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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 29, 2022 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news. i'm lukwesa burak. the headlines at 7pm... culture secretary, nadine dorries, has urged uefa to launch a formal investigation — after liverpool fans were tear—gassed at the champions league final. president biden is meeting the families of some of the 19 children and two teachers shot dead by a teenage gunman in texas. president zelensky visits his troops on the front—line in eastern ukraine — for the first time since the war started. another day of travel disruption — waits of six hours reported for ferries at dover — and hundreds of flighs cancelled at some uk airports. lester has it in the bag! and one of the greatest jockeys of all time — lester piggott — has died aged 86
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that evening, welcome to bbc news. culture secretary nadine dorries has called on european football's governing body uefa to "launch a formal investigation into what went wrong and why" after chaotic scenes at last night's champions league final between liverpool and real madrid in paris. french police have been criticised for firing tear gas and pepper spray at some liverpool fans waiting to get in to the stadium. ms dorries said the footage from fans and the media was "deeply concerning". the mayor of liverpool — who was at the game — described the police actions as brutal and intimidating. uefa has said it will "review these
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matters urgently" with french police. our correspondent danjohnson sent this report from paris. this sort of scene unnerves any football fan. it's not what you would expect of the biggest game in european club football. liverpool supporters say there was indiscriminate tear gassing by heavy—handed french police, who failed to manage the crowd and get everyone to their seats in time. it was an experience which meant many went home to merseyside today in shock as well as disappointment. a big queue of kids getting crushed together, it was disgusting, really. a young lad who i know, he's 12, his dad posted a message, they were gassed. he's 12. a few older people were getting tear gassed, we got tear gassed. a few kids panicking. we got in, me and my daughter got into the stadium. it was quite intimidating but others
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did not get in who had tickets. we got there two and a half hours before kick—off and then going through one gate, thousand of us trying to go through one turnstile. it was just mayhem. they were squashed against the fences, all down the side. people were crying. there was children on parents' shoulders. we were in tears at what we witnessed. it was just horrific. liverpool fans have told us this was a narrow bottleneck created by the police, which stopped them reaching the turnstiles, even though there were here in good time. so the pressure was on here. there were some people climbing the fence, it is not clear if they were actually liverpool fans. but uefa and the french authorities are sticking to their line that these problems were caused by thousands of liverpool supporters turning up here with fake tickets. even the friends and family of liverpool players had trouble getting into the stadium. it was a shambles, really. you know, one of my mates who got a ticket from me was told it was a fake ticket,
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and i can assure you it was defintely not fake. when you get them from the club and you know the player... to be honest, they werejust making it up at times and clearly and things like that, tear gas getting thrown at people, which is unacceptable. the culture secretary wants an investigation, echoing calls from liverpool's mayor, who was at the match herself. i'm gonna call on liz truss, the foreign secretary, to write to the french president, macron, and hold uefa to account. the police behaviour was absolutely brutal, and we need some answers. uefa says there will be a review into how this happened and whether the response was proportionate. but whatever was behind it, this is not the impression sports fans were supposed to take away from the city hosting next year's rugby world cup then the olympics in 2020 for. —— rugby world cup then the olympics in 202a. danjohnson, bbc news, paris. a beautiful scene behind our
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correspondent, who is arriving behind you?— correspondent, who is arriving behind ou? . , . behind you? perfect timing, perfect timinu. we behind you? perfect timing, perfect timing. we have _ behind you? perfect timing, perfect timing. we have been _ behind you? perfect timing, perfect timing. we have been waiting - behind you? perfect timing, perfect timing. we have been waiting for. timing. we have been waiting for hours here. the liverpool team bus is finally making its way down the street, thousands upon thousands of supporters have lined the streets to applaud the players. the first bus you see is the media bias, and behind that, you should be able to see the liverpool team bus. this double winning season where they have won the fa cup and the league cup. they mist out on the champions league last night in paris, the disappointment of that palpable defeat, but the fans i've spent speaking to today as the red mist descends in the fireworks go off is that they do not want that alone to bb the only focus. this has been a season in which liverpool played 63 games, every game they possibly could have played in every
