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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 29, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. the government says it's "very concerned" over upsetting scenes at the champions league final — as fans were tear gassed in paris. people were begging, the liverpool fans that were in were begging because they said it just seemed to be like it could be a repeat of hillsborough. that's how bad it was. heavy fighting is continuing in eastern ukraine, where russian forces are trying to capture the city of severodonetsk. the russian ambassador to the uk tells the bbc that moscow will not use tactical nuclear weapons in the battle for ukraine. we have a very strict provision on the issues of the use of tactical nuclear weapon, and it is mainly when the existence of the state is endangered.
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and we'll bring you that interview in full at 2.30. president biden will arrive in the texan city of uvalde later today after a teenage gunman killed 19 children and two teachers one of the greatestjockeys of all time, lester piggott, who won the derby nine times, has died at the age of 86. welcome to the programme. liverpool football club has called for an investigation into what it describes as "unacceptable issues" faced by fans trying to get into the stadium in paris last night to watch the champions league final. the match was delayed by more than half an hour after liverpool fans were held outside the stadium and police used pepper
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spray and tear gas. some merseyside police officers at the game described it as the worst european match they'd experienced. dan johnson reports. these are scenes any football fan will find uncomfortable, and not what you'd expect to see at the biggest european final in 2022. thousands of supporters frustrated and angry after the french police reached quickly for the tear gas as they struggled to get everyone to their seats on time. chaotic scenes, and fans saying they feared for their safety, despite having queued for hours. i've got really bad asthma and i've been tear—gassed twice. i'm really, really struggling. thousands and thousands of fans out there getting tear—gassed, with tickets. they're treating them like animals. uefa blamed thousands of liverpool fans with fake tickets blocking the turnstiles, but supporters said organisation wasn't good enough.
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tom was there with his disabled son harry. uefa and the police was an absolute disgrace today, indiscriminately - pepper—spraying people queueing up, . with tickets, to get in the ground, l who arrived two and a half hours | before kick—off at the stadium, | and then getting charged by riot police with shields. _ again, having to shield my son out of the way. away from the stadium, the afternoon was full of joyful positivity and confidence in the crowd at the liverpool fan park. but concern over the delay gave way to the tension of the match, and ultimately the disappointment of the final whistle. it has been a tense, nervy game, and they never really got going. there is a stunned silence here and there is heartbreak. crying: congratulations to real madrid... -
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they're really playing better football. not the result we wanted at all, but it is what it is. we'll go again next year. the atmosphere was fantastic but it's just a shame - to come away with a loss. if we'd have won this it would be bouncing here, wouldn't it? - and there was more tear gas in the streets as they left. well, within two minutes of the final whistle they tear—gassed everybody. that's why all the fans went that way. this is where liverpool's season ends, but this club and its supporters always somehow show their hope never dies. danjohnson, bbc news, paris. and a little earlier, danjohnson gave us this update from outside the stade de france. this is the end of the stade de france where the liverpool fans were, where some of the worst scenes were filmed last night. we are starting to build up a bit of a picture of exactly how this developed and what went wrong,
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talking to some liverpool fans and taking their accounts of what happened last night. this is where they came up from the metro station and the pictures here last night showed how there were police vans making this a bit of a bottleneck. it was narrowed and fans could not get through, even those with tickets, even those who say they were here in plenty of time. it took them hours to get up and to the turnstiles and that is why the pressure built. now, we did see videos of some people climbing over the fences, trying to get in. it is not clear if they were liverpool fans or not. but uefa, the french authorities and the police are sticking to their line that these problems were caused by thousands of liverpool fans trying to get in with fake tickets. liverpool fans have denied that. they say that they were orderly and that this was a failure of coordination and of organisation. the french police say there were 105 arrests made last night linked to the champions league final, and it is worth bearing in mind that this city next year will host the rugby world cup and then the year after, the olympics will be here in paris. our correspondent peter harris is at john lennon airport in liverpool — where fans are arriving
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back from paris. fans have been arriving arriving back here throughout the day in liverpool and there is considerable anger at the way they feel they were treated last night and also at the speed with which the authorities, they feel, sought to blame fans for the bottlenecks that appeared outside the stadium. a message had gone up on the big screen at the stade de france suggesting that kick—off was delayed because of fans arriving late. liverpool fans say that is simply not the case. the bottlenecks outside were caused, they say, by the stewarding, by the policing, and ultimately, as you mentioned, some of those fans were subjected to pepper spray and tear gas. we have been speaking to some of the liverpool fans who were in paris last night and this is their account of what happened. the queue we were in, people who were sat with us in the ground were gassed, you know, a young lad who i know, who's 12.
