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tv   BBC News  BBC News  May 31, 2022 2:00pm-5:01pm BST

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the is the top temperature around the cardiff area. now, looking into the weekend, we're probably going to see some rain moving to southern areas. it could be heavy and heavy and thundery and starts to turn more humid across the south. the driest weather for the weekend will be across northern areas of the uk so, for the platinumjubilee, a lot of weather, sunshine and there could be some rain around. calls for more children in england to be given free school meals. this is bbc news. the headlines... calls for more children in england to be given free school meals to help tackle the cost of living crisis. more travel misery for airline passengers as the travel giant tui cancels six holiday flights a day for the next month. andy murray — who as a child survived the dunblane school shooting — speaks out about us gun laws, and says the shooting in texas last week made him �*incredibly upset�*. surely at some stage you do something different, like,
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you can't keep approaching the problem, you know, by buying more guns and having more guns in the country. another conservative mp calls on the prime minister to resign over downing street lockdown parties. and former cabinet minister andrea leadsom criticises him for �*unacceptable failures of leadership.�* mega chippy. and the once humble chip shop in coventry, that�*s now at tiktok sensation. there are calls today to give more children in england free school meals — to help tackle the cost
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of living crisis. teaching unions say all children from families on universal credit should be eligible forfree meals — as part of an �*urgent�* expansion of the scheme. the cost of food, fuel and other goods has surged in recent months, pushing inflation to a ao—year high. here�*s our education correspondent, elaine dunkley. more children than ever are coming through the doors. at capacity... we opened 11 minutes ago, we�*ve only got a small room, we are going to be busy. at this free half—term holiday club in stockport there are activities and, crucially, for some children, a meal. so the room is full and there will be kids down the street with take—out boxes of food. so, yes, more than we can handle. we know a lot of the families who come here are living in food poverty. and many of them aren�*t on free school meals. one of the things we have noticed is our food banks are always run in the morning and some people are asking if they can come at night, because people
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are working full—time, and still can�*t make ends meet. did you want one as well? lucy is a working mum of three and is currently on maternity leave. she doesn�*t qualify for free school meals because she earns above the eligibility threshold of £7,400 a year after tax not including benefits. everything even from the daily shop, getting bits in, even the cost of baby milk, everything isjust shooting up in price. things that were £1 are now £1.10. when it is half—term holidays, it adds, and it adds to the panic as well. you are thinking, how am i going to get food this month? and it is notjust parents who are feeling the impact of rising prices. tj, harley and ben get £5 a week pocket money. the ice cream man around here is very nice but... pete. and the ice creams, a normal ice cream with like a cone, that used to be 90p. 99p. and then it went to £1.20. every single thing... has gone up about 20p.
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in england, children who get free school meals during term time now receive vouchers during the holidays. according to the government an estimated four million children live in relative poverty. however, fewer than two million pupils are eligible for free school meals. in a letter to the government, head teachers are warning that change is urgently needed. with the need to level up in the country, then, there are a whole range of reasons why universal free school meals and ensuring that every child has a hot, nutritious meal every single day of the working week, itjust couldn't be more important, if i am honest with you. the department for education says it has expanded access for free school meals more than any other government in recent decades. here at the hub, rachel is determined not to send anyone away without a meal. but as prices continue to rise, so does the anxiety for working families struggling
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with the cost of living. there�*s more misery for thousands of travellers with the tour operator tui announcing the cancellation of six holiday flights a day from manchester airport until the end ofjune. like other travel companies, it�*s blaming staff shortages after the pandemic. but the government says the airline industry has had months to prepare for the half term rush and should have put extra staff in place. there are fears of more disruption over thejubilee weekend and into the summer. gareth barlow reports. it is set to be one of the busiest travel periods of the year, 2 million people taking to the skies for the bank holiday weekend but the surge in passenger numbers has led to a surge in disruption. in manchester, tui which calls itself the uk�*s leading travel brand has announced it will cancel six flights a day from the city airport until the end ofjune. in a statement, the company said this.
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the main reason for the disruption is said to be staff shortages in baggage handling. swissport said rising flight numbers were exacerbating resource challenges across the industry and the firm is working hard to recruit more workers. but for holidaymakers like joanna and her family due to travel from manchester this morning, those extra workers are too little, too late. last night, the cases were packed, we were ready to go. we received a text last night saying the holiday had been cancelled. no explanation. nobody has been in touch.
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the chancellor rishi sunak defended the government�*s support for the industry and said ministers were focused on helping ease the current challenges. we have put in place billions of pounds of support for the travel industry particularly during the pandemic. right now, there are conversations to make sure that disruption can be eased, that is where the focus is. the government had been warned many months ago losing skilled workers from the aviation industry would cause significant delays when people started going back on holiday. they knew airports did not have a staff full security, ground control, cabin crew, they knew people would be going on holiday at half—term. despite the headlines and travel headaches, industry representatives say for the majority of passengers it is business and holidays as usual. the vast majority are able to travel, we are sendingl millions of people abroad, every single week, so, - it is in an evolving. state, getting better.
