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tv   The Context with Christian Fraser  BBC News  May 30, 2022 9:00pm-10:01pm BST

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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern. you're watching the context on bbc news. president biden�*s red line — as he decides not to send weapons to ukraine that could reach deep inside russia. but the fighting inside ukraine continues — as the country's forces try to hold back the russian advance in the east. european union leaders gathered in brussels are struggling to resolve their differences over a proposed ban on imports of russian oil. pounds or kilos? what this tortoise has to do with metric or imperial measurements. tonight with the context, former uk culture secretary and member of the house of lords it vaizey and political
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analyst dahlia scheindlin. welcome to the programme. when it comes to giving military aid to ukraine — the us has been generous — they've sent billions of dollars worth of weapons, artillery, tactical drones, ammunition. it's aid that has helped ukraine turn the tide in battles they seemed destined to lose. the us government even appears close to sending a long—range multiple—rocket system to ukraine. butjoe biden has set a line that the us will not cross when it comes to it's military support. are you going to send long—range rockets _ are you going to send long—range rockets smc ukraine? we are not going to send to ukraine rocket systems that can strike into russia. so no weapons that would allow ukraine to launch attacks deep into russia. but stronger, more longer range artillery could still be on the way. and those on the front line say they need as much support as possible. because russian forces are closing
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in on the centre of the strategic city of severo—donetsk in the donbas region. russia has been bombarding the city and now has troops closing in on the city centre. if they seize it, they will effectively have control of the entire luhansk region. but while there are gains for russia in the donbas, ukraine continues to push back across the country. in the southern kherson region, which russia has held since the first weeks of the war, ukrainian forces are pushing back and gaining territory. and in proof that ukraine can successfully win back its territory — president zelensky has visited in kharkiv — a city that russia spent weeks trying to capture and hold. it's now back in ukraine's hands. joining me now is retired four star general david petraeus — former cia chief and former commander of us and nato forces in afghanistan. you are welcome back to the programme. let's take a look at the
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situation outlining some of what's happening on the ground. do you think there is a way for ukrainians to turn the tide on russia when we see what's happening, particularly which people are saying is also where russians are pushing forwards. i do. first of all, i think it's worth clarifying that it's possible both to send multiple launch rocket system, but not send the long—range munitions that go with that. you can send the medium range or shorter range munitions, which will do about double the range of the heavy artillery that we have sent to them recently, which those tubes are definitely making a difference. includes more than 200,000 rounds of 155 ammendment howitzer ammunition because that's a different calibre from that which ukraine has. those have been augmented by that same
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kind of system from other countries in nato. but in this case, certainly, the challenge is in the east. he correctly noted, the last of the certainly major cities in the hanscom province, if that falls again, that would be a blow to ukrainians, and they find very, very hard to keep russians out of it. the truth is that at this point, the russians are basically destroying the city. it will be rubble that they take over if indeed they can finally take over, keeping in mind they combat in cities just consume soldiers. infantrymen and so forth and it's very tough, as we saw for the many weeks that the ukrainians held out down in the port city and that huge steel complex it is possible that they could withdraw from this city ultimately, hold the russians there while continuing to
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pursue offensive operations counter offensive, really come as you noted down in the south, that is a very important city that the ukrainians have wanted to take pot dashed take back for a long time. i would also push the russians further from ultimately getting all the way to 0desa, the major port city in the southwestern part of ukraine along the black sea. but right now, we will see, literally, in the weeks that lie ahead whether the russians have put so much into this battle in eastern ukraine that they have nothing left for elsewhere and the ukrainians who are supported now by the... 0f ukrainians who are supported now by the... of democracy and our study adding additional ammunition and other military supplies, whether they can make use of that and not just stop the russians, but roll them back in critical places. as you noted, has been the case having earlier done that of course outside trying to heave in the north. d0
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trying to heave in the north. do you think that this — trying to heave in the north. do you think that this is _ trying to heave in the north. do you think that this is a _ trying to heave in the north. do you think that this is a change _ trying to heave in the north. do you think that this is a change in - think that this is a change in strategy by the russians and indeed does there need to be a change in strategy by the ukrainians �*s because really what we have been seeing since this began is ukrainians on the defence, right? and also the us and other countries supplying lethal aid, military aid to try and hold a defensive position. can this continue in these areas, particularly in the macro to? 0r areas, particularly in the macro to? or do they need to be on the offensive and attacking and cannot be seen as a provocation. let’s offensive and attacking and cannot be seen as a provocation. let's keep in mind that — be seen as a provocation. let's keep in mind that it _ be seen as a provocation. let's keep in mind that it hasn't _ be seen as a provocation. let's keep in mind that it hasn'tjust _ be seen as a provocation. let's keep in mind that it hasn'tjust been - be seen as a provocation. let's keep in mind that it hasn'tjust been the l in mind that it hasn'tjust been the ukrainians on the defence. yes, they were on the defence outside kyiv, which is the major objective of the russians at the very beginning to type all of the zielinski government and replace presidents and lensed with the pro—russian figure, and
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they stopped the russians there and began counterattacking and ultimately the russians withdrew. those counterattacks forced the russians to pull back and they did already change their strategy. they've given up on the north on kyiv, two other northern cities to which they also withdrew having not taken them and they have focused almost exclusively now in terms of their offensive and that far eastern pockets, again, around... the question, of course, is can ukrainians muster sufficient combat power to continue the momentum that they achieved outside kharkiv, another city from which the russians have been pushed, never really getting to artillery range of the city centre, certainly not now at this point in time, certainly each of these locations, though, the russians can indeed hit them with missiles, with rockets, with bombs in some cases and so forth as they
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have done throughout the country, and they continue to target critical infrastructure that the ukrainians require both for their civilian population and for the military operation. again, it will be seen in the weeks that lie ahead of whether the weeks that lie ahead of whether the ukrainians can take what has been provided to them from the west, put that into operation, use that to tip the scales against the russians and the other question is do the russians have anything more? they have taken horrific losses and personnel and material. we know they are scraping very deep to find replacement armoured systems and so forth and also replacement soldiers. i think we will find this out in the weeks that lie ahead.— i think we will find this out in the weeks that lie ahead. time is of the essence as — weeks that lie ahead. time is of the essence as well _ weeks that lie ahead. time is of the essence as well no _ weeks that lie ahead. time is of the essence as well no doubt _ weeks that lie ahead. time is of the essence as well no doubt as - weeks that lie ahead. time is of the essence as well no doubt as we - weeks that lie ahead. time is of the | essence as well no doubt as we were hearing from ukrainian officials. when you see president biden speaking about his redline, you know, that he won't be able to give our long—range missiles that would
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go deep into russia but could perhaps send a different sort of missile. how do you feel the us, uk it should on that aspect? i missile. how do you feel the us, uk it should on that aspect?— it should on that aspect? i think the president _ it should on that aspect? i think the president is _ it should on that aspect? i think the president is right. _ it should on that aspect? i think the president is right. we - it should on that aspect? i think the president is right. we talk. the president is right. we talk about... that's _ the president is right. we talk about... that's seen - the president is right. we talk about... that's seen as - the president is right. we talk- about... that's seen as appeasement. i support— about... that's seen as appeasement. i support those who say we shouldn't worry— i support those who say we shouldn't worry about — i support those who say we shouldn't worry about whether or not we provoke — worry about whether or not we provoke russia because russia is the aggressor. but i do understand that there _ aggressor. but i do understand that there is_ aggressor. but i do understand that there is a _ aggressor. but i do understand that there is a redline and if you get there is a redline and if you get the ukrainian system which allows them _ the ukrainian system which allows them to— the ukrainian system which allows them to attack deep into russia on a personal level, that does take the war to _ personal level, that does take the war to another level, united states weapon— war to another level, united states weapon systems are being used to attack— weapon systems are being used to attack russian centres. it takes to work— attack russian centres. it takes to work to— attack russian centres. it takes to work to another level, takes it to a criticat— work to another level, takes it to a critical level — work to another level, takes it to a critical level of danger to the west — critical level of danger to the west. what i want to see, of course is for— west. what i want to see, of course is for us _ west. what i want to see, of course is for us to— west. what i want to see, of course is for us to maintain our resolve for the — is for us to maintain our resolve for the eu to remain —— is for us to maintain our resolve forthe eu to remain —— retain is for us to maintain our resolve for the eu to remain —— retain its unity~ _ for the eu to remain —— retain its unity. there's _ for the eu to remain —— retain its unity. there's some debate today over the purchase of russian oil and energy— over the purchase of russian oil and energy and — over the purchase of russian oil and energy and also to make sure that ukraine _ energy and also to make sure that ukraine stays at the top of programmes like this which i am glad it is, that _ programmes like this which i am glad it is, that we — programmes like this which i am glad it is, that we keep focusing on this
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war, _ it is, that we keep focusing on this war, we keep supporting ukrainians, and again. _ war, we keep supporting ukrainians, and again. i— war, we keep supporting ukrainians, and again, i agree with the general that there — and again, i agree with the general that there is every chance that ukrainians will push back. he talked about— ukrainians will push back. he talked about a _ ukrainians will push back. he talked about a war— ukrainians will push back. he talked about a war of attrition by the russians— about a war of attrition by the russians to ukrainians, but the russians— russians to ukrainians, but the russians are so weak now it may turn into a _ russians are so weak now it may turn into a war— russians are so weak now it may turn into a war of— russians are so weak now it may turn into a war of attrition by the ukrainians to wear down the russians _ ukrainians to wear down the russians— ukrainians to wear down the russians. ., , ., ., russians. then me turn to you dalia, about that point _ russians. then me turn to you dalia, about that point being at _ russians. then me turn to you dalia, about that point being at the - russians. then me turn to you dalia, about that point being at the top - about that point being at the top of the programme, there are some aspects that people say there is a waning interest in the public sometimes for coverage of ukraine when they talk about also whether the us administration will also keep it at the top of the agenda or perhaps follow the public in that respect. what do you think? i would like to hone — respect. what do you think? i would like to hope that _ respect. what do you think? i would like to hope that the _ respect. what do you think? i would like to hope that the us _ like to hope that the us administration - like to hope that the us administration doesn't. like to hope that the us . administration doesn't only like to hope that the us - administration doesn't only follow the public— administration doesn't only follow the public because _ administration doesn't only follow the public because i— administration doesn't only follow the public because i think- administration doesn't only follow the public because i think we - administration doesn't only follow the public because i think we arel the public because i think we are starting — the public because i think we are starting to— the public because i think we are starting to see _ the public because i think we are starting to see the _ the public because i think we are starting to see the beginnings i the public because i think we are starting to see the beginnings ofj starting to see the beginnings of maybe _ starting to see the beginnings of maybe not— starting to see the beginnings of maybe not cracks, _ starting to see the beginnings of maybe not cracks, that's - starting to see the beginnings of maybe not cracks, that's too - starting to see the beginnings of. maybe not cracks, that's too strong a word, _ maybe not cracks, that's too strong a word, but — maybe not cracks, that's too strong a word, but starting _ maybe not cracks, that's too strong a word, but starting to _ maybe not cracks, that's too strong a word, but starting to see - maybe not cracks, that's too strong a word, but starting to see a - a word, but starting to see a partisan _ a word, but starting to see a partisan divide _ a word, but starting to see a partisan divide here - a word, but starting to see a partisan divide here in- a word, but starting to see a partisan divide here in the l a word, but starting to see al partisan divide here in the us a word, but starting to see a - partisan divide here in the us and we are _ partisan divide here in the us and we are starting _ partisan divide here in the us and we are starting to _ partisan divide here in the us and we are starting to see _ partisan divide here in the us and we are starting to see the - we are starting to see the beginnings _ we are starting to see the beginnings of— we are starting to see the beginnings of that - we are starting to see the beginnings of that divide i we are starting to see the - beginnings of that divide around we are starting to see the _ beginnings of that divide around the world _ beginnings of that divide around the world a— beginnings of that divide around the world a new— beginnings of that divide around the world. a new survey— beginnings of that divide around the world. a new survey came - beginnings of that divide around the world. a new survey came out - beginnings of that divide around the world. a new survey came out just i world. a new survey came outjust today— world. a new survey came outjust today that — world. a new survey came outjust today that was _ world. a new survey came outjust today that was published - world. a new survey came outjust today that was published showing i today that was published showing that most — today that was published showing that most of— today that was published showing that most of the _ today that was published showing that most of the countries - today that was published showing that most of the countries that i today that was published showing l that most of the countries that are most _ that most of the countries that are
