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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  May 30, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. our headlines today: an emergency meeting in paris as the uk calls for an investigation into the treatment of liverpool fans at the champions league final. president biden meets grieving families in texas amid anger at the slow police response to last week's school shooting in which 19 children and two teachers died. nottingham forest return to the premier league. after 23 years away, the two—time european champions are back in the top flight of english football after beating huddersfield at wembley. and ahead of the platinum jubilee, we get a tour
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of the queen's floating palace — the royal yacht britannia. and be right for the platinum jubilee? i will glance into the crystals bolt to see what the weather has in store and a detailed forecast for today, with some showers, some heavy and thundery. it's monday 30th may. our main story is that the french government will hold an emergency meeting today with uefa and other officials, to examine what went wrong at the champions league final on saturday. there were chaotic scenes before and after the match after french police repeatedly fired tear gas and pepper spray at liverpool fans waiting to get into the stadium in paris. the uk's culture secretary nadine dorries has called for an investigation into what happened as tim muffett reports. fallback! fall back!
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in the countdown to kick—off, this was the situation facing many fans on saturday night. real madrid's 1—0 victory over liverpool at the stade de france has been largely overshadowed by what went on outside the ground. it was just... the only word i can think of is chaos. we were patiently trying to queue. and then we'd be pushed by the police and kettled against railings, against the wall. and then pepper spray had come out and i was completely disorientated, didn't know what was happening with all the crowds that were there as well. there were children crying. there were grown men who were kind of shouting out that they needed help. who were kind of shouting out this nine—year—old boy was one of those who suffered the after—effects of tear gas. many liverpool fans say the policing was shambolic and heavy handed. there was no communication.
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we weren't told if the gate was going to open, when it was going to open. it wasjust chaotic. and actually it was a disgrace and it was very, very dangerous. it was shambolic. it was dangerous and hostile. and one of the worst atmospheres i've ever experienced _ among football fans, i've ever experienced that at blue ribbon events. - uefa said that turnstiles became blocked because thousands of liverpool fans arrived with fake tickets. footage also show some people climbing overfences, but it's not clear whether they're liverpool fans or not. today, the french sports ministry will host a meeting with uefa, the french football association, stadium officials and police. it says it wants to draw lessons from the event. the culture secretary, nadine dorries, has called for a formal investigation. she described the footage and descriptions from fans as deeply concerning. "i urge uefa to launch a formal investigation into what went wrong and why", she said in a statement.
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following their defeat in paris there was still a victory parade in liverpool yesterday, the club having won both the fa cup and league cup this season, a positive end to what had been a dispiriting weekend for the team and its fans. tim muffett, bbc news. so this morning we will try to work out what went wrong. we will hear from fans who attended the match including ian burnley mp who saw in that report so we will try to understand what happened so it doesn't happen again. the us presidentjoe biden has promised to turn "pain into action" during a visit to the texan town of uvalde where 19 children and two teachers were killed in america's latest mass shooting. the president and the first lady laid white roses at a memorial for the victims, before meeting families and survivors. from texas, our north america correspondent, barbara plett usher, reports.
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do something! do something! the commander in chief was visiting a community in shock, devastated by loss. "do something, do something" the crowd chanted as he left a church service. "we will, we will", he responded. his only public remarks on the trip. it is the hardest visit a president has to make, especially when the victims are so young. outside the school, mr biden and his wife, jill, paused to recognize each of those murdered while cowering on the floor of their classroom. 19 children and two teachers. later, they met privately with the families. a bouquet of flowers added to the mound of remembrance that seeks to dampen the horror by honouring the dead. but the police response to the shooting is now under review by the justice department. the rampage began when the teenage gunman entered the school through a back door, armed with a high—powered rifle. children as young as nine were trapped with him for an hour
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before security forces finally stormed in. this small community has pulled together to face an unspeakable tragedy. but the political environment is difficult. there's a fierce debate about how to stop such attacks. the president wants to tighten gun laws and faces strong partisan opposition, especially in texas. this is, after all, gun country. there are mixed feelings about mr biden�*s visit. i don't know if it can make any difference, actually. i think that as a nation, we'rejust very divided. but i think that in a time of crisis, itjust... it's great for leaders to show unity. we just need to grieve. we just... just come here and give us hope for tomorrow. but don't tell us politically what we need to do. most of all, the families don't want their pain to be drawn into the political disputes. patricia castanon is lost in a fog of grief at the death of her niece, annabelle.
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she was happy, smiley. this is how she was with me. there's no words for me to say. she was just a good person. we know that the president is coming to visit. do you think that will help? no. why do you say that? because he can't bring her back. he can't bring her back. he can't bring none of them back. and nobody can. he can't bring them back. and he's struggling to protect others. his biggest obstacle is how to prevent this from happening again. this is the second time in a month that president biden has made a visit to console a community recovering from a mass shooting. and he finds it very distressing and frustrating. and here, of course, they're facing another difficult week as they prepare to begin burying their loved ones. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas. ukraine's president volodymyr
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zelensky has visited troops in the kharkiv region, on the country's battered eastern front line. it's his first official trip outside the capital since the russian invasion began. let's speak to our correspondentjoe inwood. joe, how much does president zelensky�*s visit signal that the tide�*s turning in ukraine's second city? it is definitely a sign that the battle around kharkiv has gone ukraine's way. this is the second city of the country and was almost under constant bombardment but in the last few weeks ukrainian forces have pushed the russian forces almost all the way back to the international border so a couple of weeks ago president zelensky would not have made this visit. he saw troops and handed out awards but the battle for kharkiv is not over. russians are still within shelling distance of the city and a number of attacks came in on the day he was
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there. this is a morale boosting event for the people of the city but it's in the context of a very difficult situation elsewhere. in the east of the country, the donbas, in severodonetsk city the bombardment is getting more intense and the ukrainians are struggling to hold on. , ., . ~' and the ukrainians are struggling to hold on. , ., ., ~ the ukrainian band who won this year's eurovision song contest, kalush orchestra, have sold their trophy at auction for $900,000, to raise money for the war in ukraine. the sale coincided with the band's appearance at a charity concert for ukraine in berlin. the funds will be used to buy drones for the army. that time is nine minutes past six, it's quite nice and bright out there this morning. it
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it's quite nice and bright out there this morning-— it's quite nice and bright out there this morning. it was, better than i exected. this morning. it was, better than i exnected- what — this morning. it was, better than i expected. what have _ this morning. it was, better than i expected. what have we - this morning. it was, better than i expected. what have we got - this morning. it was, better than i expected. what have we got in - this morning. it was, better than i . expected. what have we got in store, matt? fit. expected. what have we got in store, matt? �* , ., expected. what have we got in store, matt? ~ , ., , expected. what have we got in store, matt? ~ , ., y ., matt? a bit of everything. for some it's uuite a matt? a bit of everything. for some it's quite a chilly _ matt? a bit of everything. for some it's quite a chilly start _ matt? a bit of everything. for some it's quite a chilly start to _ matt? a bit of everything. for some it's quite a chilly start to the - it's quite a chilly start to the way, in suffolk there is a bit of frost on the grass, temperatures are around freezing but sunshine overhead there, not quite so sunny in south—west scotland where showers pushed through, you can see that bats are showers working in across scotland, parts of north—west england, north west wales and northern ireland, dry to the south and east where we have the better sunshine but some brightness here and there but lots of cloud around in the showers will develop across southern areas after a reasonably dry start. driest across parts of kent towards essex, the south—east of london but where we see the showers they could be heavy but the winds could be light so if you get caught under one of the showers, others will stay dry. not especially
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warm for the stage approaching june, 13 degrees across parts of scotland but if you were out at the weekend you may have realised if you get in the sunnier moments it won't feel too bad. 0vernight showers keep going, many places become dry with heavier bursts towards the north—west, temperatures down into single figures, coldest across northern scotland and in the next few days we will see sunshine and showers on tuesday, if you were on wednesday as they remain mostly in the east. and hopefully settling down a bit towards the platinum jubilee. will you give us that in the next half an hour from the weather? what a tease he is. the king ofjordan has described the queen as a beacon of light and hope ahead of her platinum jubilee. speaking to our royal correspondent, daniela relph, king abdullah i! said the queen set a high moral standard in public life and held a special
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place in the heart of his family. the crowded landscape of amman injordan. for generations, the bond between this country's royal family and british royalty has been strong. hello. how are you? something the current king ofjordan, abdullah ii, reflected on as we spoke about his lifelong family friend, the queen. as king, you are in a unique position to observe the reign of another monarch. i wonder how you view the queen's 70 years on the throne. i think with with a lot of humility. my late father, his majesty king hussein, became a monarch the same year as her majesty. and the special relationship that they had is something that we inherited and we grew up with. but to think of what she has seen in her life and the standard that she has, i think, held as a monarch is an example for all of us. so for me, it'sjust, i'm honoured to be part of that story, to have seen that special relationship between
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my father and her, between myself and her majesty and his royal highness, prince charles, and now a wonderful young man, prince william, who's a friend of my son. so this is a historical relationship that we're very, very proud of. what are the attributes that she has that have largely made her reign so successful? i think, you know, when you look at her majesty, you look at consistency and i think putting the moral bar at the highest point possible. she has dedicated herself to the monarchy and to the people. and as we have all experienced, sometimes you say things or have to take positions that may not necessarily be popular but is the right thing. and i think that moral compass, if you look at her reign, is, i think, what has really made her shine compared to monarchies elsewhere. and as king, you know what it's
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like to live your life in the public eye and the challenges that brings. how difficult is that aspect of the job? the queen has had a difficult few years. how difficult is it to live life so publicly in all its challenges? immensely difficult, because you're always under the microscope. and again, i think that when you look at how her majesty has typified her rule, it's again, that moral compass of feeling, i'm here to serve the people. and, you know, my life is under a microscope. but i will not shy away from my responsibility as a monarch and to hold that bar as high as she has, i think it'sjust a testament of who she is. what lessons are there to be learnt from the queen's reign? if you look at 70 years of british history, you've had good days and bad days. her majesty, i think, was a beacon of light, of hope and continues to be, i believe, for your nation and for many of us around the world. and finally, can i ask you if you have a message for the queen on this platinumjubilee, such a historic moment for the uk?
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in our own humble way as the son of one of her closest friends, his majesty, king hussein, i just say congratulations on just a remarkable 70 years of what you've done for your nation, for your people. i am very proud, in a small way, to have that relationship with her majesty and with your country. and our heart is always going to have a very big and warm place for her majesty the queen. king abdullah, thank you very much for talking to the bbc. thank you. that was king abdullah speaking to daniela relph. let's take a look at today's papers. the mirror leads on the chaos in paris at the champions league final, with the paper quoting one liverpool fan who says his nine—year—old son was tear—gassed by french police. the times reports that six million uk households could face power cuts this winter due to russia's invasion of ukraine. the paper has been told the government's "reasonable" worst—case scenario is there could be widespread gas shortages if russia cuts
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off supplies to the eu. and the mail's front page looks at the queen'sjubilee, reporting that 12 million people are expected to celebrate with street parties. and pictured is the queen with the jockey lester piggott, who died yesterday aged 86. sarah will be remembering lester piggott a little bit later. inside the papers, do you live with a serial killer? you might well do if you have a cat. cats across britain killed 270 million animals every year in what the mirror calls an ecological disaster.— an ecological disaster. because i have known _ an ecological disaster. because i have known a — an ecological disaster. because i have known a family _ an ecological disaster. because i have known a family cat - an ecological disaster. because i have known a family cat to - an ecological disaster. because i have known a family cat to bring| an ecological disaster. because i l have known a family cat to bring a bird to the back door and proudly display it to you. bird to the back door and proudly display it to yon-— display it to you. that's 'ust the ti - display it to you. that's 'ust the ti of a display it to you. that's 'ust the tip of a bloody * display it to you. that's 'ust the tip of a bloody iceberg, _ display it to you. that's just the tip of a bloody iceberg, there i display it to you. that's just the tip of a bloody iceberg, there isj tip of a bloody iceberg, there is much worse stuff looking on your
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doormat. ., ., , , much worse stuff looking on your doormat. ., ., ,, ., �* much worse stuff looking on your doormat. ., ., doormat. you have caps, don't you? i 'ust have doormat. you have caps, don't you? i just have a — doormat. you have caps, don't you? i just have a kitten, _ doormat. you have caps, don't you? i just have a kitten, she _ doormat. you have caps, don't you? i just have a kitten, she hasn't - doormat. you have caps, don't you? i just have a kitten, she hasn't been i just have a kitten, she hasn't been allowed out yet.— allowed out yet. don't let her out! you have to _ allowed out yet. don't let her out! you have to let _ allowed out yet. don't let her out! you have to let them _ allowed out yet. don't let her out! you have to let them live - allowed out yet. don't let her out! you have to let them live a - allowed out yet. don't let her out! you have to let them live a little. | you have to let them live a little. as long as she is a serial killer outside a home and not inside, that's fine. sticking with pets, some would say this is lovely, and affectionate moment for two visitors to the goodwood dog festival, should you let your pet lick your face? hat you let your pet lick your face? not a cat! lots — you let your pet lick your face? not a cat! lots of _ you let your pet lick your face? not a cat! lots of people _ you let your pet lick your face? not a cat! lots of people do _ you let your pet lick your face? not a cat! lots of people do come - you let your pet lick your face? not a cat! lots of people do come late | a cat! lots of people do come late to snuggle — a cat! lots of people do come late to snuggle op _ a cat! lots of people do come late to snuggle up to _ a cat! lots of people do come late to snuggle up to them _ a cat! lots of people do come late to snuggle up to them and - a cat! lots of people do come late to snuggle up to them and let - a cat! lots of people do come late l to snuggle up to them and let them elect theirfaces. i'm not to snuggle up to them and let them elect their faces. i'm not keen on it. this is a positive story, have you been to see top done yet? lilo. you been to see top done yet? no, but i want you been to see top done yet? no, but i want to- — you been to see top done yet? no, but i want to. -- _ you been to see top done yet? no, but i want to. -- top _ you been to see top done yet? no, but i want to. -- top gun. - you been to see top done yet? no, but i want to. -- top gun. these i you been to see top done yet? no, | but i want to. -- top gun. these big ticket items —
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but i want to. -- top gun. these big ticket items are _ but i want to. -- top gun. these big ticket items are the _ but i want to. -- top gun. these big ticket items are the ones _ but i want to. -- top gun. these big ticket items are the ones that - but i want to. -- top gun. these big ticket items are the ones that will . ticket items are the ones that will save cinemas because people who went through the pandemics paid that money but it is these ones that you spend it on popcorn and drinks. aha, spend it on popcorn and drinks. a proper cinema trip, shall we go this afternoon? it's 18 minutes past six. last month we spoke to the bbc�*s global health correspondent tulip mazumdar ahead of her documentary about her experience of miscarriage. since then a number of families have been in touch to share their stories of loss, including one couple who were forced to keep their baby's remains in their fridge because a&e staff said they weren't able to store them safely. tulip has been to meet laura and laurence, and just to warn viewers you may find some of the details in this report upsetting. there's a tiny blanket for the baby and then a teddy that you can put in the coffin. we've got a sprig of leaves that we took from our garden. and then the only other thing
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in here, we've got the baby's ashes. these precious items, a memory box for laura and laurence's baby. some comfort in a time of utter despair. it's been just two months since the couple suffered a late miscarriage 15 weeks into their pregnancy. it happened after they were sent home from hospital, having been told their baby no longer had a heartbeat. there were no beds available, the hospital said, for laura to give birth there. i woke up in really quite bad pain. i felt a lot of pressure. and so i ran upstairs to the bathroom and that's where i delivered the baby. i looked... i looked down and canjust see a mass in the water. and so i scooped it out, still assuming that it was going to be something else.
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and at that point, i realised that it was a baby. i realised it was my baby, obviously. and you just think, obviously it's not alive, and so i scooped it out, put it in the sink and realised it was a baby boy. and at that point, i'd screamed and laurence had come upstairs and ijust was in such a panic. i just went out to the bathroom, closed the door and said, do not go in there. the couple called 999 but were advised that this wasn't an emergency. and so they placed their baby's remains in a box and went into a&e, which they say was chaos. it got to midnight and we just thought, we've got a decision to make here. there's no—one at this hospital who's willing to take charge of our baby. there's no—one who seems to know what's going on. and it's been in a hot room
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for nearly five hours now. so we decided together that i would go home. so i took the box to the entrance of the hospital and got a taxi and took took him home, cleared out some space in our fridge and put him there. as harrowing as it is to talk about what happened, the couple say they're speaking out to try and ensure this doesn't happen to anyone else. when were you sitting in that a&e waiting room, at that point, you just felt like there is no safety net. when things go wrong with the pregnancy, you know, there are not the systems in place to help you. and even with all the staff and the experts and they're working really hard in the best way
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in the world, the processes are so flawed that itjust felt like we've been tipped into hell. a statement from lewisham and greenwich nhs trust, "we are deeply sorry and offer our sincerest condolences to miss brody and her partner for the tragic loss of their baby in these traumatic experiences." it goes on to say a full investigation is under way to understand where failings in care may have occurred so that any necessary changes and improvements can be made. it's beyond sad, really. it's unbearable. there should be an. available cold place. there simply should l be, and it should be, if it's not in the morgue, there probably ought - to be something in a&e. and there ought to be something in the maternity department - or in the gynae department, - somewhere where pregnancy remains or these tiny little babies can be safely and respectfully- and carefully stored with clear labelling. why isn't that happening yet? i don't know, but it isn't happening. i
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we're talking about one case - and we're talking about one trust. and i'm sure it happensj in more than one place, more than one trust. so we have to be careful not to assume from this case i that everything is awful. there is good advicel and guidance around. and at the same time, - it's also about ensuring the staff have the time and the space to work through that. - the importance of pregnancy loss care is increasingly being recognised. this is a special cot for babies that have died here at birmingham women's hospital. there's a specialist suite in a side room on the maternity ward for women who are having a late miscarriage or stillbirth. the hospital is also starting work on a first of its kind in the uk bereavement centre, specialising in care forfamilies, including those experiencing pregnancy loss.
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this site is going to be our woodland house. they will be able to come back and see their baby there. if they want to go home, we'll be able to hold follow—up appointments with doctors. we'll be able to look after our families going through early pregnancy loss who want to come back in and collect their pregnancy, maybe for a little burial at home or a funeral amongst the smell amongst the smell of fresh roses and a feeling of being close to family, laura and laurence can remember and grieve. this is the crematorium where my grandparents' ashes were scattered and their plaque's here. and we were thinking of putting the baby's ashes here as well. itjust gives what happens some permanence and it's something tangible as otherwise itjust feels like everything evaporates and it never really happened and the baby's just forgotten. and all of this heartbreak is just for nothing. we just felt like the baby's already been so alone. and this way, at least it's near us. and it's near family.
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tulip mazumdar, bbc news. laura and lawrence, thinking of you and i know they were sharing their story because they want other people not to go through what they have been through. we not to go through what they have been through-— been through. we will be talking later to a charity _ been through. we will be talking later to a charity who _ been through. we will be talking later to a charity who are - later to a charity who are campaigning to make sure after—care forfamilies in that campaigning to make sure after—care for families in that situation is improved and is more uniform so everyone has a level of expectation to make sure they get the right care. if you've been affected by any of the issues raised in this report, you can find links to help and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. survivors of a deadly fairground
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accident in south—west london will plant a tree today to remember the victims. it's now 50 years since the big dipper roller—coaster crashed in battersea park, killing five children and injuring more than a dozen. it's been described as a "forgotten tragedy" and there's now a campaign for a permanent memorial. the mayor said he's in talks with wandsworth council. i know from other memorials i have been involved in, it's a place you could go to just to reflect, to think, to spend time with others, to commemorate this awful tragedy. but also its a reminder of the importance of health and safety, to make sure we get things right. we also need to educate londoners about this tragedy almost 50 years ago. it's feared many people in temporary accomodation are trapped in their situation due to a shortage of affordable homes. a three—year study by the charity crisis suggests almost half of those in need of housing remained homeless despite seeking help from their local council. there are now calls for the government to
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build more social homes. the government says it's invested more than £11 billion on affordable housing. environmental campaigners are guarding a tree in north london day and night, to stop it being chopped down. haringey council plans to remove the tree in stroud green as it's causing damage to nearby homes. activists are calling for a meeting to discuss their concerns. drivers are being warned to expect long delays on some routes during thejubilee bank holiday period as many head off for a break. motoring group the rac estimates nearly 20 million journeys are being planned betwen wednesday and sunday. the advice is to set off before 6am or after 3pm. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, there are a few problems to watch out for. minor delays on the circle line and a part suspension on the district and hammersmith and city lines. 0nto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
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lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the next few days or so across the capital, but there will be some showers at times. notably so today and tomorrow. this morning, it's locally quite a chilly start to the day, temperatures having dropped right back into mid single figures for many of us last night. some early brightness, some sunshine around this morning. we will start to see the cloud building, low pressure is over us, there will be some showers forming as the daytime heating gets going. some of those showers through the afternoon could turn out to be heavy and they could be quite slow moving as well so they could last for some time. the winds are light, temperatures will once again for most of us peak in the mid—teens in celsius. 0vernight tonight, a rather messy picture. some showers at times, some areas of cloud, long clear spells. temperatures again dropping back into single figures as we head into tuesday. tuesday it will start to feel a little warmer, but again expect to see some showers as we head through the afternoon. lots of dry weather, on wednesday and indeed on thursday, for the start of thejubilee bank holiday weekend. there could be some showers moving
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in from the south, though, so do keep an eye on the forecast. that's it from me. i'm back in half an hour. now though it's back tojon and nina. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. coming up on breakfast this morning. we'll be finding out why a massive backlog means the brakes are on for learner drivers with some having to wait until next year to take their driving tests. tv hardman ross kemp will be chatting to us about how we can all take part in the second annual thank you day. historian lucy worsley is back investigating four dramatic chapters of british history including witch hunts, the black death and what happened to the princes in the tower.