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competition, they did. for defeats, yes, that's all it was in the end, they agonisingly fell short in the perimeter of the title race to manchester city last weekend and again against re—on the dread that these fans desperate to celebrate with the players and you can see what it means to them, you can see what it means to them, you can see what it means to the fans of this football club that mist out on celebrating a primary league title, of course, back in 2020 because of the covid restrictions. there was no parade. this is an opportunity not to be mist by these thousands of fans. they've lined the streets for eight miles of the city and you can see what it means for the women's team, they won the championship title and are back in the wind and super league and for the men's team, of course, forjuergen klopp, he has now won every trophy it could have an english football, the primary league of the champions league, the league cup, the fa cup on the super cup, the club world cup. look, let's not take away from the
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disappointment of missing out on a quadruple, the disappointment of missing out on a travel, but for the players, this is what it means to be a liverpool football club, perhaps a message here from mo salah who has yet to sign a track —— contract, this is an opportunity for them to realise what it means to pay for this team and make sure there are many other football clubs in world football that would see scenes like this for only, someone say only, winning two trophies, the league cup and the fa cup, other than manchester city, every other team in england would swap for scenes like this, and the fans have turned out in their numbers, and their thousands, as he can see, to take this moment in with the players, with the men's team, but the women's team holding their trophies aloft. liverpool's great success at wembley, those back—to—back winds over chelsea on penalties this season, delivered the two remaining
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trophies. as the fireworks go off, and for the women's team they deserve more than just a cursory mention, they were relegated two seasons ago. they won the championship in convincing style. they are back in the women's super league where they feel they will belong. football is the lifeblood of the city and the men's and women's team doing everything they can to make the fans proud as they follow these buses along. this is where it ends among the historic building just a few yards away from the dalbert dock in the heart of liverpool city centre, and this is where most of the fans had gathered on route as they now follow this bus, and you can hear the banging of the drums in the background as well, the drums in the background as well, the global support of liverpool on show there. we have vuvuzela, trumpets, trombones. this has been a day to rememberfor the trumpets, trombones. this has been a day to remember for the thousands of liverpool fans that have turned up here to enjoy this moment and
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perfect timing, because we have been here since two o'clock this afternoon, and yet it was in that moment that those buses paraded their trophies in front of these fans who have been waiting so patiently throughout the day stop and very patient of you as well. we will let your voice have a rest now, but well done and thank ou ve a rest now, but well done and thank you very much _ a rest now, but well done and thank you very much indeed. _ a rest now, but well done and thank you very much indeed. thank- a rest now, but well done and thank you very much indeed. thank you. l you're watching bbc news, and sure we will have pictures of that scene on the front pages of tomorrow morning's papers. join me at half past 10pm and 11:30pm this evening. — our guestsjoining me tonight are broadcaster and writer jemma forte and the journalist and broadcaster caroline frost. i hope you will be there with us. the usjustice department has announced a formal investigation into how police responded the school shooting in texas last week, in which 19 children and two teachers were killed. young children trapped
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with the gunman repeatedly called 911 while officers waited to go in for at least an hour. the announcement comes as president biden arrived in uvalde just days after the horrific attack. mr biden is going to meet victims' families and first responders, as well as religious and community leaders. our correspondentjane o'brien is in uvalde for us now. something of a solemn ritualfor something of a solemn ritual for us presidents, jane. it is something of a solemn ritual for us presidents, jane._ presidents, jane. it is indeed, and it is the second _ presidents, jane. it is indeed, and it is the second time _ presidents, jane. it is indeed, and it is the second time in _ presidents, jane. it is indeed, and it is the second time in as - presidents, jane. it is indeed, and it is the second time in as many i it is the second time in as many weeks thatjoe biden has had to perform this duty as consoler in chief. just two weeks ago he was in buffalo, new york where he was meeting with the bereaved families of the ten victims and that mass shooting at a grocery store, and here we are today, where he will be meeting the families of the victims and some of the survivors, the young