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most forcefully _ that most of the countries that are most forcefully critical _ that most of the countries that are most forcefully critical of - that most of the countries that are most forcefully critical of russia i most forcefully critical of russia are the — most forcefully critical of russia are the liberal— most forcefully critical of russia are the liberal democracies - most forcefully critical of russia i are the liberal democracies based most forcefully critical of russia - are the liberal democracies based by contrast to _ are the liberal democracies based by contrast to countries _ are the liberal democracies based by contrast to countries in _ are the liberal democracies based by contrast to countries in south - contrast to countries in south america. _ contrast to countries in south america, asia, _ contrast to countries in south america, asia, another- contrast to countries in south america, asia, another —— i contrast to countries in south america, asia, another —— a. contrast to countries in south - america, asia, another —— a number of countries — america, asia, another —— a number of countries that _ america, asia, another —— a number of countries that are _ america, asia, another —— a number of countries that are not _ america, asia, another —— a number of countries that are not as - of countries that are not as critical— of countries that are not as critical and _ of countries that are not as critical and that— of countries that are not as critical and that actually. of countries that are not asl critical and that actually still have — critical and that actually still have some _ critical and that actually still have some support- critical and that actually still have some support for- critical and that actually still. have some support for russia critical and that actually still- have some support for russia or else don't _ have some support for russia or else don't think— have some support for russia or else don't think that — have some support for russia or else don't think that they— have some support for russia or else don't think that they should - have some support for russia or else don't think that they should cut - don't think that they should cut econonric— don't think that they should cut economic ties _ don't think that they should cut economic ties with _ don't think that they should cut economic ties with russia. - don't think that they should cut economic ties with russia. so i| economic ties with russia. sol think— economic ties with russia. sol think that _ economic ties with russia. sol think that unity _ economic ties with russia. sol think that unity is _ economic ties with russia. sol think that unity is really - economic ties with russia. sol think that unity is really the . economic ties with russia. sol. think that unity is really the most important — think that unity is really the most important thing, _ think that unity is really the most important thing, maybe - think that unity is really the most important thing, maybe even - think that unity is really the most i important thing, maybe even more than where — important thing, maybe even more than where it— important thing, maybe even more than where it actually— important thing, maybe even more than where it actually is _ important thing, maybe even more than where it actually is on - important thing, maybe even more than where it actually is on the - than where it actually is on the news _ than where it actually is on the news cycle _ than where it actually is on the news cycle i_ than where it actually is on the news cycle. i think _ than where it actually is on the news cycle. i think the - than where it actually is on the news cycle. i think the cracks i news cycle. i think the cracks that we are _ news cycle. i think the cracks that we are starting _ news cycle. i think the cracks that we are starting to _ news cycle. i think the cracks that we are starting to see _ news cycle. i think the cracks that we are starting to see are - we are starting to see are still reparabte _ we are starting to see are still reparable in terms _ we are starting to see are still reparable in terms of- we are starting to see are still reparable in terms of the - we are starting to see are still reparable in terms of the oil. we are starting to see are still. reparable in terms of the oil deal that we _ reparable in terms of the oil deal that we are — reparable in terms of the oil deal that we are trying _ reparable in terms of the oil deal that we are trying —— _ reparable in terms of the oil deal that we are trying —— we - reparable in terms of the oil deal that we are trying —— we see - that we are trying —— we see that you trying — that we are trying —— we see that you trying to _ that we are trying —— we see that you trying to pass— that we are trying —— we see that you trying to pass today - that we are trying —— we see that you trying to pass today and in l that we are trying —— we see that. you trying to pass today and in the coming _ you trying to pass today and in the coming days i_ you trying to pass today and in the coming days. i think we _ you trying to pass today and in the coming days. i think we are - you trying to pass today and in the j coming days. i think we are seeing bil coming days. i think we are seeing big efforts — coming days. i think we are seeing big efforts to — coming days. i think we are seeing big efforts to reach _ coming days. i think we are seeing big efforts to reach compromises i coming days. i think we are seeingl big efforts to reach compromises to the extent— big efforts to reach compromises to the extent possible _ big efforts to reach compromises to the extent possible which _ big efforts to reach compromises to the extent possible which i - big efforts to reach compromises to the extent possible which i think. big efforts to reach compromises to the extent possible which i think isl the extent possible which i think is the extent possible which i think is the right— the extent possible which i think is the right thing _ the extent possible which i think is the right thing to _ the extent possible which i think is the right thing to do _ the extent possible which i think is the right thing to do even - the extent possible which i think is the right thing to do even if- the extent possible which i think is the right thing to do even if it- the right thing to do even if it means— the right thing to do even if it means that _ the right thing to do even if it means that fact _ the right thing to do even if it means that fact oil— the right thing to do even if it means that fact oil band - the right thing to do even if itj means that fact oil band can't the right thing to do even if it. means that fact oil band can't be the right thing to do even if it- means that fact oil band can't be as frenetic— means that fact oil band can't be as frenetic as maybe _ means that fact oil band can't be as frenetic as maybe we _ means that fact oil band can't be as frenetic as maybe we would - means that fact oil band can't be as frenetic as maybe we would like - means that fact oil band can't be as frenetic as maybe we would like it i frenetic as maybe we would like it to be _ frenetic as maybe we would like it to be it's — frenetic as maybe we would like it to be. it's worth _ frenetic as maybe we would like it to be. it's worth it _ frenetic as maybe we would like it to be. it's worth it for— frenetic as maybe we would like it to be. it's worth it for the - frenetic as maybe we would like it to be. it's worth it for the sake . frenetic as maybe we would like it to be. it's worth it for the sake of| to be. it's worth it for the sake of showing — to be. it's worth it for the sake of showing him _ to be. it's worth it for the sake of showing him from _ to be. it's worth it for the sake of showing him from —— _ to be. it's worth it for the sake of- showing him from —— uncompromising sense _ showing him from —— uncompromising sense of— showing him from —— uncompromising sense of unity— showing him from —— uncompromising sense of unity to — showing him from —— uncompromising sense of unity to pressure _ showing him from —— uncompromising sense of unity to pressure russia - sense of unity to pressure russia and cut _ sense of unity to pressure russia and cut off — sense of unity to pressure russia and cut off the _ sense of unity to pressure russia and cut off the sources _ sense of unity to pressure russia and cut off the sources of- sense of unity to pressure russia| and cut off the sources of funding for that — and cut off the sources of funding for that so — and cut off the sources of funding for that so i _ and cut off the sources of funding for that. so i realise _ and cut off the sources of funding for that. so i realise there - and cut off the sources of funding for that. so i realise there is- for that. so i realise there is a problem — for that. so i realise there is a problem with— for that. so i realise there is a problem with waning - for that. so i realise there is a problem with waning interestl for that. so i realise there is a - problem with waning interest among the public, _ problem with waning interest among the public, but — problem with waning interest among the public, but i _ problem with waning interest among the public, but i think— problem with waning interest among the public, but i think that _ problem with waning interest among the public, but i think that it's- problem with waning interest among the public, but i think that it's up. the public, but i think that it's up to the _ the public, but i think that it's up to the policy— the public, but i think that it's up to the policy community - the public, but i think that it's up to the policy community and - to the policy community and the countries — to the policy community and the countries that— to the policy community and the countries that are _ to the policy community and the countries that are really - to the policy community and the i countries that are really committed to putting _
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countries that are really committed to putting maximum _ countries that are really committed to putting maximum pressure - countries that are really committed to putting maximum pressure on i to putting maximum pressure on russia _ to putting maximum pressure on russia toward _ to putting maximum pressure on russia toward stopping - to putting maximum pressure on russia toward stopping this - to putting maximum pressure on russia toward stopping this war. to putting maximum pressure on. russia toward stopping this war to continue _ russia toward stopping this war to continue those _ russia toward stopping this war to continue those policies _ russia toward stopping this war to continue those policies in - russia toward stopping this war to continue those policies in a - russia toward stopping this war to continue those policies in a very. continue those policies in a very forthright — continue those policies in a very forthright way _ continue those policies in a very forthright way regardless - continue those policies in a very forthright way regardless of - continue those policies in a very. forthright way regardless of where the public— forthright way regardless of where the public is — forthright way regardless of where the public is and _ forthright way regardless of where the public is and i— forthright way regardless of where the public is and i think— forthright way regardless of where the public is and i think the - forthright way regardless of where the public is and i think the us - forthright way regardless of where| the public is and i think the us has actually— the public is and i think the us has actually been — the public is and i think the us has actually been showing _ actually been showing an extraordinary— actually been showing an extraordinary measure i actually been showing anj extraordinary measure of bipartisanship _ extraordinary measure of bipartisanship that- extraordinary measure of bipartisanship that one . extraordinary measure of| bipartisanship that one of extraordinary measure of - bipartisanship that one of the most difficult _ bipartisanship that one of the most difficult times— bipartisanship that one of the most difficult times in _ bipartisanship that one of the most difficult times in american - bipartisanship that one of the most difficult times in american history i difficult times in american history on that— difficult times in american history on that issue _ difficult times in american history on that issue in _ difficult times in american history on that issue in support— difficult times in american history on that issue in support of- difficult times in american history on that issue in support of the - on that issue in support of the presents— on that issue in support of the present's agenda _ on that issue in support of the present's agenda here, and i on that issue in support of the - present's agenda here, and i think it would _ present's agenda here, and i think it would be — present's agenda here, and i think it would be a — present's agenda here, and i think it would be a mistake _ present's agenda here, and i think it would be a mistake to _ present's agenda here, and i think it would be a mistake to run- present's agenda here, and i think it would be a mistake to run afterl present's agenda here, and i thinki it would be a mistake to run after a few polls showing _ it would be a mistake to run after a few polls showing the _ it would be a mistake to run after a few polls showing the beginnings . it would be a mistake to run after a| few polls showing the beginnings of partisan _ few polls showing the beginnings of partisan divide _ few polls showing the beginnings of partisan divide when _ few polls showing the beginnings of partisan divide when that _ partisan divide when that bipartisanship _ partisan divide when that bipartisanship has - partisan divide when thatj bipartisanship has served partisan divide when that _ bipartisanship has served america's policy— bipartisanship has served america's policy so _ bipartisanship has served america's policy so well — bipartisanship has served america's policy so well in _ bipartisanship has served america's policy so well in supporting - policy so well in supporting ukraine _ policy so well in supporting ukraine. ., ~ policy so well in supporting ukraine. ., ,, , ., policy so well in supporting ukraine. ., ,, ., ., ., ukraine. thank you for that, dalia. back to you _ ukraine. thank you for that, dalia. back to you general. _ ukraine. thank you for that, dalia. back to you general. you - ukraine. thank you for that, dalia. back to you general. you have - ukraine. thank you for that, dalia. | back to you general. you have read some of the thoughts that our guests. i'm curious what you think the public should be thinking about as they think about this war? thea;r as they think about this war? they should be thinking _ as they think about this war? the: should be thinking about the as they think about this war? ti9:1 should be thinking about the long haul. i think distinguish between supporting the united states, certainly when it comes to washington, dc and perhaps that in some of the european capitals that are much more affected, frankly, by various aspects of the sanctions on
