, i think i had my ticket checked three times before the council. — ticket checked three times before the council. my— ticket checked three times before the council, my ticket _ ticket checked three times before the council, my ticket was - ticket checked three times before the council, my ticket was not. the council, my ticket was not checked — the council, my ticket was not checked until— the council, my ticket was not checked until the _ the council, my ticket was not checked until the steward - the council, my ticket was not| checked until the steward took the council, my ticket was not i checked until the steward took it the council, my ticket was not - checked until the steward took it to open the _ checked until the steward took it to open the turnstile _ checked until the steward took it to open the turnstile —— _ checked until the steward took it to open the turnstile —— three - checked until the steward took it to open the turnstile —— three times. open the turnstile —— three times before _ open the turnstile —— three times before the — open the turnstile —— three times before the turnstile. _ open the turnstile —— three times before the turnstile. we - open the turnstile —— three times before the turnstile. we left - open the turnstile —— three times before the turnstile. we left at i open the turnstile —— three times. before the turnstile. we left at the bar about — before the turnstile. we left at the bar about quarter— before the turnstile. we left at the bar about quarter past _ before the turnstile. we left at the bar about quarter past six - before the turnstile. we left at the bar about quarter past six just - before the turnstile. we left at the| bar about quarter past six just over there _ bar about quarter past six just over there as _ bar about quarter past six just over there as we — bar about quarter past six just over there as we are _ bar about quarter past six just over there as we are now— bar about quarter past six just over there as we are now and _ bar about quarter past six just over there as we are now and there - bar about quarter past six just overi there as we are now and there were 15 or 16 _ there as we are now and there were 15 or 16 of— there as we are now and there were 15 or 16 of us — there as we are now and there were 15 or 16 of us together, _ there as we are now and there were 15 or 16 of us together, we - there as we are now and there were | 15 or 16 of us together, we managed to get— 15 or 16 of us together, we managed to get split — 15 or 16 of us together, we managed to get split up — 15 or 16 of us together, we managed to get split up and _ 15 or 16 of us together, we managed to get split up and getting _ 15 or 16 of us together, we managed to get split up and getting various i to get split up and getting various different— to get split up and getting various different points, _ to get split up and getting various different points, but _ to get split up and getting various different points, but none - to get split up and getting various different points, but none of- to get split up and getting various different points, but none of us i different points, but none of us relate. — different points, but none of us relate, nobody _ different points, but none of us relate, nobody our— different points, but none of us relate, nobody our train - different points, but none of us relate, nobody our train that i different points, but none of usi relate, nobody our train that left was late — relate, nobody our train that left was late. ultimately, _ relate, nobody our train that left was late. ultimately, i— relate, nobody our train that left was late. ultimately, ithink- relate, nobody our train that left. was late. ultimately, i think there is an— was late. ultimately, i think there is an element— was late. ultimately, i think there is an element of— was late. ultimately, i think there is an element of uefa _ was late. ultimately, i think there is an element of uefa basically- is an element of uefa basically putting — is an element of uefa basically putting information _ is an element of uefa basically putting information out - is an element of uefa basically putting information out that i is an element of uefa basically. putting information out that they have been— putting information out that they have been given _ putting information out that they have been given to _ putting information out that they have been given to them - putting information out that they have been given to them by- putting information out that they have been given to them by the. have been given to them by the french— have been given to them by the french police _ have been given to them by the french police so— have been given to them by the french police so it _ have been given to them by the french police so it is _ have been given to them by the french police so it is easy- have been given to them by the french police so it is easy for. have been given to them by the i french police so it is easy for them
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to do. _ french police so it is easy for them to do. it _ french police so it is easy for them to do. itjust— french police so it is easy for them to do. itj'ust was— french police so it is easy for them to do. itjust was not— french police so it is easy for them to do. it just was not great - french police so it is easy for them to do. it just was not great and - french police so it is easy for themj to do. itjust was not great and has left a _ to do. itjust was not great and has left a sour— to do. itjust was not great and has left a sour taste, _ to do. itjust was not great and has left a sour taste, really. _ to do. itjust was not great and has left a sour taste, really. if- to do. itjust was not great and has left a sour taste, really. if there i left a sour taste, really. if there is another — left a sour taste, really. if there is another european _ left a sour taste, really. if there is another european cup - left a sour taste, really. if there is another european cup final. left a sour taste, really. if there is another european cup final on this particular— is another european cup final on this particular ground, - is another european cup final on this particular ground, i- is another european cup final on this particular ground, i think. is another european cup final on this particular ground, i think it| this particular ground, i think it was something _ this particular ground, i think it was something i— this particular ground, i think it was something i would - this particular ground, i think it was something i would give - this particular ground, i think it was something i would give a i this particular ground, i think it- was something i would give a mess, and i_ was something i would give a mess, and i beautified _ was something i would give a mess, and i beautified my— was something i would give a mess, and i beautified my lifetime. - was something i would give a mess, and i beautified my lifetime. find . and i beautified my lifetime. and that is and i beautified my lifetime. that is something that and i beautified my lifetime. biol that is something that says and i beautified my lifetime. that is something that says a and i beautified my lifetime.