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liverpool fans have arrived home after what has been described as a chaotic 2a hours for those that attended the champions league final in paris. french police have been criticised for firing tear gas and pepper spray at some fans waiting to get in to the stadium moments before kick off. we're joined now by bbcjournalist, nick parrot, who was at the match. good morning. how was your experience? it good morning. how was your experience?_ experience? it was the most petrifying — experience? it was the most petrifying experience - experience? it was the most petrifying experience i - experience? it was the most petrifying experience i have | experience? it was the most - petrifying experience i have ever had a football match and i been going to games home and away for 27 years. going to games home and away for 27 ears. ~ ., going to games home and away for 27 ears. . . . , , going to games home and away for 27 ears. ~ ., ., , , it is going to games home and away for 27 years._ it is chaotic l years. what happened? it is chaotic from the start. _ years. what happened? it is chaotic from the start. i _ years. what happened? it is chaotic from the start. i went _ years. what happened? it is chaotic from the start. i went to _ years. what happened? it is chaotic from the start. i went to the - years. what happened? it is chaotic from the start. i went to the ground from the start. i went to the ground from my hotel which was really close to hours before kick—off in the first sense of something wrong was at the outer perimeter. it was close to the ground. there were lots of people there and they were trying to squeeze you between a bottle bank and a wall of the building. there were kids by me, and you are getting
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crushed already. that was scary. to explain to people, there was this outer perimeter that you had to share your tick at that point but we got the turnstiles this is i came in, the tree by the building, i came in, the tree by the building, i came in there, i had my ticket checked twice and then when you look at the hive is there, we had it checked again and they marked the back of the ticket. it again and they marked the back of the ticket. ., ., ~' again and they marked the back of the ticket. ., ., ~ ., ., ., the ticket. it took me half an hour to net the ticket. it took me half an hour to get through _ the ticket. it took me half an hour to get through that _ the ticket. it took me half an hour to get through that little - to get through that little bit there. it did then i moved round to there. it did then i moved round to the gate, and that was gate y. when i got there there where 1000 fans there, they were, quite but they didn't understand where the gate was not open and they were not getting in. these are pictures i took at that moment. and then it got a bit more difficult as people were desperately trying to get in. this lady here was talking, the one in the pink, was talking about being squashed and asking fans to get back. the fans were talking to each other saying, come back, back. the fans were talking to each othersaying, come back, it back. the fans were talking to each other saying, come back, it is getting scary. they were not opening
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it, there was no information whatsoever, we didn't know why. that is a very narrow _ whatsoever, we didn't know why. that is a very narrow gate there. that - is a very narrow gate there. that ate was is a very narrow gate there. that gate was opened _ is a very narrow gate there. that gate was opened to _ is a very narrow gate there. trisgt gate was opened to let in or let out a disabled person so people are trying to get in and this is where it gets scary, one fan was punched there, he doesn't react, there was no aggression from liverpool fans towards the police, just confusion. they came up with the pepper spray. they came up with the pepper spray. they were using it like a stream, and if you are close, you saw people getting it fill in the face. i was five metres away it carries in the wind and it got me in the face. what wind and it got me in the face. what does it you — wind and it got me in the face. what does it you like? _ wind and it got me in the face. what does it you like? it's _ wind and it got me in the face. what does it you like? it's horrible, —— it feels like. does it you like? it's horrible, -- it feels like-— it feels like. it's horrible, it stints, it feels like. it's horrible, it stings. i — it feels like. it's horrible, it stings, i have _ it feels like. it's horrible, it stings, i have got - it feels like. it's horrible, it stings, i have got asthma l it feels like. it's horrible, it| stings, i have got asthma as it feels like. it's horrible, it - stings, i have got asthma as well and it took my breath away and that was at a distance. brute and it took my breath away and that was at a distance.— was at a distance. we are seeing --eole was at a distance. we are seeing people climbing _ was at a distance. we are seeing people climbing over, _ was at a distance. we are seeing people climbing over, what - was at a distance. we are seeing people climbing over, what wasl people climbing over, what was happening? i
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people climbing over, what was happening?— people climbing over, what was haueninu? ~ ,.,, , ., happening? i think it is a sense of there, happening? i think it is a sense of there. this _ happening? i think it is a sense of there. this is _ happening? i think it is a sense of there, this is the _ happening? i think it is a sense of there, this is the girl _ happening? i think it is a sense of there, this is the girl in _ happening? i think it is a sense of there, this is the girl in the - there, this is the girl in the picked up and i am guessing she has probably been pepper sprayed. you could see her distress as she was being moved away. when the riot police came out it was chaotic. british riot police tend to work to an order, the french were all over the place. i had tojump over a fence to get away from them at some point. the safest place was to be in the ground which is why the fans were trying to get in. i almost got pushed out of the outer perimeter were the right police were there, i had to push my —— when the right police came there. i had to push against their will. the police went for anyone who moved so staying still was the best thing to do. you work for the _ still was the best thing to do. you work for the bbc _ still was the best thing to do. you work for the bbc as a journalist but you were at the match, you weren't going for the press box, you are a fanning your own right? yes. going for the press box, you are a farming your own right?— going for the press box, you are a
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farming your own right? fanning your own right? yes, i got a ersonal fanning your own right? yes, i got a personal ticket _ fanning your own right? yes, i got a personal ticket from _ fanning your own right? yes, i got a personal ticket from the _ fanning your own right? yes, i got a personal ticket from the livable - personal ticket from the livable allocation. we were hearing the tickets were shake. there is a possibility they could be stop —— we were hearing the tickets were fake. i'm not an expert on ticket printing but i expect that qr code could be easy to copy. it but i expect that qr code could be easy to copy-— easy to copy. it doesn't look particularly _ easy to copy. it doesn't look particularly sophisticated, i easy to copy. it doesn't look i particularly sophisticated, you sometimes have holograms on them. it looks a bit basic. brute sometimes have holograms on them. it looks a bit basic.— looks a bit basic. we will come to that. looks a bit basic. we will come to that- they — looks a bit basic. we will come to that- they had — looks a bit basic. we will come to that. they had a _ looks a bit basic. we will come to that. they had a marker - looks a bit basic. we will come to that. they had a marker pen - looks a bit basic. we will come to that. they had a marker pen that| that. they had a marker pen that they wiped on the back, and it came up they wiped on the back, and it came up pink eventually. this was the ticket from the key final in 2018, this has a hologram, much harder to replicate. 50 this has a hologram, much harder to relicate. ,, ~' this has a hologram, much harder to relicate. i. ~ ,, replicate. so you think the issue was that the _ replicate. so you think the issue was that the guys _ replicate. so you think the issue was that the guys at _ replicate. so you think the issue was that the guys at the - replicate. so you think the issue l was that the guys at the turnstiles did not know which was a real ticket? , , , did not know which was a real ticket?- it _ did not know which was a real ticket?- it is - did not know which was a real ticket?- it is hard - did not know which was a real ticket?- it is hard to | ticket? possibly. it is hard to know, ticket? possibly. it is hard to know. and — ticket? possibly. it is hard to know, and looking _ ticket? possibly. it is hard to know, and looking at - ticket? possibly. it is hard to know, and looking at the - ticket? possibly. it is hard to - know, and looking at the footage, what strikes me as it could have been so much worse.—
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what strikes me as it could have been so much worse. yes, i have seen bad thins been so much worse. yes, i have seen bad things at — been so much worse. yes, i have seen bad things at football _ been so much worse. yes, i have seen bad things at football matches, - been so much worse. yes, i have seen bad things at football matches, i - bad things at football matches, i was at anfield when sean cox was attacked by hooligans and i was close that, that was a terrible thing but it was one flashpoint. this was tension over hours. what thing but it was one flashpoint. this was tension over hours. what is secondary but _ this was tension over hours. what is secondary but still _ this was tension over hours. what is secondary but still important, - this was tension over hours. what is secondary but still important, you i secondary but still important, you cannot guarantee being in the champions league ever again, it is a massive occasion for fans, so champions league ever again, it is a massive occasion forfans, so mind is elsewhere. massive occasion for fans, so mind is elsewhere-— is elsewhere. this is a dream, liverpool _ is elsewhere. this is a dream, liverpool have _ is elsewhere. this is a dream, liverpool have been _ is elsewhere. this is a dream, liverpool have been in - is elsewhere. this is a dream, liverpool have been in three l is elsewhere. this is a dream, i liverpool have been in three cup finals this year, but they have not beenin finals this year, but they have not been in the fa cup finalfor ten years before that. there are people who are going there for the first time and who may never go to the ball back to get. i am uncomfortable about going to a —— who may never go to a football match again. i am comfortable now about going to games. 50 comfortable now about going to iames. comfortable now about going to names. i. ., ., comfortable now about going to names. ,, ., ., ., games. so you will not go to the football? l _ games. so you will not go to the football? iwill— games. so you will not go to the football? i will go _ games. so you will not go to the football? i will go to _ games. so you will not go to the football? i will go to anfield - games. so you will not go to the football? i will go to anfield but| games. so you will not go to the | football? i will go to anfield but i will be more _ football? i will go to anfield but i will be more careful— football? i will go to anfield but i will be more careful in _ football? i will go to anfield but i will be more careful in my -
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football? i will go to anfield but i i will be more careful in my planning, and a country like france where the riot police have a reputation for using pepper spray, riot police have a reputation for using pepperspray, i neverwant riot police have a reputation for using pepper spray, i never want to be pepper sprayed again. we using pepper spray, i never want to be pepper sprayed again.— using pepper spray, i never want to be pepper sprayed again. we have to be pepper sprayed again. we have to be very careful _ be pepper sprayed again. we have to be very careful about _ be pepper sprayed again. we have to be very careful about comparisons i be very careful about comparisons that because of the legacy of hillsborough, to what extent was that in people's mines? i hillsborough, to what extent was that in people's mines?— hillsborough, to what extent was that in people's mines? i heard it straightaway. _ that in people's mines? i heard it straightaway, there _ that in people's mines? i heard it straightaway, there was - that in people's mines? i heard it straightaway, there was an - that in people's mines? i heard it| straightaway, there was an elderly couple there was talking about, this is like hillsborough. i was trying to protect them, she was quite scared. you heard people mention it when the crash was started. that is why the fans were vocal, saying, get back, push back, come now, we will not get in if we would not come. it sounds —— if we are not calmer. it sounds —— if we are not calmer. it sounds terrifying. thank you so much for all of that first person experience.— for all of that first person exerience. ~ ., ., ., experience. we will hear from other eo - le experience. we will hear from other people who —
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experience. we will hear from other people who were — experience. we will hear from other people who were there _ experience. we will hear from other people who were there and - experience. we will hear from other people who were there and we - experience. we will hear from other people who were there and we will. people who were there and we will hear from — people who were there and we will hear from the mayor of liverpool about _ hear from the mayor of liverpool about what she would stand down. there _ about what she would stand down. there are — about what she would stand down. there are meetings taking place in paris _ there are meetings taking place in paris to— there are meetings taking place in paris to try— there are meetings taking place in paris to try and —— about what she wants_ paris to try and —— about what she wants done — paris to try and —— about what she wants done now. there are meetings taking _ wants done now. there are meetings taking place in paris.— taking place in paris. there is a lot of other _ taking place in paris. there is a lot of other sports _ taking place in paris. there is a lot of other sports going - taking place in paris. there is a lot of other sports going on - taking place in paris. there is a lot of other sports going on as | lot of other sports going on as well. this was a big day in nottingham. myself and nick spent time in paris at the women's world cup, definitely at the women's world cup, definitely a different experience. let's talk about nottingham forest. nottingham forest are back in the premier league. twice european champions, they have spent 23 years in the championship and league one, but yesterday they finally won promotion back to the top division of english football. adam wild reports from wembley. after almost a quarter of a century, nottingham forest are finally back amongst english football's elite. the prize, the prestige of the premier league awaits,
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but for now, it's the promotion party that can begin. absolutely over the moon, really. i have been supporting forest since i was, sort of, that high when my dad used to take me down and, yeah, it's just i've followed them all over europe and it's absolutely fantastic, isn't it, really? great day, obviously, premier league, first time in 20 odd years, brilliant day. they put us through the mill, . don't they, nottingham forest? my nerves are shredded, absolutely shredded. - so, premier league next season, looking forward to it. _ it's not the easiest way to get promoted. it is often all at once the most agonising, the most exciting. in the end, forest needed just one goal to beat huddersfield town. it came before half—time, the unfortunate levi colwill deflecting into his own net. it wasn't pretty, it didn't have to be. forest fans will remember the goal forever. the one that ended the exile. the final whistle confirming it. i'm just pleased for everybody connected with the football club. we are a big football club, we know
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that, full of history and tradition. we stand on that proud but i've always said, let's try and create the next positive chapter. and we've managed to do that. they call this football's richest game, 170 million the estimated value of promotion. but for the nottingham forest fans, this means far more than money. it signals the end of the wait, it signals the start of their new premier league era. adam wild, bbc news, at wembley. celtic won the women's scottish cup, and with it, ensured that glasgow city finished a season trophyless for the first time since 2005. izzy atkinson got the winning goal in extra—time, making it 3—2, against city at tynecastle. they beat the same opposition to lift the league cup earlier in the season. formula 0ne's monaco grand prix was badly affected by heavy rain. the start was delayed by over an hour after heavy downpours
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but the race was eventually won by red bull's sergio perez. his team outfoxed rivals ferrari allowing perez to move from third to the lead during a wet part of the race. championship leader max verstappen finished third, crucially ahead of title rival charles leclerc. it means verstappen extends his lead to nine points. lewis hamilton started and finished eighth. rafa nadal took five sets to get past felix auger aliassime at the french open. nadal lost the opening set but roared back to win the next two. the canadian who is coached by nadal�*s uncle toni made sure the match went to five sets with nadal winning the final set 6—3. it sets up a mouthwatering quarter final against novak djokovic who swept aside argentina's diego schwartzmann in straight sets. american teenager coco gauff has equalled her best run
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at roland garros by reaching the last eight. belgian elise mertens was seen off in straight sets. she'll play fellow american sloane stephens next. the world of horse racing has been paying tribute to lester piggott, who has died at the of 86. he won the derby a record nine times among almost 11,500 winners. in 1987, he was jailed for tax fraud, spending a year and a day in prison, but returned to racing after his release, before retiring at the age of 59. an incredible competitor. a ruthless competitor, somebody who marched to the beat of his own drum, but someone with an instinctive and sympathetic talent on a horse. somebody who completely understood horses and racing, and more than that, someone with an intense thirst to know everything about every race he was riding it. he was way ahead of his time and he had a massive edge.
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he was a phenomenaljockey. we will react a little bit more in the next couple of hours to that news. lats couple of hours to that news. lots of memories. _ couple of hours to that news. lots of memories, thank _ couple of hours to that news. lots of memories, thank you. 6:41am. couple of hours to that news. lots i of memories, thank you. 6:41am on monday morning- — the cost of building materials has soared in the last year. ben's at a builder's merchants in stoke this morning to find out more. good morning. then the builder this morning. we are at this builders merchants, they sell everything from bricks to timber, they have got some big pipes, that is the technical term, and gravel, everything you would need rebuilding job. the thing is that the cost of all of these raw materials is searching for various reasons. you have the problem of energy costs, high energy costs we talk about quite a lot, transportation is a problem, a
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shortage of lorry drivers and the big covid shut down. let me talk you do the numbers. building materials have gone up by more than 25 —— 23%. some items have gone up even more, one merchant told us that the price of timber has gone up by 70%. plastic as well, if you have a pvc door fitted, plastic as well, if you have a pvc doorfitted, it could cost plastic as well, if you have a pvc door fitted, it could cost you £200 more now than it would have done a year ago. x0 83% of builders are having to put their prices up for thejobs having to put their prices up for the jobs they are doing for people like you and me. that is if they can get hold of goods. there are supply problems which means that people like sabiha have to wait longer for jobs to be done at home. this is the porch the builders left unfinished. the first builder, even before the price had gone up, he was playing up a bit with timing and everything. maybe it's because the price had gone up, and the quote
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they gave initially, they can't cope with it. it's traumatising, basically because your living standard, your house, everything, is so affected, obviously. it does affect your emotion lot. let's speak to the managing director here at emery�*s, james. are you noticing the prices going up, and if so what are you noticing? goad so what are you noticing? good morning- _ so what are you noticing? good morning- we — so what are you noticing? good morning. we are _ so what are you noticing? good morning. we are in _ so what are you noticing? (13mm morning. we are in unprecedented, uncharted times at the moment. steel is a major factor, uncharted times at the moment. steel is a majorfactor, timber as uncharted times at the moment. steel is a major factor, timber as you have mentioned, but all across the range, bricks, blocks, it changes from day to day, it is that fast at the moment. from day to day, it is that fast at the moment-— from day to day, it is that fast at the moment. ., ., ., ~ the moment. you have worked here since 1999, — the moment. you have worked here since 1999. a _ the moment. you have worked here since 1999, a good _ the moment. you have worked here since 1999, a good couple _ the moment. you have worked here since 1999, a good couple of- since 1999, a good couple of decades. how does what we are seeing now compare with what has gone before in terms of price spikes and
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economically difficult times? we have never _ economically difficult times? - have never seen anything like it in the industry. we have had price increases before, recessions, good times and bad times but at the moment it feels very buoyant, sales are good, but we question whether we can actually see it is being masked by price increases. so you have got a volume increase which is only 1.5% but there is a big feel good factor in the industry, because sales are up in the industry, because sales are up 18%. so we are wondering how masked the actual real picture is at the moment. 50 masked the actual real picture is at the moment-— the moment. so you sell to the builders. the moment. so you sell to the builders- if _ the moment. so you sell to the builders. if they _ the moment. so you sell to the builders. if they have _ the moment. so you sell to the builders. if they have to - the moment. so you sell to the builders. if they have to pay - the moment. so you sell to the i builders. if they have to pay more for materials, they have to charge customers more, so what do builders say when you tell them that the prices have gone up? it say when you tell them that the prices have gone up?— say when you tell them that the prices have gone up? it has been really difficult, _ prices have gone up? it has been really difficult, i _ prices have gone up? it has been really difficult, i feel— prices have gone up? it has been really difficult, i feel for- prices have gone up? it has been really difficult, i feel for the - really difficult, i feel for the builders, our customers and end users. but everyone can see it is the case. it is an accepted fact,
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people are feeling it with their own fuel bills, electricity at home, transport costs. there are pressures from every angle. people there appreciate that it is not rank profiteering or anything like that, it is the nature of the world and the economy we are in. the way that is driving everything, we are yet to see but it does feel very buoyant. thank you very much indeed, james, thank you for speaking to us. all of that means that if the question you are asking this morning is, can ben the builderfix it, yes, he can, but he will have to charge you more because the raw materials are going to be more expensive. you because the raw materials are going to be more expensive.— because the raw materials are going to be more expensive. you forgot to do the pensive _ to be more expensive. you forgot to do the pensive chin _ to be more expensive. you forgot to do the pensive chin scratch - to be more expensive. you forgot to do the pensive chin scratch when - to be more expensive. you forgot to| do the pensive chin scratch when you said how much the raw materials are. it is going to cost you! more said how much the raw materials are. it is going to cost you!— it is going to cost you! more than it would have _ it is going to cost you! more than it would have done. _ it is going to cost you! more than it would have done. but - it is going to cost you! more than it would have done. but as - it is going to cost you! more than j it would have done. but as james vincent, it would have done. but as james
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vincent. they _ it would have done. but as james vincent, they cannot _ it would have done. but as james vincent, they cannot predict - it would have done. but as james vincent, they cannot predict how| vincent, they cannot predict how much prices are going to go up by so if they are setting prices for the customer, it is impossible. what if they are setting prices for the customer, it is impossible. what are the implications _ customer, it is impossible. what are the implications for _ customer, it is impossible. what are the implications for things _ customer, it is impossible. what are the implications for things like - the implications for things like house—building? if builders cannot build houses, we do not solve the housing crisis and it goes down the chain. that housing crisis and it goes down the chain. �* ., , housing crisis and it goes down the chain. �* . , ., housing crisis and it goes down the chain. ~ . , ., ., ., housing crisis and it goes down the chain. ~ ., ., ., ,, chain. at least we have got a bank hohda chain. at least we have got a bank holiday weekend _ chain. at least we have got a bank holiday weekend and _ chain. at least we have got a bank holiday weekend and the - chain. at least we have got a bank holiday weekend and the sun - chain. at least we have got a bank holiday weekend and the sun is . chain. at least we have got a bank i holiday weekend and the sun is going to shine, lie, is it? —— matt, is it? a pensive weatherman as well! we have got some reasonably good news. we have got the bunting out. you cannot have enough bunting. we cannot have enough bunting. we cannot have enough bunting. we cannot have the exact details on the bank holiday weekends but there are some promising signs, high pressure in charge to begin with you which generally means dry. maybe thursday into friday we could get some showers before high pressure builds backin showers before high pressure builds back in and then through saturday and sunday, how close an area of low
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pressure from france gets to summon areas, it could strengthen the winter break some heavy showers. there is a chance of a few showers over thejubilee weekend but there is a chance of a few showers over the jubilee weekend but for most of the over thejubilee weekend but for most of the time for most of you it will be dry which is great news if you have any outdoor plants. —— any plans outside. and it is going to be warm as well. a few degrees higher than normal. there could be an easterly breeze to make it feel cooler in the east. but a lot of positives over the weekend at the moment. as they are now and over the next few days, sunshine and showers is the name of the game. we have got plenty of showers at the moment, particularly across northern and western areas of the country. the splashes of blue on the chart. south and east, a dry start, chilly start
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across east anglia and the south—east, but it should warm up with sunny spells. cloud about increasing through the day, showers developing as they worked south and east. some will become heavy and thundery. fewershowers east. some will become heavy and thundery. fewer showers across the south, but they will be slow—moving with a gentle breeze and in between the sunshine it should feel pleasantly warm. it would not be a bank holiday weekend without a bit ofjeopardy! put the bunting out, bring it in! thank you! last night, viewers were treated to a special, one off bbc documentary, featuring her majesty as we've never seen her before. it was fantastic. beautiful footage. ahead of her platinum jubilee, �*the unseen queen' explored hundreds of private home movies shot by the royal family over the last 90 years. it is well worth watching on iplayer if you have not seen it. among them, were memories made on board the royal yacht britannia,
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and breakfast'sjohn maguire is on board for us this morning. he is ona he is on a vip position, seem to be on board. —— soon to be on board. good morning. happyjubilee week and what better place to start, the royal yacht britannia, looking resplendent this morning, celebrating its own silverjubilee next year, 25 years of being a tourist attraction. but before that it was circumnavigating the globe. interesting stuff everywhere, there is a rolls—royce phantom, we will see a lot of those, and look at this hole. —— look at this hull, the rivets have been ground down so it is a smooth mirrorlike finish on the side. this is a statue of the policeman who kept the crew in line
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backin policeman who kept the crew in line back in the day. they were known as yachties. we will take you on board, meet some yachties and some fun stories. 0ur cameras go on board the royal yacht britannia, now moored by tower bridge. for almost 45 years, she served as a floating royal palace, a global business centre, and a family refuge away from the permanent scrutiny of public life. her majesty's yacht britannia hosted kings, queens, presidents and prime ministers while the crew ensured everything ran to perfection, above and below decks. rear entrance to the engine room. former engineer rushy, everyone has a nickname in the royal navy, of course, is showing us around. and here we are inside the mechanical palace of the royal yacht. because although she was a floating palace for the royal family,
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this was our cathedral down here. the engines haven't run for years but when they did, nothing was left to chance as the order came down from the bridge to set sail. and we were waiting for a telephone call from the bridge that says, obey then. you know at that point the royal family are on board. and she's just about 30 foot up there. you cannot imagine the feeling. you can't see her, the feeling of all of a sudden the responsibility now for the safety and security of the royal family has come within this family. so we were really, i was the queen's chauffer without eyes. ijust did what the bridge told me. but we got her to the church on time.
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out of all the gauges, dials and warning lights, rushy reckons this instrument, the inclinometer, which says if the ship is level, is the most important in the engine room. especially challenging if guests gathered on one side of the ship to watch the royal marines band. all these people are at a cocktail party. so when they go on the upper deck, each and every one of them is a spirit level because they have got a glass. so you can't afford them to put it down, even her majesty has got a glass. so you can't bluff it. if you're not perpendicular, everyone will know. in the state dining room, these days available for hire and laid up for dinner, we find former steward peter. it's not that he works here any more, he just can't resist making sure everything is shipshape. he recalls how the crew, known as yachties, would have to set up and dismantle functions in a matter of minutes. so you would have to bring the furniture down past the stairs, and nine times out of ten the queen always used to, when i was there,
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would sit on the stairs after a long evening and go, "ah!", and talk to herlady in waiting. it was quite funny, there were many a time i had to ask her, "excuse me, your majesty, would you mind moving, i have to bring the chairs down". "0h, am i in the way?" yes! and it was that sort of rapport, but within 20 minutes it would be all back in the right place ready to start again. keeping the crew fit and healthy were the cooks, the medics and the pti, the physical training instructor. george explained how they made the most of limited space with an ingenious take on tug—of—war. there would be a team here which was the port side, and you would have the rope which would be laid up here, and then it would go round the capstan, here, across here, to the capstan, and then down here you would have your opposition. so they're sort next to each other? so you're throwing abuse at each otherfrom either side. and sometimes there would be a royal ringer.
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the queen once described the yacht as a place where she was able to relax and looked visibly upset at the decommissioning in 1997. since then, it was bought to leith near edinburgh to become a tourist attraction. so now, the royal yacht that brought the royals to the rest of the world has visitors coming around the world to britannia. lots of interesting things to tell you about. if we can squeeze them in. the clock is set to one minute past three, and all of the clocks on board the yacht are set to that, thatis board the yacht are set to that, that is the time at which her majesty left the yacht for the last time when she was decommissioned, she left in portsmouth. the old cocktail cabinet here, the easel that was often used by prince philip. they used the yacht for summer holidays, sailing up the west coast of scotland. this was one of
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the favourite rooms on board of her majesty, the sun lounge. let's meet one of the tour guides to tell us lots of fascinating things, tell us about the bell, why is it so interesting? it about the bell, why is it so interesting?— about the bell, why is it so interestinu? , ., , , ., interesting? it is the only place on board where _ interesting? it is the only place on board where you _ interesting? it is the only place on board where you actually - interesting? it is the only place on board where you actually see - interesting? it is the only place on board where you actually see the i board where you actually see the name the yacht britannia, because it was so prestigious at the time you didn't even need it on the side stop mike. , ., , didn't even need it on the side stop mike. , . , ,, didn't even need it on the side stop mike. , ., , i. ., ., mike. usually you would have it written on _ mike. usually you would have it written on the _ mike. usually you would have it written on the bow, _ mike. usually you would have it written on the bow, on - mike. usually you would have it written on the bow, on the - written on the bow, on the registration, but you didn't need that. , �* ., , ., that. didn't need it on this one. visitors are _ that. didn't need it on this one. visitors are back _ that. didn't need it on this one. visitors are back after - that. didn't need it on this one. visitors are back after the - that. didn't need it on this one. - visitors are back after the pandemic what they ask you more typically? they ask whether the royal family have been back on board themselves, the queen has not be but we had the wedding reception of zara and mike tindall, so we had her cousins, princes harry and william, the duchess kate and the princess
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eugenie and beatrice. but duchess kate and the princess eugenie and beatrice.- duchess kate and the princess eugenie and beatrice. but not the queen? not— eugenie and beatrice. but not the queen? not since _ eugenie and beatrice. but not the queen? not since she _ eugenie and beatrice. but not the queen? not since she was - queen? not since she was decommissioned - queen? not since she was decommissioned in - queen? not since she was decommissioned in 1997. l queen? not since she was - decommissioned in 1997. what is queen? not since she was _ decommissioned in 1997. what is your favourite story? _ decommissioned in 1997. what is your favourite story? it _ decommissioned in 1997. what is your favourite story? it is _ decommissioned in 1997. what is your favourite story? it is to _ decommissioned in 1997. what is your favourite story? it is to do _ decommissioned in 1997. what is your favourite story? it is to do without - favourite story? it is to do without it, prince charles _ favourite story? it is to do without it, prince charles was _ favourite story? it is to do without it, prince charles was eight - favourite story? it is to do without it, prince charles was eight or - favourite story? it is to do without| it, prince charles was eight or nine and he was out here it is about here, prince charles was eight or nine and he was playing football on the bow, and he kicked it overboard, so they went to pick it up in the middle of the irish sea, and since he got it back, he kicked it straight back overboard again. it is a place where they can truly relax, here. . , . . a place where they can truly relax, here. . ,. . ., a place where they can truly relax, here. . ,. ., ., ., here. fascinating to wandering around here. _ here. fascinating to wandering around here, we _ here. fascinating to wandering around here, we will— here. fascinating to wandering around here, we will talk- here. fascinating to wandering around here, we will talk to i here. fascinating to wandering i around here, we will talk to more yachties later on, jeff the chef, i wonder what he did on board? let's get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, this is bbc london. i'm frankie mccamley.