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survivors of that tragedy just on tuesday, the mass shooting at uvalde elementary school where children and adults are shot dead by an 18—year—old gunman. it is a terribly solemn occasion. he'sjust 18—year—old gunman. it is a terribly solemn occasion. he's just visited the school, he's wrapped that up, he and the first lady touched the photographs of the children that are part of the memorial they are, and they have just finished attending mass at a local catholic church which is being described as a very solemn occasion indeed. i which is being described as a very solemn occasion indeed. i understand that the time — solemn occasion indeed. i understand that the time he _ solemn occasion indeed. i understand that the time he is _ solemn occasion indeed. i understand that the time he is going _ solemn occasion indeed. i understand that the time he is going to _ solemn occasion indeed. i understand that the time he is going to spend - that the time he is going to spend with the family is is going to be a substantial amount of time, unusual, in fact. ., substantial amount of time, unusual, in fact. . , , ., in fact. yeah, it is quite unusual. he's spending — in fact. yeah, it is quite unusual. he's spending all— in fact. yeah, it is quite unusual. he's spending all day _ in fact. yeah, it is quite unusual. he's spending all day here, - in fact. yeah, it is quite unusual. i he's spending all day here, several hours with the families and this is really the focus of his visit. he wants to show support, he wants to
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empathise, he wants to share their grief, if that is at all possible, and offer some kind of consolation. of course, reaction to his visit is mixed, it always is. there are some people here saying it is a distraction. some people worry that he will politicise this tragedy even more than it already has been, and others say, yes, of course he is welcome, he's the president, he should be here, but ultimately what can he do? nothing is going to change. can he do? nothing is going to chance. ., can he do? nothing is going to chance. . ~ ., ., , can he do? nothing is going to chance. ., ., , ., change. the backlog to this, of course, change. the backlog to this, of course. is _ change. the backlog to this, of course, is this _ change. the backlog to this, of course, is this investigation - change. the backlog to this, of| course, is this investigation into the police response. i wonder if you could just summarise that for us. also, is this something that's been discussed openly in uvalde? people here are furious _ discussed openly in uvalde? people here are furious about _ discussed openly in uvalde? people here are furious about the - discussed openly in uvalde? people here are furious about the police . here are furious about the police response. the two critical delays that happened in the 78 minutes between the gunman entering the school and being shot dead by police when the order was finally gave in to storm those two classrooms that were connected. the officer in
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charge decided that the shooter was no longer active and that his priority should be to evacuate the other children who are not in immediate harms way. that according to officials was a mistake. the second mistake came when he delayed yet again to wait for tactical equipment. texas protocol, in fact a us protocol in these situations is that if there is just one officer armed with one gun, that officer has to go and come and for some reason, this is why the department of justice is not looking at this and conducting a review, for some reason, the officer in charge did not follow that protocol. dana brian, thank you very much indeed. thank you. in a gesture of defiance — directed at russia — president zelensky has made a rare trip to visit his troops on the front line in eastern ukraine. he went to kharkiv, close to the russian border, an area once again under attack. mr zelensky described the situation in some parts —
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particularly serevo—donetsk — as "indescribably difficul�*” for the ukrainian army. it's the first time since the start of the war that the president has ventured to the devastated eastern region — as our correspondent caroline hawley reports. with heavy artillery, russian forces are continuing to pound ukrainian positions in a war that's taking more lives every day. with all this firepower, moscow is now making steady advances in the east. today, president zelensky visited north—eastern ukraine for the first time since the russian invasion. he was shown the damage inflicted in what's been some of the worst fighting of the war. handing out medals, he thanked soldiers for their service to their country. for risking their lives for all ukrainians, their comrades in the donbas were now facing what he said was an indescribably difficult situation. applause. nowhere has president putin's war been harder than in the port city of mariupol.
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these pictures show it before the invasion. and this is what it looks like now. but in a bbc interview, moscow's emissary here defended the conduct of russian forces. these are residential areas. these are not legitimate military targets. we have a lot of registered cases when... ..when ukrainian artillery was shelling residential areas. i do accept that mariupol is destroyed by fighting. but you won't accept it's the result of russian forces? no, it can be both because this is a fight. so there is a possibility in your mind that russia as i have said, russians are targeting military infrastructure. collateral damage is possible. the town of bucha has become synonymous with atrocities, but the ambassador dismissed allegations of war crimes here as a fabrication.