- that is something that says a lot. -- give _ that is something that says a lot. -- give a — that is something that says a lot. —— give a miss. the pedigree came through— —— give a miss. the pedigree came through on— —— give a miss. the pedigree came through on the night. you -- give a miss. the pedigree came through on the night.— -- give a miss. the pedigree came through on the night. you need only two words and _ through on the night. you need only two words and they _ through on the night. you need only two words and they are, _ through on the night. you need only two words and they are, could - two words and they are, could warrant people —— the goalkeeper was unbeatable. he produced highly significant saves —— liverpool bridges have a significant saves against city, but that one—man goalkeeper had a major bearing on the goalkeeper had a major bearing on real madrid ending up with the trophy yet again. on real madrid ending up with the trophy yet again-— trophy yet again. many thanks indeed. sad _
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trophy yet again. many thanks indeed. sad times, _ trophy yet again. many thanks indeed. sad times, busily, - trophy yet again. many thanks indeed. sad times, busily, for| trophy yet again. many thanks - indeed. sad times, busily, for the indeed. sad times, busily, forthe experiences you felt last night and those _ experiences you felt last night and those liverpool fans you're with, it has pumped at the club, liverpool to ask for— has pumped at the club, liverpool to ask for an _ has pumped at the club, liverpool to ask for an investigation by uefa into what— ask for an investigation by uefa into what happened and seemingly everything that could have gone the wrong _ everything that could have gone the wrong before kick—off did go wrong with those — wrong before kick—off did go wrong with those fans being held at the entrance — with those fans being held at the entrance points. young fans been cut up entrance points. young fans been cut up and _ entrance points. young fans been cut up and it— entrance points. young fans been cut up and it as _ entrance points. young fans been cut up and it as well with the use of the tear— up and it as well with the use of the tear gas and the pepper spray and it— the tear gas and the pepper spray and it certainly has left a sour taste — and it certainly has left a sour taste in — and it certainly has left a sour taste in the mouth when you consider what was _ taste in the mouth when you consider what was meant to be the showpiece event _ what was meant to be the showpiece event in _ what was meant to be the showpiece event in european club football, wasn't _ event in european club football, wasn't it? — event in european club football, wasn't it? to teams of such a great penalty. _ wasn't it? to teams of such a great penalty. reat— wasn't it? to teams of such a great penalty, real madrid up against liverpool, but the spotlight falling on events — liverpool, but the spotlight falling on events that led to the match, poor— on events that led to the match, poor organisation, poor policing, and sad — poor organisation, poor policing, and sad evening for those liverpool fans were _ and sad evening for those liverpool fans were caught up in it.— fans were caught up in it. john, thank you _ fans were caught up in it. john, thank you very _ fans were caught up in it. john, thank you very much _ fans were caught up in it. john, thank you very much indeed. i fans were caught up in it. john, i thank you very much indeed. john watson night for us paris this morning. —— night for us. we�*re obviously talking about the champions league final a lot this morning, but let�*s take a look
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at some of the other sport. wigan warriors came from behind to win the challenge cup yesterday, in the most incredible of finishes. they beat huddersfield giants 16—14 and adam wild watched all the drama unfold at the tottenham hotspur stadium. wigan, wigan! a new location, the same historic occasion. for 125 years, the challenge cup final has been rugby league�*s grandest moment. in tottenham for the very first time, a chance for either huddersfield or wigan to make history. pressure? well, plenty. but the giants brought their own for good measure. leutele ursting through for the game�*s opening try. wigan not quite themselves in the first half. chris mcqueen with the sidestep and huddersfield held the halftime lead, but from the restart space wigan hadn�*t been
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given space before we can hitting back, lighting up this final. as quickly as that space appeared, though, so it disappeared. still, jermaine mcgillvary didn�*t really need any. somehow finding a way through huddersfield, finding a way back in front. the tightest gap, the finest margin. but this would be wigan�*s finest hour. commentator: lane marshall, in with the coroner! just minutes remaining, liam marshall with the game�*s biggest moment, breaking giant hearts. so on the day history is made in tottenham, it is the wigan warriors who take home the game�*s grandest prize. the game�*s grandest prize — challenge cup winners 2022. adam wild, bbc news, at the tottenham hotspur stadium. and to rugby union. there was late drama in the european champions cup final, as la rochelle came back to beat leinster in the final minutes of the game. the irish side were leading by 21 points to 17 before this try sealed the victory for la rochelle.