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survivors of a deadly fairground accident in south—west london will plant a tree today to remember the victims. it's now 50 years since the big dipper roller—coaster crashed in battersea park, killing five children and injuring more than a dozen. there's now a campaign for a permanent memorial. the mayor said he's in talks with wandsworth council. i know from other memorials i have been involved in, it's a place you could go to just to reflect, to think, to spend time with others, to commemorate this awful tragedy. but also its a reminder of the importance of health and safety, to make sure we get things right. we also need to educate londoners about this tragedy almost 50 years ago. it's feared many people in temporary accomodation are "trapped" in their situation due to a shortage of affordable homes. a three—year study by the charity crisis suggests almost half of those in need of housing remained homeless despite seeking help from their council. there are calls for more social homes.
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the government says it's invested more than £11 billion on affordable housing. the sale of chelsea football club is expected to be completed today. its after the government and premier league approved the takeover worth more than four billion pounds. chelsea was put up for sale in march before its owner roman abramovich was sanctioned over his links to the russian president vladimir putin. drivers are being warned to expect long delays on some routes during thejubilee bank holiday period as many head off for a break. the motoring group the rac estimates nearly 20 million journeys are being planned betwen wednesday and sunday. the advice is to set off before 6am or after 3pm. well, if you're heading out on public transport this morning, there are a few problems to watch out for. severe delays on the circle line and a part suspension
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on the district and hammersmith and city lines. 0nto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the next few days or so across the capital, but there will be some showers at times. notably so today and tomorrow. this morning, it's locally quite a chilly start to the day, temperatures having dropped right back into mid single figures for many of us last night. some early brightness, some sunshine around this morning. we will start to see the cloud building, low pressure is over us, there will be some showers forming as the daytime heating gets going. some of those showers through the afternoon could turn out to be heavy and they could be quite slow moving as well so they could last for some time. the winds are light, temperatures will once again for most of us peak in the mid—teens in celsius. 0vernight tonight, a rather messy picture. some showers at times, some areas of cloud, long clear spells. temperatures again dropping back into single figures as we head into tuesday. tuesday it will start to feel a little warmer, but again expect to see some showers as we head through the afternoon. lots of dry weather, on wednesday and indeed on thursday,
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for the start of thejubilee bank holiday weekend. there could be some showers moving in from the south, though, so do keep an eye on the forecast. that's it from me. bye for now. good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. 0ur headlines today: fall back! an emergency meeting in paris as the uk calls for an investigation into the treatment of liverpool fans at the champions league final. president biden meets grieving families in texas amid anger at the slow police response to last week's school shooting in which 19 children and two teachers were killed. nottingham forest return to the premier league. after 23 years away, the two—time european champions are back in the top flight of english football after beating huddersfield at wembley.
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and ross kemp will tell us why we should be knocking on our neighbours' doors for this year's thank you day. plus i will take a look at the weather including thejubilee weekend forecast which is looking promising but for the next few days it's a day of sunshine and at times heavy showers. it's monday 30th may. our main story is that the french government will hold an emergency meeting today with uefa and other officials, to examine what went wrong at the champions league final on saturday. there were chaotic scenes before and after the match after french police repeatedly fired tear gas and pepper spray at liverpool fans waiting to get into the stadium. the uk's culture secretary nadine dorries has called for an investigation into what happened, as tim muffett reports. fall back!
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in the countdown to kick—off, this was the situation facing many fans on saturday night. real madrid's 1—0 victory over liverpool at the stade de france has been largely overshadowed by what went on outside the ground. it was just... the only word i can think of is chaos. we were patiently trying to queue. and then we'd be pushed by the police and kettled against railings, against the wall. and then pepper spray had come out and i was completely disorientated, didn't know what was happening with all the crowds that were there as well. there were children crying. there were grown men who were kind of shouting out that they needed help. this nine—year—old boy was one of those who suffered the after—effects of tear gas. many liverpool fans say the policing was shambolic and heavy—handed. there was no communication. we weren't told if the gate was going to open, when it was going to open.
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it wasjust chaotic and actually it was a disgrace and it was very, very dangerous. it was shambolic. it was dangerous and hostile - and one of the worst atmospheres i've ever experienced. no football fan should ever experience that. at a blue ribbon event. uefa said that turnstiles became blocked because thousands of liverpool fans arrived with fake tickets. footage also show some people climbing overfences, but it's not clear whether they're liverpool fans or not. today, the french sports ministry will host a meeting with uefa, the french football association, stadium officials and police. it says it wants to draw lessons from the event. the culture secretary, nadine dorries, has called for a formal investigation. she described the footage and descriptions from fans as deeply concerning. "i urge uefa to launch a formal investigation into what went wrong and why", she said in a statement.
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following their defeat in paris there was still a victory parade in liverpool yesterday, the club having won both the fa cup and league cup this season, a positive end to what had been a dispiriting weekend for the team and its fans. tim muffett, bbc news. we'll be hearing from fans who attended the match throughout the morning. to get a first—hand account of what exactly they saw and what these meetings might lead to later today. the us presidentjoe biden has promised to turn "pain into action" during a visit to the texan town of uvalde where nineteen children and two teachers were killed in america's latest mass shooting. the president and the first lady placed white roses at a memorial for the victims, before meeting families and survivors. from texas, our north america correspondent, barbara plett usher, reports. do something!
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the commander in chief was visiting a community in shock, devastated by loss. "do something, do something" the crowd chanted as he left a church service. "we will, we will", he responded. his only public remarks on the trip. it is the hardest visit a president has to make, especially when the victims are so young. outside the school, mr biden and his wifejill paused to recognise each of those murdered while cowering on the floor of their classroom. 19 children and two teachers. later, they met privately with the families. a bouquet of flowers added to the mound of remembrance that seeks to dampen the horror by honouring the dead. but the police response to the shooting is now under review by the justice department. the rampage began when the teenage gunman entered the school through a back door, armed with a high—powered rifle. children as young as nine were trapped with him for an hour before security forces
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finally stormed in. this small community has pulled together to face an unspeakable tragedy. but the political environment is difficult. there's a fierce debate about how to stop such attacks. the president wants to tighten gun laws and faces strong partisan opposition, especially in texas. this is, after all, gun country. there are mixed feelings about mr biden's visit. i don't know if it can make any difference, actually. i think that as a nation, we'rejust very divided. but i think that in a time of crisis, itjust... it's great for leaders to show unity. we just need to grieve. we just... come here and give us hope for tomorrow. but don't tell us politically what we need to do. most of all, the families don't want their pain to be drawn into the political disputes. patricia castanon is lost in a fog of grief at the death of her niece, annabelle. she was happy, smiley.
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this is how she was with me. there's no words for me to say. she was just a good person. we know that the president is coming to visit. do you think that will help? no. why do you say that? because he can't bring her back. he can't bring her back. he can't bring none of them back. and nobody can. he can't bring them back. and he's struggling to protect others. his biggest obstacle is how to prevent this from happening again. this is the second time in a month that president biden has made a visit to console a community recovering from a mass shooting. and he finds it very distressing and frustrating. and here, of course, they're facing another difficult week as they prepare to begin burying their loved ones. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas. ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky has visited troops in the kharkiv region, on the country's battered
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eastern front line. it's his first official trip outside the capital since the russian invasion began. let's speak to our correspondent, joe inwood. what does this tell us, the fact that president zelensky felt able to get sound outside of kyiv and visit the second city? it get sound outside of kyiv and visit the second city?— the second city? it tells us that the second city? it tells us that the battle _ the second city? it tells us that the battle for _ the second city? it tells us that the battle for kharkiv, - the second city? it tells us that the battle for kharkiv, if- the second city? it tells us that the battle for kharkiv, if not i the battle for kharkiv, if not completely over, has gone in ukraine's favour. go back a couple of weeks and the city was under almost continuous bombardment but then we started to see ukrainian forces on the counteroffensive pushing the russians all the way back to the international border and while kharkiv is not completely free of russian artillery, there were more barrages yesterday, the fact that president zelensky whose personal security is essential to the country and its war effort tells
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you something about how they feel the war is going here but this is not the main front line. kharkiv has been defended successfully, it is in the donbas in the east where we are seeing russian advances coming and in the last half or the governor of luhansk region has said russian troops are now inside the city of severodonetsk. this is the focus of their attack, this is where their men and their armour are pushing and it seems like they are pushing into the city. jae it seems like they are pushing into the ci . , ., . it seems like they are pushing into the ci . g ., ., ., it seems like they are pushing into the ci ., ., ., ., ., ., ,, the city. joe edward, for now thank ou, and the city. joe edward, for now thank you. and we _ the city. joe edward, for now thank you, and we have _ the city. joe edward, for now thank you, and we have another - the city. joe edward, for now thank you, and we have another story i the city. joe edward, for now thank| you, and we have another story this morning about ukraine. the band who won this year's eurovision song contest, kalush 0rchestra, have sold their trophy at auction for more than £700,000, to raise money for the war in ukraine. the sale coincided with the band's appearance at a charity concert for ukraine in berlin. the funds will be used to buy drones and a ground control system for the army.
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it's quite a moment when they won it. let's check in with matt and i look at the weather that's in store. good morning, both, a new weekend a bright start to the south and east where it has been quite chilly so a touch of frost earlier in parts of suffolk and norfolk but a different story further north, more cloud, outside wigan it is a soggy start, showers have been packing into north—west england and wales and parts of scotland and northern ireland. few showers in the south at the moment so most of you will have a dry commute with a fair bit of cloud but some sunshine but overall or cloud than sunshine and those shower clouds will bubble up more in the afternoon so some heavy and thundery showers, not moving a great deal because there will be a gentle breeze but if you get caught under the showers the south they could be stuck with you for a while. parts
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will be dry all day long, parts of kent and is london and essex staying dry and in the north showers will come and go but slow moving, and not especially warm in the cloudier moments, 17 degrees that are high. tonight we have plenty of cloud with a few showers but with the bright longest across parts of scotland, cooler here tonight which leads into a cool start to tuesday but tuesday looks like another day of sunshine and showers, fewer showers across western areas with more turning dry and a bit warmer. thank you, matt, and we will have a fulljubilee update later on. as if waiting for your driving test wasn't scary enough... learner drivers are still facing major delays to book their driving tests, with cities including london, birmingham and manchester, having no slots available
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for at least six months. just to extend the tension! the body responsible for examinations, the dvsa, say they have introduced further measures to try and help resolve the issue — they include reducing the average waiting time from the current 1a weeks, to nine weeks by the end of the year. which is still a long time. they're suggesting recruiting a further 300 examiners, and widening the hours that testing can take place, which they say has increased capacity by more than 100,000 tests in the past year. we can talk more about this with ashley neil, a liverpool—based driving instructor and also broadcaster and former top gear host steve berry. good morning to you both. we will start with you, ashley, so you are seeing the front line of driving test. what is the main blockage? people booking tests before they are ready is _ people booking tests before they are ready is a _ people booking tests before they are ready is a big thing. what they also tend to _
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ready is a big thing. what they also tend to do — ready is a big thing. what they also tend to do is honestly get ready for test and _ tend to do is honestly get ready for test and then they don't prepare properly— test and then they don't prepare properly and when they don't prepare properly. _ properly and when they don't prepare properly, they are then failing and it's causing — properly, they are then failing and it's causing tests to not be passed and its— it's causing tests to not be passed and it's a — it's causing tests to not be passed and it's a snowball effect. is it's causing tests to not be passed and it's a snowball effect.- and it's a snowball effect. is that ha enin: and it's a snowball effect. is that happening more _ and it's a snowball effect. is that happening more now— and it's a snowball effect. is that happening more now than - happening more now than pre—pandemic? it happening more now than pre-pandemic?_ happening more now than pre-pandemic? happening more now than --re-andemic? ., , , pre-pandemic? it has always been the case, pre-pandemic? it has always been the case. people — pre-pandemic? it has always been the case. people are _ pre-pandemic? it has always been the case. people are in — pre-pandemic? it has always been the case, people are in a _ pre-pandemic? it has always been the case, people are in a rush _ pre-pandemic? it has always been the case, people are in a rush to - pre-pandemic? it has always been the case, people are in a rush to get i pre-pandemic? it has always been the case, people are in a rush to get to i case, people are in a rush to get to the test _ case, people are in a rush to get to the test as— case, people are in a rush to get to the test as quickly and easily as they can — the test as quickly and easily as they can. but the pandemic has made things— they can. but the pandemic has made things worse. people who then had tats but— things worse. people who then had tats but at— things worse. people who then had tats but at the start of the pandemic were not able to pass the test, _ pandemic were not able to pass the test. we _ pandemic were not able to pass the test, we were all closed down and it has been _ test, we were all closed down and it has been a — test, we were all closed down and it has been a snowball effect of people who then _ has been a snowball effect of people who then wanted to start to learn but weren't able to start so it has been _ but weren't able to start so it has been a _ but weren't able to start so it has been a big — but weren't able to start so it has been a big snowball effect. 0ne been a big snowball effect. one thing _ been a big snowball effect. one thing after the other has led on.
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let's _ thing after the other has led on. let's check— thing after the other has led on. let's check in with steve because you know this in your own household, talk us through what's happening with your kids.— with your kids. today is my birthday- — with your kids. today is my birthday- happy _ with your kids. today is my birthday. happy birthday! l with your kids. today is my i birthday. happy birthday! 40 with your kids. today is my - birthday. happy birthday! 40 years auo i birthday. happy birthday! 40 years ago i passed _ birthday. happy birthday! 40 years ago i passed my — birthday. happy birthday! 40 years ago i passed my car _ birthday. happy birthday! 40 years ago i passed my car and _ birthday. happy birthday! 40 years| ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within— ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within it — ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within 11 days _ ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within 11 days of _ ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within 11 days of the _ ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within 11 days of the day - ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within 11 days of the day i - ago i passed my car and motorcycle test within 11 days of the day i was i test within 11 days of the day i was old enough — test within 11 days of the day i was old enough to— test within 11 days of the day i was old enough to do _ test within 11 days of the day i was old enough to do so— test within 11 days of the day i was old enough to do so illegally- test within 11 days of the day i was old enough to do so illegally and i| old enough to do so illegally and i cannot— old enough to do so illegally and i cannot help — old enough to do so illegally and i cannot help look _ old enough to do so illegally and i cannot help look back— old enough to do so illegally and i cannot help look back now - old enough to do so illegally and i cannot help look back now and i old enough to do so illegally and i. cannot help look back now and think how straightforward, _ cannot help look back now and think how straightforward, a _ cannot help look back now and think how straightforward, a bit _ how straightforward, a bit stressful, _ how straightforward, a bit stressful, i— how straightforward, a bit stressful, i managed i how straightforward, a bit stressful, i managed to. how straightforward, a bit. stressful, i managed to get how straightforward, a bit - stressful, i managed to get through both, _ stressful, i managed to get through both, that _ stressful, i managed to get through both, that may— stressful, i managed to get through both, that may seem _ stressful, i managed to get through both, that may seem cocky- stressful, i managed to get through both, that may seem cocky but i stressful, i managed to get throughl both, that may seem cocky but there you go _ both, that may seem cocky but there you go people — both, that may seem cocky but there you go. people cannot— both, that may seem cocky but there you go. people cannot take - both, that may seem cocky but there you go. people cannot take their- you go. people cannot take their test until— you go. people cannot take their test until they _ you go. people cannot take their test until they can _ you go. people cannot take their test until they can get _ you go. people cannot take their test until they can get an - test until they can get an appointment— test until they can get an appointment but- test until they can get an appointment but having. test until they can get an - appointment but having looked test until they can get an _ appointment but having looked into this, i_ appointment but having looked into this, iwas— appointment but having looked into this, i was a — appointment but having looked into this, i was a person _ appointment but having looked into this, i was a person what _ appointment but having looked into this, i was a person what are - appointment but having looked into this, i was a person what are they i this, i was a person what are they doing. _ this, i was a person what are they doing. why— this, i was a person what are they doing. why don't _ this, i was a person what are they doing, why don't they— this, i was a person what are they doing, why don't they get - this, i was a person what are they doing, why don't they get their i doing, why don't they get their finger— doing, why don't they get their finger out— doing, why don't they get their finger out and— doing, why don't they get their finger out and crack— doing, why don't they get their finger out and crack on? - doing, why don't they get their finger out and crack on? but i doing, why don't they get their i finger out and crack on? but what is most _ finger out and crack on? but what is most important _ finger out and crack on? but what is most important and _ finger out and crack on? but what is most important and ashley- finger out and crack on? but what is most important and ashley touched | finger out and crack on? but what is i most important and ashley touched on it is standards — most important and ashley touched on it is standards aren't _ most important and ashley touched on it is standards aren't relaxed. - most important and ashley touched on it is standards aren't relaxed. the i it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is _ it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is hard — it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is hard to— it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is hard to pass _ it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is hard to pass for— it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is hard to pass for a - it is standards aren't relaxed. the test is hard to pass for a reason i test is hard to pass for a reason because — test is hard to pass for a reason because a — test is hard to pass for a reason because a motor— test is hard to pass for a reason because a motor vehicle - test is hard to pass for a reason because a motor vehicle is i test is hard to pass for a reason because a motor vehicle is a i because a motor vehicle is a dangerous— because a motor vehicle is a dangerous piece _ because a motor vehicle is a
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dangerous piece of- because a motor vehicle is a i dangerous piece of equipment in because a motor vehicle is a - dangerous piece of equipment in the wrong _ dangerous piece of equipment in the wrong hands — dangerous piece of equipment in the wrong hands. maybe _ dangerous piece of equipment in the wrong hands. maybe if— dangerous piece of equipment in the wrong hands. maybe if people - dangerous piece of equipment in the wrong hands. maybe if people are i dangerous piece of equipment in the. wrong hands. maybe if people are not preparing _ wrong hands. maybe if people are not preparing properly. _ wrong hands. maybe if people are not preparing properly. but— wrong hands. maybe if people are not preparing properly, but a _ wrong hands. maybe if people are not preparing properly, but a lot - wrong hands. maybe if people are not preparing properly, but a lot of- preparing properly, but a lot of people — preparing properly, but a lot of people are _ preparing properly, but a lot of people are struggling, - preparing properly, but a lot of people are struggling, one i preparing properly, but a lot of people are struggling, one of. preparing properly, but a lot of. people are struggling, one of the biggest _ people are struggling, one of the biggest problems— people are struggling, one of the biggest problems is— people are struggling, one of the biggest problems is people - people are struggling, one of the biggest problems is people are i biggest problems is people are struggling _ biggest problems is people are struggling to _ biggest problems is people are struggling to find _ biggest problems is people are struggling to find a _ biggest problems is people are struggling to find a qualified i struggling to find a qualified instructor— struggling to find a qualified instructor to _ struggling to find a qualified instructor to prepare - struggling to find a qualified instructor to prepare for i struggling to find a qualified. instructor to prepare for their struggling to find a qualified - instructor to prepare for their test and they— instructor to prepare for their test and they are — instructor to prepare for their test and they are booking _ instructor to prepare for their test and they are booking an— instructor to prepare for their test i and they are booking an appointment for their— and they are booking an appointment for their test. — and they are booking an appointment for their test, thinking _ and they are booking an appointment for their test, thinking they— and they are booking an appointment for their test, thinking they have i for their test, thinking they have to grab— for their test, thinking they have to grab one _ for their test, thinking they have to grab one because _ for their test, thinking they have to grab one because they - for their test, thinking they have to grab one because they are i for their test, thinking they have i to grab one because they are looking at the _ to grab one because they are looking at the news — to grab one because they are looking at the news and _ to grab one because they are looking at the news and their— to grab one because they are looking at the news and their phone - to grab one because they are looking at the news and their phone and - to grab one because they are looking at the news and their phone and it'si at the news and their phone and it's tettihg _ at the news and their phone and it's telling them — at the news and their phone and it's telling them in _ at the news and their phone and it's telling them in places— at the news and their phone and it's telling them in places like _ telling them in places like manchester— telling them in places like manchester where - telling them in places like manchester where my - telling them in places like i manchester where my family telling them in places like - manchester where my family are, it might— manchester where my family are, it might be _ manchester where my family are, it might be six— manchester where my family are, it might be six months. _ manchester where my family are, it might be six months. my— manchester where my family are, it might be six months. my daughterl manchester where my family are, it i might be six months. my daughter is a single _ might be six months. my daughter is a single working _ might be six months. my daughter is a single working mother— might be six months. my daughter is a single working mother who - might be six months. my daughter is a single working mother who was - a single working mother who was cycling _ a single working mother who was cycling to— a single working mother who was cycling to work. _ a single working mother who was cycling to work, she _ a single working mother who was cycling to work, she wants - a single working mother who was cycling to work, she wants to - a single working mother who wasi cycling to work, she wants to take a single working mother who was . cycling to work, she wants to take a test, _ cycling to work, she wants to take a test. she _ cycling to work, she wants to take a test. she keeps— cycling to work, she wants to take a test, she keeps paying _ cycling to work, she wants to take a test, she keeps paying for- cycling to work, she wants to take a test, she keeps paying for lessons i test, she keeps paying for lessons but then— test, she keeps paying for lessons but then it — test, she keeps paying for lessons but then it seems _ test, she keeps paying for lessons but then it seems so _ test, she keeps paying for lessons but then it seems so far— test, she keeps paying for lessons but then it seems so far off, - test, she keeps paying for lessons but then it seems so far off, howl but then it seems so far off, how much _ but then it seems so far off, how much money— but then it seems so far off, how much money is _ but then it seems so far off, how much money is she _ but then it seems so far off, how much money is she supposed - but then it seems so far off, how much money is she supposed to| but then it seems so far off, how- much money is she supposed to spend before _ much money is she supposed to spend before she _ much money is she supposed to spend before she sits— much money is she supposed to spend before she sits at _ much money is she supposed to spend before she sits at the _ much money is she supposed to spend before she sits at the test? _ much money is she supposed to spend before she sits at the test? find - much money is she supposed to spend before she sits at the test?— before she sits at the test? and for our son before she sits at the test? and for your son it's _ before she sits at the test? and for your son it's an _ before she sits at the test? and for your son it's an issue _ before she sits at the test? and for your son it's an issue because - before she sits at the test? and for your son it's an issue because he i your son it's an issue because he has missed out on an employment opportunity. i has missed out on an employment opportunity-— opportunity. i spent the last few da s in