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the russian economy and financial system in particular on energy exports. you mentioned the bipartisan support that led to the $40 billion package that president biden signed while he was still on his trip in asia was very substantial. the republican minority leader of the senate, senator mcconnell is very strongly supportive of the effort, so you have a very substantial bipartisan basis on which to move forward, certainly in washington, dc. and i don't think that that will change. i think there is very steadfast support here. i think the challenge will be, actually, in some of the european countries, especially as inflation continues, as energy prices go up, perhaps as economies slow and so forth, and i think that's the concern that i would have, more so, frankly than that in the united states.—
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the united states. general, thank ou so the united states. general, thank you so much _ the united states. general, thank you so much for— the united states. general, thank you so much for coming _ the united states. general, thank you so much for coming on - the united states. general, thank you so much for coming on our. you so much for coming on our programme. he will speak to you again soon. programme. he will speak to you again soon-— could colombia be on course to elect the first left—wing president in its history? leftist candidate gustavo petro has won the first round of the presidential elections with 40% of the vote. he has promised huge economic and social changes and will face right—wing populist, rodolfo hernandez, in next month's run—off. let's cross now to bogata in colombia and speak to sergio guzmanthe director of the consultancy firm colombia risk analysis. i think there may be a lot of our viewers who have not been following this race closely. it is a fascinating one. first off, the two candidates, what do our viewers need to know about each of them? absolutely. thank you so much for having me. ithink absolutely. thank you so much for having me. i think in first place, gustavo has been a senator for quite a long time in columbia he's twice run for president, he is to be in an 19 fighter. 0ne
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run for president, he is to be in an 19 fighter. one of the things that i9 fighter. one of the things that propels him and his candidacy is that discontent and that dissatisfaction with the status quo. he was a contender for the presidency four years ago and he has been the most clear face of the opposition. since he took office, there has been three very big bouts of protest in 2019, in 2020 and in 2021. so petro has been looking to capitalise at this dissatisfaction with the government and with the political system and with the economic system to lead his campaign. rodolfo hernandez is a 77—year—old tick—tock star who has... yes! who has formally also been the mayor of the tertiary city here in columbia. he has run a very unorthodox campaign. he has promised his entire campaign on fighting the political establishment and on
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trying to take the money and the contracting away from the political establishment. 0ther contracting away from the political establishment. other candidates such as sergio and... who represents the incumbent government were not elected by voters to make it to a runoff. so now we are between two very extreme versions of change in columbia and that has a lot of people concerned.— columbia and that has a lot of people concerned. that is june 19, i believe, people concerned. that is june 19, i believe. is — people concerned. that is june 19, i believe, is for _ people concerned. that is june 19, i believe, is for the _ people concerned. that is june 19, i believe, is for the next _ people concerned. that is june 19, i believe, is for the next round. - people concerned. that is june 19, i believe, is for the next round. i - believe, is for the next round. i just even the most cursory view of the importance of columbia, it doesn't take long to find out, for example, the united states, they are going to be watching this really closely. if you could explain a little bit about why who becomes the next leader of this country matters so much on a global scale.- so much on a global scale. well, i would say — so much on a global scale. well, i would say three _ so much on a global scale. well, i would say three major _ so much on a global scale. well, i would say three major reasons. i so much on a global scale. well, i i would say three major reasons. the first one is columbia is the united states's most important ally in south america. on the second to mexico and all of the western hemisphere and perhaps canada as
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well. columbia is a global nato ally in terms of nine nato partners for the united states and columbia has been fighting a war on drugs for almost 50 years alongside the united states. both petro and rodolfo hernandez propose a massive change to the way that the war on drugs is led by the colombian government. they said that the current model of eradication of fighting the drug cartels is not working and suggest a shift in things. cartels is not working and suggest a shift in things-— shift in things. sorry, 'ust about 30 shift in things. sorry, 'ust about so seeensd * shift in things. sorry, 'ust about 30 seconds orh shift in things. sorry, 'ust about 30 seconds or so, _ shift in things. sorry, just about 30 seconds or so, but _ shift in things. sorry, just about 30 seconds or so, but i - shift in things. sorry, just about 30 seconds or so, but i was - shift in things. sorry, just about 30 seconds or so, but i wasjust 30 seconds or so, but i was just wondering how engaged are colombians in this race and is it turning out —— is turnout expected to be high? while, colombians are very excited about this race because it's for the first time they are not going to have a right—wing person to lead, but they are also extremely divided. we had a 54% turn up, which is not great, but actually for columbia,
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that's a record, so we will be tuning in and we will be keeping you up—to—date on the future developments of this race. up-to-date on the future developments of this race. thank you so much for — developments of this race. thank you so much for bringing _ developments of this race. thank you so much for bringing us _ developments of this race. thank you so much for bringing us up-to-date l so much for bringing us up—to—date and we will watch it with interest. thank you. and we will watch it with interest. thank yon-— is that price for pounds or kilos? metres or feet? people in the uk might soon be asking those questions again when they head to the shops. that's because borisjohnson is launching a post—brexit review next week on how and where traders can sell produce using imperial measurements. currently shops must use metric when selling packaged or loose goods under eu rules the uk copied over after brexit. so let's put it into a bit of global context. this is a map from statista — only three countries in the world use imperial as their official form of measurement, the us, liberia and myanmar. the uk does a bit of both. and that can lead to a fair bit of confusion. be it when you are doing the weekly shop — through to trying to navigate through space.
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nasa famously lost it's mars rover because the engineering company used imperial measurements to build the orbit computer, while nasa used the metric system to plot the course. and a little closer to home — a 250 kilogram galapagos tortoise escaped from a california college, because they accidentally built an enclosure suitable for holding a 250—pound tortoise. not the 250 kilogram beast they received. clarence the tortoise just pushed over the fence and walked away on the first night. joining me now is professorjim al —khalili — who is a physicist, science broadcaster and a patron of the uk metric association. 0k, it is not going to take me too long to figure out which side of the fence you are on on this on. but i am curious about what you think about some of the nostalgia and the
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arguments to return and impose imperial system. to arguments to return and impose imperial system.— arguments to return and impose imperial system. to be honest, i think this is _ imperial system. to be honest, i think this is an _ imperial system. to be honest, i think this is an absolute - imperial system. to be honest, i | think this is an absolute backward step. i think it's nothing more than a populist appeal to a bygone era, as you mentioned. very few countries still use imperial measures. i've checked with my students at university if they know how long a yard is, and honestly, they don't know, because for many years now we've taught the metric system, and i think that's returned back to imperial measures, it's a bit like going back to, i don't know, bendy bananas. it's ridiculous retrograde step to a bygone era, and i think it's very, very silly and a distraction.— it's very, very silly and a distraction. :, ., , :, distraction. you say a distraction, but there are _ distraction. you say a distraction, but there are certain _ distraction. you say a distraction, but there are certain little - but there are certain little cultural touchstones that people love, we definitely side with brexit. 0ne love, we definitely side with brexit. one that came to me was that the passport colour, for example,
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that changed back to blue to maroon, burgundy colour of the eu that some people were delighted to have that. perhaps some have never really moved onto metric. i mean, what would you to convince people that your way is the better way, as i thank you are saying. the better way, as i thank you are sa int. , the better way, as i thank you are sa int, , the better way, as i thank you are sa int. , , the better way, as i thank you are sa in. , , saying. listen, look, i still say! am five saying. listen, look, i stillsayi am five foot— saying. listen, look, i still say! am five foot ten. _ saying. listen, look, i still say! am five foot ten. i _ saying. listen, look, i still say! am five foot ten. i buy - saying. listen, look, i still say i| am five foot ten. i buy a plaintiff i drive my car at 70 miles an hour on the motorway. these are part of british culture, and i think we are all fine with ease. but to but to expect to teach our schoolchildren about fahrenheit or the acceleration due to earth gravity is 32 feet per second square, i think it's nonsense. we left the eu, this is no longer a battle of ideology between britain and the eu. this is a step backwards. we should be working on a global scale internationally in terms of economics, in terms of
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technology, everybody uses the metric system, the si units. i think this is reallyjust, to be honest, i think it's a jingoistic, it's a populist move to appeal to a generation who probably are getting used to metric now. it doesn't matter if we still think in terms of pounds or feet here and there, but to move back to imperial, i mean, you know, what is next? will we be expected to greet each other with blessed be the fruit? this is 'ust so 19th centuryi so 19th century. blessed be the fruit, 0k. _ so 19th century. blessed be the fruit, 0k. let's _ so 19th century. blessed be the fruit, 0k. let's chat _ so 19th century. blessed be the fruit, 0k. let's chat about - so 19th century. blessed be the fruit, 0k. let's chat about this. j so 19th century. blessed be the i fruit, 0k. let's chat about this. do you know your height in centimetres? yes, i do, weirdly. buti you know your height in centimetres? yes, i do, weirdly. but i couldn't tell you — yes, i do, weirdly. but i couldn't tell you my— yes, i do, weirdly. but i couldn't tell you my weight in kilos. i can tell you — tell you my weight in kilos. i can tell you how many times i still need to lose _ tell you how many times i still need to lose on _ tell you how many times i still need to lose on my perpetual diet, and i agree _ to lose on my perpetual diet, and i agree with — to lose on my perpetual diet, and i agree with the professor, we live in the uk _ agree with the professor, we live in the uk with— agree with the professor, we live in the uk with a slightly hybrid system. i couldn't tell you how many kilometres _ system. i couldn't tell you how many kilometres it is to ask fred where i'm kilometres it is to ask fred where l'm going — kilometres it is to ask fred where i'm going tomorrow, but i can tell you roughly— i'm going tomorrow, but i can tell you roughly how many miles it is and
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how fast— you roughly how many miles it is and how fast my— you roughly how many miles it is and how fast my car is driving and miles and not _ how fast my car is driving and miles and not kilometres. it's an odd system — and not kilometres. it's an odd system that we live and under the uk, but _ system that we live and under the uk, but i — system that we live and under the uk, but i think professor is right, most _ uk, but i think professor is right, most people younger than me and perhaps— most people younger than me and perhaps younger than him, if i can be rude _ perhaps younger than him, if i can be rude are— perhaps younger than him, if i can be rude, are now very comfortable with the _ be rude, are now very comfortable with the metric system. i suspect my children— with the metric system. i suspect my children may have although they are in centimetres and how much they weigh— in centimetres and how much they weigh in— in centimetres and how much they weigh in kilograms, it is, like everything, apparently glad —— could have always — everything, apparently glad —— could have always had a blue passport even as members of the eu, and like everything, we could've had imperial measures— everything, we could've had imperial measures to gay abandon while still being _ measures to gay abandon while still being members of the eu, and it's rather— being members of the eu, and it's rather sort — being members of the eu, and it's rather sort of pathetic position we find ourselves in the uk that we see these _ find ourselves in the uk that we see these completely pointless brexit opportunities having left the largest— opportunities having left the largest free—trade area in the world — largest free-trade area in the world. :, ., world. the northern ireland secretary — world. the northern ireland secretary brandon - world. the northern ireland secretary brandon lewis - world. the northern ireland secretary brandon lewis as| world. the northern ireland i secretary brandon lewis as he world. the northern ireland - secretary brandon lewis as he was pleased with the freedom of choice, it gives british people, brexit was all about removing red tape. dalia, i know you are in new york today, often in israel as well. how do you see this debate?—