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this is the first time they�*ve won the competition, becoming the fourth french team to do so. charles leclerc took pole position for his home race in the monaco grand prix. the ferrari driver dominated the race and ended fractionally clear of team—mate carlos sainz. championship leader max verstappen will start in fourth position and lewis hamilton is in eighth. returning to football. port vale will be back in league one next season, afterfive years playing in english football�*s bottom division. the football league�*s bottom division. the staffordshire club beat mansfield 3—0 in the league two play—off final. former mansfield player mal benning wrapped it up late in the second half, scoring vale�*s third goal of the match. just a point inside story to this, daryl clark, the porterville manager was given six weeks compassionate leave earlier after the death of his 18—year—old daughter, ellie. daryl and ellie are from mansfield. both sets of supporters did a minute�*s applause in memory of ellie and apparently dido spent the last five
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minutes with tears rolling down his cheeks. it must have been a poignant day for him. find cheeks. it must have been a poignant day for him-— day for him. and to receive that su ort day for him. and to receive that sopport from — day for him. and to receive that support from both _ day for him. and to receive that support from both sets - day for him. and to receive that support from both sets of - day for him. and to receive that support from both sets of fans. | wrexham are co—owned by film stars ryan reynolds and rob mcelhenney but it was luke waterfall who provided the hollywood ending for grimsby in their national league play—off semi—final. he scored a late winner in extra time to beat wrexham 5—4. grimsby is nowjust one game away from a return to the football league. what�*s being called the richest game in football takes place today when huddersfield town and nottingham forest meet at wembley for the championship play—off. the prize is a place in the premier league — said to be worth at least £170 million to the winner. yesterday, we featured forest and this morning, at huddersfield�*s rugby league team were beaten yesterday, we will profile the footballers who are hoping to bring glory to huddersfield this afternoon.
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go on! jonathan hogg, huddersfield town midfielder. it�*s special, i think, the bond that i�*ve built with this club, the fans, everyone involved, to get over the line one more time. i�*m getting on now, right? you know what i mean? it could be my last chance. and i want to make the most of it. and i want to try and do the club proud and give the fans what they want. sorba thomas. huddersfield town winger. we got into games and i don't think the other team knows what formation we're going to play. who's playing where ? and i feel like that's the advantage we've got over teams, everyone going in the same direction. and for us, one more game and the dream becomes a reality. you think of the head coach carlos corberan as the professor. why do you call him that? because the man has so many plans up his sleeve. and if one don't work, you know, the second one might. that one don't work, there's another one and etc.. and for him, he's
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he's one of a kind. carlos corberan, head coach, - huddersfield town football club. i know how big is going to be the support that all our fans| are going to bring us. because if i put all the people that come here usually- tojoin me in the stadium, _ wembley, that is going to be exactly the same 01’ even more. i know how much they are helping us every time that they are _ giving their support. levi cole. huddersfield town defender. i haven�*t played at wembley. i�*ve been there twice. i�*ve watched the chelsea fa cup game. seeing my family there will be will be crazy and it will make me a bit emotional, i think. and hopefully, i don�*t get nervous for it, i suppose. of course i can dream, but we know how hard it's going to be. and for us, i feel that we do what we do and i feel like no one can really stop us.
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huddersfield against nottingham forest, a big afternoon for all those supporters. wishing them a good day at wembley. high-stakes indeed! it good day at wembley. high-stakes indeed! it is _ good day at wembley. high-stakes indeed! it isjust _ good day at wembley. high-stakes indeed! it isjust after _ good day at wembley. high-stakes indeed! it isjust after quarter- good day at wembley. high-stakes indeed! it isjust after quarter to i indeed! it is 'ust after quarter to nine. the london fire brigade has made major changes to the way it deals with blazes in high—rise buildings, following the grenfell tower fire five years ago. the anniversary is coming up any couple of weeks. the inquiry into the disaster made several recommendations on how the force can improve its policies, procedures and equipment — and most of them have now been implemented. our reporter karl mercer has been to see a training exercise in action. just put this over your head. this is london fire brigade�*s latest training. they are training firefighters and control staff in how to get people out of burning tower blocks.