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opportunity. i spent the last few days in london _ opportunity. i spent the last few days in london and _ opportunity. i spent the last few days in london and one - opportunity. i spent the last few days in london and one thing i days in london and one thing highlighted _ days in london and one thing highlighted is— days in london and one thing highlighted is that _ days in london and one thing highlighted is that londoners days in london and one thing - highlighted is that londoners might not highlighted is that londoners might hot think— highlighted is that londoners might not think this — highlighted is that londoners might not think this but _ highlighted is that londoners might not think this but how— highlighted is that londoners might not think this but how fantastic- highlighted is that londoners might not think this but how fantastic the | not think this but how fantastic the public— not think this but how fantastic the public transport _ not think this but how fantastic the public transport network _ not think this but how fantastic the public transport network here - not think this but how fantastic the public transport network here is i public transport network here is compared — public transport network here is compared to— public transport network here is compared to the _ public transport network here is compared to the rest _ public transport network here is compared to the rest of- public transport network here is compared to the rest of the - public transport network here is - compared to the rest of the country. my sorr— compared to the rest of the country. my son was— compared to the rest of the country. my son was looking _ compared to the rest of the country. my son was looking at _ compared to the rest of the country. my son was looking at taking - compared to the rest of the country. my son was looking at taking a - compared to the rest of the country. my son was looking at taking a job . my son was looking at taking a job in manchester, _ my son was looking at taking a job in manchester, there _ my son was looking at taking a job in manchester, there are - in manchester, there are opportunities _ in manchester, there are opportunities there, - in manchester, there are opportunities there, he i in manchester, there are - opportunities there, he doesn't in manchester, there are _ opportunities there, he doesn't mind a bit of— opportunities there, he doesn't mind a bit of cycling — opportunities there, he doesn't mind a bit of cycling but _ opportunities there, he doesn't mind a bit of cycling but doesn't _ opportunities there, he doesn't mind a bit of cycling but doesn't want - opportunities there, he doesn't mind a bit of cycling but doesn't want to i a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 _ a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles — a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles of— a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles of cycling _ a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles of cycling a _ a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles of cycling a day - a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles of cycling a day and l a bit of cycling but doesn't want to do 70 miles of cycling a day and a | do 70 miles of cycling a day and a full-time — do 70 miles of cycling a day and a full-time job _ do 70 miles of cycling a day and a full—time job so _ do 70 miles of cycling a day and a full—time job so he _ do 70 miles of cycling a day and a full—time job so he has _ do 70 miles of cycling a day and a full—time job so he has decided i do 70 miles of cycling a day and a i full—time job so he has decided to stay where — full—time job so he has decided to stay where he _ full—time job so he has decided to stay where he is _ full—time job so he has decided to stay where he is until— full—time job so he has decided to stay where he is until later- full—time job so he has decided to stay where he is until later in - full—time job so he has decided to stay where he is until later in the i stay where he is until later in the years— stay where he is until later in the years he — stay where he is until later in the years he can _ stay where he is until later in the years he can take _ stay where he is until later in the years he can take is— stay where he is until later in the years he can take is test. - stay where he is until later in the years he can take is test. i- stay where he is until later in the l years he can take is test. i bought him a _ years he can take is test. i bought him a car— years he can take is test. i bought him a car and _ years he can take is test. i bought him a car and i've _ years he can take is test. i bought him a car and i've been— years he can take is test. i bought him a car and i've been paying - years he can take is test. i bought him a car and i've been paying tax and insurance _ him a car and i've been paying tax and insurance and _ him a car and i've been paying tax and insurance and mot— him a car and i've been paying tax and insurance and mot for- him a car and i've been paying tax and insurance and mot for two i him a car and i've been paying taxi and insurance and mot for two and him a car and i've been paying tax i and insurance and mot for two and a half years— and insurance and mot for two and a half years because _ and insurance and mot for two and a half years because that _ and insurance and mot for two and a half years because that is _ and insurance and mot for two and a half years because that is how- and insurance and mot for two and a half years because that is how long l half years because that is how long he has _ half years because that is how long he has been — half years because that is how long he has been trying _ half years because that is how long he has been trying to— half years because that is how long he has been trying to get— half years because that is how long he has been trying to get his - half years because that is how long he has been trying to get his test l he has been trying to get his test and it's— he has been trying to get his test and it's outside _ he has been trying to get his test and it's outside my— he has been trying to get his test and it's outside my house - he has been trying to get his test and it's outside my house with i he has been trying to get his testl and it's outside my house with me payihg _ and it's outside my house with me paying for— and it's outside my house with me paying for it — and it's outside my house with me paying for it and _ and it's outside my house with me paying for it and i— and it's outside my house with me paying for it and i don't _ and it's outside my house with me paying for it and i don't like - and it's outside my house with me paying for it and i don't like that. i paying for it and i don't like that. at least— paying for it and i don't like that. at least you _ paying for it and i don't like that. at least you were _ paying for it and i don't like that. at least you were very _ paying for it and i don't like that. at least you were very relaxed i paying for it and i don't like that. - at least you were very relaxed about it. �* . , , ., , it. but that is the truth, people are missing _ it. but that is the truth, people are missing out _ it. but that is the truth, people are missing out on _ it. but that is the truth, people l are missing out on opportunities it. but that is the truth, people - are missing out on opportunities and businesses are not flourishing the weight they might be able to if people were behind the wheel. i
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weight they might be able to if people were behind the wheel. i have had --eole people were behind the wheel. i have had people who _ people were behind the wheel. i have had people who have _ people were behind the wheel. i have had people who have just _ people were behind the wheel. i have had people who have just got - people were behind the wheel. i have had people who have just got to - people were behind the wheel. i have had people who have just got to the test who— had people who have just got to the test who originally had a test but in the _ test who originally had a test but in the first— test who originally had a test but in the first couple of months of the pandemic— in the first couple of months of the pandemic and it's hard for people because — pandemic and it's hard for people because they rely on it for work. you were — because they rely on it for work. you were saying people don't turn up for their test or book them early but that symptomatic of the fact they don't know when they will get a slot so they put in a bid to get a slot so they put in a bid to get a slot and then maybe it's just the wrong time, it's a vicious circle. i wrong time, it's a vicious circle. i run a driving school in liverpool and we — run a driving school in liverpool and we are _ run a driving school in liverpool and we are in with people getting in contact _ and we are in with people getting in contact to— and we are in with people getting in contact to say i have a test but, could _ contact to say i have a test but, could we — contact to say i have a test but, could we have an instructor and a car for— could we have an instructor and a car for the — could we have an instructor and a car for the day and because driving instructors — car for the day and because driving instructors are really busy, the wait _ instructors are really busy, the wait for— instructors are really busy, the wait for an— instructors are really busy, the wait for an instructor is huge so people — wait for an instructor is huge so people booking these tests, not finding — people booking these tests, not finding anyone to learn present for touts, _ finding anyone to learn present for touts, i_ finding anyone to learn present for touts, i would say to people if you are in _ touts, i would say to people if you are in that — touts, i would say to people if you are in that scenario try to cancel your— are in that scenario try to cancel your test— are in that scenario try to cancel your test so— are in that scenario try to cancel your test so it at least give
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someone _ your test so it at least give someone else a chance to use it, if you cannot — someone else a chance to use it, if you cannot find someone that someone else take _ you cannot find someone that someone else take that slot. it�*s you cannot find someone that someone else take that slot.— else take that slot. it's like a waitin: else take that slot. it's like a waiting list — else take that slot. it's like a waiting list where _ else take that slot. it's like a waiting list where people - else take that slot. it's like a waiting list where people can else take that slot. it's like a - waiting list where people can turn up waiting list where people can turn up at a centre and get a gap if one emerges, it stressful but it might help some. the emerges, it stressful but it might help some-— help some. the current time to cancel a test — help some. the current time to cancel a test without _ help some. the current time to cancel a test without losing - help some. the current time to | cancel a test without losing your fee is— cancel a test without losing your fee is three days and the dvs site or in— fee is three days and the dvs site or in trying — fee is three days and the dvs site or in trying to extend that to encourage people to cancel it with more _ encourage people to cancel it with more time — encourage people to cancel it with more time-— more time. how was your first drivin: more time. how was your first driving test. — more time. how was your first driving test, steve? _ more time. how was your first driving test, steve? i- more time. how was your first driving test, steve? i took - more time. how was your first driving test, steve? i took my| more time. how was your first i driving test, steve? i took my car and bike test _ driving test, steve? i took my car and bike test within _ driving test, steve? i took my car and bike test within 11 _ driving test, steve? i took my car and bike test within 11 days - driving test, steve? i took my car and bike test within 11 days of - driving test, steve? i took my car and bike test within 11 days of my | and bike test within 11 days of my birthday— and bike test within 11 days of my birthday and _ and bike test within 11 days of my birthday and when _ and bike test within 11 days of my birthday and when i— and bike test within 11 days of my birthday and when i turned - and bike test within 11 days of my birthday and when i turned up- and bike test within 11 days of my birthday and when i turned up at| and bike test within 11 days of my i birthday and when i turned up at the motorcycle — birthday and when i turned up at the motorcycle test _ birthday and when i turned up at the motorcycle test it _ birthday and when i turned up at the motorcycle test it was _ birthday and when i turned up at the motorcycle test it was the _ birthday and when i turned up at the motorcycle test it was the same - motorcycle test it was the same examiner — motorcycle test it was the same examiner i_ motorcycle test it was the same examiner. i kept— motorcycle test it was the same examiner. i kept my— motorcycle test it was the same examiner. i kept my crash - motorcycle test it was the same l examiner. i kept my crash helmet motorcycle test it was the same - examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to— examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the _ examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the end — examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the end of— examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the end of the _ examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the end of the tent _ examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the end of the tent and - examiner. i kept my crash helmet on, not to the end of the tent and when . not to the end of the tent and when itook— not to the end of the tent and when i took it— not to the end of the tent and when i took it off— not to the end of the tent and when i took it off he — not to the end of the tent and when i took it off he said _ not to the end of the tent and when i took it off he said do— not to the end of the tent and when i took it off he said do i— not to the end of the tent and when i took it off he said do i know- not to the end of the tent and when i took it off he said do i know you i i took it off he said do i know you and i_ i took it off he said do i know you and i said — i took it off he said do i know you and i said you _ i took it off he said do i know you and i said you passed _ i took it off he said do i know you and i said you passed me - i took it off he said do i know you and i said you passed me for- i took it off he said do i know you and i said you passed me for the| i took it off he said do i know you i and i said you passed me for the car test four— and i said you passed me for the car test four days — and i said you passed me for the car test four days ago. _ and i said you passed me for the car test four days ago. he _ and i said you passed me for the car test four days ago. he said - and i said you passed me for the car test four days ago. he said i- test four days ago. he said i would have _ test four days ago. he said i would have failed — test four days ago. he said i would have failed you _ test four days ago. he said i would have failed you if _ test four days ago. he said i would have failed you if i _ test four days ago. he said i would have failed you if i had _ test four days ago. he said i would
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have failed you if i had known - test four days ago. he said i would have failed you if i had known that| have failed you if i had known that and i_ have failed you if i had known that and i said. — have failed you if i had known that and i said. too— have failed you if i had known that and i said, too late _ have failed you if i had known that and i said, too late for— have failed you if i had known that and i said, too late for that. - and i said, too late for that. finally— and i said, too late for that. finally can _ and i said, too late for that. finally can i _ and i said, too late for that. finally can ijust _ and i said, too late for that. finally can ijust say, - and i said, too late for that. i finally can ijust say, perhaps and i said, too late for that. - finally can ijust say, perhaps the reading _ finally can ijust say, perhaps the reading i— finally can ijust say, perhaps the reading i have _ finally can ijust say, perhaps the reading i have done _ finally can ijust say, perhaps the reading i have done around - finally can ijust say, perhaps the reading i have done around this, i finally can ijust say, perhaps the | reading i have done around this, a lot of— reading i have done around this, a lot of people — reading i have done around this, a lot of people who _ reading i have done around this, a lot of people who were _ reading i have done around this, a lot of people who were driving - reading i have done around this, a| lot of people who were driving test examiners — lot of people who were driving test examiners and _ lot of people who were driving test examiners and instructors - lot of people who were driving test examiners and instructors have - lot of people who were driving test| examiners and instructors have left that job _ examiners and instructors have left thatjob and — examiners and instructors have left that job and found _ examiners and instructors have left thatjob and found other— examiners and instructors have left that job and found otherjobs - examiners and instructors have left that job and found otherjobs and l that job and found otherjobs and perhaps— that job and found otherjobs and perhaps it's — that job and found otherjobs and perhaps it's time _ that job and found otherjobs and perhaps it's time like _ that job and found otherjobs and perhaps it's time like a _ that job and found otherjobs and perhaps it's time like a lot- that job and found otherjobs and perhaps it's time like a lot of- perhaps it's time like a lot of other— perhaps it's time like a lot of otherjobs— perhaps it's time like a lot of otherjobs where _ perhaps it's time like a lot of otherjobs where there - perhaps it's time like a lot of otherjobs where there is - perhaps it's time like a lot of otherjobs where there is a l perhaps it's time like a lot of- otherjobs where there is a huge problem. — otherjobs where there is a huge problem. perhaps— otherjobs where there is a huge problem, perhaps it's _ otherjobs where there is a huge problem, perhaps it's time - otherjobs where there is a huge problem, perhaps it's time we . problem, perhaps it's time we recognised _ problem, perhaps it's time we recognised how— problem, perhaps it's time we recognised how important - problem, perhaps it's time we recognised how important this problem, perhaps it's time we - recognised how important this job problem, perhaps it's time we - recognised how important thisjob is and we _ recognised how important thisjob is and we paid — recognised how important thisjob is and we paid those _ recognised how important thisjob is and we paid those people _ recognised how important thisjob is and we paid those people better- recognised how important thisjob is| and we paid those people better and then they— and we paid those people better and then they would _ and we paid those people better and then they would want _ and we paid those people better and then they would want to _ and we paid those people better and then they would want to stay- and we paid those people better and then they would want to stay in - and we paid those people better and then they would want to stay in that| then they would want to stay in that oh. then they would want to stay in that 'ob. . , then they would want to stay in that 'ob. ., , ., , then they would want to stay in that 'ob. . , . , _, ., job. that is a bigger conversation ha enin: job. that is a bigger conversation happening around _ job. that is a bigger conversation happening around lots _ job. that is a bigger conversation happening around lots of - job. that is a bigger conversation i happening around lots of industries. thank you, steve and ashley. band thank you, steve and ashley. and have a good _ thank you, steve and ashley. and have a good birthday, steve, enjoy. he's right, in london and the public transport system makes it easier if you don't drive but it's trickier in other parts of the uk. a bbc news investigation has learned that police forces are taking longer
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to respond to serious incidents in england and wales. information requests indicate that officers are more than three minutes slower to attend the most urgent emergencies than six years ago. research also shows that the number of recorded crimes being solved has fallen for the last seven consecutive years. the policing minister kit malthouse says the government is committed to improving the responsiveness of local police. our special correspondent ed thomas reports. three, four, five, six, seven. it's the perfect storm. i don't think there's a point in ringing the police any more, because there's nothing being done. the windows smashed, everything thrown all over my house. police are solving fewer recorded crimes. they are taking longer to respond. they got put through one morning. how many windows? all of them. and when did the police come? they didn't. leaving the public losing faith. do you have confidence in the police to come out? do i heck! why? waste of time.
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they come about six hours later when they have all gone. this is in kent. it was a ball bearing probably eight or ten millimetres. it was pretty much shot straight through. this is where it hit me on the leg. where were you? sitting in the garden. we spoke to half a dozen neighbours who all said the street is being tormented by teenagers. going through double glazed glass, you can really do some injury to someone's skull. after repeated calls to the police, many here said officers don't turn up at all. i reported it, nothing came of it, that was it. i have just kept it since. at what point do you then go and say, enough is enough? is it when a child dies? levels of crime have been going down over the past decade but our research shows that the proportion of recorded crimes being solved has fallen by ao%. we have also learned that police are taking longer to arrive at emergency call—outs. forces are now 25% slower to arrive at urgent incidents than six years ago.
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one, two, three, four. we move north. we move north to leigh. this is robert's teenage grandson being attacked on a bus in february. he says months after the attack, the police have failed to visit the family. what is your reaction to that? considering i pay their wages, really annoyed. and at the end of the day, that is what the country sees, it is getting worse, and worse, and worse. this is the actual footage of them attacking me. we then met stephen. being kicked all over the floor, and hit me bad, knuckle dusters. he says it took police three days to respond this beating. and then it got worse. this is the state they have left my house, the windows smashed. if the police would have done it from the start, none of this would have happened. he has been repeatedly burgled. that is my son's bedroom, that. this is actually my son's bedroom. he says the police and forensic teams have not been out to visit for two of the burglaries. how would you describe the police response to the burglaries? atrocious, atrocious.
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absolutely atrocious. i'm at breaking point. there's nothing. it's my kids, my home, my car, everything. it's gone. i've got nothing at all. ijust need the police to help me and they won't. theyjust won't help me. what would you say to the police? please, get off your bum and help people in need. i'm in need of help. i need some help. we have also learned that police are not turning up for sexual assaults and domestic violence incidents. one woman who says she was assaulted by an ex—partner in front of her two and four year old children was told no one could visit her until the following morning. if officers had attended, they may have seen the man return again later that evening. i could actually see my car, my stolen car. when michelle's car was stolen, desperate, she turned detective. they took me to the station to take a statement. what they did actually say was to actually go on to facebook because that is the best chance of you finding it. eventually, she was sent this cctv
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which located her car. but still, officers wouldn't help. doing all the job for you, got the address of where that car is. and you're still not doing anything. and we would be on the phone to the police at least three or four times every night saying, this is where my car is. one night, she followed her stolen car. she was confronted by a man with a crowbar before escaping. the next day, it was found abandoned. you just think, who do you go to if you are in trouble? the home office says it's committed to improving the responsiveness of local police, and the public should have confidence that forces will do everything in their power to solve and prevent crime. ed thomas, bbc news. lots of you getting in touch this morning about driving tests and people saying test centres around the country have closed and that is
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another issue causing those delays and backlogs. find another issue causing those delays and backlogs-— and backlogs. and i imagine if its takinu and backlogs. and i imagine if its taking ages _ and backlogs. and i imagine if its taking ages to — and backlogs. and i imagine if its taking ages to secure _ and backlogs. and i imagine if its taking ages to secure your - and backlogs. and i imagine if its taking ages to secure your test, | and backlogs. and i imagine if its. taking ages to secure your test, the pressure not to make mistakes would be massive and that could mean more people getting it wrong. good luck to anyone taking their test. famously described by the queen as the one place she can truly relax — the royal yacht britannia served as a home away from home for the royals from 1954 until she was decommissioned in 1997. in that time the ship sailed more thani million nautical miles to 135 countries. john maguire is on board for us this morning ahead of the queen's platinum jubilee weekend. it's always one minute past three there, right? it's always one minute past three there. right?— it's always one minute past three there, right? absolutely and i will show ou there, right? absolutely and i will show you why _ there, right? absolutely and i will show you why a — there, right? absolutely and i will show you why a nice _ there, right? absolutely and i will show you why a nice second. - there, right? absolutely and i will show you why a nice second. we i there, right? absolutely and i will. show you why a nice second. we are on one of the decks on the port side of the royal yacht britannia. it still looks pretty pristine, back in the date the crew on board would
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keep it spotless. the rear of the ship, very much the royal quarters, here is the grand staircase, the banqueting room through there and we will bring you through to the state drawing room at the back so you can imagine the kings and queens and prime ministers and presidents who would have been on board and met her majesty as a yacht sailed around the world. all the clocks on board still set one minute past the ray. that is the moment at which her majesty left the moment at which her majesty left the ship for the final time when it was decommissioned in decommissioned in portsmouth in 1997. we are in leith near edinburgh where that ship is moored, it's been a tourist attraction for the last 20 years and will celebrate its silverjubilee next year and lots of family photos on the furniture, this famous portrait above the fireplace, all sorts of facts and stories. the
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queen apparently wanted a coal fireplace installed with a real fire but it would have meant somebody guarding it all the time because farr is such a danger of a ship so a fire marshal standing by with a bucket of sand so they decided to fit an electric —— electric one. we will be talking to some of the former crewe after the news, traffic and weather where you are watching this morning. good morning, this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. survivors of a deadly fairground accident in south—west london will plant a tree today to remember the victims. it's now 50 years since the big dipper roller—coaster crashed in battersea park, killing five children and injuring more than a dozen. there's now a campaign for a permanent memorial. the mayor says he's in talks with wandsworth council. i know from other memorials i have been involved in, it's a place you could go to just to reflect, to think, to spend time with others, to commemorate this awful tragedy. but also its a reminder
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of the importance of health and safety, to make sure we get things right. we also need to educate londoners about this tragedy almost 50 years ago. it's feared many people in temporary accomodation are trapped in their situation due to a shortage of affordable homes. a three—year study by the charity crisis suggests almost half of those in need of housing remained homeless despite seeking help from their council. there calls for more social homes. the government says it's invested more than £11 billion. the sale of chelsea football club is expected to be completed today. it's after the government and premier league approved the takeover. chelsea was put up for sale in march because of roman abramovich's links to the russian president. drivers are being warned to expect long delays during thejubilee bank holiday. the motoring group the rac estimates nearly 20 million journeys are being planned. the advice is to set off
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before 6am or after three. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, there are a few problems to watch out for. severe delays on the circle line and a part suspension on the district and hammersmith and city lines. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the next few days or so across the capital, but there will be some showers at times. notably so today and tomorrow. this morning, it's locally quite a chilly start to the day, temperatures having dropped right back into mid single figures for many of us last night. some early brightness, some sunshine around this morning. we will start to see the cloud building, low pressure is over us, there will be some showers forming as the daytime heating gets going. some of those showers through the afternoon could turn out to be heavy and they could be quite slow moving as well so they could last for some time. the winds are light, temperatures will once again for most of us peak in the mid—teens in celsius. overnight tonight, a rather messy picture.