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his dad's posted a message. they were gassed. he's12. and this is not fans rioting. this is people with tickets queuing legitimately, just trying to get in to watch a football match. l it's pretty frightening, actually, i got squashed because they weren't organising the ticketing properly and things like that. _ and so yeah, that was scary. and then the police didn't really seem to be that. bothered about us either, to be honest. _ it sounds like a bit of a kind of scary atmosphere at times. yeah, it was a bit. obviously we were alljust trying to keep together. but there was nothing we could do. and then we were getting pushed . in and then they were trying to push us back, like the police . and authorities and stuff, but we couldn't control it. they were squashed up against the fences all down the side. people were crying. there was children on parents�* shoulders. we were in tears. just what we witnessed, it was just horrific. it really was horrific. and nobody seemed to know what was happening.
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there was a language barrier. so there was english people there from liverpool who were helping, but they said there's a barrier between them and the french, so nobody understood what was going on. so they were just, just locked out, just like animals. and people were begging. the liverpool fans that were in were begging because, you know, they were saying itjust seemed to be like a repeat of hillsborough. that's how bad it was. it wasn't good, was it? no. yes, clearly a very unpleasant experience for many of the fans who were there on what should have been obviously a great night for liverpool fans. now, the french police are sticking to their line. they say there were fans with fake tickets who attempted to get into the ground. they are blaming those people, they say, for the problems that occurred last night. as for the liverpool fans�* group, the spirit of shankly, they say the scenes last night were shambolic and dangerous. indeed, the bbc has spoken to some people who were there who say it is lucky really that we're not
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talking about a far worse outcome than we actually are as a result of that bottleneck that formed outside the ground. and liverpool football club itself says it wants uefa to carry out an investigation into what it says were unacceptable issues faced by liverpool fans in paris last night. and now in liverpool, just back from paris, we'rejoined byjohn gibbons from the anfield wrap podcast who was in the thick of it last night. thank you forjoining us. talk us thank you for “oining us. talk us throu~h thank you for “oining us. talk us through what — thank you forjoining us. talk us through what happened - thank you forjoining us. talk us through what happened to - thank you forjoining us. talk us through what happened to you? | thank you forjoining us. talk us . through what happened to you? we thank you forjoining us. talk us - through what happened to you? we got there nice and — through what happened to you? we got there nice and early _ through what happened to you? we got there nice and early like _ through what happened to you? we got there nice and early like we _ through what happened to you? we got there nice and early like we were - there nice and early like we were instructed to, went up about two and a half hours before and then just really surprised by the lack of instruction at where we were supposed to be, the signposting was appalling and then like many other liverpool fans, we were directed away, into a really crowded area. it just felt very unsafe. more and more
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people were coming in behind. it was a real bottleneck and we were held there for a long period of time. i didn't feel safe, i did not understand, we were getting the instructions —— are not getting any instructions —— are not getting any instructions on why we were being held, it looked like to get checked but when we were eventually let through, no one was checking to get there so it seemed very strange and it was just the idea of holding these liverpool fans in a very cramped and small space for quite a long period of time. when we eventually got to the turnstiles, our one ended up being closed, again, we did not have any information on why that had happened, the queues were getting longer and people were getting agitated as we did not know why it had been closed, whether it would be open again, whether we were allowed to access through another gate or we had to wait for this one to open. by this time, you know, it was getting very near kick—off because obviously, we had been held for so long really so people were getting worried they would miss the game. people have spent a lot of money to get out there. what we found is we found then another area where they were letting people in so we managed