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with more of us are set to go away over the bank holiday weekend, holiday—makers and travel operators are still braced for more disappointment and disruption. greg mckenzie is at stansted airport for us. here at stansted plains are taking on and landing on time here, all being said, just one cancelled flight here on saturday evening, and as for going forward, there has not been any major cancellation or delay here. been any ma'or cancellation or delay here. , , ., ., , ., , here. just more travellers, really, they estimate _ here. just more travellers, really, they estimate about _ here. just more travellers, really, they estimate about 80,000 - here. just more travellers, really, i they estimate about 80,000 people travelling from stansted per day. and that is up and up on pandemic levels and across the country about 2 million people will travel. and
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that has restricted lifting on coronavirus testing has given people the confidence to travel again and many people are simply doing that but the problem we have as many airports are recovering from where staff had been furloughed and chose not to come back to work, in particular airport with tui cancelling six flights per day and they will cancel up to 43 flights until thejune they will cancel up to 43 flights until the june with they will cancel up to 43 flights until thejune with having a knock—on effect with people hoping to go away and we hope in countries like spain, turkey and greece affected at manchester in particular, elsewhere some delays at gatwick and heathrow is, longer queues to be expected, but the main advice is to get to the airport early and contractual airport when
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you get there. one union body said the government and industry are blaming each other and had been pre—warned about the surge in passenger numbers months ago and it is now time that both got around the table and sorted the problem. the unions are saying that you cannot recruit staff to run an airport and they need to be trained and what security check they have and that can take weeks. we�*ll be answering your questions on the latest situation with travel just after 15:30. if there�*s something you want to ask our travel experts or are wondering about, get in touch with the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk
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sir andy murray has told the bbc that last week�*s school shooting in texas left him angry and upset. when he was eight years old, murray surived the massacre at his primary school in dunblane, when a gunman killed 16 children and a teacher. murray says there need to be changes to america�*s gun laws. he�*s been speaking to our sports news correspondent laura scott. andy murray was busy preparing for the grass court season when he saw the news of the latest mass shooting in america... on social media, murray described the incident as madness, and one survivor�*s account in particular brought back painful memories of the horrific shootings that took place at his own school in dunblane in 1996. unbelievably sad and disappointing and itjust makes you feel angry and incredibly upset for the parents. i heard something on the radio the other day and it was
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a child from that school. i experienced a similar thing when i was at dunblane and a teacher coming out and waving all of the children under tables and telling them to go and hide. and there was a kid telling exactly the same story about how she survived it. they were saying that they go through these drills as young children, seven, eight—year—old children, and it�*s like how? how is that normal that children should be having to go through drills in case someone comes into school with a gun? i don�*t get it. murray feels strongly that the time has come for change. i think there have been over 200 mass shootings. i don�*t see how it is. my feeling is, surely, you do something different. the former world number one made light work of his first grass court match yesterday and has set himself
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lofty goals at wimbledon. there won�*t be ranking points available — punishment for the ban on russian and belarusian players over the war in ukraine. but he says the trophy is what matters. i�*d give every ranking point i have won back to win another grand slam or wimbledon. yes, i understand why rankings are important but a tournament like wimbledon is bigger than that. that is why i think all the players will still show up. as he embarks on another bid at wimbledon glory, it is clear events around the world are neverfarfrom his mind. let�*s return to one of our stories today, about free school meals to tackle the rising cost of living
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that could push many families or more families into poverty. we can now speak to nick capstick, the chair of school food review group, who co—signed today�*s call for free school meals to be made available to children of families that receive universal credit. at first you explain can why such a move is necessary now, and what it is you are calling for? fit move is necessary now, and what it is you are calling for?— is you are calling for? of course. increasingly _ is you are calling for? of course. increasingly with _ is you are calling for? of course. increasingly with the _ is you are calling for? of course. increasingly with the cost - is you are calling for? of course. increasingly with the cost of - is you are calling for? of course. l increasingly with the cost of living getting larger and larger, with basically food getting more expensive a lot number of people are coming to school and they are lethargic and tired and more importantly a hungry and they are just not ready for school. maw; just not ready for school. many schools in _ just not ready for school. many schools in your _ just not ready for school. many schools in your area _ just not ready for school. many schools in your area are - just not ready for school. many i schools in your area are affected. give us a sense of some of the causes. i know social deprivation might be quite clear, but rural poverty is also a big problem, isn�*t
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it? poverty is also a big problem, isn't it? ., �* , poverty is also a big problem, isn't it? ,. poverty is also a big problem, isn't it? ., �*, ,. ., ~ it? that's right, the schools i work with tend to _ it? that's right, the schools i work with tend to be _ it? that's right, the schools i work with tend to be in _ it? that's right, the schools i work with tend to be in areas _ it? that's right, the schools i work with tend to be in areas of- it? that's right, the schools i work with tend to be in areas of urban l with tend to be in areas of urban deprivation and rural poverty and we are seeing the same manifestation in both such schools whereby because of a lack of employment or decent wages, young people have come in and they could have spent from last night to this morning without having had a single thing to it. if night to this morning without having had a single thing to it.— had a single thing to it. if that is the only male — had a single thing to it. if that is the only male that _ had a single thing to it. if that is the only male that they - had a single thing to it. if that is the only male that they can - had a single thing to it. if that is the only male that they can get, j had a single thing to it. if that is - the only male that they can get, nor families that do need not currently eligible. families that do need not currently eli . ible. families that do need not currently eliaible. . , , families that do need not currently eliaible. ., , , ., families that do need not currently eliaible. . , , ., , ., ., eligible. the ability to provide a hot meal for— eligible. the ability to provide a hot meal for children... - eligible. the ability to provide a hot meal for children... seems| eligible. the ability to provide a - hot meal for children... seems that we miaht hot meal for children. .. seems that we might not— hot meal for children... seems that we might not be — hot meal for children... seems that we might not be able _ hot meal for children... seems that we might not be able to _ hot meal for children... seems that we might not be able to hear - hot meal for children... seems that we might not be able to hear you i hot meal for children... seems that we might not be able to hear you at this point. i�*m assuming you can still hear us. it has suddenly gone mute. maybe let me try again, perhaps it was muted at your end.