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some showers at times, some areas of cloud, long clear spells. temperatures again dropping back into single figures as we head into tuesday. tuesday it will start to feel a little warmer, but again expect to see some showers as we head through the afternoon. lots of dry weather, on wednesday and indeed on thursday, for the start of thejubilee bank holiday weekend. there could be some showers moving in from the south, though, so do keep an eye on the forecast. just a reminder we want to know how you're celebrating thejubilee. let us know by emailing us and we might even come and film you! that's it from me. i'm back in an hour. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. just after half past seven, thank you forjoining us. we are
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reflecting on saturday night. from hours—long queues to children being fired at with tear gas, liverpool fans have been arriving home after facing chaotic scenes at the weekend in paris. talks will take place today between french ministers and football authorities, to work out what went wrong at the champions league final. we're joined now by liverpool fans, louisejudge and her son oliver and the mayor of liverpool, joanne anderson. morning to both of you in the studio. we will chat to the mayor in a moment. let's start with you guys first. you are back, a terrible time you have had. what makes this more poignant is the reason why he wanted to be there, just tell people why you wanted to be at the final. basically because my husband and oliver's dad passed away suddenly at the game on the 13th of april. he
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went to his seat and unfortunately suffered a massive heart attackjust before the game started. everybody at liverpool was amazing, paramedics and everybody tried to help but unfortunately he passed away in hospital an hour later. taste unfortunately he passed away in hospital an hour later.— unfortunately he passed away in hospital an hour later. we are so so sor that hospital an hour later. we are so so sorry that you _ hospital an hour later. we are so so sorry that you had _ hospital an hour later. we are so so sorry that you had to _ hospital an hour later. we are so so sorry that you had to go _ hospital an hour later. we are so so sorry that you had to go through - sorry that you had to go through that. it was in terry �*s memory that he wanted to be there and the champions league final.- he wanted to be there and the champions league final. yes, we wanted to show _ champions league final. yes, we wanted to show how _ champions league final. yes, we wanted to show how much - champions league final. yes, we wanted to show how much he - champions league final. yes, we . wanted to show how much he meant champions league final. yes, we - wanted to show how much he meant to us to be _ wanted to show how much he meant to us to be in— wanted to show how much he meant to us to be in that game to make sure we got _ us to be in that game to make sure we got into— us to be in that game to make sure we got into that stadium and get there _ we got into that stadium and get there. . . . we got into that stadium and get there. . , . ., , , . there. that is a lovely picture. so he reached _ there. that is a lovely picture. so he reached out _ there. that is a lovely picture. so he reached out to _ there. that is a lovely picture. so he reached out to the _ there. that is a lovely picture. so he reached out to the club, - he reached out to the club, explained what had happened and they offered you take which is available, so for you guys arriving atjohn lennon airport at 2am, excited, what happened after that? from lennon airport at 2am, excited, what happened after that?— lennon airport at 2am, excited, what happened after that? from the moment we not to happened after that? from the moment we got to the — happened after that? from the moment we got to the airport, _ happened after that? from the moment we got to the airport, we _ happened after that? from the moment we got to the airport, we were - happened after that? from the moment we got to the airport, we were meant i we got to the airport, we were meant to be on a flight tram, we got told
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that the flight had been cancelled, so we then spent the next six hours before we finally flew at 10am. we went through massive chaotic scenes with lots of other firms who were told the same as us, one part of us had to go to one end of the airport, another to another. eventually they charted another flight and we did get on a flight at ten past ten. we then went and picked up our tickets, we went to the family zone which was amazing —— the fan zone. then it all kicked off. 50 amazing -- the fan zone. then it all kicked off. . . ,., amazing -- the fan zone. then it all kicked off-— kicked off. so at that point you think, kicked off. so at that point you think. we _ kicked off. so at that point you think, we are _ kicked off. so at that point you think, we are here _ kicked off. so at that point you think, we are here and - kicked off. so at that point you think, we are here and we - kicked off. so at that point you think, we are here and we are | kicked off. so at that point you - think, we are here and we are going to get the match, so let's talk through getting there to the stadium, what did you experience? taste stadium, what did you experience? we left the fan zone at around four and a half— left the fan zone at around four and a half hours — left the fan zone at around four and a half hours before the game started _ a half hours before the game started. plenty of time. 100%, i don't _ started. plenty of time. 100%, i don't thing _ started. plenty of time. 100%, i don't thing i have ever been to a game _ don't thing i have ever been to a game that— don't thing i have ever been to a game that early. got to the metro station. _ game that early. got to the metro station, everything was fine. we got
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off at— station, everything was fine. we got off at the _ station, everything was fine. we got off at the train station we were supposed — off at the train station we were supposed to and we started walking towards _ supposed to and we started walking towards the ground, we got to this certain— towards the ground, we got to this certain checkpoint and they were 'ust certain checkpoint and they were just police vans everywhere. and then _ just police vans everywhere. and then we — just police vans everywhere. and then we were... just police vans everywhere. and then we were. . ._ then we were... was this in the outer ring? _ then we were... was this in the outer ring? yes, _ then we were... was this in the outer ring? yes, it _ then we were... was this in the outer ring? yes, it was - then we were... was this in the | outer ring? yes, it was outside. then we had — outer ring? yes, it was outside. then we had to _ outer ring? yes, it was outside. then we had to go _ outer ring? yes, it was outside. then we had to go through - outer ring? yes, it was outside. then we had to go through a - outer ring? yes, it was outside. - then we had to go through a tunnel, the 400 yards. then we had to go through a tunnel, the 400 yards-— the 400 yards. quite a small one? you could rrot _ the 400 yards. quite a small one? you could not see _ the 400 yards. quite a small one? you could not see the _ the 400 yards. quite a small one? you could not see the other- the 400 yards. quite a small one? you could not see the other end, l you could not see the other end, just police vans and the right gear around one side.— just police vans and the right gear around one side. there is the mood chanttin around one side. there is the mood changing here? _ around one side. there is the mood changing here? yes, _ around one side. there is the mood changing here? yes, everybody- around one side. there is the mood i changing here? yes, everybody was around one side. there is the mood | changing here? yes, everybody was i ritht, changing here? yes, everybody was i right. wondering _ changing here? yes, everybody was i right, wondering how— changing here? yes, everybody was i right, wondering how long _ changing here? yes, everybody was i right, wondering how long it - changing here? yes, everybody was i right, wondering how long it would . right, wondering how long it would take, we had been there an hour and a half. we wondered if we were going to get in to see the game. the police were saying, there is no way we can let you in. there are only two turnstiles. so after getting through the tunnel to get into the ground, we then got told to go to section b. taste ground, we then got told to go to section b. ~ . ground, we then got told to go to section b. ~ , ., section b. we were sent the wrong way around — section b. we were sent the wrong way around the _ section b. we were sent the wrong way around the stadium _ section b. we were sent the wrong way around the stadium by - section b. we were sent the wrong way around the stadium by this - way around the stadium by this fella~ _ way around the stadium by this fella~ we — way around the stadium by this fella. we were told to go right around — fella. we were told to go right around the stadium instead of having
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around the stadium instead of having a two _ around the stadium instead of having a two minute walk left. 30 around the stadium instead of having a two minute walk left.— a two minute walk left. so they 'ust didn't a two minute walk left. so they 'ust didnt know — a two minute walk left. so they 'ust didn't know what i a two minute walk left. so they 'ust didn't know what they i a two minute walk left. so they 'ust didn't know what they were i a two minute walk left. so theyjust didn't know what they were doing? | didn't know what they were doing? they were so unorganised. br; didn't know what they were doing? they were so unorganised.- they were so unorganised. by the time we got _ they were so unorganised. by the time we got to — they were so unorganised. by the time we got to section _ they were so unorganised. by the time we got to section b, - they were so unorganised. by the time we got to section b, there i they were so unorganised. by the i time we got to section b, there were 5000 otherfans the time we got to section b, there were 5000 other fans the same as us, liverpool fans, trying to get into the turnstile. one turnstile, completely closed, no officials there. people were screaming in the queue, why are they not letting us in? you could hear the atmosphere in the stadium, you could hear you'll never walk alone and we were thinking at this point we were not going to see the game. so thinking at this point we were not going to see the game.— going to see the game. so ten minutes to _ going to see the game. so ten minutes to kick _ going to see the game. so ten minutes to kick off? _ going to see the game. so ten minutes to kick off? yes, - going to see the game. so ten minutes to kick off? yes, and | going to see the game. so ten - minutes to kick off? yes, and nobody told us that — minutes to kick off? yes, and nobody told us that it — minutes to kick off? yes, and nobody told us that it had _ minutes to kick off? yes, and nobody told us that it had been _ minutes to kick off? yes, and nobody told us that it had been delayed. - told us that it had been delayed. they didn't say nothing. theyjust literally open to the turnstile and everybody stampeded, it was chaos. that must have been terrifying. you are looking after him, he is looking after you. are looking after him, he is looking afteryou. he are looking after him, he is looking
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after ou. . . are looking after him, he is looking after ou. ., are looking after him, he is looking after ou. . after you. he was looking after me, i was petrified. _ after you. he was looking after me, i was petrified. it _ after you. he was looking after me, i was petrified. it was _ after you. he was looking after me, i was petrified. it was so _ after you. he was looking after me, i was petrified. it was so scary. - i was petrified. it was so scary. one wrong _ i was petrified. it was so scary. one wrong fit _ i was petrified. it was so scary. one wrong fit any _ i was petrified. it was so scary. one wrong fit any would - i was petrified. it was so scary. - one wrong fit any would underneath someone~ _ one wrong fit any would underneath someone. there were ladies —— one wrong _ someone. there were ladies —— one wrong step— someone. there were ladies —— one wrong step and you would be underneath someone.- wrong step and you would be underneath someone. there were eo - le underneath someone. there were people crying. _ underneath someone. there were people crying. people _ underneath someone. there were people crying, people who - underneath someone. there were people crying, people who had . underneath someone. there were i people crying, people who had been to hillsborough, i imagine, it was like history repeating. people were talking about it once they got into the ground. at the stampede meant that nobody even checked your ticket. �* . that nobody even checked your ticket. . . . that nobody even checked your ticket-_ not - that nobody even checked your| ticket._ not once. ticket. after all that! not once. all of this _ ticket. after all that! not once. all of this stuff _ ticket. after all that! not once. all of this stuff about _ ticket. after all that! not once. all of this stuff about fake - all of this stuff about fake tickets. _ all of this stuff about fake tickets, we have proper once in our back— tickets, we have proper once in our back and _ tickets, we have proper once in our back and not— tickets, we have proper once in our back and not once did any official come _ back and not once did any official come up — back and not once did any official come up and say, have you got a ticket _ come up and say, have you got a ticket they— come up and say, have you got a ticket. they were asking inside to -et ticket. they were asking inside to get to— ticket. they were asking inside to get to your— ticket. they were asking inside to get to your seats but you could have had any _ get to your seats but you could have had any tickets, they were not checking — had any tickets, they were not checking it's they were just looking at it with _ checking it's they were just looking at it with the naked eye. so checking it's they were just looking at it with the naked eye.— checking it's they were just looking at it with the naked eye. so you did tet it but at it with the naked eye. so you did get it but you _ at it with the naked eye. so you did get it but you didn't _ at it with the naked eye. so you did get it but you didn't show— at it with the naked eye. so you did get it but you didn't show anyone i get it but you didn't show anyone your ticket. flat get it but you didn't show anyone your ticket-— get it but you didn't show anyone
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your ticket._ let's - get it but you didn't show anyone your ticket._ let's bring i your ticket. not once. let's bring in the bear _ your ticket. not once. let's bring in the bear off— your ticket. not once. let's bring in the bear off at _ your ticket. not once. let's bring in the bear off at liverpool, - your ticket. not once. let's bring i in the bear off at liverpool, joanne addison, was it a similar experience to you? —— joanne anderson, the mayor of liverpool. i to you? -- joanne anderson, the mayor of liverpool.— to you? -- joanne anderson, the mayor of liverpool. i arrived three hours early. _ mayor of liverpool. i arrived three hours early. it _ mayor of liverpool. i arrived three hours early, it was _ mayor of liverpool. i arrived three hours early, it was shambolic - mayor of liverpool. i arrived three hours early, it was shambolic but | mayor of liverpool. i arrived three | hours early, it was shambolic but i managed — hours early, it was shambolic but i managed to— hours early, it was shambolic but i managed to get _ hours early, it was shambolic but i managed to get him _ hours early, it was shambolic but i managed to get him because - hours early, it was shambolic but i managed to get him because —— l hours early, it was shambolic but i i managed to get him because —— get hours early, it was shambolic but i - managed to get him because —— get in because _ managed to get him because —— get in because the _ managed to get him because —— get in because the queues _ managed to get him because —— get in because the queues were _ managed to get him because —— get in because the queues were quite - managed to get him because —— get in because the queues were quite low. i because the queues were quite low. when _ because the queues were quite low. when the _ because the queues were quite low. when the game _ because the queues were quite low. when the game was _ because the queues were quite low. when the game was delayed - because the queues were quite low. when the game was delayed and . because the queues were quite low. when the game was delayed and ii when the game was delayed and i could _ when the game was delayed and i could see — when the game was delayed and i could see lots _ when the game was delayed and i could see lots of _ when the game was delayed and i could see lots of liverpool- when the game was delayed and i could see lots of liverpool seats l could see lots of liverpool seats empty. — could see lots of liverpool seats empty. with _ could see lots of liverpool seats empty. with people _ could see lots of liverpool seats empty, with people not- could see lots of liverpool seats empty, with people not gettingi could see lots of liverpool seats . empty, with people not getting in, could see lots of liverpool seats - empty, with people not getting in, i went to _ empty, with people not getting in, i went to walk— empty, with people not getting in, i went to walk around _ empty, with people not getting in, i went to walk around the _ empty, with people not getting in, i went to walk around the ground - empty, with people not getting in, i went to walk around the ground to i went to walk around the ground to see what _ went to walk around the ground to see what was— went to walk around the ground to see what was going _ went to walk around the ground to see what was going on _ went to walk around the ground to see what was going on and - went to walk around the ground to see what was going on and i - went to walk around the ground to see what was going on and i havei see what was going on and i have seen _ see what was going on and i have seen all— see what was going on and i have seen all of— see what was going on and i have seen all of the _ see what was going on and i have seen all of the liverpool- see what was going on and i have seen all of the liverpool fans - see what was going on and i have seen all of the liverpool fans in i see what was going on and i have seen all of the liverpool fans in a i seen all of the liverpool fans in a bottleneck. — seen all of the liverpool fans in a bottleneck, shouting _ seen all of the liverpool fans in a bottleneck, shouting at - seen all of the liverpool fans in a bottleneck, shouting at officials i seen all of the liverpool fans in a i bottleneck, shouting at officials or stewards. — bottleneck, shouting at officials or stewards, there _ bottleneck, shouting at officials or stewards, there were _ bottleneck, shouting at officials or stewards, there were only- bottleneck, shouting at officials or stewards, there were only three i bottleneck, shouting at officials or| stewards, there were only three or four, _ stewards, there were only three or four. and _ stewards, there were only three or four. and that _ stewards, there were only three or four, and that the _ stewards, there were only three or four, and that the riot _ stewards, there were only three or four, and that the riot police - stewards, there were only three or four, and that the riot police justi four, and that the riot police just came _ four, and that the riot police just came over— four, and that the riot police just came overand _ four, and that the riot police just came overand pepper— four, and that the riot police just came over and pepper sprayed i four, and that the riot police just- came over and pepper sprayed them. it came over and pepper sprayed them. it was _ came over and pepper sprayed them. it was shambolic— came over and pepper sprayed them. it was shambolic but _ came over and pepper sprayed them. it was shambolic but also _ came over and pepper sprayed them. it was shambolic but also the - came over and pepper sprayed them. it was shambolic but also the police i it was shambolic but also the police behaviour— it was shambolic but also the police behaviour was — it was shambolic but also the police behaviour was really _ it was shambolic but also the police behaviour was really brutal. - it was shambolic but also the police behaviour was really brutal. the - behaviour was really brutal. the stories — behaviour was really brutal. the stories i— behaviour was really brutal. the stories i have _ behaviour was really brutal. the stories i have heard _ behaviour was really brutal. the stories i have heard after- behaviour was really brutal. the stories i have heard after the i behaviour was really brutal. the i stories i have heard after the game as well. _ stories i have heard after the game as well. you — stories i have heard after the game as well. you want _ stories i have heard after the game as well, you want your— stories i have heard after the game as well, you want your fans - stories i have heard after the game as well, you want your fans to - stories i have heard after the game as well, you want your fans to be i as well, you want your fans to be able _ as well, you want your fans to be able to— as well, you want your fans to be able to go— as well, you want your fans to be able to go safely— as well, you want your fans to be able to go safely away— as well, you want your fans to be able to go safely away from - as well, you want your fans to be able to go safely away from the i as well, you want your fans to be - able to go safely away from the game as well _ able to go safely away from the game as well the _ able to go safely away from the game as well. the police _ able to go safely away from the game as well. the police are _ able to go safely away from the game as well. the police are there - able to go safely away from the game as well. the police are there to - as well. the police are there to guide _ as well. the police are there to
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guide you _ as well. the police are there to guide you. safer— as well. the police are there to guide you. safer for— as well. the police are there to guide you. safer for me, - as well. the police are there to guide you. safer for me, not. as well. the police are there to i guide you. safer for me, not only as well. the police are there to - guide you. safer for me, not only a shambolic— guide you. safer for me, not only a shambolic organisation _ guide you. safer for me, not only a shambolic organisation of- guide you. safer for me, not only a shambolic organisation of the - guide you. safer for me, not only a i shambolic organisation of the event, but disgusting — shambolic organisation of the event, but disgusting behaviour— shambolic organisation of the event, but disgusting behaviour from - shambolic organisation of the event, but disgusting behaviour from the i but disgusting behaviour from the police _ but disgusting behaviour from the olice. �* . . ., , police. and the french authorities have held their— police. and the french authorities have held their hands _ police. and the french authorities have held their hands up - police. and the french authorities have held their hands up to - police. and the french authorities have held their hands up to a - have held their hands up to a certain extent and said they know something has gone wrong and they are set to investigate immediately and work with uefa and merseyside police. what do you want to hear from them? than police. what do you want to hear from them?— police. what do you want to hear from them? . . ., , ., . , . from them? an apology, our fans have been stereotyped _ from them? an apology, our fans have been stereotyped in _ from them? an apology, our fans have been stereotyped in terms _ from them? an apology, our fans have been stereotyped in terms of - from them? an apology, our fans have been stereotyped in terms of their - been stereotyped in terms of their behaviour. — been stereotyped in terms of their behaviour, saying _ been stereotyped in terms of their behaviour, saying they— been stereotyped in terms of their behaviour, saying they were - been stereotyped in terms of their behaviour, saying they were late i been stereotyped in terms of theirl behaviour, saying they were late or they didn't — behaviour, saying they were late or they didn't have _ behaviour, saying they were late or they didn't have the _ behaviour, saying they were late or they didn't have the right _ behaviour, saying they were late or they didn't have the right tickets. i they didn't have the right tickets. and isaac— they didn't have the right tickets. and isaac from _ they didn't have the right tickets. and isaac from the _ they didn't have the right tickets. and isaac from the stories, - they didn't have the right tickets. and isaac from the stories, i- they didn't have the right tickets. and isaac from the stories, i ami and isaac from the stories, i am getting — and isaac from the stories, i am getting more _ and isaac from the stories, i am getting more angry— and isaac from the stories, i am getting more angry the - and isaac from the stories, i am getting more angry the more . and isaac from the stories, i am - getting more angry the more stories i getting more angry the more stories i have _ getting more angry the more stories i have heard — getting more angry the more stories i have heard an— getting more angry the more stories i have heard. an apology— getting more angry the more stories i have heard. an apology at - getting more angry the more stories i have heard. an apology at the - getting more angry the more stories i have heard. an apology at the veryi i have heard. an apology at the very least _ i have heard. an apology at the very least in _ i have heard. an apology at the very least in terms — i have heard. an apology at the very least in terms of _ i have heard. an apology at the very least in terms of people's _ least in terms of people's treatment~ _ least in terms of people's treatment. the _ least in terms of people's treatment. the fans - least in terms of people's treatment. the fans need least in terms of people's i treatment. the fans need to least in terms of people's - treatment. the fans need to be treated — treatment. the fans need to be treated with _ treatment. the fans need to be treated with more _ treatment. the fans need to be treated with more respect. - treatment. the fans need to be i treated with more respect. people have just — treated with more respect. people have just said. _ treated with more respect. people have just said, cancelled - treated with more respect. people have just said, cancelled flights, i have just said, cancelled flights, people _ have just said, cancelled flights, people have _ have just said, cancelled flights, people have had _ have just said, cancelled flights, people have had treacherous - people have had treacherous journeys. _ people have had treacherous journeys. just _ people have had treacherous journeys, just to _ people have had treacherous journeys, just to see - people have had treacherous journeys, just to see the - people have had treacherous i journeys, just to see the game. people have had treacherous - journeys, just to see the game. to some _ journeys, just to see the game. to some people — journeys, just to see the game. to some people going _ journeys, just to see the game. to some people going to _ journeys, just to see the game. to some people going to this- journeys, just to see the game. to some people going to this game i journeys, just to see the game. to some people going to this game isi some people going to this game is life changing. _ some people going to this game is life changing, it's _ some people going to this game is life changing, it's amazing - some people going to this game is life changing, it's amazing to - life changing, it's amazing to follow — life changing, it's amazing to follow your— life changing, it's amazing to follow your team _ life changing, it's amazing to follow your team and - life changing, it's amazing to follow your team and be - life changing, it's amazing to follow your team and be in i life changing, it's amazing to - follow your team and be in europe. the very—
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follow your team and be in europe. the very least _ follow your team and be in europe. the very least you _ follow your team and be in europe. the very least you need _ follow your team and be in europe. the very least you need from - the very least you need from authorities— the very least you need from authorities is— the very least you need from authorities is to _ the very least you need from authorities is to be _ the very least you need from authorities is to be kept - the very least you need from - authorities is to be kept organised and safe _ authorities is to be kept organised and safe joanne _ authorities is to be kept organised and safe joanne talking _ authorities is to be kept organised and safe joanne talking about - authorities is to be kept organised and safe joanne talking about how angry— and safe joanne talking about how angry she — and safe joanne talking about how angry she is. _ and safe joanne talking about how angry she is. how— and safe joanne talking about how angry she is, how angry _ and safe joanne talking about how angry she is, how angry are - and safe joanne talking about how angry she is, how angry are you i angry she is, how angry are you feeling. — angry she is, how angry are you feeling, especially— angry she is, how angry are you feeling, especially bearing - angry she is, how angry are you feeling, especially bearing in. angry she is, how angry are you i feeling, especially bearing in mind how important _ feeling, especially bearing in mind how important this _ feeling, especially bearing in mind how important this was _ feeling, especially bearing in mind how important this was for - feeling, especially bearing in mind how important this was for you - how important this was for you personally— how important this was for you personally to _ how important this was for you personally to be _ how important this was for you personally to be there? - how important this was for you personally to be there? i- how important this was for you personally to be there?- how important this was for you personally to be there? i think it is 'ust a personally to be there? i think it isjust a shame, _ personally to be there? i think it isjust a shame, really, - personally to be there? i think it isjust a shame, really, a - personally to be there? i think it isjust a shame, really, a big - isjust a shame, really, a big shame. liverpool supporters have been branded something that they were genuinely not doing, nothing wrong, just like us, we were going in terry's memory to enjoy a champions league final, the first one we had actually got a ticket for. as a mother and son, wejust wanted to enjoy the day and do a cheers for terry, just awful. even after the game what we experienced was just so awful. it has really put me off, i would never go to another champions league match. that me off, i would never go to another champions league match. that such a shame. we champions league match. that such a shame- we just _ champions league match. that such a shame. we just keep _ champions league match. that such a shame. we just keep clicking - champions league match. that such a shame. we just keep clicking it - shame. wejust keep clicking it could have been a lot worse. it did get worse after, we left the stadium as soon as the game ended, thinking we need to get out of here get
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straight to the airport. football was the last thing from your mind. i was the last thing from your mind. i feared for my life going in and coming — feared for my life going in and coming out was even worse. all you could see was _ coming out was even worse. all you could see was riot _ coming out was even worse. all you could see was riot police, _ coming out was even worse. all you could see was riot police, running, l could see was riot police, running, the french police, you could see french people waiting internal to go to the fans, running at them —— rating in tunnels. to go to the fans. �* ,., rating in tunnels. to go to the fans. �* , . �* fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't work out _ fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't work out for _ fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't work out for you. _ fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't work out for you. thank - fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't work out for you. thank you i fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't| work out for you. thank you for fans. i'm so sorry that it didn't - work out for you. thank you for all of you, i hope the talks go well. we will talk later on about what questions the authorities have got, how do we stop this happening again. we have got huge tournaments coming up, and the olympics in paris as well. �* . , ., , . .