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to get to the front of there, a large group of young local lads who were trying to get in, trying to force their way in so we could not get past them to show people, we were trying to show people that we had tickets but then i saw people who are getting tickets snatched from them and people running away. it was very unsafe. it was very dangerous, really. ifelt it was very unsafe. it was very dangerous, really. i felt it it was very unsafe. it was very dangerous, really. ifelt it was very cramped, in a tight space, i'm just frustrated there was not better to me occasional round.— just frustrated there was not better to me occasional round. thank you, that is a really _ to me occasional round. thank you, that is a really clear _ to me occasional round. thank you, that is a really clear example - to me occasional round. thank you, that is a really clear example of- that is a really clear example of what it was like for you, what do you make of the reports it was liverpool fans trying to jump over gates and liverpool fans turning up late? ., , gates and liverpoolfans turning up late? . , �* gates and liverpool fans turning up late? . , �* , gates and liverpool fans turning up late? . , , , . late? that 'ust wasn't my experience at all. i late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all- i can — late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all- i can only _ late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all. i can only go _ late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all. i can only go on _ late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all. i can only go on what - late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all. i can only go on what i - late? thatjust wasn't my experience at all. i can only go on what i can - at all. i can only go on what i can see and what i saw was liverpool fans being patient, livable fans not really understanding why we couldn't access the ground because we were not getting any information at all. i spoke to lots of liverpool fans this morning who had legitimate tickets who could not get into the
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ground, a friend gave a ticket to a friend and they said it was not legitimate, i thought the organisation was shocking, we were not getting information, just silence and aggression, it is no way to treat football fans. it is meant to treat football fans. it is meant to be a party and a celebration and it has left a sour taste in mouth. who do you hold for this? it is who do you hold for this? it is uefa's party. _ who do you hold for this? it is uefa's party, uefa _ who do you hold for this? it 3 uefa's party, uefa takeover the stadium area and they have to be responsible really. but i think the french authorities need to look at the policing and if they want to hold these events and say, they want to hold world events, they need to police their much differently. i think liverpool fans did everything that was asked of them, they got up early, turned up well in time really, and they came with the intention of supporting their football team. they needed more support and better instruction and frankly, they need to be treated like human beings. john, we are glad you are safe. thank you forjoining us. and talking us through what happened to you so clearly.
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now we can talk to ian burns, liverpool mp for west derby and a liverpool mp for west derby and a liverpool fan who was at the game last night. thank you for coming on the programme. h0 last night. thank you for coming on the programme-— last night. thank you for coming on j the programme._ what last night. thank you for coming on i the programme._ what do the programme. no problem. what do ou make the programme. no problem. what do you make of — the programme. no problem. what do you make of what _ the programme. no problem. what do you make of what happened? - the programme. no problem. what do| you make of what happened? listening to john's account, _ you make of what happened? listening to john's account, i _ you make of what happened? listening to john's account, i thought _ you make of what happened? listening to john's account, i thought it - you make of what happened? listening to john's account, i thought it was - tojohn�*s account, i thought it was absolutely spot on. it was shambolic, it was dangerous, it was hostile, and it was one of the worst atmospheres i've ever experienced and a football fan should never experience that, and especially at the premier football game of the calendar in europe, that is the experience of football supporters, and it was absolutely disgraceful. and also the aftermath, when once again, we have had a narrative of lies and smears by uefa and the french authorities, trying to put the blame solely on liverpool supporters. and for people listening, this could have been any football team here today. manchester city got knocked out in the semifinals, it could have been them as well. this was untenable.