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but let me try again. no? talk to me if you can and we will try if the technology allows, about some of the reasons and repercussions and what does it mean if children are coming to school having not eaten. how does it manifest? it to school having not eaten. how does it manifest?— it manifest? it manifest that children lose _ it manifest? it manifest that children lose their _ it manifest? it manifest that i children lose their self-esteem it manifest? it manifest that - children lose their self-esteem and children lose their self—esteem and pride, and imagine coming to school without having eaten or having a hot drink and sitting by peers who have had their breakfast and had something decent to eat. so it�*s not just the physical imprecations, it�*s high for a lot of children. the just the physical imprecations, it's high for a lot of children.— high for a lot of children. the half term holidays _ high for a lot of children. the half term holidays make _ high for a lot of children. the half term holidays make the - high for a lot of children. the half term holidays make the problem | high for a lot of children. the half- term holidays make the problem worse as they are not in school and not able to get a free school meal, if they are at home,, there are calls for that to be and we�*ve seen it
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publicly over the last couple of years. publicly over the last couple of ears. ., . ,. ., years. the voucher scheme works really well — years. the voucher scheme works really well and _ years. the voucher scheme works really well and it _ years. the voucher scheme works really well and it worked - years. the voucher scheme works really well and it worked for - years. the voucher scheme works really well and it worked for them to come for holiday times but it doesn�*t work during term time when we can guarantee a hot, decent meal for every child of school age. i5 for every child of school age. is their shame or reluctance on the part of parents to be able to ask for help with this sort of thing? without a doubt. we know loads of parents who should either be in the benefit system or on the borderline as such, and really don�*t want to admit it either to themselves and sometimes to the school, because of the shame, the indignity ofjust admitting that they cannot cope and manage with the little money they have got. manage with the little money they have not. ., .., ., manage with the little money they have not. ., u. ., i. manage with the little money they have not. ., ., ., have got. how confident are you that these things — have got. how confident are you that these things will _ have got. how confident are you that these things will be _ have got. how confident are you that these things will be in _ have got. how confident are you that these things will be in force? - have got. how confident are you that these things will be in force? we - these things will be in force? we are more in _ these things will be in force? - are more in hope than confidence but this is about educators, school
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unions, caterers, food supplies all coming together to bring about concerted effort to work with the government. it is not about challenging the government, it�*s about working with them to find a solution where they can have a meal they deserve. it�*s solution where they can have a meal they deserve-— they deserve. it's good to have you with some banks _ they deserve. it's good to have you with some banks are _ they deserve. it's good to have you with some banks are persevering . they deserve. it's good to have you i with some banks are persevering with theissues with some banks are persevering with the issues but thank you, it�*s a really important issue and we are grateful for your insight. thanks for being with us. the former cabinet minister dame andrea leadsom has become the latest senior conservative to criticise borisjohnson over lockdown parties in downing street. she�*s accused him of "unacceptable failings of leadership". our political correspondent helen catt is in westminster. helen, how significant is this intervention do you think? this is quite separate to the letters or submissions to the 1922 committee of no confidence in the prior minister.—
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prior minister. yes, it is insofar as andrea _ prior minister. yes, it is insofar as andrea leadsom _ prior minister. yes, it is insofar as andrea leadsom does - prior minister. yes, it is insofar as andrea leadsom does have. prior minister. yes, it is insofar- as andrea leadsom does have some striking criticism of the prime minister here but she stopped short of saying he should step down and does not say that he submit —— she submitted a letter calling for a vote of no confidence, but the criticism is striking, and striking and significant coming from somebody like andrea leadsom who was a prominent brexit bacco supported borisjohnson in his leadership bid after he dropped out of the race and she is has been in his cabinet and was the business secretary so it is quite striking when you get criticism from those quarters and as you said the language she uses is strong and she talked about how if this came out in a statement that was sent to some of her constituents and in it she said that while the police investigation found that the prior minister�*s own personal rule breaking was limited to a surprise birthday party, looking at the soubry report, she said the conclusion she drew was there had been unacceptable failures of
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leadership that could not be tolerated and where the responsibility of the prime minister and then added it was up to her and each of her conservative mp colleagues to decide individually on what is the right course of action that will restore confidence in the government, so somebody like andrea leadsom coming forward with such strong criticism does show it comes from different parts of the conservative party are notjust one area, and as you said there was a separate issue of who had gone so far as to separate issue of who had gone so faras to submit separate issue of who had gone so far as to submit a letter calling for a vote of no confidence and there�*s been another one of those today as john stephenson the there�*s been another one of those today asjohn stephenson the mp for carlisle became the 28 conservative mp to call for borisjohnson to go and most of those had submitted a letter of no confidence. what and most of those had submitted a letter of no confidence.— letter of no confidence. what is our letter of no confidence. what is your assessment _ letter of no confidence. what is your assessment of _ letter of no confidence. what is your assessment of whether . letter of no confidence. what is. your assessment of whether that intervention could maybe persuade others to either write a letter or conversely do the opposite and throw their support behind the prime minister. it
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their support behind the prime minister. , , minister. it interesting when every time somebody — minister. it interesting when every time somebody comes _ minister. it interesting when every time somebody comes out - minister. it interesting when every time somebody comes out to - minister. it interesting when every time somebody comes out to see l minister. it interesting when every| time somebody comes out to see if the calculation has gone through and when andrea leadsom, coming from these particular parts of the party, that will be food for thought some others but again it comes out every time a new mp comes forward and say something that people will be going through that sort of thought process. through that sort of thought rocess. . ~' through that sort of thought rocess. . ~ , ., through that sort of thought rocess. ., ~ , ., ., ., eu leaders have ended weeks of wrangling about how to reduce their reliance on russian energy by agreeing a compromise deal — to ban immediately more than two—thirds of oil imports from moscow. a total embargo was blocked by hungary, which is heavily dependant on russian supplies. but eu officials say imports will be cut by 90% by the end of the year. from brussels, bethany bell reports. eu leaders given the green light to some of the toughest sanctions against russia so far. they have agreed to ban most of the oil they receive from russia.