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we were invited to this disused block in north london to see what has changed since the grenfell tower fire nearly five years ago. much has. the brigade now has new appliances with longer ladders, some the tallest in europe. there is new technology for fire safety guidance, or the fsg as they call it. this is the fsg app that the london fire brigade have developed. one call is incoming, as you can see, and it lists all calls coming in. we have the premises, the floor and what the status of the fsg is. this column shows what our crews are currently doing, so you can see that we have five crews committed to deal with incoming calls. i went into the base of the tower at grenfell and i found an officer there writing the names and flat numbers of those people trapped on the wall with pencil because so many people were trapped in that incident that we had run out of space on our boards to capture that information. he's a good guy and he was distraught that he was having to do
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thatjust as colleagues had done previously. i made a promise to myself that i never wanted to see a london firefighter in that position again without the kit and the policy to deal with it. inside, firefighters have new tools as well. fire curtains to block off the smoke in stairwells. and there are smoke hoods for those being rescued. they�*ll protect them for up to 15 minutes as they are led out of the building. in more than 1000 blocks in london, the brigade now says we weren�*t ready for a catastrophic building failure of that nature, that complete failure of regulation. what i am sure about now is that with this exercise and this training and this kit, we are. so i think it is a recognition of all the lessons we have learned. all the listening we have done and we have done it because, quite frankly, we owe it to those people who lost their lives.
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drones have been brought in too. another tool to help identify where the fire and victims are. and control room officers are able link up to witnesses�* phones. there is a lot of smoke coming out of the window here. i will show you. so they can see how fires are developing. the changes had to come. the brigade was heavily criticised by the first phase of the grenfell enquiry. that awful night, people inside the tower were speaking to the control room and those messages were not being passed on to those on the ground, there was communication and so forth and so that is why i support both financially and offering support to the fire service to make sure lessons are learned. many have been and the learning, they say, will continue. so good at that lessons are being learned and hopefully safety improvements for the future. indeed. it is ten to nine. _ i�*m off to read the news for the sunday morning programme.
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let�*s check in with louise for a final look at this morning�*s weather. good morning everybody, i hope you�*re having a lovely weekend so far. not optimistic as yesterday, but not a bad start for some. northamptonshire are some sunshine around, but they sure are glad spring and we have seen some of those showers across the north norfolk coast. over the next three hours, some of those showers will start to push further inland. the high pressure is moving away and we had a brisk northerly wind, a cool source, that is pushing those showers are down it�*s really not see. this is the story so far. mostly affecting aberdeenshire, one or two just mostly affecting aberdeenshire, one or twojust running in mostly affecting aberdeenshire, one or two just running in across that east coast and also down through the irish sea and the cheshire gaps. as we go through the remainder of the day, we will see some cloudy skies developing, a coalition afternoon across the north and east of scotland, 9—11 c, may be highs of 14 into glasgow. a belfast, you should escape the showers through the afternoon, but there will be cloudy skies. for much of england and
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wales, showers very hit and mist, some will catch on, some will not. some of these could be quite mandatory as well. top temperatures through the afternoon disappointing. a maximum of 16 celsius. some showers will fade away, a frequent rash across the final north to majorly start to monday morning, single figures for all of us. a subtle change in wind direction is with swing around to a north—westerly. that will dry in more cloud and showers along the west coast tomorrow. here is where west coast tomorrow. here is where we will likely see —— dry in more cloud. with lighter winds, the could be slow—moving. if you do catch on, you will probably know about it. heavy, may be thundery, and those temperatures a little down and where they should be for this time of year. the lowest still with us as we move into tuesday. we are still going to see more showers, particularly to the north west of tuesday. we might start relatively sunny, but then that could trigger