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football fans should not be treated like animals like we were yesterday. is there any way of finding out or knowing or do you have an idea at the moment, was this the case of a policing strategy that just the moment, was this the case of a policing strategy thatjust didn't work? was this uefa's organisation not working? i know it is difficult but any sense of what exactly has gone wrong? i but any sense of what exactly has gone wrong?— but any sense of what exactly has gone wrong? i can only speak from hersonal gone wrong? i can only speak from personal experience, _ gone wrong? i can only speak from personal experience, that - gone wrong? i can only speak from personal experience, that i - gone wrong? i can only speak from personal experience, that i had - personal experience, that i had yesterday, and it was horrific. you know, an example of that was where we were trying to get in, there were two turnstiles open, 13 turnstiles available. i was lucky enough to get through. once i got through, i begged the main steward to open the other 11 turnstiles. i mean, it was... it was so bad, you know, and it was so unnecessary. liverpool sand had been there hours before, like we were told, we queue to get in, we would tear gas and pepper sprayed. this would not happen at
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any other major sporting event. that is so worrying. the french authorities and uefa need to investigate exactly what has happened here. iwill investigate exactly what has happened here. i will be calling for that tomorrow, i will be asking the foreign secretary to reach out to her french counterpart and we need a full investigation because this should never happen again, what we experienced yesterday. what should never happen again, what we experienced yesterday.— experienced yesterday. what about the argument _ experienced yesterday. what about the argument from _ experienced yesterday. what about the argument from the _ experienced yesterday. what about the argument from the authorities, j the argument from the authorities, presumably, that there were fans or people trying to get over gates and they had to therefore respond and thatis they had to therefore respond and that is why pepper spray and tear gas had to be used? i. .. that is why pepper spray and tear gas had to be used? i... speaking from personal— gas had to be used? i... speaking from personal experience, - gas had to be used? i... speaking from personal experience, i - gas had to be used? i... speaking from personal experience, i have| from personal experience, i have seen queues and queues of liverpool fans, two hours before, trying to get in and i think the liverpool fans deserve a huge amount of credit for the patience that they showed yesterday in not... it was just, for the patience that they showed yesterday in not... it wasjust, you know, it was exemplary. i didn't see anybodyjump over the gate. i've seen lots of fans who were parisi
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and sue were in the stadium, four or five next to me, who had no idea who liverpool were but they got in the stadium. i think the french authorities, if they want to hold major events like this, they may need to look at exactly how that was policed and what actually happened. you know, we need to learn from what happened yesterday, not try to smear and spin lies on to the liverpool supporters because that is what is happening now. the supporters because that is what is happening nova— supporters because that is what is happening now. the ed byrne -- we must leave — happening now. the ed byrne -- we must leave it _ happening now. the ed byrne -- we must leave it there, _ happening now. the ed byrne -- we must leave it there, but _ happening now. the ed byrne -- we must leave it there, but ian - happening now. the ed byrne -- we must leave it there, but ian byrne, l must leave it there, but ian byrne, thank you forjoining us. heavy fighting is continuing in the luhansk region of eastern ukraine, where russian forces are trying to capture the city of severodonetsk. moscow says it has taken the town of lyman, a key railway hub. ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky said moscow was trying to "squeeze out some result for itself" in the region.
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here, russia's ambassador to the uk, in an inteview with the bbc, has described alleged war crimes by russia in ukraine as a "fabrication". our ciplomatic correspondent caroline hawley reports. with heavy artillery, russian forces are continuing to pound ukrainian positions in a war that is taking more lives every day. with all this firepower, moscow is now making steady advances in the east. president zelensky has admitted the situation is difficult. nowhere has preident putin's war been harder than in the port city of mariupol. these pictures show it before the war. this is what it looks like now. but in a bbc interview, moscow's emissary here defended the conduct of russian forces. these are residential areas. these are not legitimate military targets. we have a lot of registered cases...
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this is over a widespread area. ..where ukraine's artillery was shelling residential areas. i do accept mariupol is destroyed by fighting. but you won't accept it is the result of russian forces? fighting, it cannot... it can be both because this is a fight. so there is a possibility in your mind russia is responsible... russians... that is a possibility? as i have said, russians are targeting military infrastructure. collateral damage is possible. the town of bucha has become synonymous with atrocities but the ambassador dismissed allegations of war crimes here as a fabrication. and what of an incident caught on cctv in which these two soldiers are about to kill two unarmed ukrainians? these men, sir, are walking away from the soldiers. you can see it there. they are shot and they are killed. is this how russia is conducting this war?