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this is very important. thanks to this, council should now be able to finalise a ban on almost 90% of all russian oil imported by the end of the year. two—thirds of russian oil imports arrive in the eu by sea. that will be banned immediately. but there will be a temporary exemption for pipeline oil because of objections by hungary. it says its economy can�*t cope with the ban. germany and poland have volunteered to wind down their pipeline imports by the end of this year. that leaves around 10% of pipe line oilfrom russia which will continue to go to hungary, slovakia and the czech republic. the eu is also taking measures against russia�*s biggest bank, and people accused of war crimes in ukraine. it has taken weeks of complicated negotiations for the eu to reach this compromise deal.
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earlier sanction packages were agreed quickly but the oil embargo has exposed divisions among european countries. eu leaders say they want to wean themselves off russian gas as well as oil, but that is likely to be far more complicated. the oil embargo will cost russia billions. with oil prices surging, it will hurt europe, too. in ukraine, fierce fighting continues, especially in the donbas region in the east of the country. the eu hopes the new sanctions will cut off a huge source of funds for russia�*s war effort there. bethany bell, bbc news, brussels. the hungarian leader viktor orban has welcomed his country�*s temporary exemption from the eu oil embargo against russia. our correspondent in budapest, nick thorpe, told me more.
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viktor orban has it really stuck to a very stubborn position throughout these negotiations, he said basically that hungary gets 64% of its oil, and it is not alone in that, slovakia, the czech republic. he was also more public in his opposition to this initial proposalfrom the eu. he says because hungary gets this particularly high sulphur rich oil, russian oil, through their pipeline, that it would have cost hungary hundreds of millions of euros to change that technology and it would have taken many years. viktor orban has it really stuck to a very stubborn position at one point, he was suggesting perhaps that money could be paid to hungary in orderfor it to sign up to sanctions. in the end, the eu commission chose a different option, exempting for the time being that oil pipeline. viktor orban this morning has been presenting that is a great victory for his negotiating position.
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our russia editor, steve rosenberg, told us how moscow was reacting to the eu deal. this is a compromise deal with caveats, but it�*s still a big deal. two thirds of russian oil imports into the eu will be affected now by the end of the year up to 90%, and that will cost russia billions of dollars a year in lost export revenue. moscow�*s position on this is that it is a big world out there and we will sell to other markets, africa, asia, and even if russia has to do that at a discount, it reckons that the high global oil price will help offset the losses and that might be wishful thinking on the part of moscow, but i suspect vladimir putin will not be sitting in the kremlin now thinking, oh my goodness, i have miscalculated and dozen are estimated the economic consequences of this for my country and i will pull my troops out of
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ukraine. i can�*t see that happening. more likely, based on the anti—western rhetoric he has been coming up with in recent weeks, president putin will say to himself, 0k, president putin will say to himself, ok, europe, you are already experiencing a degree of economic pain, and expect more of that now as a result of this oil embargo. and one other thing. the kremlin will have seen how difficult it was for eu member states to sit down and come to an agreement over this oil embargo. the kremlin knows that there are differences of opinion in europe on relations with russia, on how much to support ukraine, and you could expect vladimir putin to exploit those differences as much as you can to his benefit. only one police force in the uk is meeting a target to answer 90% of 999 calls in under 10 seconds, new data has shown.
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avon and somerset police was the only force to meet the standard according to national statistics released for the first time by the home office. with me now to explain more is our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford. nice to see you. quite a stark difference in the ones that are doing it and the ones that aren�*t. talk to me about the detail in this report. talk to me about the detail in this re ort. , , . talk to me about the detail in this re ort, , , ., ., talk to me about the detail in this reort. , ,., ., , . report. this is a home office drive to improve — report. this is a home office drive to improve the _ report. this is a home office drive to improve the response _ report. this is a home office drive to improve the response time - report. this is a home office drive to improve the response time to l report. this is a home office drive i to improve the response time to 999 calls, so that�*s how quick it is before somebody picks up the phone when you dial 999. they really want the target to be ten seconds, so in ten seconds if you�*re making the call, you will be on the phone to a 999 operator wanting to get hold of the police and the target was that forces should aim to meet 90% of the phone calls in ten seconds and only avon and somerset have met that target. humberside police by contrast were 2% of the calls in ten seconds, so you can see there is a
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massive difference there and the numbers of forces that are meeting the 10%, meeting that target is actually about 70%, so there�*s a lot of calls that are not being answered within that critical ten second window. ~ ., , ., , within that critical ten second window. . ., , ., , , . window. what explains the difference from those getting _ window. what explains the difference from those getting it _ window. what explains the difference from those getting it right _ window. what explains the difference from those getting it right or - from those getting it right or nearly write to those missing the target by a huge amount? is it down to resourcing or demand for services ljy to resourcing or demand for services by stomach it�*s about resorting an anticipation of demand, making sure you don�*t starve the same all the time and you need to have some idea when you get more calls and some forces have particular problems with technology and there is a lag of 999 before it gets through. that technology and there is a lag of 999 before it gets through.— before it gets through. that would ex - lain the before it gets through. that would explain the performance _ before it gets through. that would explain the performance of - before it gets through. that would explain the performance of some l explain the performance of some forces. some forces are particular problems with prank calls and people not having confidence with the nonemergency service, dialling 999
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when they shouldn�*t. but what forces can do apart from sorting out the techis can do apart from sorting out the tech is to make sure that they are resorting in the same way that even on somerset are to meet peak demand and try to make sure that they are not having a one size fits all response to 999 call answering. i5 response to 999 call answering. is there a danger that it's all about there a danger that it�*s all about box ticking and meeting targets when it should be about the care and the service provided once people have called 999? it is service provided once people have called 999?— service provided once people have called 999? , , called 999? it is interesting. there were a lot of _ called 999? it is interesting. there were a lot of targets _ called 999? it is interesting. there were a lot of targets in _ called 999? it is interesting. there were a lot of targets in policing - called 999? it is interesting. there were a lot of targets in policing in i were a lot of targets in policing in the 1990s and early 2000 is, and they were pretty much all abandoned in 2010 because what had happened his forces had tailored their entire operation around meeting home office targets and they were essentially gaming the system because that is what they told they had to meet the targets, so they were abandoned and this was the beginning of targets creeping back in. ministers would say it is very specific and very