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see this debate? having lived with both systems can _ see this debate? having lived with both systems can i _ see this debate? having lived with both systems can i think _ see this debate? having lived with both systems can i think i - see this debate? having lived with both systems can i think i can - see this debate? having lived with i both systems can i think i can speak with great— both systems can i think i can speak with great authority _ both systems can i think i can speak with great authority that _ both systems can i think i can speak with great authority that if— both systems can i think i can speak with great authority that if i- both systems can i think i can speak with great authority that if i can - with great authority that if i can paraphrase _ with great authority that if i can paraphrase, your— with great authority that if i can paraphrase, your labour- with great authority that if i can paraphrase, your labour and i with great authority that if i canj paraphrase, your labour and he with great authority that if i can - paraphrase, your labour and he was a pathetic— paraphrase, your labour and he was a pathetic attempt _ paraphrase, your labour and he was a pathetic attempt to _ paraphrase, your labour and he was a pathetic attempt to have _ paraphrase, your labour and he was a pathetic attempt to have a _ paraphrase, your labour and he was a pathetic attempt to have a nice - pathetic attempt to have a nice nostalgia. _ pathetic attempt to have a nice nostalgia, think— pathetic attempt to have a nice nostalgia, think it's _ pathetic attempt to have a nice nostalgia, think it's a _ pathetic attempt to have a nice nostalgia, think it's a frankly i nostalgia, think it's a frankly pathetic— nostalgia, think it's a frankly pathetic attempt _ nostalgia, think it's a frankly pathetic attempt to - nostalgia, think it's a frankly pathetic attempt to weapon i nostalgia, think it's a frankly - pathetic attempt to weapon eyes and distract— pathetic attempt to weapon eyes and distract from — pathetic attempt to weapon eyes and distract from other— pathetic attempt to weapon eyes and distract from other political - distract from other political failings _ distract from other political failings right— distract from other political failings right now— distract from other political failings right now and - distract from other political failings right now and borisj distract from other political - failings right now and borisjohnson government — failings right now and borisjohnson government it's_ failings right now and borisjohnson government. it's got _ failings right now and borisjohnson government. it's got a _ failings right now and borisjohnson government. it's got a lot _ failings right now and borisjohnson government. it's got a lot to - failings right now and borisjohnson| government. it's got a lot to answer for and — government. it's got a lot to answer for and it— government. it's got a lot to answer for and it seems— government. it's got a lot to answer for and it seems like _ government. it's got a lot to answer for and it seems like you _ government. it's got a lot to answer for and it seems like you trying to. for and it seems like you trying to distract— for and it seems like you trying to distract people _ for and it seems like you trying to distract people. little—known- for and it seems like you trying to distract people. little—known factj distract people. little—known fact about _ distract people. little—known fact about me. — distract people. little—known fact about me, actually— distract people. little—known fact about me, actually wrote - distract people. little—known fact about me, actually wrote my- distract people. little—known fact about me, actually wrote my phdj about me, actually wrote my phd about _ about me, actually wrote my phd about political— about me, actually wrote my phd about political symbolism. - about me, actually wrote my phd about political symbolism. i - about me, actually wrote my phd . about political symbolism. i learned how to _ about political symbolism. i learned how to identify— about political symbolism. i learned how to identify when _ about political symbolism. i learned how to identify when symbols - about political symbolism. i learned how to identify when symbols have i how to identify when symbols have genuine _ how to identify when symbols have genuine and — how to identify when symbols have genuine and deep— how to identify when symbols have genuine and deep are _ how to identify when symbols have genuine and deep are found - how to identify when symbols have i genuine and deep are found political meaning _ genuine and deep are found political meaning to — genuine and deep are found political meaning to the _ genuine and deep are found political meaning to the point _ genuine and deep are found political meaning to the point where - genuine and deep are found political meaning to the point where they. meaning to the point where they can mobilise _ meaning to the point where they can mobilise people _ meaning to the point where they can mobilise people. i— meaning to the point where they can mobilise people. i am _ meaning to the point where they can mobilise people. lam not _ meaning to the point where they can mobilise people. i am not seeing - meaning to the point where they can| mobilise people. i am not seeing any indications _ mobilise people. i am not seeing any indications that— mobilise people. i am not seeing any indications that this _ mobilise people. i am not seeing any indications that this is _ mobilise people. i am not seeing any indications that this is one _ mobilise people. i am not seeing any indications that this is one of- indications that this is one of those — indications that this is one of those cases _ indications that this is one of those cases. the _ indications that this is one of those cases. the other- indications that this is one of those cases. the other thing| indications that this is one of. those cases. the other thing is, indications that this is one of- those cases. the other thing is, i grew— those cases. the other thing is, i grew up— those cases. the other thing is, i grew up in— those cases. the other thing is, i grew up in the— those cases. the other thing is, i grew up in the united _ those cases. the other thing is, i grew up in the united states - those cases. the other thing is, i grew up in the united states and | those cases. the other thing is, i. grew up in the united states and we are such _ grew up in the united states and we are such an— grew up in the united states and we are such an outlier, _ grew up in the united states and we are such an outlier, the _ are such an outlier, the united states. — are such an outlier, the united states. such _ are such an outlier, the united states, such an _ are such an outlier, the united states, such an outlier- are such an outlier, the united states, such an outlier on - are such an outlier, the united i states, such an outlier on various aspects from _ states, such an outlier on various aspects from across _ states, such an outlier on various aspects from across the - states, such an outlier on various aspects from across the united i aspects from across the united states — aspects from across the united states has— aspects from across the united states has a _ aspects from across the united states has a tradition - aspects from across the united states has a tradition of - states has a tradition of exceptionalism. - states has a tradition of exceptionalism. i- states has a tradition of exceptionalism. i wouldj states has a tradition of - exceptionalism. ! would say being states has a tradition of _ exceptionalism. ! would say being an outlier— exceptionalism. i would say being an outlier on _ exceptionalism. i would say being an outlier on the — exceptionalism. i would say being an outlier on the measurement - exceptionalism. i would say being an outlier on the measurement system i exceptionalism. i would say being an. outlier on the measurement system is one of— outlier on the measurement system is one of the _ outlier on the measurement system is one of the things _ outlier on the measurement system is one of the things that _ outlier on the measurement system is one of the things that keeps _ outlier on the measurement system is one of the things that keeps america i one of the things that keeps america in a sort _ one of the things that keeps america in a sort of— one of the things that keeps america in a sort of self— one of the things that keeps america in a sort of self claimed _ one of the things that keeps america in a sort of self claimed exclusion i in a sort of self claimed exclusion from _ in a sort of self claimed exclusion from global— in a sort of self claimed exclusion from global society— in a sort of self claimed exclusion from global societyjust _ in a sort of self claimed exclusionj from global societyjust alongside not a _
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from global societyjust alongside not a learning _ from global societyjust alongside not a learning other— from global societyjust alongside not a learning other foreign i not a learning other foreign languages _ not a learning other foreign languages and _ not a learning other foreign languages and there - not a learning other foreign languages and there is i not a learning other foreign languages and there is no. not a learning other foreign - languages and there is no need for that, _ languages and there is no need for that, it's _ languages and there is no need for that, it's not — languages and there is no need for that, it's not the _ languages and there is no need for that, it's not the kind _ languages and there is no need for that, it's not the kind of— languages and there is no need for that, it's not the kind of attitude i that, it's not the kind of attitude we need — that, it's not the kind of attitude we need to— that, it's not the kind of attitude we need to perpetuate - that, it's not the kind of attitude we need to perpetuate in- that, it's not the kind of attitude we need to perpetuate in a i we need to perpetuate in a globalised _ we need to perpetuate in a globalised interdependentl we need to perpetuate in a i globalised interdependent world. we need to perpetuate in a - globalised interdependent world. i don't think— globalised interdependent world. i don't think this — globalised interdependent world. i don't think this is _ globalised interdependent world. i don't think this is american - don't think this is american exceptionalism _ don't think this is american exceptionalism that- don't think this is american i exceptionalism that anybody don't think this is american - exceptionalism that anybody should emulate _ exceptionalism that anybody should emulate. :, ,, ., exceptionalism that anybody should emulate. :, ,, :, , exceptionalism that anybody should emulate. :, ,, :, emulate. baroness who is a conservative _ emulate. baroness who is a conservative set _ emulate. baroness who is a conservative set a - emulate. baroness who is a j conservative set a ludicrous emulate. baroness who is a i conservative set a ludicrous dead cat from the prime minister echoing, perhaps, a little of what dalia was saying there. lenexa basically they agree. suggest briefly, before we let you go, 30 seconds ago. do you think that the imperial measurement in a what what i call them, campaign, could gain fire? maybe metric will go out the window? tia. metric will go out the window? no, absolutely not. _ metric will go out the window? tin, absolutely not. listen, we got our jubilee celebrations coming up, we should be celebrating how we are part of the global community, how technologically advanced the uk is. i think we would be a little bit of laughing stock if it became the point that somehow the uk was moving back to a bygone era using units that really are not part of the rest of the world. we that really are not part of the rest of the world-— of the world. we will leave it there. thank _
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of the world. we will leave it there. thank you _ of the world. we will leave it there. thank you so - of the world. we will leave it there. thank you so much. l of the world. we will leave it i there. thank you so much. strong opinions about imperial and also metric measurements. stay with us here. a rather cool and showery first half before things turn a little bit warmer as we head into the jubilee weekend. good weather for ducks or in this case geese, today, heavy showers and some thundering and this evening across parts of eastern england and low—pressure sitting right across because of the moment and still be into tomorrow, so the showers popping up again and when you have showers by day, they fade away into the night but a few reports wednesday, showers run. northern ireland and some are bricks of rain affecting the western aisles of the night in temperatures in single figures in a few spots with the clear spell in scotland
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and close to freezing by morning and just a brief touch of frost around, and into tomorrow, outbreaks of rain in the western aisles sinking down towards northern ireland. showers developing elsewhere in the heaviest went across eastern areas some thundery and the chance of hail and a few sunny spots to be had and a touch warmer through wells in southern england with increasing sunny spells as we head on into the evening. for many, things will brighten up before the end of the day and are bricks of rain through tuesday evening and a western parts of england. a weather system will gradually pushing its weakest routes as we go into wednesday. single figures and temperatures around a rather cool stuff for the day on wednesday but the first day ofjune. first day of meteorological summer and showers again in the system continues to inch for the use through england and elsewhere, sunny spots yes but the showers popping up again will tend to fade away from western areas later in the day but largely fine
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into wednesday and temperatures are nudging upwards, closer to average for the time of year and will feel warmer where we see some sunshine. high—pressure building in the bank holidays but with and that weather disturbance, we are expected to see a chance of showers, not as widespread as they've been through northern areas in showers shifting in the southern areas of low pressure into the weekend and doesn't dry but factor —— of low pressure into the weekend and does look dry but factor and for outdoor plans chemistry parties and the chance of showers with the sun appears, it's going to feel warmer.