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some showers into the afternoon. maybe a degree are so warm as we move through to saturn, 18 celsius the high. we have an all—important weekend up. at the bank holiday weekend, still some uncertainty, and weekend, still some uncertainty, and we have the commuter model is not agreeing with each other so this moment. —— computer models. we are optimistic at the moment, drier, a little warmer, with some sunshine coming through. still the risk of a future as coming through, but if you have outdoor fans, we will take this. it would not be a bank holiday — will take this. it would not be a bank holiday without _ will take this. it would not be a bank holiday without a - will take this. it would not be a bank holiday without a few - will take this. it would not be a - bank holiday without a few scattered showers, we did, louise questioning enjoy yourjubilee on the common, i�*m sure it will be glorious! i�*m i'm sure it will be glorious! i'm sure we will— i'm sure it will be glorious! i'm sure we will have _ i'm sure it will be glorious! tn sure we will have a great time, come rain or shine. sure we will have a great time, come rain or shine-— rain or shine. where there is a will, rain or shine. where there is a will. there _ rain or shine. where there is a will, there is _ rain or shine. where there is a will, there is a _ rain or shine. where there is a will, there is a way! _ rain or shine. where there is a will, there is a way! enjoy - rain or shine. where there is a | will, there is a way! enjoy your sunday! the queen is used to being on camera, but there are many moments captured on film that the public have never seen. to celebrate her platinum jubilee,
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the bbc has been given access to hundreds of private home movies following her early years as a princess for a new documentary. let�*s take a look. balmoral is a place one looks forward to very much. i think that it has an atmosphere of its own. families so often treasure their routines and embrace the roles, traditions and values that mean so much to us. i see it in my own family and it is a source of great happiness. just beautiful. let�*s speak now to claire popplewell, who�*s behind the documentary. good morning to you. 500 reels were restored, never before seen. what was it like unearthing these pictures and seeing them for the
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first time? it pictures and seeing them for the first time? :, , pictures and seeing them for the first time? :,, :, , :, , pictures and seeing them for the first time? :, , :, , :, , ,, first time? it was fabulous. i think as soon as — first time? it was fabulous. i think as soon as we _ first time? it was fabulous. i think as soon as we start _ first time? it was fabulous. i think as soon as we start off _ first time? it was fabulous. i think as soon as we start off watched i as soon as we start off watched those first three reels, we realised it was potentially a very special film to be made. bud it was potentially a very special film to be made.— it was potentially a very special film to be made. and it is almost a ic of the film to be made. and it is almost a pic of the nicest _ film to be made. and it is almost a pic of the nicest pictures _ film to be made. and it is almost a pic of the nicest pictures and - film to be made. and it is almost a pic of the nicest pictures and you i pic of the nicest pictures and you find speeches that at the queen has delivered almost as a voice—over to link the pieces together, chronologically? it link the pieces together, chronologically?- chronologically? it is chronologically. - chronologically? it is chronologically. we i chronologically? it is i chronologically. we go chronologically? it is - chronologically. we go from chronologically? it 3 chronologically. we go from her birth, the earliest footage of the queen being pushed in a pan by the queen being pushed in a pan by the queen mother, right up to the queen plasma coronation in 1953, so using her home movie footage we see those private footage of those years. ibshd private footage of those years. and the thing we _ private footage of those years. and the thing we were struck by looking at that footage as a young girl in balmoral, the intimacy offered, the precious family moments, but also at that time, she could never have had any idea that she was to become queen. i any idea that she was to become queen. ~ :. any idea that she was to become queen. ,, :, , :, , queen. i think that is what comes across. it
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queen. i think that is what comes across- it is _ queen. i think that is what comes across. it is what _ queen. i think that is what comes across. it is what normal, - queen. i think that is what comes across. it is what normal, loving i across. it is what normal, loving family they are and where and at their relationship with georgia six, their relationship with georgia six, their father, their relationship with georgia six, theirfather, just their relationship with georgia six, their father, just shines through, his love for both his children and grandchildren —— george vi. and as the queen said in her opening to the film, you are very different, behave very differently when you know the person behind the camera to when you don�*t and i think it is that warmth of a family that shines through. ibshd of a family that shines through. and we see in footage at the moment of home movies, they are in south africa, away on a three—day break there. is it right that at points, there. is it right that at points, the queen and queen mother were both filming and so you could sort of edit between them? iterate filming and so you could sort of edit between them?— filming and so you could sort of edit between them? ~ ~ edit between them? we did. we edited between many — edit between them? we did. we edited between many members _ edit between them? we did. we edited between many members of _ edit between them? we did. we edited between many members of the - edit between them? we did. we edited between many members of the royal. between many members of the royal family filming each other, including the king, who was also a keen photographer. and we also had quite unusual and unseen newsreel that had been donated to the royal family from those tours that we were able to ultimately tell the story of all