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well. and the champions league final can be one special _ well. and the champions league final can be one special night _ well. and the champions league final can be one special night so _ well. and the champions league final can be one special night so such - well. and the champions league final can be one special night so such a - can be one special night so such a shame to those found. let's have a look at the other sport, some of the other things unfolding in a much more happy way. other things unfolding in a much more happy way-— other things unfolding in a much more happy way. yes, a special day for nottingham _ more happy way. yes, a special day for nottingham forest _ more happy way. yes, a special day for nottingham forest fans - more happy way. yes, a special day for nottingham forest fans in - for nottingham forest fans in wembley. the championship play—off final, worth £170 million. nottingham forest are back in the premier league. twice european champions, they have spent 23 years in the championship and league one, but yesterday they finally won promotion back to the top division of english football. they beat huddersfield 1—0 at wembley. an own goal from levi colwill was the decisive moment of the game. manager steve cooper only took over in september with the club bottom of the table. every time we have had a mini setback we have recovered, and that's what winners do. this i'm just pleased to everybody connected with the football club. l
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we are a big football club, we know that, full of history and tradition, we stand on that proud, but i've always said, let's try and create a next positive chapter and we have managed to do that. celtic won the women's scottish cup, and with it, ensured that glasgow city finished a season trophyless for the first time in 14 years. it finished 3—2 at tynecastle, with izzy atkinson grabbing the winning goal in extra—time. they beat the same opposition to lift the league cup earlier in the season. too many mistakes according to ferrari's charles leclerc, after a series of errors from his team led to red bull's sergio perez winning the monaco grand prix. leclerc started from pole, but dropped from first to fourth over four laps in a rain affected grand prix. red bull capitilised on ferrari's poor strategy, with perez moving into the lead. crucially championship leader max verstappen finished third, ahead of leclerc, which means
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the red bull driver extends his lead to nine points. lewis hamilton started and finished eighth. rafa nadal took five sets to get past felix auger aliassime at the french open. nadal lost the opening set but roared back to win the next two. the canadian who is coached by nadal�*s uncle toni made sure the match went to five sets with nadal winning the final set 6—3. it sets up a mouthwatering quarter final against novak djokovic who swept aside argentina's diego schwartzmann in straight sets. american teenager coco gauff has equalled her best run at roland garros by reaching the last eight. belgian elise mertens was seen off in straight sets. she'll play fellow american sloane stephens next. now, one man who is not at the french open is a certain sir andy murray. he's a little busy elsewhere according to his latest post on instagram. "preparation for wimbledon
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going really well" he wrote while posing in this beautiful dragon suit. he may be a knight of the realm, but i guess that's all part of being a parent. is suitably glum face from him there! we're going to reflect now on the life and career of lester piggott, widely regarded as the finest jockey ever to ride on british turf. he died on sunday in switzerland at the age of 86. we're joined now by former jockey willie carson, who competed against lester throughout his career. thank you forjoining us, great rivals of course but also good friends in the end. give us your reaction firstly, to the news. goad reaction firstly, to the news. good mornint. reaction firstly, to the news. good morning- yes. _ reaction firstly, to the news. good morning. yes, it _ reaction firstly, to the news. good morning. yes, it was _ reaction firstly, to the news. good morning. yes, it was a _ reaction firstly, to the news. good morning. yes, it was a bit - reaction firstly, to the news. good morning. yes, it was a bit of- reaction firstly, to the news. good morning. yes, it was a bit of a - morning. yes, it was a bit of a shock because we had just read in the rating papers the day before that maureen, his daughter, had just returned from switzerland and said he was coming out of hospital. 50 it
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was a bit of a shock to wake up to the news. basically, we go back to when i started in racing when i was 15, i got an apprentice to part of his, he married into the armstrong family, susan, and i have been associated basically with lester from that day until now, really. competitors on the track, enemies, you could say. we had great tussles together. normally he won it, which was not good for me! but he became an iconic figure, didn't he? it doesn't matter, we went around the world are sometimes in the winter when racing wasn't going on in england and he was just as well known in south africa, australia, new zealand, singapore, kuala lumpur, all of those places, he was
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an iconic figure. you lumpur, all of those places, he was an iconic figure.— an iconic figure. you will know from com -tetin an iconic figure. you will know from competing against _ an iconic figure. you will know from competing against him _ an iconic figure. you will know from competing against him just - an iconic figure. you will know from competing against him just what . an iconic figure. you will know from i competing against him just what made him stand out as such a remarkable jockey. can you explain that to us? well, he was born into racing. his grandfather i believe won the grand national. he was a was going to be a jockey. and you must remember, he rode his first winner when he was 12 years of age, only a boy. he became a boy wonder. he rode a derby winner in his teens, never say die, and he became this iconic figure. he lived and breathed racing. he didn't understand what went on outside of racing. it hasjust understand what went on outside of racing. it has just his life, racing. it has just his life, racing. and that's how he became, well, he was talented, of course, that he became a figure that we had to all up our game to beat him. he
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was so good at it. bud to all up our game to beat him. he was so good at it.— to all up our game to beat him. he was so good at it. and he was also a complicated — was so good at it. and he was also a complicated character, _ was so good at it. and he was also a complicated character, difficult i was so good at it. and he was also a complicated character, difficult to i complicated character, difficult to interview, he would give one—word answers, what was he like off the track? ~ . track? well, when we were writing at the heitht track? well, when we were writing at the height of— track? well, when we were writing at the height of our— track? well, when we were writing at the height of our careers, _ track? well, when we were writing at the height of our careers, there i track? well, when we were writing at the height of our careers, there was. the height of our careers, there was not a lot said. he never spoke too much. he was the sort of figure, when he walked into the weighing room, you didn't have to see him, you could feel him. the aura was there. that's the type of person he was. he never said much, there. that's the type of person he was. he neversaid much, he there. that's the type of person he was. he never said much, he granted a few times. but he just had this aura around him because he was so good at what he was doing. he was a bit of a genius, really. d0 good at what he was doing. he was a bit of a genius, really.— bit of a genius, really. do you think we will— bit of a genius, really. do you think we will ever _ bit of a genius, really. do you think we will ever see - bit of a genius, really. do you | think we will ever see anybody bit of a genius, really. do you - think we will ever see anybody come close to matching what he did? flat close to matching what he did? not in m close to matching what he did? iirrt in my lifetime, i have not got long left, by d. but i doubt it. but i
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think, lester, everybody in this country, 30 years ago you just said the word lester and we knew who you are talking about. he had this aura about him. and his history of the racecourse, nine derby winners. i should not think that will ever be beaten. he has done things that no otherjockey has ever done before. or since. appreciate your time, willie carson, reflecting on the life of your great rival and friend lester piggott who has died at the age of 86. thank you very much. a lot of people watching this mauling are not going to work this week. i cannot imagine what that is like! three days off! you week. i cannot imagine what that is like! three days off!— like! three days off! you lost your breath there! _ like! three days off! you lost your breath there! let's _ like! three days off! you lost your breath there! let's hope -
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like! three days off! you lost your breath there! let's hope wasn't i like! three days off! you lost your i breath there! let's hope wasn't good —— there is some good weather. we brace ourselves for tumultuous where they're going to a bank holiday, will it be different? i think it might be one of those weeks where it gets better towards the keep the raincoats nearby, it will not be a wash—out but they might come in handy as we will have a scattering of showers. it might come in handy as we will have a scattering of showers.— a scattering of showers. it will feel quite _ a scattering of showers. it will feel quite pleasant, _ a scattering of showers. it will feel quite pleasant, cool- a scattering of showers. it will feel quite pleasant, coolto i a scattering of showers. it will i feel quite pleasant, coolto start feel quite pleasant, cool to start with and warming up a touch. showers around widely this morning, a dry start for many across southern and central parts. it will not stay that way, showers into the afternoon. where you see them they will be slow moving, not much wind around today. if you get stuck under one it will be with you for a while and they will become heavy and thundery. cool
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in the cloudy moments but where you have got the sunshine it will feel quite pleasant. pollen levels will be suppressed a touch but high uv in the channel islands. showers will fade for some but they will keep going in some parts, scotland and northern ireland will have the clearest part so single figures temperatures, and a touch of frost in rural spots. cloud and longer spells of rain coming into more into northern ireland. western scotland and western areas of england and wales, fewer showers tomorrow compared with today but slightly more in eastern areas tomorrow. it will feel on the cool side. it will feel quite pleasant and there will be sunnier moments across western scotland and northern ireland as we head into wednesday. cloud and rain across england and wales but breaks appearing, sunshine coming out and starting to feel a touch warmer. by
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this stage temperatures closer to what we should be as we head into june. that's going into thejubilee weekend, i cannot put exact details on it but i can give you a rough idea, high pressure on thursday to begin with should keep things largely dry, we have to watch for a weather system which could bring showers across the north. it's a saturday and sunday, low pressure across france could throw some heavy showers and thunderstorms close to southern coast where it could be breezy. but fairly optimistic for the weekend, the chance of showers, keep across the forecast but much of the time it will be dry, some people will have the entire weekend dry and when the sun is out it will feel very pleasant. not a scorcher but we can expect temperatures a few
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degrees above normal for the early stage ofjudah. and the strong sunshine will make it feel warmer. —— early stage ofjudah. it could be cooler depending on the breeze across east coasts. but heading towards a bank holiday weekend, it looks like things are improving. that is what we like to hear. we will kee that is what we like to hear. - will keep you updated. that is what we like to hear. we will keep you updated. thank i that is what we like to hear. we i will keep you updated. thank you, can we say. _ will keep you updated. thank you, can we say, thank— will keep you updated. thank you, can we say, thank you! _ will keep you updated. thank you, can we say, thank you! we - will keep you updated. thank you, can we say, thank you! we do i will keep you updated. thank you, can we say, thank you! we do not| will keep you updated. thank you, i can we say, thank you! we do not say it enouuh, can we say, thank you! we do not say it enough. matt- _ can we say, thank you! we do not say it enough, matt. if _ can we say, thank you! we do not say it enough, matt. if it _ can we say, thank you! we do not say it enough, matt. if it goes _ can we say, thank you! we do not say it enough, matt. if it goes wrong - it enough, matt. if it goes wrong from tomorrow, _ it enough, matt. if it goes wrong from tomorrow, carol— it enough, matt. if it goes wrong from tomorrow, carol is - it enough, matt. if it goes wrong from tomorrow, carol is back - it enough, matt. if it goes wrong from tomorrow, carol is back in l from tomorrow, carol is back in charge! thank you, thank yoo, nina. thank you, jon! the first ever national thank you day took place last summer. its aim was for us to show gratitude to those who helped us during the pandemic,
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whether it be nurses or neighbours, carers or cleaners. or colleagues, may be! now for its second year the day is coinciding with the platinum jubilee. here's a few messages from some of those who want to give thanks. ! that is lovely. and it's often the people who are closest to you do not say thank you to say this is a good chance to do it!
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ross kemp is here to tell us more. firstly, it is a massive thank you for 70 years of service from her majesty, that is driving all of this. it coincides with thank you day which is great, so we are hoping that people up and down the country will get together, whether it is barbecues, street parties, picnics, evenjust barbecues, street parties, picnics, even just a cup of tea, raising barbecues, street parties, picnics, evenjust a cup of tea, raising a mug or a glass to her majesty may maybe then raise a glass to some of the people who may have helped them in the community over the last two years. in the community over the last two ears. �* , , ., ., years. and the message is to get to know our years. and the message is to get to know your neighbours _ years. and the message is to get to know your neighbours and - years. and the message is to get to know your neighbours and the - years. and the message is to get to i know your neighbours and the people who live next door, maybe you don't even know their names?— who live next door, maybe you don't even know their names? that's right. we are asking — even know their names? that's right. we are asking people _ even know their names? that's right. we are asking people to _ even know their names? that's right. we are asking people to three - we are asking people to three things. the first thing is to knock, go with a friend, knock on a door, someone who you made have not connected with before or you want to reconnect with. someone who lives next door to who you have not seen
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for a long time. knock on the door, let them know they are invited. let's make this as inclusive as possible. even if you don't get an answer, slip a note under the door, they may not want to come but at least they know they are invited. the first thing is knock. second thing is name. iam the first thing is knock. second thing is name. i am going down to the cupboard where i live and i am going to wear a name tag, it will not say grant, it will save us! we hope —— it will say ross! we hope that will help break the ice, particularly people feeling vulnerable over the last two years, who feel that they are not included at the community. we are at 15 million and we think it could be more than that. knock first, then name at the event, and then lastly do a bit of nattering. i am quite good at that as you know. try and stop me! get people coming together and talking, but we would also like
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to see this producing a future for people in their community, people who feel vulnerable and isolated, that they can connect with people. maybe a whatsapp group, a facebook group, that they know that they are included. they are not isolated. and the more the merrier. we have had a hike in the cost of living, there is a war in europe, lots of things to be unhappy about. let's celebrate 70 years of glorious service by her majesty the queen, raise a glass to her, and raise a glass to the millions of volunteers that have stepped forward over the last two years. stepped forward over the last two ears. ., ~' ., stepped forward over the last two ears. ., ~ ., ., ., years. you know that if you go around knocking _ years. you know that if you go around knocking on _ years. you know that if you go around knocking on doors, - years. you know that if you go l around knocking on doors, don't years. you know that if you go - around knocking on doors, don't use your scary grant face? i around knocking on doors, don't use your scary grant face?— your scary grant face? i promise, i will be a happy _ your scary grant face? i promise, i will be a happy chappie! _ your scary grant face? i promise, i will be a happy chappie! there - your scary grant face? i promise, i will be a happy chappie! there are | will be a happy chappie! there are some big organised _ will be a happy chappie! there are some big organised events - will be a happy chappie! there are some big organised events which l some big organised events which sound fantastic. stadium picnic on the pitch, 1000 specially invited people, and generations of refugees from the holocaust to modern
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conflicts like afghanistan and syria, sharing a meal with people who helped them along the way, what a great idea. who helped them along the way, what a ureat idea. , who helped them along the way, what a great idea-— who helped them along the way, what a great idea— a great idea. yes, even behind to be, the a great idea. yes, even behind to be. the holy _ a great idea. yes, even behind to be, the holy trinity _ a great idea. yes, even behind to be, the holy trinity church - a great idea. yes, even behind to be, the holy trinity church in - be, the holy trinity church in clapham, they have invited everybody. the queen transcends faith and class, she is loved by everybody in the maid. —— in the brain. i hope that will get people out into the community meeting people for the first time reconnecting with old friends. what reconnecting with old friends. what are ou reconnecting with old friends. what are you doing _ reconnecting with old friends. what are you doing this _ reconnecting with old friends. what are you doing this weekend? we i reconnecting with old friends. what l are you doing this weekend? we are auoin to are you doing this weekend? we are aoian to be are you doing this weekend? we are going to be wandering _ are you doing this weekend? we are going to be wandering down - are you doing this weekend? we are going to be wandering down to - are you doing this weekend? we are going to be wandering down to the l going to be wandering down to the common at the end of our road, we have got a little group on facebook and we have all decided to wander down there, join up with other people in our community, have some sandwiches, and the odd glass of rose. ~ , ., ., ., .,, rose. why not! i thought what was auite rose. why not! i thought what was quite striking _ rose. why not! i thought what was quite striking in _ rose. why not! i thought what was quite striking in some _ rose. why not! i thought what was quite striking in some of _ rose. why not! i thought what was quite striking in some of the - quite striking in some of the celebrities who have interviewed iii, they are not necessarily thinking
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nhs workers or people in the community, —— who you have interviewed for thank you day, it is people close to you, so it is may be saying thank you to people in your family. saying thank you to people in your famil . �* ., ., saying thank you to people in your famil . �* . ., ., ., saying thank you to people in your famil. �* . ., ., ., , family. and we have a lot to be thankfulfor, _ family. and we have a lot to be thankful for, we _ family. and we have a lot to be thankfulfor, we may— family. and we have a lot to be thankful for, we may forget - family. and we have a lot to be | thankful for, we may forget that because we are so wrapped up in what is going on, getting from a to b. this is an opportunity to come together as a community, a community that our queen has presided overfor 70 years, the better volunteer we have ever had, to say an immense thank you to her but also to members of yourfamily, to nhs, to scout groups, to the guys who turn up on a saturday and run local football teams. it's an opportunity to say a huge thank you to the queen and other volunteers out there. there is onl one other volunteers out there. there is only one thing _ other volunteers out there. there is only one thing left _ other volunteers out there. there is only one thing left to _ other volunteers out there. there is only one thing left to say _ other volunteers out there. there is only one thing left to say to - other volunteers out there. there is only one thing left to say to you, i only one thing left to say to you, ross, thank you! enjoy your weekend. thank you, you too! if he ross, thank you! en'oy your weekend. thank you, you too!— thank you, you too! if he had won a badae, thank you, you too! if he had won a badge. we — thank you, you too! if he had won a badge, we would _ thank you, you too! if he had won a
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badge, we would have _ thank you, you too! if he had won a badge, we would have known. -- i thank you, you too! if he had won a| badge, we would have known. -- we would know — badge, we would have known. -- we would know who _ badge, we would have known. -- we would know who he _ badge, we would have known. -- we would know who he was. _ badge, we would have known. -- we would know who he was. yes, - badge, we would have known. -- we would know who he was. yes, i- would know who he was. yes, i thought he was grant. he was yours thank you? i thought he was grant. he was yours thank ou? ~ , ,.,, ., thank you? i think it is the postal workers, thank you? i think it is the postal workers. they — thank you? i think it is the postal workers, they are _ thank you? i think it is the postal workers, they are there - thank you? i think it is the postal workers, they are there every - thank you? i think it is the postal i workers, they are there every single day. workers, they are there every single da . ., ., ., ., workers, they are there every single da. ., ., ., ., day. you are meant to say your wife. and my wife! — day. you are meant to say your wife. and my wife! headlines _ day. you are meant to say your wife. and my wife! headlines coming i day. you are meant to say your wife. and my wife! headlines coming up. | good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. our headlines today: fallback!
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an emergency meeting in paris as the uk calls for an investigation into the treatment of liverpool fans at the champions league final. president biden meets grieving families in texas amid anger at the slow police response to last week's school shooting in which 19 children and two teachers were killed. good morning from this builders merchant in stoke—on—trent where i'm finding out how much the cost of everything has gone up, from timber to cement, pipes and plastic and what it means for any building work you are having done at your home. in sport, nottingham forest return to the premier league. after 23 years away, the two—time european champions are back in the top flight of english football after beating huddersfield at wembley. and ahead of the platinum jubilee we get a tour of the queen's floating palace — the royal yacht britannia.
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and a sign that things could be turning drier and warmer as we head towards thejubilee turning drier and warmer as we head towards the jubilee weekend turning drier and warmer as we head towards thejubilee weekend but for the next few days it's a story of sunshine and showers, but some of those showers could be heavy and thundery. it's monday 30th may. our main story is that the french government will hold an emergency meeting today with uefa and other officials, to examine what went wrong at the champions league final on saturday. there were chaotic scenes before and after the match after french police repeatedly fired tear gas and pepper spray at liverpool fans waiting to get into the stadium. the uk's culture secretary nadine dorries has called for an investigation into what happened as tim muffett reports. fallback! fallback! in the countdown to kick—off, this was the situation facing many fans on saturday night.
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real madrid's i—0 victory over liverpool at the stade de france has been largely overshadowed by what went on outside the ground. it was just... the only word i can think of is chaos. we were patiently trying to queue. and then we'd be pushed by the police and kettled against railings and against the wall. and then pepper spray had come out and i was completely disorientated, didn't know what was happening with all the crowds that were there as well. there were children crying. there were grown men who were kind of shouting out that they needed help. this nine—year—old boy was one of those who suffered the after—effects of tear gas. many liverpool fans say the policing was shambolic and heavy—handed. there was no communication. we weren't told if the gate was going to open, when it was going to open. it wasjust chaotic and actually it was a disgrace and it was very, very dangerous. it was shambolic.
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it was dangerous and hostile i and one of the worst atmospheres i've ever experienced, and | no football fan should ever experience that - at a blue ribbon event. uefa said that turnstiles became blocked because thousands of liverpool fans arrived with fake tickets. footage also show some people climbing overfences, but it's not clear whether they're liverpool fans or not. today, the french sports ministry will host a meeting with uefa, the french football association, stadium officials and police. it says it wants to draw lessons from the event. the culture secretary, nadine dorries, has called for a formal investigation. she described the footage and descriptions from fans as deeply concerning. "i urge uefa to launch a formal investigation into what went wrong and why", she said in a statement. following their defeat in paris there was still a victory parade in liverpool yesterday, the club having won both the fa cup
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and league cup this season, a positive end to what had been a dispiriting weekend for the team and its fans. tim muffett, bbc news. the us presidentjoe biden has promised to turn "pain into action" during a visit to the texan town of uvalde where 19 children and two teachers were killed in america's latest mass shooting. the president and the first lady placed white roses at a memorial for the victims, before meeting families and survivors. from texas, our north america correspondent, barbara plett usher, reports. do something! the commander in chief was visiting a community in shock, devastated by loss. "do something, do something" the crowd chanted as he left a church service. "we will, we will", he responded. his only public remarks on the trip. it is the hardest visit a president has to make, especially
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when the victims are so young. outside the school, mr biden and his wifejill paused to recognise each of those murdered while cowering on the floor of their classroom. 19 children and two teachers. later, they met privately with the families. a bouquet of flowers added to the mound of remembrance that seeks to dampen the horror by honouring the dead. but the police response to the shooting is now under review by the justice department. the rampage began when the teenage gunman entered the school through a back door, armed with a high—powered rifle. children as young as nine were trapped with him for an hour before security forces finally stormed in. this small community has pulled together to face an unspeakable tragedy. but the political environment is difficult. there's a fierce debate about how to stop such attacks. the president wants to tighten gun laws and faces strong partisan opposition, especially in texas. this is, after all, gun country.
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there are mixed feelings about mr biden's visit. i don't know if it can make any difference, actually. i think that as a nation, we'rejust very divided. but i think that in a time of crisis, itjust... it's great for leaders to show unity. we just need to grieve. we just... come here and give us hope for tomorrow. but don't tell us politically what we need to do. most of all, the families don't want their pain to be drawn into the political disputes. patricia castanon is lost in a fog of grief at the death of her niece, annabelle. she was happy, smiley. this is how she was with me. there's no words for me to say. she was just a good person. we know that the president is coming to visit. do you think that will help? no. why do you say that? because he can't bring her back. he can't bring her back.
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he can't bring none of them back. and nobody can. he can't bring them back, and he's struggling to protect others. his biggest obstacle is how to prevent this from happening again. this is the second time in a month that president biden has made a visit to console a community recovering from a mass shooting. and he finds it very distressing and frustrating. and here, of course, they're facing another difficult week as they prepare to begin burying their loved ones. barbara plett usher, bbc news, uvalde, texas. the ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky has visited troops in the eastern kharkiv region. it's his first official trip outside the capital, kyiv, since russia invaded in february. meawhile, fighting in the ukrainian city of severodonetsk has intensified. russia has made seizing the whole eastern donbas region a key aim of the war. the ukrainian band who won this year's eurovision song contest, kalush orchestra, have sold their trophy at auction
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for more than £700,000 to raise money for the war in ukraine. the sale coincided with the band's appearance at a charity concert for ukraine in berlin. the funds will be used to buy drones and a ground control system for the army. here's matt with a look at this morning's weather. what have you got behind you they i have a graphics system which has decided it doesn't like me this morning. i will try my best, very futuristic but it gives me a few moments to show where the radar is showing for the rain is, lots of showers across the rain is, lots of showers across the north, one or two i stated ones around the cloud, it starts to with sunny scale spells, a chilly start but at least here we have sunshine but at least here we have sunshine but the showers to the north and
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west will attract south and east as west will attract south and east as we go through today and that means we go through today and that means we will see showers just about any work throughout the day. winds will be light so the showers are slow moving and some could be heavy and thundery. between the showers we have the sunshine, temperatures of 11-17 have the sunshine, temperatures of 11—17 so cool forthe have the sunshine, temperatures of 11—17 so cool for the stage in may ii—i7 so cool for the stage in may but winds will be largely lied and as we go into the afternoon anyone could see a shower, overnight the showers will start to fade and then tomorrow we have more sunshine and showers. the graphics are now showing where the showers are, some could be heavy and thundery, he we saw looks for the afternoon pick up from school, for some of you it is half term but as we head towards evening parts of east anglia will stay dry, showers frequent across northern england, easing in northern ireland but more to come in scotland. the full forecast coming up ireland but more to come in scotland. the full forecast coming up later ireland but more to come in
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scotland. the full forecast coming up later on. you might be upset that your machine wasn't working but the people of the sort dean have never had so much coverage! good morning, salt dean. last month we spoke to the bbc�*s global health correspondent tulip mazumdar ahead of her documentary about her experience of miscarriage. since then a number of families have been in touch to share their stories of loss, including one couple who were forced to keep their baby's remains in their fridge because a&e staff said they weren't able to store them safely. tulip has been to meet laura and lawrence, and just to warn viewers you may find some of the details in this report upsetting. there's a tiny blanket for the baby and then a teddy that you can put in the coffin. we've got a sprig of leaves that we took from our garden. and then the only other thing
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in here, we've got the baby's ashes. these precious items, a memory box for laura and lawrence's baby. some comfort in a time of utter despair. it's been just two months since the couple suffered a late miscarriage 15 weeks into their pregnancy. it happened after they were sent home from hospital, having been told their baby no longer had a heartbeat. there were no beds available, the hospital said, for laura to give birth there. i woke up in really quite had pain. i felt a lot of pressure. and so i ran upstairs to the bathroom and that's where i delivered the baby. i looked down and canjust see a mass in the water. and so i scooped it out, still assuming that it was going to be something else. and at that point, i realised
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that it was a baby. i realised it was my baby, obviously. and you just think, obviously it's not alive, and so i scooped it out, put it in the sink and realised it was a baby boy. and at that point, i'd screamed and lawrence had come upstairs and ijust was in such a panic. i just went up to the bathroom, closed the door and said, do not go in there. the couple called 999 but were advised that this wasn't an emergency. and so they placed their baby's remains in a box and went into a&e, which they say was chaos. it got to midnight and we just thought, we've got a decision to make here. there's no—one at this hospital who's willing to take charge of our baby. there's no—one who seems to know what's going on and it's been in a hot room
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for nearly five hours now. so we decided together that i would go home. so i took the box to the entrance of the hospital and got a taxi and took him home, cleared out some space in our fridge and put him there. as harrowing as it is to talk about what happened, the couple say they're speaking out to try and ensure this doesn't happen to anyone else. when you were sitting in that a&e waiting room, at that point, you just felt like there's no safety net, when things go wrong with the pregnancy, you know, there are not the systems in place to help you, and even with all the staff and the experts and they're working really hard with the best will in the world, the processes are so flawed that itjust felt like we've been tipped into hell. a statement from lewisham
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and greenwich nhs trust, where laura was treated, says: "we are deeply sorry and offer our sincerest condolences to miss brody and her partner for the tragic loss of their baby in these traumatic experiences." it goes on to say a full investigation is under way to understand where failings in care may have occurred so that any necessary changes and improvements can be made. it's beyond sad, really. it's unbearable. there should be an available cold place. there simply should be, and it should be, if it's not in the morgue, there probably ought to be something in a&e and there ought to be something in the maternity department or in the gynae department, somewhere where pregnancy remains or these tiny little babies can be safely and respectfully and carefully stored with clear labelling. why isn't that happening yet? i don't know, but it isn't happening. we're talking about one case
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and we're talking about one trust. and i'm sure it happens in more than one place, more than one trust. so we have to be careful not to assume from this case that everything is awful. there is good advice and guidance around. and at the same time, it's also about ensuring the staff have the time and the space to work through that. the importance of pregnancy loss care is increasingly being recognised. this is a special cot i for babies that have died. here at birmingham women's hospital, there's a specialist suite in a side room on the maternity ward for women who are having a late miscarriage or stillbirth. the hospital is also starting work on a first of its kind in the uk bereavement centre, specialising in care forfamilies, including those experiencing pregnancy loss. this site is going to i be our woodland house. they will be able to come back
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and see their baby there, i if they want to go home. we'll be able to hold follow—up appointments with doctors. i we'll be able to look after our families going through early. pregnancy loss who want to come back in and collect their pregnancy, - maybe for a little burial at home or a funeral. . amongst the smell of fresh roses and a feeling of being close to family, laura and lawrence can remember and grieve. this is the crematorium where my grandparents' ashes were scattered and their plaque's here. and we were thinking of putting the baby's ashes here as well. itjust gives what happens some permanence and it's something tangible as otherwise itjust feels like everything evaporates and it never really happened and the baby's just forgotten, and all of this heartbreak is just for nothing. we just felt like the baby's already been so alone. and this way, at least it's near us. and it's near family.