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specific thing about making sure the phone call is answered quickly but there is a risk if targets keep being brought back into policing that we end up with police forces not thinking about the holistic of giving the best service but meeting some very specific targets. you can imagine that loads of resources could be put into meeting the ten second target but those resources could may be used elsewhere. absolutely. daniel, thanks very much. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. we are looking at an unsettled day today, a day broadly speaking of sunshine and showers but the showers are particularly extensive today across all areas of the uk. there are so many showers around, even the hay bales in the countryside have decided it�*s a day for the waterproofs. this afternoon some of the heaviest showers will turn thundery with hail mixed in, especially wet over north—east england down to yorkshire and lincolnshire and heavy downpours in the south—east but becoming dry for wales and south—west
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england this afternoon. we end the day with a band of rain moving into northern ireland and overnight that will spill south—eastwards into parts of wales, staying damp for a time across the south east of scotland. temperatures similar to recent nights, a little on the chilly side for the time of year. and then for tomorrow, we have another showery day on the cards with this area of rain turning showery, some thunderstorms pushing across east anglia and south east england through the day but the weather should become a bit dry and more in the way of sunshine across western areas, so feeling a touch warmer. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: calls for more children in england to be given free school meals — to help tackle the cost of living crisis. more travel misery for airline passengers — as the travel giant tui cancels six holiday flights a day for the next month. andy murray — who as a child survived
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the dunblane school shooting — speaks out about us gun laws, and says the shooting in texas last week made him "incredibly upset". sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. stuart broad says he�*s going to approach his england comeback as if he�*s played "zero test cricket." the bowler is back in the squad after being left out for the west indies tour earlier this year. and could start the first test against new zealand on thursday. it�*s the first match under new coach brendan mccullum, who along with recently appointed captain ben stokes decided to recall both broad and james anderson to the squad. two bowlers who have amounted a total of nearly 1,200 test wickets. i�*m obviously delighted to be in this first test squad. you know, obviously, i was disappointed to miss out on a test tour but,
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you know, that is life. that is selection. i had to work hard to get back to nottinghamshire and prove that i want and that the team would want me around in this environment. to tennis and canada�*s leylah fernandez out of the french open after losing her quarter—final to martina trevisan of italy. the 17th seed who was in the us open final with emma raducanu lost in three sets. trevisan is in herfirst grand slam semi final where she�*ll face either coco gauff or sloane stephens who are on court right now. coming up later a match fitting of a final. indeed it has been three times at the french open — rafa nadal against novak djokovic. this year they�*re meeting in the quarter finals. they share 41 grand slam titles between them — nadal has won 13 at roland garros, but djokovic famously won their last meeting in paris 12 months ago.
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i�*m not sure if the fact they are playing so early will affect either of them unduly and they probably both had in their mind that they need to be absolutely up to speed given the magnitude of the meeting, but what is the disadvantage for nadal, he only had five clay—court matches going into roland garros because of the rib fracture he suffered at indian wells which forced him to take 4—6 weeks off and he�*s not playing as well as would like. taken to five sets in one of his previous games and he has a foot problem in the back of his mind which is chronic and long—term and novak djokovic is playing so well. two days after winning the monaco grand prix, sergio perez has signed a new two year contract with red bull. the mexican has agreed the deal until and sits third in the current drivers standings behind his teammate max
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verstappen, who signed his own new deal in march. perez�*s win in monte carlo made him the most successful driver from his country in f1 history. everton manager frank lampard has been fined £30,000 for comments after his side�*s 2—0 defeat to liverpool last month. referee stuart attwell chose not to penalise a challenge on anthony gordon during the game, with lampard suggesting in a post—match interview that a penalty would have been given if the challenge had been made on a liverpool player. hollie doyle says becoming the first female jockey to win a british classic would be a "dream come true." she�*s riding second—favourite nashwa in the cazoo oaks on friday. doyle has already broken several records in her career, setting a new mark for the most wins by a british female rider in one year. doyle says she sometimes forgets just how significant her achievements have been. because i compete on a day—to—day basis on level terms with men i suppose when i pop my head out of my little racing bubble what i�*m doing is quite unique.
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but i�*m so unique in my industry, like one of the lads, almost, as bad as it sounds, so you forget what you�*re doing, really. you can find more about the french open tennis on the bbc website. that�*s all the sport for now. police and prosecutors should immediately stop subjecting rape victims from exessive scrutiny according to a new report. the uk�*s information commissioner says that victims are being treated as suspects — with prosecutors collecting large amounts of personal information about them. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports. it�*s known as the digital strip search. many rape complainants have to consent to hand over their phones as part of the criminal investigation. they are also being asked for a whole range of personal information. we�*ve heard from complainants whose
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cases didn�*t get to trial and who have waived their right to anonymity to speak out. they got all of my medical records, which, unfortunately, are quite substantial. my social care records and a complete download of my mobile phone. looking back on it, it is such a violation. it felt as though i was the one that was being investigated, i was the one on trial, i was the one that had committed a crime. there are things in my medical records that are just personal, that you don't want, you know, an investigating officer, potentially even the defence, asking for as well, to be scrutinised. it's now sitting in a police cabinet somewhere, it's not destroyed, it's still out there. this trawl by police and prosecutors should stop immediately, says the uk�*s information commissioner, whose job it is to uphold information rights. in some cases school records are being examined.