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and what of an incident caught on cctv in which these two soldiers are about to kill two unarmed ukrainians? these men, sir, are walking away from the soldiers. you can see it there. they are shot and they are killed. is this how russia is conducting this war? i cannot tell whether they are russian soldiers. you have showed me something, probably a piece of a film or a piece of a game orajoke, orwhatever. a computer game, and telling me... sir, it's cctv footage. let's see what it is. it's cctv footage... great. ..from a building, and it has been corroborated. whatever the kremlin says, the ukrainian people know to their cost what to expect from the invading forces, and so, here in the town of sloviansk, they are preparing to flee as russia advances in the east. caroline hawley, bbc news. there's more travel disruption today. in dover, passengers have complained of waits of up to six hours to get on ferries.
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the delays are being blamed on a lack of staff at french passport control. and people flying abroad from some airports, including gatwick, after airlines cancelled hundreds of flights over the next few days. we can now speak to sally gethin,an aviation commentator, who can tell us more about the background of these current disturbances. veseli, lovely too heavy with us this evening on bbc news. i if we could start off first at the airports and what is taking place there, why. {iii airports and what is taking place there. why-— airports and what is taking place there, wh. ., , ., , there, why. of many of us have seen these pictures _ there, why. of many of us have seen these pictures of— there, why. of many of us have seen these pictures of incredible - these pictures of incredible congestion and delays, sometimes with cues sneaking out of the airport terminals. so what it is is that in the first instance, there is a lack of available staff, so airports are ramping up quickly, and
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they need thousands upon thousands of new people to join their teams, so they simply don't have the stock available, but also borderforce which operates the security gates and immigration, they have always been chronically understaffed and still are. also, there are still some variable travel restrictions country by country, which has added to the paperwork, brexit has also changed some of the queuing systems, for example, in and out of immigration at airports. it's also an international picture as well, so they're absolutely huge problems at amsterdam, and happens is that there are big problems at any airport in the system tends to have a knock on effect on the others because there is this spoke system that's operating, so smaller airports feed the larger airports with originating
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and estimating flights. so it all kind of meshes together into a very complicated picture causing these delays. complicated picture causing these dela s. ,, , , ., , delays. surely, veseli, airlines would know— delays. surely, veseli, airlines would know what _ delays. surely, veseli, airlines would know what the - delays. surely, veseli, airlines would know what the calendar| delays. surely, veseli, airlines. would know what the calendar is, would know what the calendar is, would know what the calendar is, would know the school breaks and when people are travelling. —— sally. is this all down to bad planning?— sally. is this all down to bad ”lannin? ,. ., _, planning? there is certainly a responsibility _ planning? there is certainly a responsibility on _ planning? there is certainly a responsibility on the - planning? there is certainly a responsibility on the airlines. | planning? there is certainly a - responsibility on the airlines. they appear to have overbooked. so they've increased their seat capacity and they are not really having the staff are the resources to support that, so what they are doing now is trending back now, for example, easyjet has said that it is cutting back 2a flights a day for the next ten days to be able to handle, you know, the surplus that they have at the moment. i mean, other airlines like kl and have suspended flight sales, but they are also making cancellations, there are delays with air and also dublin
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airport is facing massive chaos as well. so, yeah, those airlines didn't really plan accordingly, but having said that, the uk in particular opened up very suddenly, and there was a sudden surge in pent—up demand. passengers, because of all the problems they have had with lockdown rules and travel rules changing in the last two years, tend to book much later now. as a leader booking window, and that sometimes catches them off guard. sham booking window, and that sometimes catches them off guard.— booking window, and that sometimes catches them off guard. am afraid we have to end — catches them off guard. am afraid we have to end it — catches them off guard. am afraid we have to end it there, _ catches them off guard. am afraid we have to end it there, but _ catches them off guard. am afraid we have to end it there, but thank - have to end it there, but thank you very much for that. we will not speak to a passenger, or someone who should have been a passenger. kate, i'm going to let you tell the story, you're on the plane, ready to take off, and then what happened? irate you're on the plane, ready to take off, and then what happened? we were fl in: from off, and then what happened? we were flying from manchester— off, and then what happened? we were flying from manchester airport - off, and then what happened? we were flying from manchester airport going i flying from manchester airport going to create this morning at 7:55 a:m., so we got there and got through security absolutely fine because my
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husband checked the bags in yesterday. he was there for three hours yesterday checking the bags and so we didn't have the cath this morning, got through security, we boarded the plane pretty much on time, howeverthen boarded the plane pretty much on time, however then it started to be delayed and lots of passengers rejoining late because they had all been stuck in the bag 0, and then we ended up being on the plane for about three and a half hours and the pilot said that there were no staff to put the bags on the plane, basically and they were waiting for the luggage to arrive. eventually the luggage to arrive. eventually the luggage to arrive. eventually the luggage did arrive after about three and half hours and by that point, i think the airline staff had got to a point where they weren't actually able to fly any more because they had gone over there time that they were allowed, so we ended up having to get back on the buses and go back to the terminal, and a really great choice of music on the bus going back to the terminal was who we are leaving on a jet plane. , which was very tactful.