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hello, i'm nuala mcgovern. you're watching the context on bbc news. the us department ofjustice says it will investigate the police response to last week's mass shooting at a school in texas. 19 children and two teachers were killed in the attack — the first funerals of the victims are set to start tomorrow. the cheapest pasta in uk supermarkets goes up by 50% in a year — as households continue to be hit with the rising cost of living. and a box office smash for tom cruise — as top gun maverick collects $100 million dollars in it's first weekend. tonight with the context, former uk culture secretary and member of the house of lords it
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vaizey and political analyst dahlia scheindlin. the us department ofjustice says it will investigate the police response to last week's mass shooting at a school in uvalde, texas, which killed 19 children and two teachers. public anger is growing after it emerged that officers waited in the hallway as children trapped with the shooter made desperate 911 calls. let's speak to chris grollnek, who's an active shooter security expert. perfectly placed to speak about some of the events we had sappy scene unfold over the past few days. how do you understand what happened and what went wrong?— what went wrong? hello, thank you for having me- _ what went wrong? hello, thank you for having me. terrible _ what went wrong? hello, thank you for having me. terrible subject i what went wrong? hello, thank you for having me. terrible subject for i for having me. terrible subject for that there's no way to understand. no one could foresee the inaction of
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police and there is no justification no matter what of why the action was not taken that should've been. but with this i think the most heartbreaking parts that we've been hearing over the past couple days was for parents that wanted officers to enter that building, that they did not. they spoke afterwards about not realising that it was still an active shooter situation. how do you think something like that can happen? i think something like that can ha-nen? ~ �*, think something like that can ha en? ~ �* , :, think something like that can hat-en? ~ �*, ., , think something like that can hauen? ~ 3 . , :, happen? i think there's a couple of different things _ happen? i think there's a couple of different things happening - happen? i think there's a couple of different things happening here. i different things happening here. some of the message getting watered down by what's inferred that it wasn't inactive shooter turned into a barricaded person. the layman is to understand a barricaded person leaves a person that robs a bank and barricaded himself inside a new way for the police to negotiate their way out for the inactive shooter starts actively killing people and thatis starts actively killing people and that is not a non—active shooting spot until the shooter stops or is stopped. you arrest them or you neutralise them. but you definitely don't go outside and start
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negotiating with them. if you go backwards even further, sandy hook, the sending of promise, the department ofjustice spent about $50 million at texas state university on the alert centre to train police over 144th thousand police have been trained. you locate, find and stop the shooter, that your first priority when you show up. incident commander or not, real—time intelligence of the gunshots that are coming. we have seen after spending $50 million in ten years to shoot these, there are several instances and this is no different where the police failed to go inside. you can invest in response at nausea him but it doesn't mean that people are going to respond appropriately. i think it's time for an honest question and dialogue about adding some things like preventing, response and options to do both.— like preventing, response and options to do both. what would that look like? when _ options to do both. what would that look like? when you _ options to do both. what would that look like? when you talk— options to do both. what would that look like? when you talk about i look like? when you talk about trading, i did see in 2020 the city
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of uvalde swat team, toward campus in interacted with children in case of emergency, the departments annual report said the swat unit had monthly tactical training sessions, open to all officers to attend. it looks likes from some of those details that they were putting training in place to be able to deal with an incident like this. what is the aspect that doesn't work, as you say with other incidences that have happened? i say with other incidences that have ha-nened? ~ . say with other incidences that have ha ened? ~ ., :, :, :, happened? i think we have to go down to the original — happened? i think we have to go down to the original thing _ happened? i think we have to go down to the original thing that _ happened? i think we have to go down to the original thing that went - to the original thing that went wrong. if i can take a d0] investigation to understand the book somet building was hardened. what somet building was hardened. what does that mean? _ somet building was hardened. what does that mean? they _ somet building was hardened. what does that mean? they had - somet building was hardened. what does that mean? they had a - somet building was hardened. what does that mean? they had a class l does that mean? they had a class that had failed _ does that mean? they had a class that had failed on _ does that mean? they had a class that had failed on it, _ does that mean? they had a class that had failed on it, that - does that mean? they had a class that had failed on it, that was i that had failed on it, that was ballistic, the doors were hard and cover the outer security system of access control, video cameras, all ventures want to see to start an initial hardening of the building. the problem is, all that doesn't
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work if you properly door open. and they actually prop the door open and they actually prop the door open and the shooter was able to come in and make that fortified castle his last stand. and it worked against the police. unfortunately, the police waited 1a minutes before taking action. there are so many minute details there is no explanation if they would've followed active shooter protocols, which is taught through alert for police, for response, the shooter would been either neutralised or they would've tried to fight him earlier. but that many departments responding in unison with different training, different levels of experience, different levels of experience, different mindsets and no one when in because someone gave an order not to? i would consider that an illegal order. as if we were in combat and somebody said shoot unarmed person because i don't like them, that would be an illegal order. so wouldn't it work in the reverse? i say don't stop this person from executing these little children, that would be an illegal order. you should go in and do anything you can
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to stop that shooting, no matter what. ,, . ., , . what. such a difficult time in the united states. _ what. such a difficult time in the united states. you _ what. such a difficult time in the united states. you are _ what. such a difficult time in the united states. you are there - what. such a difficult time in the l united states. you are there today and no doubt those repercussions still very much being felt even though you are in new york and this took place in texas. so much soul—searching. how do you see this incident, particular picking up on crystal i suppose that human error of popping open that door, also that police were not in unison in thinking what was the right actions to take place. let thinking what was the right actions to take place-— to take place. let me remind you that no place _ to take place. let me remind you that no place is _ to take place. let me remind you that no place is immune. - to take place. let me remind you that no place is immune. just - to take place. let me remind youi that no place is immune. just the that no place is immune. just the previous— that no place is immune. just the previous week there was a shooting in buffalo_ previous week there was a shooting in buffalo in new york state and the public— in buffalo in new york state and the public here — in buffalo in new york state and the public here was still reeling from that and — public here was still reeling from that and a — public here was still reeling from that and a very weak after the opposites shooting in the subway in new york — opposites shooting in the subway in new york. nobody is immune from this _ new york. nobody is immune from this i_ new york. nobody is immune from this. i would new york. nobody is immune from this. iwould pick new york. nobody is immune from this. i would pick up on what chris said, _ this. i would pick up on what chris said. of— this. i would pick up on what chris said, of course this is a very legitimate and serious professional analysis we need to have about how the police _ analysis we need to have about how the police may or may not have behaved — the police may or may not have behaved correctly, sounds like they really _ behaved correctly, sounds like they really didn't. but the focus on this, — really didn't. but the focus on this, if— really didn't. but the focus on this, ifthis really didn't. but the focus on this, if this becomes the centre of
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the debate, i think it will be nothing less than tragic. it is shifting — nothing less than tragic. it is shifting the responsibility for this issue _ shifting the responsibility for this issue onto local police. which is basically— issue onto local police. which is basically looking at the symptom rather _ basically looking at the symptom rather than the cause of this problem _ rather than the cause of this problem. and talking about having better— problem. and talking about having better bulletproof windows or viewer doors _ better bulletproof windows or viewer doors as _ better bulletproof windows or viewer doors as ted cruz and kevin mccarthy has surreally proposed is simply symptomatic treatment. the fact is that we _ symptomatic treatment. the fact is that we cannot shift the conversation away from the national level where the american leadership for decades has allowed access to guns _ for decades has allowed access to guns in _ for decades has allowed access to guns in ways that the constitutional framers— guns in ways that the constitutional framers never intended, they wrote very clearly — framers never intended, they wrote very clearly well regulated in the second _ very clearly well regulated in the second amendment and everybody has ignore _ second amendment and everybody has ignore that _ second amendment and everybody has ignore that. this is a betrayal tell us of— ignore that. this is a betrayal tell us of the — ignore that. this is a betrayal tell us of the american people. over 90% of americans want to see some sort of americans want to see some sort of background checks, for example. that's _ of background checks, for example. that's exactly what the republicans they say— that's exactly what the republicans they say guns don't kill, people killed _ they say guns don't kill, people killed for— they say guns don't kill, people killed for that regular people who shouidn't— killed for that regular people who shouldn't have have access to guns.