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what�*s the line that can come from a forged letter justifying an absence, given when they were a teenager, to an event that happened last saturday night? we have called our report, "who is under investigation?", because the experience of many survivors of these offences is that they are the ones who are being investigated, not the suspects. the information commissioner is warning police and prosecutors they could be fined if they don�*t put a brake on the collection of information. they stress they are working to improve the system. the home office says it is launching a consultation exercise but campaigners say more legislation is needed to make the gathering of so much personal information illegal. june kelly, bbc news. the war in ukraine has seen notjust soldiers captured but civilians too. for those who survive, many find themselves as bargaining chips for prisoner of war exchanges — orforced by the russians to accept their occupation. one soldier told the bbc�*s correspondent in kyiv, james waterhouse, his story.
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metal scaffolding... holding together hlib�*s broken pelvis. he also broke his jaw and lost vision in one eye. hlib is onlyjust taking his first steps. two months ago he was defending mariupol with the marines, watching for the enemy. translation: i turned my head and saw a tank aimed at me. - i saw a bright flash, ifelt the building collapsing. he survived, but was captured. no one knew whether he was dead or alive until this video was posted online by his captors. he was taken to a hospital in russian—occupied territory.
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translation: they held a dagger on my leg, up my throat, - and led to my ear and said, "it would be nice to cut off your ear." they did it to nearly everyone. i couldn�*t feed myself because myjaw was broken, and i couldn�*t sit up. some nurses would taunt me by leaving food down in front of me and say, "try and eat that, you lowlife ukrainian." this is hlib�*s testimony. we haven�*t been able to independently verify his claims. translation: we were lying there without any painkillers or anything. | so, only my faith, and the understanding that i had to survive helped me carry on. choir sings while hlib suffered, his church in poltava prayed. translation: i knew there were only two ways out of mariupol. _ death, or captivity.
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all that remained was to pray. the war has brought a lot of suffering, a lot of families are waiting for their sons to return. we pray and we suffer. after 17 days, he was released in a prisoner exchange. translation: the driver approached, patted us and said, "calm down, - guys, you are in ukraine." then i cried, and tears streamed down my face. i was very happy. james waterhouse there with that story. it is a week since a gunman entered an elementary school in uvalde and killed 19 children and two teachers. as the small town in texas prepares for the victims�* funerals, the usjustice department has now opened a review of the police responses on the day after officials admitted mistakes were made. the parents of one of the children,
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alithia ramirez, spoke of their grief in an exclusive interview with the bbc. will grant reports from uvalde. there is grief and then there is the grief of losing a child. further still, the grief of losing a child in these most awful of circumstances. she was just loved. alithia ramirez was one of the 19 children killed by a gunman inside her classroom as an ordinary school day in uvalde descended into horror. a week on, her parents, jess and ryan are still struggling to comprehend their loss. i haven't been able to eat or sleep or drink. it'sjust affecting me really, really badly. she was my best friend. she looked a lot like me, i would always tell her, you know, she's my twin and she would always smile.
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it'sjust been really, really hard on me. how can you move on from that? how can you get over that moment? this is a parents�* nightmare, this is the worst of the worst. a talented artist, alithia�*s bedroom is full of her awards, especially for drawing. compounding her parent�*s grief is their anger over how the police let the gunman spend more than one hour in the school before they shot him. i don�*t understand how, you know, police officers, they�*re sworn to protect and they are outside the room. and just hearing gunshots, kids screaming. you know, go in there, and save those kids. on sunday, president biden came to uvalde to pay his respects and meet the victims�* families.
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ryan told him alithia was an artist and mr biden asked if he could have one of her pictures to hang in the white house. he did say that whenever we hang it up, we are going to send you a picture of where it�*s hanging, and you are free to see at any time. there is something special that she put her heart into it. it�*s there hanging in the white house. after the darkest week in its history, uvalde must now bury its victims. a community heartbroken over the senseless murder of alithia, 18 of her classmates, and her two teachers. will grant, bbc news, uvalde. a new study on the best time of day for exercise suggests women enjoy greater benefits in the morning — while men get more out of it in the evening. according to the researchers — who monitored 60 people —
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differences in hormones, in biological clocks and sleep—wake cycles between the sexes, could all play a role — but it�*s not clear exactly why men and women�*s responses to the timing of exercise were so different, and the study concludes more research is needed to find out more. with me is our health reporterjim reed. some big differences, even though we don�*t really know why? there some big differences, even though we don't really know why?— don't really know why? there were four grouos. _ don't really know why? there were four grouos. two — don't really know why? there were four grouos. two by _ don't really know why? there were four groups, two by sex, _ don't really know why? there were four groups, two by sex, male - don't really know why? there were four groups, two by sex, male and| four groups, two by sex, male and female, two by the time of day, so half of them were given a job of exercising between 630 and 830 in the morning at the aha behalf —— and the morning at the aha behalf —— and the other half were given that 12 hours later, and they closely monitored what was going on with their bodies, their blood pressure,
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their bodies, their blood pressure, their blood samples and their metabolic rate, that kind of thing, and before and afterwards. one of the results was completely unsurprising which is that everyone�*s health improved if they were on this team over the 12 week period at the other one which was hinted at, they looked at the differences between men and women, and this is very early signal but it looks like women who exercised in the morning did a betterjob at reducing their body fat and they have reduced blood pressure, and women who exercised in the evening seemed to reduce or increase upper body strength and muscle performance but they did not lose weight in the same way and they did not lose weight across the middle of the body. it looks like if women were exercising the morning they were more successful at losing that weight which is important because it is that weight around the centre of body which is seen as being by dieticians as most dangerous to long—term health. when they looked at men it was slightly different,