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we ended up basically being sent back up to the departure lounge, we all went in a big queue up the stairs and are thinking, oh, there will be a rep at the top to tell us what's happening, and is literally nobody there, we ended up going to an information desk, there was nobody there. we waited for two hours for someone to come and tell us what was happening, and in the end, got a text message saying the flight had been cancelled and rescheduled to tomorrow. then eventually somebody turned up and said the same thing over at hanoi and we had tojust go said the same thing over at hanoi and we had to just go and said the same thing over at hanoi and we had tojust go and get our bags back and come home, so that's where we are now. we are in manchester. where we are now. we are in manchester-— where we are now. we are in manchester. ., ., , ., [m manchester. how are you feeling? i'm reall tired manchester. how are you feeling? i'm really tired and _ manchester. how are you feeling? i'm really tired and a _ manchester. how are you feeling? i'm really tired and a bit _ manchester. how are you feeling? i'm really tired and a bit emotional, - manchester. how are you feeling? i'm really tired and a bit emotional, to - really tired and a bit emotional, to be honest, my children are subsets, they've been really looking forward to this holiday, we've really looked forward to it it's cost us a lot of money. we've not been able to go away for many years, planning the
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half term break with the children, and it'sjust half term break with the children, and it's just sort of up in the air and it'sjust sort of up in the air and it's just sort of up in the air now. we're hoping it will go 0k tomorrow, but they were people flying out today who have been trying to fly out since friday and they got the same thing happening to them twice, they had to wait on the plane twice for it to cancelled again. i think they did actually fly out today, but i don't know if i could go through that two more times and then fired again, so i'm just hoping we managed to fly tomorrow, but by the time we get there will be only two days of our holiday stop i only two days of our holiday stop i can tell you're emotional about it, understandably so. and fingers crossed that you directly take off tomorrow as promised. thank you very much indeed. bon voyage. back to the events taking place in texas. the shooting of 19 school children and two teachers in uvalde, president biden is there visiting the town. the usjustice department has announced a formal investigation
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into how police responded the school shooting. joining me now is daniel berman — who's a former gop senate staffer. thank you forjoining us here in bbc news. i'm going to get straight to the point when it comes to gun reform. why is there this bottleneck in congress? i wonder if he could just lay it out for us.— just lay it out for us. there are several reasons. the - just lay it out for us. there are several reasons. the first - just lay it out for us. there are i several reasons. the first reason, just lay it out for us. there are - several reasons. the first reason, i would say is that democrats don't have a clear idea of what sort of reforms they want. i think part of thatis reforms they want. i think part of that is because it's been so long since anyone has actually had legislative gun reform, a lot of them are still stuck either in the 19905 them are still stuck either in the 1990s with rehashing things like assault weapons without people knowing what that is, or attempting to wish away things that have happened since, and you see this whenever anyone asks if this changes things. secondly, ithink whenever anyone asks if this changes things. secondly, i think if they did have them, it is very late in
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the election year. i don't think it's impossible that, for instance, you could get some degree of bipartisan stuff on mental health, the problem is, at this point in the election cycle, passing any major legislation would be seen as demoralising to republican voters and motivating to democratic ones, and motivating to democratic ones, and for that reason, i think it's unlikely that even if the gop was inclined to hold discussions on policy that they would allow stuff to necessarily pass the senate on it, which i think means in turn that democrats probably, unless they can get their filibuster, they are not going to be able to get much done, and i think the combination of those two interact because the fact that nothing is going to legislatively happen means that there is no reason to seriously consider what you would do if you could pass.— do if you could pass. listening to you. you're _ do if you could pass. listening to you, you're describing _ do if you could pass. listening to you, you're describing the - do if you could pass. listening to l you, you're describing the context, and that is very important, because it is those people who are looking at that very election cycle that you've described who will be making the decision. texas allows you to