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shouldn't— shouldn't have have access to guns. shouldn't be having this conversation over and over and over. ed, how— conversation over and over and over. ed, how are — conversation over and over and over. ed, how are you seeing a? i will come back to one moment. go ahead ed. �* , come back to one moment. go ahead ed. look, i can't better what talia said. we ed. look, i can't better what talia said- we are _ ed. look, i can't better what talia said. we are in _ ed. look, i can't better what talia said. we are in the _ ed. look, i can't better what talia said. we are in the uk, we - ed. look, i can't better what talia said. we are in the uk, we had i ed. look, i can't better what talia said. we are in the uk, we had a| said. we are in the uk, we had a discussion— said. we are in the uk, we had a discussion earlier a _ said. we are in the uk, we had a discussion earlier a light- said. we are in the uk, we had a discussion earlier a light heartedi discussion earlier a light hearted topic— discussion earlier a light hearted topic on— discussion earlier a light hearted topic on metric— discussion earlier a light hearted topic on metric versus _ discussion earlier a light hearted topic on metric versus imperial i topic on metric versus imperial measures. _ topic on metric versus imperial measures. this _ topic on metric versus imperial measures, this is _ topic on metric versus imperial measures, this is american - measures, this is american exceptionalism _ measures, this is american exceptionalism on - measures, this is american exceptionalism on a - measures, this is american exceptionalism on a much. measures, this is american - exceptionalism on a much more serious — exceptionalism on a much more serious scale _ exceptionalism on a much more serious scale which _ exceptionalism on a much more serious scale which most - exceptionalism on a much more serious scale which most of - exceptionalism on a much more serious scale which most of the | exceptionalism on a much more - serious scale which most of the rest of the _ serious scale which most of the rest of the world — serious scale which most of the rest of the world cannot _ serious scale which most of the rest of the world cannot get _ serious scale which most of the rest of the world cannot get their- serious scale which most of the rest of the world cannot get their headsl of the world cannot get their heads around~ _ of the world cannot get their heads around. america _ of the world cannot get their heads around. america is— of the world cannot get their heads around. america is a _ of the world cannot get their heads around. america is a peculiar- of the world cannot get their heads around. america is a peculiar place when _ around. america is a peculiar place when it— around. america is a peculiar place when it comes _ around. america is a peculiar place when it comes to— around. america is a peculiar place when it comes to thomas - around. america is a peculiar place when it comes to thomas muzzle l around. america is a peculiar placel when it comes to thomas muzzle to can't _ when it comes to thomas muzzle to can't drink— when it comes to thomas muzzle to can't drink in— when it comes to thomas muzzle to can't drink in most— when it comes to thomas muzzle to can't drink in most states _ can't drink in most states until you're — can't drink in most states until you're 21. _ can't drink in most states until you're 21. the _ can't drink in most states until you're 21, the idea you - can't drink in most states until you're 21, the idea you can- can't drink in most states until you're 21, the idea you can goi can't drink in most states until. you're 21, the idea you can go out by a _ you're 21, the idea you can go out by a semi — you're 21, the idea you can go out by a semi automatic _ you're 21, the idea you can go out by a semi automatic rifle - you're 21, the idea you can go out by a semi automatic rifle on - you're 21, the idea you can go out by a semi automatic rifle on yourl by a semi automatic rifle on your 18th birthday— by a semi automatic rifle on your 18th birthday and _ by a semi automatic rifle on your 18th birthday and going - by a semi automatic rifle on your 18th birthday and going kill- by a semi automatic rifle on your 18th birthday and going kill 19 . 18th birthday and going kill 19 children— 18th birthday and going kill 19 children is— 18th birthday and going kill 19 children isjust _ 18th birthday and going kill 19 i children isjust incomprehensible to any of— children isjust incomprehensible to any of us _ children isjust incomprehensible to any of us in — children isjust incomprehensible to any of us in europe. _ children isjust incomprehensible to any of us in europe. we _ children isjust incomprehensible to any of us in europe. we had - any of us in europe. we had a shooting _ any of us in europe. we had a shooting in— any of us in europe. we had a shooting in the _ any of us in europe. we had a shooting in the uk— any of us in europe. we had a shooting in the uk 24- any of us in europe. we had a shooting in the uk 24 years . any of us in europe. we had a l shooting in the uk 24 years ago any of us in europe. we had a - shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were — shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were shot _ shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were shot by— shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were shot by a _ shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were shot by a man - shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were shot by a man with - shooting in the uk 24 years ago when children were shot by a man with a i children were shot by a man with a handgun _ children were shot by a man with a handgun and — children were shot by a man with a handgun and we _ children were shot by a man with a handgun and we ban _ children were shot by a man with a handgun and we ban handguns- children were shot by a man with al handgun and we ban handguns ever sense for— handgun and we ban handguns ever sense for them _ handgun and we ban handguns ever sense for them and _ handgun and we ban handguns ever sense for them and that's _ handgun and we ban handguns ever sense for them and that's how- handgun and we ban handguns ever sense for them and that's how you i sense for them and that's how you stop schooi— sense for them and that's how you stop school shootings _ sense for them and that's how you stop school shootings in _ sense for them and that's how you stop school shootings in mass i stop school shootings in mass shootings was _ stop school shootings in mass shootings was up _ stop school shootings in mass shootings was up i _ stop school shootings in mass shootings was up i can- stop school shootings in mass shootings was up i can clearly| stop school shootings in mass . shootings was up i can clearly at three. _ shootings was up i can clearly at three. the — shootings was up i can clearly at three, the idea _ shootings was up i can clearly at three, the idea becomes- shootings was up i can clearly at three, the idea becomes a i shootings was up i can clearly at i three, the idea becomes a debate on how better— three, the idea becomes a debate on how better to — three, the idea becomes a debate on how better to secure _ three, the idea becomes a debate on how better to secure school. - three, the idea becomes a debate on how better to secure school. the i
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how better to secure school. the idea that — how better to secure school. the idea that any _ how better to secure school. the idea that any school _ how better to secure school. the idea that any school in _ how better to secure school. the idea that any school in the - how better to secure school. the idea that any school in the uk i how better to secure school. the i idea that any school in the uk would think about — idea that any school in the uk would think about antiballistic _ idea that any school in the uk would think about antiballistic windows i idea that any school in the uk would think about antiballistic windows is i think about antiballistic windows is completely— think about antiballistic windows is completely and _ think about antiballistic windows is completely and utterly _ think about antiballistic windows is completely and utterly alien. i i completely and utterly alien. i agree — completely and utterly alien. i agree on— completely and utterly alien. i agree on the _ completely and utterly alien. i i agree on the second amendment, completely and utterly alien. i - agree on the second amendment, the i’ili'it agree on the second amendment, the right to _ agree on the second amendment, the right to bear— agree on the second amendment, the right to bear arms _ agree on the second amendment, the right to bear arms for— agree on the second amendment, the right to bear arms for example - agree on the second amendment, the right to bear arms for example does l right to bear arms for example does not include — right to bear arms for example does not include the _ right to bear arms for example does not include the right _ right to bear arms for example does not include the right to _ right to bear arms for example does not include the right to bear- right to bear arms for example does not include the right to bear a - not include the right to bear a rocket — not include the right to bear a rocket launcher. _ not include the right to bear a rocket launcher. there - not include the right to bear a rocket launcher. there are i not include the right to bear a i rocket launcher. there are clearly what's _ rocket launcher. there are clearly what's right— rocket launcher. there are clearly what's right to _ rocket launcher. there are clearly what's right to bear— rocket launcher. there are clearly what's right to bear in _ rocket launcher. there are clearly what's right to bear in arm. - rocket launcher. there are clearly what's right to bear in arm. the l what's right to bear in arm. the idea _ what's right to bear in arm. the idea that — what's right to bear in arm. the idea that you _ what's right to bear in arm. the idea that you can _ what's right to bear in arm. the idea that you can bear- what's right to bear in arm. the idea that you can bear a - what's right to bear in arm. the. idea that you can bear a machine what's right to bear in arm. the i idea that you can bear a machine gun at the _ idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age _ idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age of— idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age of 18— idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age of 18 is— idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age of 18 isjust _ idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age of 18 isjust for— idea that you can bear a machine gun at the age of 18 is just for the - at the age of 18 isjust for the birds — at the age of 18 isjust for the birds but— at the age of 18 isjust for the birds. but this _ at the age of 18 isjust for the birds. but this is _ at the age of 18 isjust for the birds. but this is part- at the age of 18 isjust for the birds. but this is part of- at the age of 18 isjust for the birds. but this is part of the l birds. but this is part of the culture _ birds. but this is part of the culture war— birds. but this is part of the culture war on _ birds. but this is part of the culture war on a _ birds. but this is part of the culture war on a very- birds. but this is part of the - culture war on a very serious level. i culture war on a very serious level. i can never— culture war on a very serious level. i can never see _ culture war on a very serious level. i can never see the _ culture war on a very serious level. i can never see the american... i i can never see the american... justice — i can never see the american... justice scalia _ i can never see the american... justice scalia has _ i can never see the american... justice scalia has indicated i i can never see the american... justice scalia has indicated that| i can never see the american... i justice scalia has indicated that it was ok_ justice scalia has indicated that it was ok for individuals to bear rocket — was ok for individuals to bear rocket launchers. we was ok for individuals to bear rocket launchers.— was ok for individuals to bear rocket launchers. ~ ~' ., ., rocket launchers. we know how he did this discussion _ rocket launchers. we know how he did this discussion gets _ rocket launchers. we know how he did this discussion gets when _ rocket launchers. we know how he did this discussion gets when it _ rocket launchers. we know how he did this discussion gets when it comes i this discussion gets when it comes to gun ownership. other arguments come out such as our employees, arming teachers. sorry chris, you wanted to come in. {30 arming teachers. sorry chris, you wanted to come in.— arming teachers. sorry chris, you wanted to come in. go ahead. very briefl . i wanted to come in. go ahead. very briefly- i do — wanted to come in. go ahead. very briefly. i do believe _ wanted to come in. go ahead. very briefly. i do believe that _ wanted to come in. go ahead. very briefly. i do believe that there's i wanted to come in. go ahead. very briefly. i do believe that there's a l briefly. i do believe that there's a conversation to be had about the second amendment or about guns and that's fine. but we can't have a binary discussion without discussing
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mental health. we can't have another discussion without talking about response. i'm not talking about hardening schools, i agree with you completely. what i'm saying is, we night to start hardening and understanding what happening for that we haven't lost a child in a school fire in 63 years because we created this giant metric to respond and prevent fires. we can respond and prevent fires. we can respond and prevent active shooters for the 40s and prevent active shooters for the 405 4.7% and prevent active shooters for the 40s 4.7% of every shooter since sandy hook, go backwards, since columbine has told somebody that they would get to be a shooter. and this person in uvalde is no different. uvaldejustjoined all those other places. welcome to, it will never happen here and it does. perhaps they weren't prepared to go in. maybe the building had an error, maybe human error but if we don't want to end up on this television show and another debate or another tragic loss of life we need to look at all of it. guns, mental health, hardening schools, training citizens and not necessarily arming citizens, i'm not saying disarm them i'm
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saying teach them common—sense measures for the 70 comes in the back to fire a gun, leave out the front door. 97% chance you're going to survive because you're not getting a chart. people run from guns. it's more than ron, had two hide and fight for that we need to take a look at the same we could solve this problem. it’s solve this problem. it's in an incredibly sad problem. i solve this problem. it's in an incredibly sad problem. and| solve this problem. it's in an| incredibly sad problem. and i solve this problem. it's in an i incredibly sad problem. and i know such strong opinions when it comes to this issue. thank you forjoining us. here in the uk — data from the office for national statistics has revealed that the cost of some of the cheapest food basics has risen steeply — further evidence of the biting cost of living. here's our business correspondent emma simpson with a break down of the some of the price rises. 0ns did this experimental research to the food campaignerjack munroe complained that the official stats on inflation underestimated the impact on the poorest households. it found that cheapest pasta went up by 50% in the past year.