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the differences were less pronounced, but it seemed to be slightly more beneficial for men to be exercising in the evening compared with the morning. i suppose any exercise — compared with the morning. i suppose any exercise is — compared with the morning. i suppose any exercise is better _ compared with the morning. i suppose any exercise is better than _ compared with the morning. i suppose any exercise is better than no - any exercise is better than no exercise but more research is needed to find out why, but do we have any indication as to why there are those differences?— differences? they did not look that far in the research _ differences? they did not look that far in the research but _ differences? they did not look that far in the research but the - differences? they did not look that far in the research but the authors| far in the research but the authors have come up with some theories to look into, hormones, biological clocks, genetics, sleep—wake cycles, all these things make a big difference to how the body regulates sleep, for example, so circadian rhythms regulate how you go to sleep and how you wake up in the morning and how you wake up in the morning and how you wake up in the morning and how alert you are, but this is the first evidence that suggest it might have an impact on exercise in a certain group of women as well, so quite important. this is not the be all and end all, and much more research is needed but it is the first hint that may be there�*s something in data to look at. i�*m
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something in data to look at. i'm alwa s something in data to look at. i'm always fascinated by the other things that go with this, maybe if you get up in the morning you are more motivated to work harder because you have got up earlier, and we should say these were healthy people already, so people who already have some sort of exercise and they were not looking at anyone who was overweight or particularly unhealthy? who was overweight or particularly unhealth ? , , w' who was overweight or particularly unhealth ? , , a ., , unhealthy? they picked volunteers for this who _ unhealthy? they picked volunteers for this who were _ unhealthy? they picked volunteers for this who were all— unhealthy? they picked volunteers for this who were all pretty - for this who were all pretty athletic anyway. it seems to show a benefit in that group, and the real advantage of this kind of research is what happens when you take a group, a procedure like that, technique, and use it for a group who are less fit and may be suffering from obesity and may be overweight and can you see the same benefit, that is where the research is probably heading in the future. really interesting. jim reed, thanks forjoining us. proof we should maybe get up early in the morning. thanks! members of the welsh parliament — the senedd — paid tribute to the queen ahead
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of the celebrations to mark her platinum jubilee. the first minister, mark drakeford, says the events will show gratitude for her many years of "selfless service". our wales correspondent hywel griffith looks at what the queen now represents to people in wales. fanfare ancient rituals, now part of modern welsh history. when the queen opened the sixth session of the senedd, she was once again giving royal approval. shazad khan had the weighty responsibility of carrying the mace, a symbol of the queen�*s authority. normally a security guard here, he says her visits bring more than pomp and ceremony. they show what happens here really matters. i can�*t think of anybody more important than the queen to me, in the whole world, really, in that capacity. she�*s basically a symbol, i think, personally, of what we all drive to towards, and she is a symbol of hope. but when power first was devolved
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to wales in the 1990s, sovereign support was far from guaranteed. the home office advised against the queen coming to open the first welsh assembly, saying it didn�*t have the status. but she ignored the advice. this opening today marks a new and significant direction in the way in which wales is governed. there was no stopping her. she made it quite clear to me that she would come. a once radical republican, lord dafydd elis—thomas was the presiding officer here for 12 years. there was no question that somebody else could come and deputise. she wanted to have exactly the same way of having a royal opening in westminster, in holyrood, in the scottish parliament, and of course, here in wales. not everyone believes wales needs a monarch... booing in 2006, the welcome wasn�*t so warm. but the queen�*s personal
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popularity has in recent years transcended political divides and different generations. everyone living on the street has got ideas of what they want to do on that street party. i was seeing if i could bring a dish! zainab and roisin have grown up with the senedd at their doorstep. for them, the queen still has an important role to play. she led us through the war, she has done a lot for her country, and she is important and she is relevant. i think, for me, looking at her, she is inspirational. she shows people not to give up in life. because she is on the throne for 70, she's been on the throne for 70 years, platinumjubilee, i think that's an amazing achievement for the queen. something being marked around wales this week to recognise a relationship that has developed over the decades. hywel griffith, bbc news. the british warship hms northumberland has been at sea for four months monitoring undeclared submarine activity and protecting the uk�*s nuclear deterrent.
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the bbc was granted exclusive access to the ship last month during its heightened state of readiness as russian troops were invading ukraine. the bbc�*s religion reporter, clairejones, followed the chaplain onboard to understand how the crew were connecting to their faith while at sea. the north sea. cold and unforgiving. and the home of warship hms northumberland. this is chaplain louisa pitman. she has come to meet us and take us back to the ship. her role is to look after the welfare of the 190 members of the ship�*s company. this ship has been at sea forfour months. its primary focus has been closely monitoring russian warships and russian submarines. and protecting the uk�*s nuclear deterrent. we were at a heightened state of readiness and we have been
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for the majority of a period of time over the last four months which is good, but that is what we train for. since the russian invasion of ukraine, the frigate has spent much of its deployment working with nato allies, participating in a long planned exercise. nato is a purely defensive alliance so if we have to operate and if we have to go into action and if we had to take life it is because we are doing so to defend ourselves and our allies. this is the largest scale military activity taking place in europe, certainly in my lifetime, so it is deeply concerning. with the recent geopolitical events in ukraine, ourtasking changed significantly. we�*ve got 190 sailors on board. being there to reassure them becomes even more important in those uncertain times. chaplin pitman is tasked with providing that reassurance. what chaplains are doing l is providing a sort of moral compass, thinking, what kind
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of position is that _ putting our people in, and, - especially as they are in places where they have to make difficult decisions. - chaplains in the royal navy are multi—faith, they never carry a weapon and hold no rank. so a captain or a junior can speak to them freely. and there are only three female chaplains in the royal navy. known in the navy as "bish", short for bishop, chaplains are ordained ministers and deliver sunday services. it will be church, church, . church, church at 10:30am. that is all. right, we have one of my favourite hymns this morning. _ the role of a chaplain is to also support crew members of every faith. i�*m jewish and i come from a fairly religious family. it�*s actually more about having someone to talk to rather than it having to be about what faith you�*re having a discussion about.