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buy an ar 15, but it won't allow you to buy a drink until you are 21. you can buy a to buy a drink until you are 21. you can buya gun to buy a drink until you are 21. you can buy a gun at 18. for those parents come i don't think they care about the election cycle, why is this being politcised?— about the election cycle, why is this being politcised? well, i think artiall it this being politcised? well, i think partially it is _ this being politcised? well, i think partially it is because _ this being politcised? well, i think partially it is because it _ this being politcised? well, i think partially it is because it is - partially it is because it is ultimately politcised. i think the problem with gun control, and this is one of the problems i think democrats have is they cannot answer what actual proposals would have prevented this. if you have a determined 18—year—old who somehow has access to $70,000 in credit cards, you are not going to be able to stop them from being able to get a weapon with any of these degree of policies that they are going to be able to do this on, and that is one reason why i think there is a lot of focus on the failings of the police or elsewhere, but the people who are saying this is gun control issue are people who seek gun control has a cultural thing will that they view
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guns and their presence as the problem. not the cause of this instance, but they see america's gun culture and gun control laws as the reason why these things happen, and therefore getting rid of it as a solution, which only works for people who already believe that. {lilia people who already believe that. ok, so much to discuss on this, but thank you very much for laying that out for us. thank you. the record—breaking jockey leicester piggott, who won the derby a nine times, has died at the age of 86. in all, he recorded 4,493 winners in a career that started in 19118, when he was 12 years old. he was admitted to hospital in switzerland, where he lived, last week. he was jailed for three years in 1987, for tax fraud, but returned to racing after his release. our sports correspondent andy swiss reports. lester has it in the bag! when it came to the art of winning, few could match lester piggott.
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his statistics are staggering. nearly 5,000 victories across a career spanning almost half a century. he rode his first winner back in 19118 at the age ofjust12. it was a feat that made the headlines, and plenty more would follow. in 1954, while still a teenager, he won the derby, the first of a record nine victories in the race. the youngest jockey to win the derby in modern times. but for all the adulation, piggott remained a shy, softly spoken man. how hard do you have to work, in fact? well, it's pretty hard work. you know, all day long, i and at night sometimes. at five foot eight, he was tall for a jockey, hence his nickname the long fellow. here comes lester piggott on nijinsky. but his much imitated style in the saddle earned him the championjockey�*s title some 11 times. the success, though, was followed by scandal. good evening. the headlines at six o'clock... lester piggott has been sent to jail for three years. - in 1987, piggott was jailed for tax
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evasion and stripped of his obe, and while he made a comeback to some success, in 1995, at the age of 59 he finally retired from the saddle. despite his personal controversy, his sporting ability beyond dispute. one of the greatestjockeys that racing has ever seen. the champion jockey lester piggott — who's died at the age of 86. now it's time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. hello again. through the afternoon, we had quite a few shower clouds develop. this was one of those showers passing over the gower. you can see some rather menacing clouds there on the horizon. looking at the weather picture overnight tonight, we've got more showers to come down from the north, so it will turn quite wet for a time in scotland. some showers for northern england, probably northern ireland by the end of the night. a little bit drier further
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southwards across the midlands, wales, east anglia and the south, but quite a cool night, 5—7 celsius the overnight low for many of you. and tomorrow is another unsettled day. now, showers will be with us from the word go, quite a bit of cloud through the morning. into the afternoon, showers become increasingly widespread, some of them heavy and thundery, and because there's not much wind around, showers are going to be very slow—moving in nature as well. on into tuesday's forecast, it's another showery looking day, but this time the showers are going to be bigger, so more of them turning thundery. a bit of hail mixed as well. by the time we get to wednesday, the showers will mainly become confined to eastern areas, easing away elsewhere. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines... culture secretary nadine dorries has urged uefa to launch a formal investigation after liverpool fans were tear—gassed at the champions league final. president biden is in texas to meet the families of some of the 19 children and two teachers shot dead by a teenage gunman.

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