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crisps were up 17%, bread was up 16% and so it was minced beef, much higher than general inflation. but six items on the list went down in price, the biggest drop was potatoes, down 14%. cheese fell 7%, while chips and sausages were 3% lower than last year. let's speak to david laborde debucquet —debooshay — economist at the international food policy research institute. what are the factors affecting food prices? we see some shooting up like she passed about others going down a little like chips and sausages in the uk. in little like chips and sausages in the uk. 4' ., the uk. in the uk like in the world ou have the uk. in the uk like in the world you have different _ the uk. in the uk like in the world you have different mix _ the uk. in the uk like in the world you have different mix at - the uk. in the uk like in the world you have different mix at play. i the uk. in the uk like in the worldi you have different mix at play. we have rising food prices overall in particular for stable like weed or soybean or corn. and of soybean and
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corn doesn't sound like a staple for human beings, it's for the livestock in the dairy sector and the meat sector impacted by that. in addition we have energy project, increase of fertiliser. we have this pressure overall on food prices. of course depending on the specific project and what is happening in terms of quality like example potato, the potato is not obviously in the same place of wheat and corn for the west the weather is not the same and so you have this different mix. food prices have increase and the current invasion of ukraine has added one more shock on the situation that we are seeing. more shock on the situation that we are seeina. ., , ., more shock on the situation that we are seeing-— are seeing. how big a factor is ukraine? _ are seeing. how big a factor is ukraine? at — are seeing. how big a factor is ukraine? at this _ are seeing. how big a factor is ukraine? at this state - are seeing. how big a factor is ukraine? at this state it's i ukraine? at this state it's relatively _ ukraine? at this state it's relatively small. - ukraine? at this state it's relatively small. for i ukraine? at this state it's relatively small. for key i ukraine? at this state it's i relatively small. for key product ukraine? at this state it's - relatively small. for key product we are already achieving a high level
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that we have not seen for 15 years in some communities even 50 years. of increase. but for essential oil of increase. but for essential oil for instance, and for weed and has an impact. also what is really worrying about the prices is the energy market and fertiliser market. that would be affecting the next harvest. right now brice has not been affected for is missing or expensive it's every family in the world that will have a higher food cost. . ~' . world that will have a higher food cost. . ,, ., , ,, cost. talking about things like otatoes cost. talking about things like potatoes for — cost. talking about things like potatoes for example, - cost. talking about things like potatoes for example, is i cost. talking about things like potatoes for example, is it i cost. talking about things like l potatoes for example, is it that people need to be tracking those products and trying then to decide how to spend their money on what products they can get at a cheaper price and their particular country? of course it would be different of course it would be different depending where they are in the world. .. , ~ 3 depending where they are in the world. , ,, �*, ., world. exactly. ithink it's what most households _ world. exactly. ithink it's what most households are _ world. exactly. ithink it's what most households are doing i world. exactly. ithink it's what most households are doing on| world. exactly. i think it's what| most households are doing on a world. exactly. i think it's what i most households are doing on a daily basis. you look at the price of
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different types of meat and this week you decide to eat more lamb or more beef, the state you decide to use more tomato or potato or pickles. and this is something pretty common from year to year. if last year was a good year for the vegetable producers with good harvest prices low and this year it is more problems due to drought or weather, price will increase. there is a lot of viability and consumers follow this carefully.— follow this carefully. drought as well as they _ follow this carefully. drought as well as they were _ follow this carefully. drought as well as they were in _ follow this carefully. drought as well as they were in ukraine. is| well as they were in ukraine. is there anything you think the authorities could do to try and soften the blow for households? it’s soften the blow for households? it's an extremely difficult question to wrestle _ an extremely difficult question to wrestle with. it's something affecting politicians all across the globe _ affecting politicians all across the globe and is going to cause some serious political instability. i think— serious political instability. i think were only at the foothills of
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the cost — think were only at the foothills of the cost of living crisis, its only beginning — the cost of living crisis, its only beginning to impact people dealing with inflation and how governments respond _ with inflation and how governments respond to— with inflation and how governments respond to that. interest rates will go up _ respond to that. interest rates will go up as— respond to that. interest rates will go up as well as the cost of food and energy in the uk as you know we had a— and energy in the uk as you know we had a big _ and energy in the uk as you know we had a big injection of cash from the chancellor. — had a big injection of cash from the chancellor, the finance minister whose _ chancellor, the finance minister whose encourage a windfall tax on the energy companies to put money into abel's — the energy companies to put money into abel's pockets to mitigate the cost of _ into abel's pockets to mitigate the cost of energy. that will have some impact. _ cost of energy. that will have some impact. it's— cost of energy. that will have some impact, it's about a half percent of our gdp~ _ impact, it's about a half percent of our gdp. politicians are aligned with us — our gdp. politicians are aligned with us. what always feels and i felt this— with us. what always feels and i felt this for a few months now specially— felt this for a few months now specially in people talked about a temporary inflation, this is now a parliament — temporary inflation, this is now a parliament state of crisis was up i think— parliament state of crisis was up i think politicians are going to be consistently behind the curve on this _ consistently behind the curve on this it _ consistently behind the curve on this it can— consistently behind the curve on this. it can be a very brave politician _ this. it can be a very brave politician that can get ahead of the curve _ politician that can get ahead of the curve |_ politician that can get ahead of the curve. ~' . politician that can get ahead of the curve. ~ . . ., curve. i think that particular line thatjumped _ curve. i think that particular line thatjumped out _ curve. i think that particular line thatjumped out at _ curve. i think that particular line thatjumped out at me - curve. i think that particular line thatjumped out at me which i curve. i think that particular line i thatjumped out at me which was, pastorjumping 50%, that was a
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cheaper brand as well from a year ago. i'm wondering what are some of the conversations that you are hearing? mi the conversations that you are hearina ? . ., ., ., hearing? all around the world i think were _ hearing? all around the world i think were looking _ hearing? all around the world i think were looking at _ hearing? all around the world i think were looking at these i hearing? all around the world i l think were looking at these kinds hearing? all around the world i i think were looking at these kinds of major price — think were looking at these kinds of major price fluctuation, _ think were looking at these kinds of major price fluctuation, inflation, . major price fluctuation, inflation, some _ major price fluctuation, inflation, some of— major price fluctuation, inflation, some of those _ major price fluctuation, inflation, some of those basic _ major price fluctuation, inflation, some of those basic goods. - major price fluctuation, inflation, some of those basic goods. what major price fluctuation, inflation, - some of those basic goods. what i've been following — some of those basic goods. what i've been following particularly— some of those basic goods. what i've been following particularly as - some of those basic goods. what i've been following particularly as where i been following particularly as where it brings _ been following particularly as where it brings different _ been following particularly as where it brings different countries - been following particularly as where it brings different countries to - been following particularly as where it brings different countries to a - it brings different countries to a breaking — it brings different countries to a breaking point. there _ it brings different countries to a breaking point. there have - it brings different countries to a | breaking point. there have been protests— breaking point. there have been protests turning _ breaking point. there have been protests turning violent - breaking point. there have been protests turning violent in - protests turning violent in iran, albania. — protests turning violent in iran, albania, protests— protests turning violent in iran, albania, protests in— protests turning violent in iran, albania, protests in panama i protests turning violent in iran, i albania, protests in panama and indie _ albania, protests in panama and indie these _ albania, protests in panama and india. these are _ albania, protests in panama and india. these are going _ albania, protests in panama and india. these are going to- albania, protests in panama and india. these are going to be - albania, protests in panama and i india. these are going to be putting pressure _ india. these are going to be putting pressure domestically— india. these are going to be putting pressure domestically on _ india. these are going to be putting pressure domestically on politiciansj pressure domestically on politicians we see _ pressure domestically on politicians we see in— pressure domestically on politicians we see in india _ pressure domestically on politicians we see in india already— pressure domestically on politicians we see in india already announced i we see in india already announced that it _ we see in india already announced that it was — we see in india already announced that it was going _ we see in india already announced that it was going to _ we see in india already announced that it was going to a _ we see in india already announced that it was going to a ban - we see in india already announced that it was going to a ban the - that it was going to a ban the export of— that it was going to a ban the export of wheat _ that it was going to a ban the export of wheat as _ that it was going to a ban the export of wheat as a result. that it was going to a ban the . export of wheat as a result a few weeks _ export of wheat as a result a few weeks ago — export of wheat as a result a few weeks ago and _ export of wheat as a result a few weeks ago and i_ export of wheat as a result a few weeks ago and i was _ export of wheat as a result a few weeks ago and i was talking - export of wheat as a result a few. weeks ago and i was talking about restricting — weeks ago and i was talking about restricting sugar. which _ weeks ago and i was talking about restricting sugar. which is - weeks ago and i was talking about restricting sugar. which is the - restricting sugar. which is the kind of thing _ restricting sugar. which is the kind of thing i_ restricting sugar. which is the kind of thing i would _ restricting sugar. which is the kind of thing i would expect _ restricting sugar. which is the kind of thing i would expect would - restricting sugar. which is the kind of thing i would expect would put i of thing i would expect would put more _ of thing i would expect would put more pressure _ of thing i would expect would put more pressure on _ of thing i would expect would put more pressure on global- of thing i would expect would put more pressure on global supply. of thing i would expect would put - more pressure on global supply lines of these _ more pressure on global supply lines of these issues _ more pressure on global supply lines of these issues i _ more pressure on global supply lines of these issues i think— more pressure on global supply lines of these issues i think the _ more pressure on global supply lines of these issues i think the domestic. of these issues i think the domestic politics— of these issues i think the domestic politics is— of these issues i think the domestic politics is going _ of these issues i think the domestic politics is going to _ of these issues i think the domestic politics is going to become - of these issues i think the domestic politics is going to become more i politics is going to become more severe _ politics is going to become more severe and — politics is going to become more severe and pressured _ politics is going to become more severe and pressured and - politics is going to become more severe and pressured and i- politics is going to become more severe and pressured and i think that will— severe and pressured and i think that will contribute _ severe and pressured and i think that will contribute to _ severe and pressured and i thinkj that will contribute to something were _ that will contribute to something were talking _ that will contribute to something were talking about _ that will contribute to something were talking about before - that will contribute to something were talking about before whichl that will contribute to something. were talking about before which is certain _ were talking about before which is certain exhaustion _ were talking about before which is certain exhaustion on _ were talking about before which is certain exhaustion on the - were talking about before which is certain exhaustion on the part - were talking about before which is certain exhaustion on the part of. certain exhaustion on the part of other— certain exhaustion on the part of other countries, _ certain exhaustion on the part of other countries, western - certain exhaustion on the part of. other countries, western countries with the _ other countries, western countries with the war — other countries, western countries with the war in _ other countries, western countries
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with the war in ukraine, _ other countries, western countries with the war in ukraine, russia's . with the war in ukraine, russia's war and — with the war in ukraine, russia's war and the _ with the war in ukraine, russia's war and the attempt— with the war in ukraine, russia's war and the attempt to - with the war in ukraine, russia's war and the attempt to pressure | war and the attempt to pressure russia, — war and the attempt to pressure russia, this _ war and the attempt to pressure russia, this is _ war and the attempt to pressure russia, this is connected. - war and the attempt to pressure russia, this is connected. as- war and the attempt to pressure i russia, this is connected. as prices -et russia, this is connected. as prices get high _ russia, this is connected. as prices get high and — russia, this is connected. as prices get high and people _ russia, this is connected. as prices get high and people get— russia, this is connected. as prices get high and people get angry - russia, this is connected. as prices get high and people get angry at i get high and people get angry at their governments— get high and people get angry at their governments i— get high and people get angry at their governments i think- get high and people get angry at their governments i think the . their governments i think the governments _ their governments i think the governments again— their governments i think the governments again or- their governments i think the governments again or lose i their governments i think the - governments again or lose patience. it's governments again or lose patience. it's basically— governments again or lose patience. it's basically what _ governments again or lose patience. it's basically what putin _ governments again or lose patience. it's basically what putin wants, - governments again or lose patience. it's basically what putin wants, he i it's basically what putin wants, he want _ it's basically what putin wants, he want to— it's basically what putin wants, he want to see — it's basically what putin wants, he want to see other— it's basically what putin wants, he want to see other countries - it's basically what putin wants, he want to see other countries and l want to see other countries and political— want to see other countries and political chaos— want to see other countries and political chaos and _ want to see other countries and political chaos and maybe - want to see other countries and political chaos and maybe losel want to see other countries and - political chaos and maybe lose their will to _ political chaos and maybe lose their will to work— political chaos and maybe lose their will to work together _ political chaos and maybe lose their will to work together and _ political chaos and maybe lose their will to work together and keep - political chaos and maybe lose their will to work together and keep a - will to work together and keep a strong _ will to work together and keep a strong light— will to work together and keep a strong light on _ will to work together and keep a strong light on the _ will to work together and keep a strong light on the pressure - will to work together and keep a strong light on the pressure andj strong light on the pressure and economic pressure _ strong light on the pressure and economic pressure against - strong light on the pressure and l economic pressure against roger. most— economic pressure against roger. most immediately— economic pressure against roger. most immediately will— economic pressure against roger. most immediately will affect - economic pressure against roger. i most immediately will affect things like wheat— most immediately will affect things like wheat and _ most immediately will affect things like wheat and energy _ most immediately will affect things like wheat and energy prices. - most immediately will affect things like wheat and energy prices. i- like wheat and energy prices. i think— like wheat and energy prices. i think we — like wheat and energy prices. i think we have _ like wheat and energy prices. i think we have to _ like wheat and energy prices. i think we have to keep - like wheat and energy prices. i think we have to keep a - like wheat and energy prices. i think we have to keep a closel like wheat and energy prices. i- think we have to keep a close eye on what's _ think we have to keep a close eye on what's going — think we have to keep a close eye on what's going on— think we have to keep a close eye on what's going on on— think we have to keep a close eye on what's going on on the _ think we have to keep a close eye on what's going on on the domestic- what's going on on the domestic politics based _ what's going on on the domestic politics based on— what's going on on the domestic politics based on this _ what's going on on the domestic politics based on this issue. - what's going on on the domestic politics based on this issue. lt’sl politics based on this issue. it's something _ politics based on this issue. something that wherever we politics based on this issue.