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tulip mazumdar, bbc news. and we send our best wishes to lawrence and laura for sharing their story with us this morning. we can now talk to vicki jennings, who has experienced two miscarriages, and zoe clark—coates, who is the founder of the charity saying goodbye and co—chair of the government's pregnancy loss review. good morning to you. hearing the experiences there, just horrific but what we were interested in reading around the subject is there is no uniformity or best practice. it depends which trust you are under when this happens. yes. depends which trust you are under when this happens. yes, absolutely, the tra a ed when this happens. yes, absolutely, the tragedy of _ when this happens. yes, absolutely, the tragedy of what _ when this happens. yes, absolutely, the tragedy of what this _ when this happens. yes, absolutely, the tragedy of what this couple i when this happens. yes, absolutely, the tragedy of what this couple have | the tragedy of what this couple have gone to vote sadly isn't isolated. so many people go through similar things every day and we need to see a change, we need excellent care
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offered across the board wherever you encounter a loss. just offered across the board wherever you encounter a loss.— you encounter a loss. just talk to us about the _ you encounter a loss. just talk to us about the work— you encounter a loss. just talk to us about the work you _ you encounter a loss. just talk to us about the work you were i you encounter a loss. just talk to | us about the work you were doing with the government at the moment. one of my roles is co—chairing the pregnancy loss review and that looks at where there are things that could be changed and altered to alter the care people receive so they don't experience situations like the one we just heard. we experience situations like the one wejust heard. we need experience situations like the one we just heard. we need to ensure every parent is given the support they need when they need it most and at the moment sadly it's a lottery, you don't know where you will receive that care and we need to see a change to that. i want to see uniformity around the care people receive so it's not this pot luck of credit you get compassionate caring support or not and we need to see an end to people being asked to store their babies in fridges, which an online survey has shown that around
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7% of families are asked to do this and that is not good enough. we shouldn't be asking parents to do such a heartbreaking thing which adds to their trauma. i such a heartbreaking thing which adds to their trauma.— such a heartbreaking thing which adds to their trauma. i suppose if ou are adds to their trauma. i suppose if you are going _ adds to their trauma. i suppose if you are going to _ adds to their trauma. i suppose if you are going to get _ adds to their trauma. i suppose if you are going to get change, i adds to their trauma. i suppose if you are going to get change, we | adds to their trauma. i suppose if i you are going to get change, we have to talk about, vicki, and that is why you wanted to talk about it, it's painful but in your own time and whoever you want to, tell us what happened to you. me and whoever you want to, tell us what happened to you.— and whoever you want to, tell us what happened to you. me and my husband have _ what happened to you. me and my husband have suffered _ what happened to you. me and my husband have suffered two - husband have suffered two miscarriages so far. we had our first_ miscarriages so far. we had our first in— miscarriages so far. we had our first in march last year. we booked in for— first in march last year. we booked in for a _ first in march last year. we booked in for a private scan with no idea anything — in for a private scan with no idea anything was wrong and when we went for that— anything was wrong and when we went for that scan they said i'm sorry, it was— for that scan they said i'm sorry, it was supposed to be a ten week pregnancy— it was supposed to be a ten week pregnancy but she said this looks like it's_ pregnancy but she said this looks like it's what's called a blighted ovum _ like it's what's called a blighted ovum or— like it's what's called a blighted ovum or an embryonic pregnancy which means_ ovum or an embryonic pregnancy which means no— ovum or an embryonic pregnancy which means no embryo has developed in the
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pregnancy— means no embryo has developed in the pregnancy sack so it feels like the bottom _ pregnancy sack so it feels like the bottom has been pulled out of your world _ bottom has been pulled out of your world we — bottom has been pulled out of your world. we then had to go to the early— world. we then had to go to the early pregnancy unit the next day for a _ early pregnancy unit the next day for a scan, — early pregnancy unit the next day for a scan, they scanned me and said it was— for a scan, they scanned me and said it was a _ for a scan, they scanned me and said it was a twin — for a scan, they scanned me and said it was a twin pregnancy but both sacks _ it was a twin pregnancy but both sacks were on embryonic so because it had _ sacks were on embryonic so because it had been— sacks were on embryonic so because it had been the first time they scanned — it had been the first time they scanned me, they sent me away for ten days— scanned me, they sent me away for ten days because there was nothing you could _ ten days because there was nothing you could do, you had to wait ten days _ you could do, you had to wait ten days to _ you could do, you had to wait ten days to have that confirmed. it was the longest ten days of my life. after— the longest ten days of my life. after ten — the longest ten days of my life. after ten days back in the early pregnancy unit they confirmed the miscarriage, these are your options, what do _ miscarriage, these are your options, what do you — miscarriage, these are your options, what do you want to do? you don't expect— what do you want to do? you don't expect to _ what do you want to do? you don't expect to have a miscarriage, it's like any— expect to have a miscarriage, it's like any other life event you don't expect— like any other life event you don't expect and — like any other life event you don't expect and to be like any other life event you don't expect and to he sat in a room and said would — expect and to he sat in a room and said would you like medication or surgery— said would you like medication or surgery or— said would you like medication or surgery or do you want to go home and wait? — surgery or do you want to go home and wait? you don't know what to do, you are _ and wait? you don't know what to do, you are blind — and wait? you don't know what to do, you are blind sounded so i chose to
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have _ you are blind sounded so i chose to have medication to bring on the miscarriage because my body still thought— miscarriage because my body still thought i— miscarriage because my body still thought i was pregnant and didn't recognise — thought i was pregnant and didn't recognise there was no baby there, thought— recognise there was no baby there, thought all— recognise there was no baby there, thought all had gone fine. four or five weeks — thought all had gone fine. four or five weeks later i became unwell, quite _ five weeks later i became unwell, quite bloated and felt unwell and myself, — quite bloated and felt unwell and myself, went back to hospital, another— myself, went back to hospital, another scan, still full of tissue from _ another scan, still full of tissue from the — another scan, still full of tissue from the pregnancy so back in for more _ from the pregnancy so back in for more treatment and that time it was surgicat _ more treatment and that time it was sura ical. .. . , ,., .. surgical. you have used some of the medical terms _ surgical. you have used some of the medical terms and _ surgical. you have used some of the medical terms and the _ surgical. you have used some of the medical terms and the options i surgical. you have used some of the medical terms and the options you | medical terms and the options you were told about. did you feel like this was a very medical situation, is that how you were treated rather than as a human being in an emotional situation? than as a human being in an emotionalsituation? i than as a human being in an emotional situation?- than as a human being in an emotional situation? i will not say m care emotional situation? i will not say my care was _ emotional situation? i will not say my care was terrible _ emotional situation? i will not say my care was terrible because i emotional situation? i will not say| my care was terrible because there were _ my care was terrible because there were some — my care was terrible because there were some good aspects of it but it's institutional in the nhs that we treat— it's institutional in the nhs that we treat miscarriage as a medical thing _ we treat miscarriage as a medical thing that— we treat miscarriage as a medical thing that happens to women whereas it's thing that happens to women whereas its so— thing that happens to women whereas its so much— thing that happens to women whereas it's so much more. it's very
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emotional, _ it's so much more. it's very emotional, especially women going through— emotional, especially women going through miscarriage are full of pregnancy hormones, they are hormonal— pregnancy hormones, they are hormonal as it is, for example when you go— hormonal as it is, for example when you go for— hormonal as it is, for example when you go for a — hormonal as it is, for example when you go for a surgical treatment for a miscarriage they call that retained _ a miscarriage they call that retained products of conception which, — retained products of conception which, its— retained products of conception which, it's your baby we are taking out _ which, it's your baby we are taking out, so _ which, it's your baby we are taking out, so the — which, it's your baby we are taking out, so the language around miscarriage needs changing. and you suffered a second _ miscarriage needs changing. and you suffered a second pregnancy - miscarriage needs changing. and you suffered a second pregnancy loss i miscarriage needs changing. and you suffered a second pregnancy loss sol suffered a second pregnancy loss so were things different on that occasion?— were things different on that occasion? , , ., , , , occasion? yes but only because m self occasion? yes but only because myself and _ occasion? yes but only because myself and my _ occasion? yes but only because myself and my husband - occasion? yes but only because myself and my husband were i occasion? yes but only because - myself and my husband were prepared, i had done _ myself and my husband were prepared, i had done what i caught a 12 month crash _ i had done what i caught a 12 month crash course — i had done what i caught a 12 month crash course on miscarriage, i spoke to women— crash course on miscarriage, i spoke to women online and did research into it _ to women online and did research into it so — to women online and did research into it so when it happened the second — into it so when it happened the second time i knew straightaway i wanted _ second time i knew straightaway i wanted to— second time i knew straightaway i wanted to go for surgery, i didn't want _ wanted to go for surgery, i didn't want what — wanted to go for surgery, i didn't want what happened because it took so long _ want what happened because it took so long to _ want what happened because it took so long to get everything back to normal— so long to get everything back to normal the year before, i thought i cannot— normal the year before, i thought i cannot go— normal the year before, i thought i cannot go through that again, i need to get— cannot go through that again, i need to get this _ cannot go through that again, i need to get this sorted as soon as
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possible _ to get this sorted as soon as possible-— to get this sorted as soon as rossible. �* ., .. , , ., possible. and nothing can bring your bab is possible. and nothing can bring your baby is back- — possible. and nothing can bring your baby is back. what _ possible. and nothing can bring your baby is back. what do _ possible. and nothing can bring your baby is back. what do you _ possible. and nothing can bring your baby is back. what do you think- baby is back. what do you think would have made a difference in terms of after—care? that would have made a difference in terms of after-care?— would have made a difference in terms of after-care? at the time you should be given _ terms of after-care? at the time you should be given your— terms of after-care? at the time you should be given your options - terms of after-care? at the time you should be given your options of- terms of after-care? at the time you should be given your options of what| should be given your options of what you can _ should be given your options of what you can do _ should be given your options of what you can do and then sent away to think— you can do and then sent away to think about — you can do and then sent away to think about it, sent home with options — think about it, sent home with options and given a day or two to come _ options and given a day or two to come back— options and given a day or two to come back when you are ready whereas bein- come back when you are ready whereas being sat _ come back when you are ready whereas being sat in _ come back when you are ready whereas being sat in an office and told these — being sat in an office and told these are _ being sat in an office and told these are your options, what do you want _ these are your options, what do you want to— these are your options, what do you want to do. — these are your options, what do you want to do, it's difficult to make that decision and i don't think this isjust— that decision and i don't think this isjust my— that decision and i don't think this isjust my hospital, this is nationwide, the after—care was not great _ nationwide, the after—care was not great so _ nationwide, the after—care was not great so you are dealing with the physical— great so you are dealing with the physical aspects but months down the line is— physical aspects but months down the line is when— physical aspects but months down the line is when the emotional trauma comes— line is when the emotional trauma comes in— line is when the emotional trauma comes in and you don't get that after-care _ comes in and you don't get that after—care. | comes in and you don't get that after-care— comes in and you don't get that after-care. .. , ., .. after-care. i can see zoe nodding throuah after-care. i can see zoe nodding through every _ after-care. i can see zoe nodding through every word _ after-care. i can see zoe nodding through every word you _ after-care. i can see zoe nodding through every word you were i after-care. i can see zoe nodding i through every word you were saying. what would make a difference in addition to what vicki has been describing? igrate addition to what vicki has been describing?— addition to what vicki has been describing? addition to what vicki has been
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describina ? . _, , , .. describing? we need consistent care like i mentioned, _ describing? we need consistent care like i mentioned, we _ describing? we need consistent care like i mentioned, we also _ describing? we need consistent care like i mentioned, we also need i like i mentioned, we also need recognition of the loss of life, the fact this isn'tjust recognition of the loss of life, the fact this isn't just a recognition of the loss of life, the fact this isn'tjust a loss of recognition of the loss of life, the fact this isn't just a loss of a pregnancy but someone's precious child, whether it's early in the pregnancy or later and i would like to see recognition of that. we have a bill going through the house of lords which is calling for a certificate of life but all these babies, that parents can optionally opt in for two say, and i would love that and i think when we get that recognition parents will feel hard but i also hope it will change the medical support offered because it's not a medical incident, this is the loss of a life and parents usually want that recognised, they usually want that recognised, they usually want to hear their pain is being recognised, seen and then the support offered to them on going after the loss because in the aftermath people are usually in
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shock but months down the line people need that support offered to them. do people need that support offered to them. ,.. , .. people need that support offered to them. ,.. ,. ~ people need that support offered to them. ,., i. ~ .. people need that support offered to them. i. ~ ., . ,, them. do you think we need to talk about pregnancy — them. do you think we need to talk about pregnancy loss _ them. do you think we need to talk about pregnancy loss more - them. do you think we need to talk| about pregnancy loss more because them. do you think we need to talk i about pregnancy loss more because it happens a lot and yet people don't feel prepared because they don't expect it and maybe if we accepted there was a lot of it happening it would be easier to understand what was happening, it will never be easy to lose a baby but to understand the process? to lose a baby but to understand the arocess? ~ , , �* to lose a baby but to understand the rocess? �* , , �* ., process? absolutely, i'm calling for better education _ process? absolutely, i'm calling for better education right _ process? absolutely, i'm calling for better education right into - process? absolutely, i'm calling for better education right into schools | better education right into schools so at the point where we learn about the mechanics of the human body we should be taught about baby loss because it is something that sadly a lot of people go through. over 250,000 losses happen every year in the uk and that was staggering to me when i first heard that because i thought it was a rarity people went through baby loss but this is something really common so we need
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to talk about it and something being common doesn't make it less painful, it's acutely painful so we need the loss recognised but we also need to be more comfortable talking about it. i be more comfortable talking about it. .. ~ be more comfortable talking about it. ., ~ .. be more comfortable talking about it. ., ~ ., , , it. i would like to finish this with ou it. i would like to finish this with you educating — it. i would like to finish this with you educating us, _ it. i would like to finish this with you educating us, from - it. i would like to finish this with you educating us, from where i it. i would like to finish this with i you educating us, from where you are now what would have helped you in the way your friends and family and colleagues talk to you about it? what would have made things easier? like zoe mentioned it talk starts at schoot _ like zoe mentioned it talk starts at schoot in — like zoe mentioned it talk starts at school. in might scoot you were you -ot school. in might scoot you were you got pregnant and had a baby, there was no _ got pregnant and had a baby, there was no mention a miscarriage. as the human— was no mention a miscarriage. as the human race _ was no mention a miscarriage. as the human race we are not great at seeing _ human race we are not great at seeing other humans in pain and people _ seeing other humans in pain and peopte do— seeing other humans in pain and people do their best when they see you in— people do their best when they see you in pain — people do their best when they see you in pain to stop that pain and it's not— you in pain to stop that pain and it's not always the right thing they say. it's not always the right thing they sa . , .. it's not always the right thing they sa . y .. , it's not always the right thing they sa . , ., , , , . say. everyone is different but what could i say? _ say. everyone is different but what could i say? the only _ say. everyone is different but what could i say? the only thing - say. everyone is different but what could i say? the only thing you i could i say? the only thing you can sa is i'm
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could i say? the only thing you can say is i'm so _ could i say? the only thing you can say is i'm so sorry _ could i say? the only thing you can say is i'm so sorry for _ could i say? the only thing you can say is i'm so sorry for your- could i say? the only thing you can say is i'm so sorry for your loss. i say is i'm so sorry for your loss. people — say is i'm so sorry for your loss. peopte say— say is i'm so sorry for your loss. people say at least it was early and you can _ people say at least it was early and you can get — people say at least it was early and you can get pregnant and they are trying _ you can get pregnant and they are trying to— you can get pregnant and they are trying to be helpful but that is not helping _ trying to be helpful but that is not helping that pain because never mind at least _ helping that pain because never mind at least i _ helping that pain because never mind at least i could get pregnant, i was pregnant— at least i could get pregnant, i was pregnant but it didn't have a happy ending _ pregnant but it didn't have a happy endina. ., ~ pregnant but it didn't have a happy endina. . ,, i. .. pregnant but it didn't have a happy endina. ., ~' ., , . pregnant but it didn't have a happy endina. ., ~ ., , . ending. thank you for sharing your sto with ending. thank you for sharing your story with us _ ending. thank you for sharing your story with us and _ ending. thank you for sharing your story with us and i'm _ ending. thank you for sharing your story with us and i'm so _ ending. thank you for sharing your story with us and i'm so sorry i ending. thank you for sharing your story with us and i'm so sorry for l story with us and i'm so sorry for your losses, and thank you to you, zoe, for raising awareness as well. and thank you to lawrence and laura and dewlap who has done a tremendous job reporting this. if you've been affected by any of the issues raised in tulip's report, you can find links to help and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning, this is bbc london, i'm frankie mccamley. survivors of a deadly fairground
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accident in south—west london will plant a tree today to remember the victims. it's now 50 years since the big dipper roller—coaster crashed in battersea park, killing five children and injuring more than a dozen. there's now a campaign for a permanent memorial. the mayor says he's in talks with wandsworth council. i know from other memorials i have been involved in, it's a place you could go to just to reflect, to think, to spend time with others, to commemorate this awful tragedy. but also it's a reminder of the importance of health and safety, to make sure we get things right. we also need to educate londoners about this tragedy almost 50 years ago. ahead of the queen's platinum jubilee, a table's being laid out in north kensington this morning for a street party that'll never happen. the groupjustice for grenfell is laying out 72 places in memory of the 72 people who died in the fire almost five years ago, and won't be there to celebrate this weekend with the rest of london.
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are you planning on heading away this bank holiday weekend? if you are expect long delays. the rac believes nearly 20 million journeys are being planned between wednesday and sunday. the advice is to set off before 6am or after three if you want to avoid sitting in long queues. if you're heading out on public transport this morning, there are a few problems to watch out for. minor delays on the circle line and a part suspension on the district and hammersmith and city lines. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. lots of dry weather in the forecast as we head through the next few days or so across the capital, but there will be some showers at times. notably so today and tomorrow. this morning, it's locally quite a chilly start to the day, temperatures having dropped right back into mid single figures for many of us last night. some early brightness, some sunshine around this morning.
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we will start to see the cloud building, low pressure is over us, there will be some showers forming as the daytime heating gets going. some of those showers through the afternoon could turn out to be heavy and they could be quite slow moving as well so they could last for some time. the winds are light, temperatures will once again for most of us peak in the mid—teens in celsius. overnight tonight, a rather messy picture. some showers at times, some areas of cloud, long clear spells. temperatures again dropping back into single figures as we head into tuesday. tuesday it will start to feel a little warmer, but again expect to see some showers as we head through the afternoon. lots of dry weather, on wednesday and indeed on thursday, for the start of thejubilee bank holiday weekend. there could be some showers moving in from the south, though, so do keep an eye on the forecast. just a reminder we want to know how you're celebrating thejubilee. have you got a street party planned or another special party. let us know by emailing us and we might even come and film you!