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i cannot tell whether they are russian soldiers. you are showing me something, probably a piece of a film, or a game, or a joke or whatever. it is a computer game. it is cctv... let's see what it is. it's cctv, ok, great. it's cctv footage from a building, and it has been corroborated. and ukrainians know only too well what to expect from russian forces, and so here in the east, they are preparing to flee their advances. caroline hawley, bbc news. and you can watch clive myrie's interview with the russian ambassador in full on the bbc�*s iplayer. lester piggott, one of the greatest jockeys of all time, has died. he was 86. his family said he died peacefully in switzerland, where he lived. the nine—times winner of the derby rode his first winner in 19118 — when he was just 12 years old. here's our sports correspondent andy swiss. lester has it in the bag!
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when it came to the art of winning, few could match lester piggott. his statistics are staggering. nearly 5,000 victories across a career spanning almost half a century. he rode his first winner back in 19118 at the age ofjust12. it was a feat that made the headlines, and plenty more would follow. in 1954, while still a teenager, he won the derby, the first of a record nine victories in the race. the youngest jockey to win the derby in modern times. but for all the adulation, piggott remained a shy, softly spoken man. how hard do you have to work, in fact? well, it's pretty hard work. you know, all day long, i and at night sometimes. at five foot eight, he was tall for a jockey, hence his nickname the long fellow. but his much imitated style in the saddle earned him the champion jockey�*s title some 11 times. the success, though, was followed by scandal.
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good evening. the headlines at six o'clock... lester piggott has been sent to jail for three years. - in 1987 piggott was jailed for tax evasion and stripped of his obe, and while he made a comeback to some success in 1995, at the age of 59 he finally retired from the saddle. despite his personal controversy, his sporting ability beyond dispute. one of the greatestjockeys that racing has ever seen. lester piggott, who's died at the age of 86. in the us, joe biden and the first lady have left delaware as they head to uvalde in texas, where they'll meet the families of 19 children and two teachers who were killed last week. the president has called for action to prevent future massacres in a country where efforts to tighten firearms regulations have repeatedly failed. our correspondent will grant has this report.
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after the most terrible week in its history, uvalde is preparing for two things — to bury its children and to receive the president. the victims�* families are only concerned with the first of those, making preparations for a day which no parent can bear to imagine. the horrific attack on robb elementary school by a teenager armed with a semiautomatic weapon has made that nightmare a reality for them. as president biden's motorcade drives down the streets of uvalde, he will come across many of these — small, impromptu tributes to the victims set up around the city. this is a community deep in mourning, torn apart by what happened. and mr biden knows he must tread carefully here to balance sympathy with asking the difficult questions. this attack has brought the gun control debate back into sharp focus in the us. before his trip, the president reiterated his position that change is both necessary and possible. we cannot outlaw tragedy, i know.
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but we can make america safer. we can finally do what we have to do to protect the lives of the people and our children. so i call on all americans this hour tojoin hands and make your voices heard, to work together to make this nation what it can and should be. however, he has his work cut out. bipartisan support is increasingly difficult to find on any major issue in the united states these days — on gun control, it's almost impossible. at the nra convention in houston, his predecessor, donald trump, echoed the republicans' line — that the main issues are school security and mental health, not guns. in a city largely bereft of hope, president biden aims to show his solidarity and empathy, as a man who has lost children of his own, to the victims�* families. the larger issues of how such brutality could have been prevented may simply be put on hold
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amid a moment's silence. will grant, bbc news, uvalde, texas. tension is high injerusalem ahead of an annual march by israeli jews through muslim areas of the old city. earlier there were skirmishes at al aqsa mosque when palestinians threw stones and fireworks at israeli police, who fired what appeared to be stun grenades. the flag march celebrates the capture of eastjerusalem during the 1967 war. it's taking place after months of deadly incidents that have strained relations. the well—known stage and tv actor patricia brake, best known for her role in porridge, has died at 79 after a long battle with cancer. her daughter told the bbc that she died yesterday at home with her family by her side.