- something that wherever we go in politics based on this issue.— something that wherever we go in the world at something people are talking about, exactly within the shopping baskets. thank you for joining us on the context. now on the context — it's time for the panel. this point in the programme we turn to our panel to find out what are they thinking about today that they
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like to bring to you. ed, let me start with you what is the topic on the top of your mind? i’m start with you what is the topic on the top of your mind? i'm thinking it's thought _ the top of your mind? i'm thinking it's thought how _ the top of your mind? i'm thinking it's thought how about _ the top of your mind? i'm thinking it's thought how about it _ the top of your mind? i'm thinking it's thought how about it slightly l it's thought how about it slightly off the conversation after the collapse of world politics and democratically elected governments which the crisis is brought about. go for it was up a graduate college off to do a seminar on soft power they a former labour mp and the hike commissioner in south africa. in david cameron's deputy chief of stash and the culture minister for the pie was a culture minister, i still think i am that. i was always very conscious of the fact that i was had a tiny budget, culture doesn't feature very strongly in british politics, probably in french politics but that's about it. time and again when prime ministers went abroad or governments went abroad they took with them a kind of soft power that britain is famous for. we
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are famous for our creativity, our football, our artists in our theatre and art playwrights like shakespeare. and i think politicians underestimate the power the soft—power power that allows it country like britain to punch above its weight and influence people. the us displays its soft power as entirely private such as hollywood, you mentioned top and earlier. you can see a better display a film about hard power but that is actually us soft power that is recalibrating yet again america's image of the world. and talk on this year will probably do more for america's image that any amount of politicians. taste america's image that any amount of oliticians. ~ . ,, . politicians. we will talk about top gun in a minute. _ politicians. we will talk about top gun in a minute. with _ politicians. we will talk about top gun in a minute. with soft - gun in a minute. with soft power, how influential it really can be? i'm thinking about the uk specifically. if you go in and you're going to use, what would you pull out of your arsenal to try and
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influence with british soft power? i influence with british soft power? i think we talen film the best stories in the world, whether as the harry potter stories and of course no time to die was deeply two previous blockbuster before top gun. an outlier kind of is an american film filmed in america. it's worth noting that the uk film industry is one of the most successful in the world even though it's financed by us money. i think every country in the world tries to use our power, particularly when it's difficult and awkward political position or whether they are merging into the world. countries like saudi arabia is very much focused on their soft power and trying to project an image of modernisation and change in order to change the perception of the country. we did this with the olympics ten years ago. were going to be celebrating our ten year anniversary and the queens platinum jubilee this weekend is another
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example where the monarchy has no real power in the uk has immense power around the world. i power around the world. i understand. dalia, what are you looking at today?— understand. dalia, what are you looking at today? before i reveal that i would _ looking at today? before i reveal that i would like _ looking at today? before i reveal that i would like to _ looking at today? before i reveal that i would like to assure - looking at today? before i reveal that i would like to assure ed - looking at today? before i reveal| that i would like to assure ed that having _ that i would like to assure ed that having gone out last night here in new york city to see the musical version _ new york city to see the musical version of— new york city to see the musical version of harry potter and the curse _ version of harry potter and the curse child can rest assure that soft power— curse child can rest assure that soft power of the uk is alive and well here — soft power of the uk is alive and well here in the us. in terms of what _ well here in the us. in terms of what others think about, an interesting discussion caught my eye about— interesting discussion caught my eye about a _ interesting discussion caught my eye about a book that i had not yet read but i about a book that i had not yet read but i think— about a book that i had not yet read but i think i— about a book that i had not yet read but i think i will run to read it, it's called _ but i think i will run to read it, it's called the genetic lottery and it's called the genetic lottery and it's generated one of the most visceral— it's generated one of the most visceral debates i've seen in quite a while _ visceral debates i've seen in quite a while in — visceral debates i've seen in quite a while in a — visceral debates i've seen in quite a while in a mug book reviewers. specifically there a fascinating ongoing debate in the new york review of— ongoing debate in the new york review of books. the book addresses the question as to what extent of your genetic makeup, your dna is at play when _ your genetic makeup, your dna is at play when looking at the success of people _ play when looking at the success of people in _ play when looking at the success of people in life of the difficulties in life —
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people in life of the difficulties in life. whether it's from hell to economic— in life. whether it's from hell to economic success and on the collective _ economic success and on the collective level, how that contributes to major social problems and specifically inequality of different groups in society. this is an absolute hot button topic. because _ an absolute hot button topic. because i think the criticism it has received _ because i think the criticism it has received is — because i think the criticism it has received is that there is a determinism if you look at people's genetic— determinism if you look at people's genetic structure as responsible for the problems in society whereas the more _ the problems in society whereas the more liberal progressive community would _ more liberal progressive community would like _ more liberal progressive community would like to say that social inequality is a mailer of social quality. — inequality is a mailer of social quality, unfair social policies or policies — quality, unfair social policies or policies that favour those who are already _ policies that favour those who are already privileged and reinforce that and — already privileged and reinforce that and most important thing to do is change _ that and most important thing to do is change policy. what he found interesting about the debate is that the author seems to want to take the nuanced _ the author seems to want to take the nuanced and complex position that says yes, _ nuanced and complex position that says yes, your genetic makeup is important — says yes, your genetic makeup is important and we need to understand exactly— important and we need to understand exactly how it leads to the kinds of outcomes — exactly how it leads to the kinds of outcomes for individuals in society that can _ outcomes for individuals in society that can contribute to quality inequality success or failure. we
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also have — inequality success or failure. we also have to account for the major impact _ also have to account for the major impact of— also have to account for the major impact of environmental factors and think about how to draw on what we know— think about how to draw on what we know about genetic makeup in order to better— know about genetic makeup in order to better hear those environmental factors _ to better hear those environmental factors and — to better hear those environmental factors and policies. it has set off alarm _ factors and policies. it has set off alarm bells among critics who seem incapable _ alarm bells among critics who seem incapable of holding both of those things— incapable of holding both of those things or— incapable of holding both of those things or perhaps the book didn't do it as well— things or perhaps the book didn't do it as well as— things or perhaps the book didn't do it as well as the author had hoped. ithink— it as well as the author had hoped. i think it _ it as well as the author had hoped. i think it really deserves deeper thought~ — i think it really deserves deeper thought. to reject the reductionism... | thought. to reject the reductionism... , . . , reductionism... i understand was that the genetic _ reductionism... i understand was that the genetic lottery. - reductionism. .. i understand was that the genetic lottery. i'll- reductionism... i understand was | that the genetic lottery. i'll watch out for it. we mentioned top gun. mentioned top gun. tom cruise his first $100—million opening weekend at the us box office. you did meet him once, i heard that previously. he you did meet him once, i heard that reviousl . . ,. ., previously. he did a screening of to gun previously. he did a screening of top gun for— previously. he did a screening of top gun for me. _ previously. he did a screening of top gun for me. i _ previously. he did a screening of top gun for me. i met _ previously. he did a screening of top gun for me. i met him - previously. he did a screening of top gun for me. i met him at - previously. he did a screening of top gun for me. i met him at a l previously. he did a screening of i top gun for me. i met him at a film and i told him how much i loved his movies. we had a bromance for about a week. it's time to repeat that
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bromance. i got so much more to say. you'll have to get them to screen it yet again. perhaps top gun maverick. thank you for the company. it becomes a little clear what kit we can expect was that will take a look at that in just a moment. until then scenes like this continue, a lot of cloud, and plenty of showers and it really is quite cool for the time of year for sitting right across the uk. not the strongest area of low pressure with ever had put up the winds are fairly light and it does mean that showers stick around where you get them. there will be many places avoiding a shower or two as we go on through tuesday. the heaviest ones will be eastern scotland and eastern side of england. thundery with tales longer smell of rain pushing him towards northern ireland in the afternoon feeling a touch warmer through wells
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in southern england, especially to the day where you get them. there will be many places avoiding a shower or two as we go on through tuesday. the heaviest ones will be eastern scotland and eastern side of england. thundery with hail. longer smell of rain pushing him towards northern ireland in the afternoon. feeling a touch warmer through wells in southern england, especially to the day we get more in the way start firing on wednesday but the showers get going again in the be having ones around. as high pressure tries to nudge in and temperatures a little bit higher, it will feel a touch warmer where you get to see some sunny spells away from the showers. it is a big fatjerk coming into the bank holiday on thursday high pressure nudging in for that there is a disturbance just slowly approaching from our northwest as we go on through the day. this is where some uncertainty remains in the forecast on thursday. for many places it is looking drier, fewer showers around, more in the way of sunny spells with you can't rule out the possibility from that disturbance, although this particular outlook isn't enjoying it, there is a chance of seeing some showers and outbreaks of rain pushing in from the as the day goes
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on. what's left of the system if it dies in is over on friday will still produce the chance for getting some showers. sunshine and showers, question marks about how many showers and how widespread it will be. it will be focused across northern areas, fewer showers relatively speaking to dissolve. we had sunshine it will be quite warmer, temperatures creeping back into the low 20s, especially in england. after the bank holiday and into the weekend high pressure looks to be close to the uk. the uncertainty about low—pressure to the south of us and how many showers out of that it will field northwards towards us. it looks as if that's more of a? for sunday rather than saturday for much of saturday is looking largely fine out there. there is a key northeasterly when developing through the north sea coast to keep in temperatures lower than they will be across western areas. with uncertain progress that low—pressure may start to feed a more in the way of showers, could be heavy and thundery towards southern
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and southeastern areas as we go through sunday and into monday. a question about showers over the jubilee weekend. as for temperatures pretty certain after a rally tonight rather cool start to the week will see our chapter turned a bit warmer here at least across western areas, temperatures above average the time of year. but closer to average. it will feel warmer when you get to see some sunshine. still a work in progress, do you come back for updates but the overall outdate two outlook is it will be drier than it is at the moment but if you get outdoor plans and street parties the potential for showers, initially thursday, friday and northern areas more towards the weekend more towards us on the part of the uk. that is our latest weather for the weekend. —— weatherfor that is our latest weather for the weekend. —— weather for the week ahead.
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european football's governing body announces an full independent investigation into the chaos that marred the champions league final in paris. move back! there's been widespread condemnation of police tactics at the match, including the use of tear gas on liverpool fans. the problem was not the liverpool fans. the problem was a completely ineffective crowd management strategy. uefa and the parisian police have so many questions to answer. the french government blames what it calls "industrial scale" ticket fraud for the problems — we'll have the latest from paris. also tonight... a bbc investigation shows some police forces are taking longer to attend serious offences
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like burglaries, and are charging fewer suspects. what would you say to the police?

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