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that's it from me. i'm back in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back tojon and nina. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and nina warhurst. the bank holiday weekend, the platinum jubilee coming the bank holiday weekend, the platinumjubilee coming up, getting excited, the hunting is out, that they have it out over there? not yet! it they have it out over there? not et! , they have it out over there? not et! . .. they have it out over there? not et! , ., , , . yet! it is not up yet that it might be b the yet! it is not up yet that it might be by the end — yet! it is not up yet that it might be by the end of— yet! it is not up yet that it might be by the end of the _ yet! it is not up yet that it might be by the end of the week! i coming up on morning live. a new study shows that you're five times more likely to get deep vein thrombosis if you've had covid in the past 30 days. with millions expected to get away this bank holiday, dr xand is telling us howjust 90 minutes sat in your car or a plane can increase the risk even more. dvt can be a medical emergency,
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l so i'll tell you why a swollen leg i is a warning sign and how a few simple exercises can _ get your blood flowing - without even leaving your chair. also on the show, with the cost of living on everyone's mind, some home improvements can actually reduce your energy bills. but, for every diy plan there's a scam. we're hearing from the morning live viewers who are down by £20,000 after being mis—sold foam loft insulation by rogue traders. a man you do want in your attic, is bargain hunt's charlie ross. he's telling us if our family heirlooms are actually worth a bob or two. and the good news is, the family silver doesn't even need a polish when it's put up for sale! but forget the silver, this week is all about platinum! 15 million of us are expected to join a jubilee street party. so, anna has the sandwiches with a royal seal of approval. i'll be making a stacked baguette that takes minutes to make i and will feed the whole family. and i've got a clever little hack,
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using a couple of plates that i will slice your prep time in half. and keeping it royal we are celebrating the queens of the dance floor in strictly fitness; nancy is kicking off the week with ashley and pasha's jive! ashley was a queen on the dance floor, there she was, we will be her backing dancers, we will find some bunting backing dancers, we will find some hunting and then xand will break something! scenes from saturday's champions league final in paris have been described as a "brutal treatment of fans" after french police used tear gas to disperse crowds of liverpool supporters who were being denied access to the stadium. the club has called for an investigation into the events. we're joined now by fans, dan austin and labour mp, ian byrne,
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who were both at the match. we will speak to you at the moment, ian. to start with you, what are the things that are going to stick in your mind, the memories it will take from what should have been one of the greatest nights? it from what should have been one of the greatest nights?— the greatest nights? it should have been. they were _ the greatest nights? it should have been. they were children _ the greatest nights? it should have been. they were children there i the greatest nights? it should have| been. they were children there who would have been at their first champions league final who should have had the time of their life but i will remember their faces streaming with tears because they were suffering from the effects of tear gas from a brutal police force who came with the idea that they were there to violently disperse travel which never occurred so they decided to because, in my view. the fads were funnelled towards turnstile which were close to a half hours before kick off with no explanation, no discussion at all. so people were forced to queue with
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no access to a bathroom or water for three hours in 2a degrees heat. they had tickets to come to the football, they arrived early to take photos, be part of the apposite they were treated like animals, beat with shields. people were forced into a crash as crowds swelled —— people forced into a crush. this was an immense failure from the authorities, the uefa, and the french state which utterly failed in its duty of care towards anybody who ended its country. hat its duty of care towards anybody who ended its country.— ended its country. not easy to keep our cool ended its country. not easy to keep your cool under— ended its country. not easy to keep your cool under the _ ended its country. not easy to keep your cool under the pressure i ended its country. not easy to keep your cool under the pressure if i ended its country. not easy to keep your cool under the pressure if you | your cool under the pressure if you are being provoked, you feel, but how did the fans respond in your view? i how did the fans respond in your view? .. how did the fans respond in your view? ., , . ., . , view? i thought the behaviour was impeccable _ view? i thought the behaviour was impeccable around _ view? i thought the behaviour was impeccable around me. _ view? i thought the behaviour was impeccable around me. people i view? i thought the behaviour was i impeccable around me. people were rh, they were trying to get a game of football that they had arrived
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incredibly early for reduce any possibility of trouble or delays getting inside. people werejust trying to politely ask question getting silence back. i speak french and i was asking and they were treating me with complete disdain. the attitude the police authorities have towards football fans has, for decades, since i have been going to football and a lot longer than that, has been disgraceful. and this was the worst example i have ever experienced. the worst example i have ever exoerienced-_ the worst example i have ever ex-erienced. �*, . ,, ., . . experienced. let's talk to ian, what went wrong? _ experienced. let's talk to ian, what went wrong? i— experienced. let's talk to ian, what went wrong? i think _ experienced. let's talk to ian, what went wrong? i think dan _ experienced. let's talk to ian, what went wrong? i think dan summed l experienced. let's talk to ian, whatj went wrong? i think dan summed it experienced. let's talk to ian, what i went wrong? i think dan summed it up reall well, went wrong? i think dan summed it up really well. it — went wrong? i think dan summed it up really well, it was _ went wrong? i think dan summed it up really well, it was a _ went wrong? i think dan summed it up really well, it was a breakdown - went wrong? i think dan summed it up really well, it was a breakdown of i really well, it was a breakdown of game _ really well, it was a breakdown of game management. and the creation of an extremely hostile environment for football_ an extremely hostile environment for football fans. we have got to remember, this is a premium game in european— remember, this is a premium game in european football, this should have been a _ european football, this should have been 6 joy— european football, this should have been a joy to go to. but instead we witnessed — been a joy to go to. but instead we witnessed kids in extreme distress,
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adults. _ witnessed kids in extreme distress, adults, women, it wasjust witnessed kids in extreme distress, adults, women, it was just awful. witnessed kids in extreme distress, adults, women, it wasjust awful. it was absolutely awful. it was a complete breakdown and then obviously, we are now getting the blame _ obviously, we are now getting the blame game and the smears and that coming _ blame game and the smears and that coming from the french authorities who failed — coming from the french authorities who failed on saturday, and uefa, the blame — who failed on saturday, and uefa, the blame on the pool fans. what sort of things _ the blame on the pool fans. what sort of things did _ the blame on the pool fans. what sort of things did you _ the blame on the pool fans. what sort of things did you see, - the blame on the pool fans. hie“usgt sort of things did you see, the treatment on saturday? it sort of things did you see, the treatment on saturday? it was like the pictures. _ treatment on saturday? it was like the pictures, people _ treatment on saturday? it was like the pictures, people getting - treatment on saturday? it was like the pictures, people getting tear l the pictures, people getting tear -as, the pictures, people getting tear gas, pepper sprayed, and there was no dialogue. we got there an hour before _ no dialogue. we got there an hour before the — no dialogue. we got there an hour before the game, getting in the ground — before the game, getting in the ground was a nightmare, the way the police _ ground was a nightmare, the way the police had _ ground was a nightmare, the way the police had created a final and pinch points _ police had created a final and pinch points around the stadium. once we -ot points around the stadium. once we got through the cheques, trying to access— got through the cheques, trying to access the — got through the cheques, trying to access the stadium, it was terrific. we were _
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access the stadium, it was terrific. we were at— access the stadium, it was terrific. we were at entrance a, there were 12 or 13 touchdowns and only two were open _ or 13 touchdowns and only two were open. people getting funnelled into that after 20 minutes —— 12 or 13 turnstiles — that after 20 minutes —— 12 or 13 turnstiles i_ that after 20 minutes —— 12 or 13 turnstiles. i was trying to ask people — turnstiles. i was trying to ask peorrte to _ turnstiles. i was trying to ask people to stay calm, and liverpool fans were — people to stay calm, and liverpool fans were if magnificent. i was begging — fans were if magnificent. i was begging the security to open the gates— begging the security to open the gates because people were getting distress. _ gates because people were getting distress, they had been there for three _ distress, they had been there for three hours. i had liverpool foothati— three hours. i had liverpool football club stuart alongside me who were not getting listened to, it was a _ who were not getting listened to, it was a complete disdain, complete breakdown of management. now the blame _ breakdown of management. now the blame is _ breakdown of management. now the blame is starting with the french authorities. the blame is starting with the french authorities.— authorities. the final was due to take place _ authorities. the final was due to take place in _ authorities. the final was due to take place in russia, _ authorities. the final was due to take place in russia, and - authorities. the final was due to take place in russia, and then i authorities. the final was due to i take place in russia, and then that had to be cancelled because of the war in ukraine. good part of the problem be that it was hurriedly organised in paris, and they will ready? organised in paris, and they will read ? ., . , . ready? from what i understand, the french authorities _ ready? from what i understand, the french authorities never _ ready? from what i understand, the french authorities never really -
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french authorities never really wanted to host the game, it was a vanity project from the french president who was up for election and he decided they would have this big event that would go without any security issues, because they have got the olympics in two weeks. —— two years as well. they did know —— it doesn't look like they did any preparatory work. this police brutality has been going on a fair bit since football fans have been able to enter the stand again, but also against things like union workers and antiracism campaigners. and this to be was a continuation of the french state's increasing harassment of regular people. this was certainly more than just the liverpool football club and the champions league final but more than football, this is a realfailure and a continuation of the failure of the
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french government to provide a safe environment for people and the increasing use of violence as a police tactic. irate increasing use of violence as a police tactic-— increasing use of violence as a police tactic. we had louise on earlier who _ police tactic. we had louise on earlier who had _ police tactic. we had louise on earlier who had got _ police tactic. we had louise on earlier who had got to - police tactic. we had louise on l earlier who had got to remember police tactic. we had louise on - earlier who had got to remember her husband, she had been given a ticket by the club and she said she will never go to another champions league match again because she was scared. when you talk about the children who were there, one of the biggest nights of their lives and they are put off something that should have been beautiful. mat put off something that should have been beautiful.— been beautiful. not one person should have — been beautiful. not one person should have been _ been beautiful. not one person should have been treated - been beautiful. not one person should have been treated like l been beautiful. not one person - should have been treated like this. people have spent the money to go to this summit which has earned uefa and france all of this money, and they paid to be treated like animals and beasts. it's a scandal and it happened so offered to football fans. as long as other football fans failed to show sympathy and solidarity with people in this situation, it gives authorities more opportunity to do it. so as people
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say, they fall along tribal lines, they say, it is just liverpool, or if it was manchester united, if you don't show up at the that the authorities could do it again and again. i came away from the stadium ticket, whether it is in france or a champions league final or a lower league game, that is going to happen again unless people are able as the football supporting community to say, we are not having this any more. �* . say, we are not having this any more. �* , ., , say, we are not having this any more. �*, .,, . say, we are not having this any more. �*, . ,. more. let's hope that lessons are learned from _ more. let's hope that lessons are learned from the _ more. let's hope that lessons are learned from the investigation - more. let's hope that lessons are i learned from the investigation which will be done. learned from the investigation which will be done-— will be done. there are meetings toda in will be done. there are meetings today in paris _ will be done. there are meetings today in paris with _ will be done. there are meetings today in paris with uefa - will be done. there are meetings today in paris with uefa the - will be done. there are meetings i today in paris with uefa the french government, the police, merseyside police. _ government, the police, merseyside police. the _ government, the police, merseyside police, the british government, trying _ police, the british government, trying to— police, the british government, trying to work out how this could not happen again.— trying to work out how this could not happen again. french authorities have said mistakes _ not happen again. french authorities have said mistakes have _ not happen again. french authorities have said mistakes have been - not happen again. french authorities have said mistakes have been made| have said mistakes have been made and lessons will be learned. let's checkin and lessons will be learned. let's check in with the rest of the sport. slightly happier scenes for nottingham forest fans at wembley.
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the championship play—off final yesterday, the rich with the ball, worth £170 million. —— they richest game in football. and the romance around this match as well. nottingham forest are back in the premier league. the long wait is over for the two time european champions. 23 years they spent in the championship and league one, but yesterday they finally won promotion back to the top division of english football. they beat huddersfield 1—0 at wembley. an own goal from levi colwill was the decisive moment of the game. manager steve cooper only took over in september with the club bottom of the table. quite some turnaround in journey for them. celtic won the women's scottish cup, and with it, ensured that glasgow city finished a season trophyless for the first time in ia years. it finished 3—2 at tynecastle, with izzy atkinson grabbing the winning goal in extra—time. they beat the same opposition to lift the league cup earlier in the season.
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too many mistakes according to ferrari's charles leclerc, after a series of errors from his team led to red bull's sergio perez winning the monaco grand prix. leclerc started from pole, but dropped from first to fourth over four laps in a rain affected grand prix. red bull capitilised on ferrari's poor strategy, with perez moving into the lead. crucially championship leader max verstappen finished third, ahead of leclerc, which means the red bull driver extends his lead to nine points. lewis hamilton started and finished eighth. tributes are being payed to the jockey lester piggott, who has died aged 86. with a career lasting almost 50 years, he rode more than 4,000 winners, the first coming at the age of 12. we're joined now by fellow jockey and friend of lester's, frankie dettori.
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thank you forjoining us, frankie. it is fair to say that alacrity was a bit of an enigma, not many people got to know him but you did as a friend —— it is that the state that lester was an enigma. what was he like in a personal capacity because mckee was intimidating as a jockey in his heyday, i came from italy, funnily enough i never got to ride with him until later in life when he made his comeback when he was 5a. he made his comeback when he was 54. he: was a great. he had that aura around him and he was very intimidating. i used to be at going, i would pull his leg and crackjokes. i got to see the other side of him. he had a dry sense of humour. he was an amazing. it dry sense of humour. he was an amazinr. ,., , ~ dry sense of humour. he was an amazinr. , ~ i. amazing. it sounds like you connected _ amazing. it sounds like you connected well _ amazing. it sounds like you connected well on - amazing. it sounds like you connected well on a - amazing. it sounds like you i connected well on a personal amazing. it sounds like you - connected well on a personal level. i wonder what you're made of him when you managed to race against him, when he came back, what you
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thought about him as a jockey? it’s thought about him as a jockey? it�*s amazing, he had five years away from the sport, he spent some time in prison as well. so to make a comeback after five years off of sports, and within a month he managed to win one of the biggest races in the world, i was in the races in the world, i was in the race and everybody was gobsmacked. it was like water off a ducks back, he would say that is what i do and that's why i am the best. to do that after five years off, 54—year—old, amazing, he was talented. in his heyday, he was 20 years in front of everybody else. he will be remembered as the greatestjockey of all time. remembered as the greatest 'ockey of all time. ., , .. , remembered as the greatest 'ockey of all time. ., , , . . all time. horse racing is a hard sort, all time. horse racing is a hard sport. isn't— all time. horse racing is a hard sport. isn't it? _ all time. horse racing is a hard sport, isn't it? and _ all time. horse racing is a hard sport, isn't it? and lester- all time. horse racing is a hard sport, isn't it? and lester in i sport, isn't it? and lester in particular had to put himself some about the physical discomfort to be able to ride, because he was tall for the era, he had to manage his weight, we have seen lots of
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tributes saying he survived on coffee and cigars, it was difficult for him. �* ., ., ., ., for him. i'm five foot four, he was five foot eight, _ for him. i'm five foot four, he was five foot eight, the _ for him. i'm five foot four, he was five foot eight, the weight - for him. i'm five foot four, he was five foot eight, the weight of - for him. i'm five foot four, he was | five foot eight, the weight of those days was a lot lower. it has risen in racing the last few years. he had to struggle. it was his biggest battle in his life, his weight. and he managed it, but he must have been really hard on his body. in he managed it, but he must have been really hard on his body.— really hard on his body. in terms of lester more _ really hard on his body. in terms of lester more broadly, _ really hard on his body. in terms of lester more broadly, i _ really hard on his body. in terms of lester more broadly, i know- really hard on his body. in terms of lester more broadly, i know you i really hard on his body. in terms of. lester more broadly, i know you were there when there was a statue unveiled to him, you were good friends with him, but the wider racing community and the wider sporting world, how do you think they will remember him? it’s they will remember him? it's amazing. _ they will remember him? it's amazing. we _ they will remember him? it�*s amazing, we have got the platinum jubilee this weekend, the epsom derby, he made that his own. and they are going to pay respects to him this weekend. he was an amazing jockey, to win nine derbies, it is really crazy just
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jockey, to win nine derbies, it is really crazyjust think jockey, to win nine derbies, it is really crazy just think about it. jockey, to win nine derbies, it is really crazyjust think about it. he will never be forgotten in my sport, that's for sure.— that's for sure. how did he win a record nine _ that's for sure. how did he win a record nine derbies, _ that's for sure. how did he win a record nine derbies, how - that's for sure. how did he win a record nine derbies, how is - that's for sure. how did he win a record nine derbies, how is that| record nine derbies, how is that possible? i record nine derbies, how is that ossible? . , ., �* record nine derbies, how is that ossible? . , ~ ., possible? i really don't know! i have asked _ possible? i really don't know! i have asked the _ possible? i really don't know! i have asked the question - possible? i really don't know! i. have asked the question myself. possible? i really don't know! i- have asked the question myself. we all went to lester and asked for advice about epsom, it is a unique place difficult to ride, and hejust said, it's the magical touch. that is why he won nine derbies. he didn't give advice too much to his competitors!— didn't give advice too much to his i competitors!_ thank competitors! absolutely, yes! thank ou for competitors! absolutely, yes! thank you foryour— competitors! absolutely, yes! thank you for your time — competitors! absolutely, yes! thank you for your time this _ competitors! absolutely, yes! thank you for your time this morning, - you for your time this morning, great to get your thoughts. thank ou. great to get your thoughts. thank you- lester _ great to get your thoughts. thank you. lester piggott _ great to get your thoughts. thank you. lester piggott was _ great to get your thoughts. thank you. lester piggott was such - great to get your thoughts. thank you. lester piggott was such a i you. lester piggott was such a remarkable — you. lester piggott was such a remarkable jockey _ you. lester piggott was such a remarkable jockey and - you. lester piggott was such a remarkable jockey and you i you. lester piggott was such a | remarkable jockey and you kind you. lester piggott was such a i remarkable jockey and you kind of forget about it but when things like this happen only gets to reflect on it, it is unbelievable what he achieved. it, it is unbelievable what he achieved-— it, it is unbelievable what he achieved. ' . achieved. the height difference, i knew he was _ achieved. the height difference, i knew he was taller _ achieved. the height difference, i knew he was taller but _ achieved. the height difference, i knew he was taller but i - achieved. the height difference, i knew he was taller but i didn't i knew he was taller but i didn't realise how much taller. it knew he was taller but i didn't realise how much taller. it has chanced realise how much taller. it has changed i— realise how much taller. it has changed i got _ realise how much taller. it has changed i got easier _ realise how much taller. it has changed i got easier and - realise how much taller. it has changed i got easier and more j changed i got easier and more acceptable forjockeys changed i got easier and more acceptable for jockeys but changed i got easier and more acceptable forjockeys but in his era, what he was doing at that
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height, remarkable. wonderful readina height, remarkable. wonderful reading all— height, remarkable. wonderful reading all those _ height, remarkable. wonderful reading all those happy - height, remarkable. wonderful- reading all those happy memories. thank you. reading all those happy memories. thank ou. . , . thank you. there was a brilliant programme _ thank you. there was a brilliant programme on _ thank you. there was a brilliant programme on bbc _ thank you. there was a brilliant programme on bbc one - thank you. there was a brilliant programme on bbc one last i thank you. there was a brilliant i programme on bbc one last night, thank you. there was a brilliant - programme on bbc one last night, the unseen cleaner, all of this brilliant footage from the last 70 years of her reign —— the unseen queen. famously described by the queen as the one place she can truly relax, the royal yacht britannia served as a home away from home for the royals from 1954 until she was decommissioned in 1997. in that time the ship sailed more than one million nautical miles to 135 countries. john maguire is on board for us this morning ahead of the queen's platinum jubilee weekend. he has blagged his way on board. but he he has blagged his way on board. bat he looks the part! not makes you one of the yachties?— of the yachties? yes, i do like i am walkin: of the yachties? yes, i do like i am walking the — of the yachties? yes, i do like i am walking the plank! _ of the yachties? yes, i do like i am walking the plank! it _ of the yachties? yes, i do like i am walking the plank! it is _ of the yachties? yes, i do like i am walking the plank! it is a _ of the yachties? yes, i do like i am
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walking the plank! it is a visitor i walking the plank! it is a visitor attraction, and i am back to the left so people could get to the different tax. —— i am next to the lift. people can get to the different deck playback. look at this, these yachties will have scrubbed the decks and not. they come back once a year to do some maintenance but they get together to socialise, i was staying in the same hotel as them last night and they were socialising all right! let's take you to the bridge. one of the idiosyncrasies of the royal yacht is the skipper was always an admiral until the last person in charge who was a commodore. everything laid out, the emerald chair, two ships compasses, you have a back—up in case one fails. i look at all of
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this brass, they call it the bright work, even in the engine room, everything is absolutely immaculate. it is a wonderful ship, not supposed to call it a ship, it is a yacht. it was a palace, an office, it is simply different things, a home away from home. let's give you a quick look round. vt! our cameras go on board the royal yacht britannia, now moored by tower bridge. for almost 45 years, she served as a floating royal palace, a global business centre, and a family refuge away from the permanent scrutiny of public life. her majesty's yacht britannia hosted kings, queens, presidents and prime ministers while the crew ensured everything ran to perfection, above and below decks. rear entrance to the engine room. former engineer rushy, everyone has a nickname in the royal navy, of course,
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is showing us around. and here we are inside the mechanical palace of the royal yacht. because although she was a floating palace for the royal family, this was our cathedral down here. the engines haven't run for years but when they did, nothing was left to chance as the order came down from the bridge to set sail. and we were waiting for a telephone call from the bridge that says, obey then. you know at that point the royal family are on board. and she's just about 30 foot up there. you cannot imagine the feeling. you can't see her, but the feeling of all of a sudden the responsibility now for the safety and security of the royal family has come within this family. so we were really, i was the queen's chauffeur without eyes. ijust did what the bridge told me. but we got her to
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the church on time. out of all the gauges, dials and warning lights, rushy reckons this instrument, the inclinometer, which says if the ship is level, is the most important in the engine room. especially challenging if guests gathered on one side of the ship to watch the royal marines band. all these people are at a cocktail party. so when they go on the upper deck, each and every one of them is a spirit level because they have got a glass. so you can't afford them to put it down, even her majesty has got a glass. so you can't bluff it. if you're not perpendicular, everyone will know. in the state dining room, these days available for hire and laid up for dinner, we find former steward peter. it's not that he works here any more, he just can't resist making sure everything is shipshape. he recalls how the crew, known as yachties, would have to set up and dismantle functions in a matter of minutes.
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so you would have to bring the furniture down past the stairs, and nine times out of ten the queen always used to, when i was there, would sit on the stairs after a long evening and go, "ah!", and talk to herlady in waiting. it was quite funny, there were many a time i had to ask her, "excuse me, your majesty, would you mind moving, i have to bring the chairs down". "oh, am i in the way?" yes! and it was that sort of rapport, but within 20 minutes it would be all back in the right place ready to start again. keeping the crew fit and healthy were the cooks, the medics and the pti, the physical training instructor. george explained how they made the most of limited space with an ingenious take on tug—of—war. there would be a team here which was the port side, and you would have the rope which would be laid up here, and then it would go round the capstan, here, across here, to the capstan, and then down here you would have your opposition. so they're sort next to each other?
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so you're throwing abuse at each otherfrom either side. the queen once described the royal yacht as a place where she could truly relax and, at the decommissioning in 1997, seemed visibly upset. since then, britannia was brought here to leith near edinburgh to become a tourist attraction. so now, the royal yacht that once took britain to the rest of the world has visitors from around the world coming to britannia. they say an army marches on its stomach and that ab does the same thing, we are withjeff the chef, the former leading cook. was it like serving on board the royal yacht? absolutely fantastic, it really was, it was a magical draft. and what i thoroughly enjoyed, just over eight years, i saw an awful lot of places,
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and being a big sports fan, the commonwealth games in new zealand, the olympics in montreal. and as a big cricket fan, the bicentennial test in melbourne. great, just the other visits, the states for their bicentennial, and... 50 other visits, the states for their bicentennial, and...— other visits, the states for their bicentennial, and... so you got a few t-shirts! _ bicentennial, and... so you got a few t-shirts! different _ bicentennial, and... so you got a few t-shirts! different to - bicentennial, and... so you got a few t-shirts! different to the - bicentennial, and... so you got a | few t-shirts! different to the rest ofthe few t-shirts! different to the rest of the navy? _ few t-shirts! different to the rest of the navy? very _ few t-shirts! different to the rest of the navy? very much - few t-shirts! different to the rest of the navy? very much so. - few t-shirts! different to the rest of the navy? very much so. very| few t-shirts! different to the rest - of the navy? very much so. very much so. i thought i would have to go back to the gray flannel lined but i didn't, i actually went back to gibraltar and wrapped in a hospital. you are back for yachties week, we saw you gathering for early morning busters, prayers and hymns, you remembered those who have lost over the last few years. you cooked for the last few years. you cooked for the crew, the yachties, like you always did?—
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the crew, the yachties, like you always did? the crew, the yachties, like you alwa sdid? , :: , . always did? yes, it was the 70s, and what we serve _ always did? yes, it was the 70s, and what we serve are _ always did? yes, it was the 70s, and what we serve are now _ always did? yes, it was the 70s, and what we serve are now really - always did? yes, it was the 70s, and what we serve are now really still i what we serve are now really still is what we ate in the 70s. everybody asks for something on toast, i will not tell you what they call it! sausage and mash, cottage pie or shepherds pie. sausage and mash, cottage pie or shepherds pie-— sausage and mash, cottage pie orl shepherds pie._ they shepherds pie. babies heads? they are steak and _ shepherds pie. babies heads? they are steak and kidney _ shepherds pie. babies heads? they are steak and kidney pudding - shepherds pie. babies heads? they are steak and kidney pudding very i are steak and kidney pudding very popular. it's discomfort food. from those days. —— it is just comfort food from those days and everybody enjoys it. when we first started i can best everybody before they came up can best everybody before they came up to what they wanted to see and thatis up to what they wanted to see and that is the answer is. i try to alter the menu around each working party but it is always the same. hand party but it is always the same. and ou party but it is always the same. and you worked — party but it is always the same. and you worked for— party but it is always the same. and you worked for the crew, not the royals? you worked for the crew, not the ro als? . . you worked for the crew, not the ro als? , , . you worked for the crew, not the royals?_ did i you worked for the crew, not the i royals?_ did you royals? yes, 'ust the crew. did you have to royals? yes, just the crew. did you have to share _
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royals? yes, just the crew. did you have to share the _ royals? yes, just the crew. did you have to share the galley _ royals? yes, just the crew. did you have to share the galley with - royals? yes, just the crew. did you have to share the galley with the l have to share the galley with the royal galley?— have to share the galley with the r0 al ralle ? ., royal galley? no, there were three different galleys _ royal galley? no, there were three different galleys on _ royal galley? no, there were three different galleys on board, - royal galley? no, there were three different galleys on board, the - different galleys on board, the ships galley at the royal galley were different. we helped them out occasionally. you were different. we helped them out occasionally-— occasionally. you did not let them use our occasionally. you did not let them use your best _ occasionally. you did not let them use your best knives! _ occasionally. you did not let them use your best knives! i _ occasionally. you did not let them use your best knives! i did - occasionally. you did not let them use your best knives! i did stand i occasionally. you did not let them | use your best knives! i did stand at the stable door _ use your best knives! i did stand at the stable door and _ use your best knives! i did stand at the stable door and watch - use your best knives! i did stand at the stable door and watch what's i the stable door and watch what's going on just to learn things from the chest. we had a good rapport with them as well. they would join us when they could, and they would come up to the rack space and have a few beers. brute come up to the rack space and have a few beers. ~ , ., come up to the rack space and have a fewbeers.~ ,., ,., _ . . few beers. we should probably draw a line after that! _ few beers. we should probably draw a line after that! it _ few beers. we should probably draw a line after that! it was _ few beers. we should probably draw a line after that! it was a _ few beers. we should probably draw a line after that! it was a great - line after that! it was a great life. thank — line after that! it was a great life. thank you _ line after that! it was a great life. thank you for _ line after that! it was a great life. thank you for talking i line after that! it was a great life. thank you for talking to | line after that! it was a great i life. thank you for talking to us, aood to life. thank you for talking to us, good to see _ life. thank you for talking to us, good to see jeff _ life. thank you for talking to us, good to see jeff the _ life. thank you for talking to us, good to see jeff the chef - life. thank you for talking to us, good to see jeff the chef and i life. thank you for talking to us, | good to see jeff the chef and the good to seejeff the chef and the rest of the yachties back on board where they belong. britannia celebrates its silverjubilee next year, 25 years in leith in
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edinburgh, buta big year, 25 years in leith in edinburgh, but a big week of celebration not only for the yachties association getting together but the platinum jubilee celebrations getting under way as well. fantastic, looking the part. if well. fantastic, lookin: the art. , ., fantastic, looking the part. if you want to watch _ fantastic, looking the part. if you want to watch the _ fantastic, looking the part. if you want to watch the documentary i fantastic, looking the part. if gm. want to watch the documentary about the queen, it is on the bbc iplayer right now. the queen, it is on the bbc iplayer riaht now. . the queen, it is on the bbc iplayer riaht now. , ., , ., right now. hundreds of reels of film restored, absolutely _ right now. hundreds of reels of film restored, absolutely beautiful. - you're watching bbc breakfast. it's 8:59.
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this is bbc news. i'm annita mcveigh and these are the latest headlines... a bbc news investigation learns that police officers are slower to attend the most urgent emergencies compared to six years ago and the number of crimes being solved has fallen too. nothing came of it. that was it. and ijust kept it since. at what point do you then go and say enough is enough? is it when a child dies? ijust need the police to help me and - they won't. theyjust won't help me. if you've been a victim of crime , what has your experience been? was your case dealt with promptly or were you forced to give up? we want to hear from you. you can message me on twitter. i'm @annitabbc or you can use the hastag bbcyourquestions.

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