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her coronation.— to ultimately tell the story of all her coronation. . :, , , :, her coronation. what is sweet about it is seeinu her coronation. what is sweet about it is seeing her— her coronation. what is sweet about it is seeing her with _ her coronation. what is sweet about it is seeing her with her _ her coronation. what is sweet about it is seeing her with her sister, - it is seeing her with her sister, they are playing up to the calm as any kid might do, and as adults, and even prince philip as well, they are performing, enjoying it, aren�*t they? performing, en'oying it, aren't the ? , :, , :, performing, en'oying it, aren't the ? , :, , performing, en'oying it, aren't the? , :, , :, :, they? they do. it is a very normal famil . they? they do. it is a very normal family- when _ they? they do. it is a very normal family. when anyone _ they? they do. it is a very normal family. when anyone is _ they? they do. it is a very normal family. when anyone is there - they? they do. it is a very normalj family. when anyone is there with the whole movie, you often smell, you have the looks, you run up to cameras —— you often smile. at the queen mother, especially plays up to the camera, some humorous moments any film that are sweet to see. iereihat any film that are sweet to see. what is our any film that are sweet to see. what is your favourite, _ any film that are sweet to see. what is your favourite, if _ any film that are sweet to see. what is your favourite, if you _ any film that are sweet to see. what is your favourite, if you have - any film that are sweet to see. what is your favourite, if you have to isolate one moment use on film and went, oh my goodness, what with that bequest might probably one of the most simple moments, it was when george vi put a lock of hair behind elizabeth because my ear. triersr elizabeth because my ear. very intimate, elizabeth because my ear. very intimate. very _ elizabeth because my ear. very intimate, very sweet, - elizabeth because my ear. very intimate, very sweet, very - elizabeth because my ear. 9 intimate, very sweet, very father and daughter. i think it is how you realise just how close they were, and just how special the relationship was they had. not a ground—breaking moment, butjust ground—breaking moment, but just
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something ground—breaking moment, butjust something very intimate and private. that you would see any dad doing to his little girl. george didn�*t know he would become king, she did not know she would become queen, it allowed them in informality in the early years. i allowed them in informality in the early years-— early years. i think so. they had icnics, early years. i think so. they had picnics, messing _ early years. i think so. they had picnics, messing about - early years. i think so. they had picnics, messing about on - early years. i think so. they had picnics, messing about on sun i picnics, messing about on sun loungers, we have the king and his brother gambolling down the hill, things you never, ever would have expected to have seen, especially from what became the future queen. what a delightful project for you to work on. it what a delightful pro'ect for you to work on. :. . :. what a delightful pro'ect for you to work on. :.. :. , what a delightful pro'ect for you to workon. :, , ,, :., work on. it was a very special, ve , work on. it was a very special, very. very _ work on. it was a very special, very, very special. _ work on. it was a very special, very, very special. and - work on. it was a very special, very, very special. and we - work on. it was a very special, - very, very special. and we worked very, very special. and we worked very closely with the film institute, who ultimately never going to restore that footage. we wanted it to become a record of the history of the early years of the queen�*s lie. i will be honest, it became more special the more we uncovered —— became more special the more we uncovered -- queen�*s life. working with the bfi, it is now a record of that archive for the nation forevermore. it that archive for the nation forevermore.— that archive for the nation forevermore. , :, ,
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forevermore. it will be there, as ou sa , forevermore. it will be there, as you say, forever. _ forevermore. it will be there, as you say, forever. fantastic. - and you can watch elizabeth — the unseen queen on bbc one tonight at 7.45pm, and it will be available on the iplayer. that�*s all from us this morning, breakfast will be back tomorrow at 6am. have a lovely sunday, goodbye.
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this is bbc news broadcasting in the uk and around the globe. our top stories... anger at the treatment of fans at the champions league final in paris; the match is delayed — some supporters claim they were tear gassed and prevented from entering the ground. we have been stewed in this queue since a quarter past six, i�*ve got really bad asthma and i�*ve been tear gassed twice. i really bad asthma and i've been tear gassed twice-— gassed twice. i was really struggling- _ gassed twice. i was really struggling. thousands i gassed twice. i was really| struggling. thousands and gassed twice. i was really _ struggling. thousands and thousands of fans— struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out— struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out there, getting tear gassed. — of fans out there, getting tear gassed. with tickets. treating them like animals. it's a disgrace. real madrid win the match, after a 1—0 victory over liverpool. the spanish football side take the title for a record 14th time. france and germany urge president putin to engage in peace talks as russia continues its offensive in the dombas. the russian ambassador to the uk tells the bbc that moscow will not
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use tactical nuclear weapons in the battle for ukraine.

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