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a clean—up operation is under way in a marine in torquay after a superyacht burst into flames and sank yesterday. the 85 foot vessel was carrying 8000 litres of fuel which the environment agency fears could escape into the surrounding waters. a major incident was declared and nearby beaches and roads were evacuated. there's more travel disruption today. in dover, passengers have complained of waits of up to six hours to get on ferries. it's being blamed on a lack of staff at french passport controls. and people flying abroad from some airports, including gatwick, bristol and manchester, have expressed frustration after airlines cancelled hundreds of flights over the next few days. the government is to ask the public whether they would rather buy goods weighed in pounds and ounces than in kilograms and grams. under existing laws, inherited from the eu, shops and market traders can use imperial measures, but must display the cost in metric units as well. the consultation will begin on friday to coincide with the queen's platinum jubilee.
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the top prize at the cannes film festival, the palme d'or, has gone to a satirical movie about two fashion models who end up stranded on a desert island with a group of billionaires. triangle of sadness was directed by the swedish film maker ruben ostlund, who's won the prize twice. claudia redmond reports. we are all equal. that is so true. everyone's equal. triangle of sadness is the winner of one of film's most prestigious awards, the palme d'or, at the 75th cannes film festival. directed by ruben ostlund, the biting satire about the worlds of fashion and the super rich, set on board a luxury yacht, had an eight minute standing ovation when it was first shown at the festival. i feel happy. of course. it's crazy. to be in the cinema together with the audience in lumiere and hear them clap and laugh and be upset, you know, all these different kind of emotions.
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i'm very, very happy that the audience, the jury acknowledged that and gave a film that is basically considered a satire or a comedy, the golden palm. the film follows the story of a male model, played by harris dickinson, who finds himself on a luxury cruise captained by woody harrelson. he can make you extremely uncomfortable. he can make you think. he can give you a sense of meaning. like, there was a purpose to going to see the film. and at the same time, and perhaps more importantly, he makes you laugh throughout. which is quite a trick. ruben is very wonderful. at picking holes in our our behaviour and our egos. and i think with this character, i really had to try and let go i of that, and allow myself to be i pathetic and, you know, and offer myself up as a piece of meat.
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and that's an absurd thing to do. three, two, one! ostlund's second palme d'or means he nowjoins a select club of two time winners, which includes the likes of francis ford coppola and ken loach. claudia redmond, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris. today we have got showers around and indeed showers are going to be in the forecast for the next several days, turning increasingly heavy as well. the radar picture picks up where we have showers at the moment, north scotland, eastern england and look at this line working across parts of wales, down into south—west england, which is where we are going to see the heaviest showers through the course of the afternoon. one or two could be thundery in nature. temperatures on the face of it a bit below par for the time of year but in the may sunshine when it comes out, it is not going to feel too bad, when the sun goes back behind the clouds, you will notice the cool
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air, for sure. overnight tonight, we will see showers moving in across scotland and into northern areas of england. another chilly night for the time of year. temperatures down to between 5—7 celsius for a number of you. tomorrow, another showery day. not much wind around so where the showers form, they will be quite slow in nature. some of the heavier showers likely to form across south—west england, working into central southern england and the south england —— south midlands. temperatures, 11—15 celsius for most, may be 17 or 18 across parts of the south—west. that is the latest weather.
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hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. the government says it's "very concerned" over upsetting scenes at the champions league final — as fans were tear gassed in paris. heavy fighting is continuing in eastern ukraine, where russian forces are trying to capture the city of severodonetsk. the russian ambassador to the uk tells the bbc that moscow will not use tactical nuclear weapons in the battle for ukraine. president biden is on his way to the texan city of uvalde, after a teenage gunman killed 19 children and two teachers one of the greatestjockey's of all time lester piggott, who won the derby nine times, has died at the age of 86.

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