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i'm the only muslim on board. religion is all about peace, love and kindness, that is the whole point of religion. it's been a tough deployment. it has been a very unusual- deployment, we have gone all over the place, something like 20,000 miles. | it hasjust been really. busy and stressful but, to be here feels like i'm finally. working at my best and, for me, that is everything. clairejones, bbc claire jones, bbc news, clairejones, bbc news, hms northumberland. regarding the travel disruption and chaos, and the pictures we have seen over the weekend. update from the travel giant tui, they have been forced to cancel some holiday
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flights untiljune. they say that 34,000 people will be affected, because of those cancellations that it is now put in place at manchester airport. they are blaming this on a number of different factors, not least the inability to a enough staff to cope with the rush. there has been criticism from the government that people knew these dates were coming and there would be a big rush over the half term holidays and of course for thejubilee weekend but now temp —— the holiday giant tui wrote have announced around 34,000 people will be affected by their cancellations. at 330 we will talk about what your rights are if your flight is cancelled. we will be talking to an expert about that. until recently it was a just
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a humble chip shop — but now the binley mega chippy in coventry has gone viral on social media, becoming a tik tok sensation. people from as far away as australia are said to be flying in to sample its fish and chips and mushy peas. our correspondent navtej johal has been to see what all the fuss is about. binley mega chippy! it�*s the takeaway taking the world by storm. binley mega chippy! in recent days, this unassuming chip shop in a coventry suburb has become a tiktok sensation. we�*re from gloucester, and we saw it on tiktok, and we were like, we have to go. ijust explained to my mum that we are going to some fish and chip shop, like, two hours away, and that i need to be woken up early. we started off from worcester, and we were on our way to - bicester village, for a half term little day out. - and then my teenage son tom suggested that we came herel to the binley mega chippy.
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it�*s three hours before it opens. i know, but we are very keen. we wanted to get here before the crowds! - the trend is to take a photo or video of yourself at the chip shop and upload it with the catchy jingle that everyone seems to love. # binley mega chippy! videos with the hashtag binley mega chippy have been viewed more than 130 million times. # binley mega chippy! staff say the business has seen ten times the customers it usually does. we had a bus—load of 12 people from dundee yesterday. i was chatting to some people from newcastle. what do you make of all this? i don�*t know, but i�*m loving it. i�*m just going to go with it. today is the last official day of coventry�*s year as the city of culture. and no—one expected this chip shop to be the place everyone seems to want to visit. navtejjohal, bbc news, coventry. who knew the power of social media? now it�*s time for a
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look at the weather. we are looking at an unsettled day today, a day broadly speaking of sunshine and showers but the showers are particularly extensive today across all areas of the uk. there are so many showers around, even the hay bales in the countryside have decided it�*s a day for the waterproofs. this afternoon some of the heaviest showers will turn thundery with hail mixed in, especially wet over north—east england down to yorkshire and lincolnshire and heavy downpours in the south—east but becoming dry for wales and south—west england this afternoon. we end the day with a band of rain moving into northern ireland and overnight that will spill south—eastwards into parts of wales, staying damp for a time across the south east of scotland. temperatures similar to recent nights, a little on the chilly side for the time of year. and then for tomorrow, we have another showery day on the cards with this area of rain turning showery, some thunderstorms pushing across east anglia and south east england through the day but the weather should become a bit dry and more in the way of sunshine
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across western areas, so feeling a touch warmer. this is bbc news. i�*m ben boulos. the headlines. calls for more children in england to be given free school meals — to help tackle the cost of living crisis. everything is shooting up in price. things that were £1 are now £1.10. it adds to the panic as well and you are just thinking, how am i going to get through this month? _ more travel misery for airline passengers as the travel giant tui confirms 34,000 holiday makers have been affected by a month of cancellations at manchester airport. have you been affected by cancelled flights? are your holiday plans now ruined? send us your thoughts using the hashtag #bbcyourquestions. we�*ll be answering them just after half past three. andy murray — who as a child survived the dunblane school shooting —
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speaks out about us gun laws, and says the shooting in texas last week made him �*incredibly upset�*. surely at some stage you do something different, like, you can�*t keep approaching the problem, you know, by buying more guns and having more guns in the country. another conservative mp calls on the prime minister to resign over downing street lockdown parties. and former cabinet minister andrea leadsom criticises him for �*unacceptable failures of leadership.�* there are calls today to give more children in england free school meals — to help tackle the cost of living crisis.
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teaching unions say all children from families on universal credit should be eligible forfree meals — as part of an �*urgent�* expansion of the scheme. the cost of food, fuel and other goods has surged in recent months — pushing inflation to a 40 year high. here�*s our education correspondent — elaine dunkley. more children than ever are coming through the doors. at capacity... we opened 11 minutes ago, we�*ve only got a small room, we are going to be busy. at this free half—term holiday club in stockport there are activities and, crucially, for some children, a meal. so the room is full and there will be kids down the street with take—out boxes of food. so, yes, more than we can handle. we know a lot of the families who come here are living in food poverty. and many of them aren�*t on free school meals. one of the things we have noticed is our food banks are always run in the morning and some people are asking if they can come at night, because people are working full—time, and still can�*t make ends meet. did you want one as well? lucy is a working mum of three
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and is currently on maternity leave. she doesn�*t qualify for free school meals because she earns above the eligibility threshold of £7,400 a year after tax not including benefits. everything even from the daily shop, getting bits in, even the cost of baby milk, everything isjust shooting up in price. things that were £1 are now £1.10. when it is half—term holidays, it adds, and it adds to the panic as well. you are thinking, how am i going to get food this month? and it is notjust parents who are feeling the impact of rising prices. tj, harley and ben get £5 a week pocket money. the ice cream man around here is very nice but... pete. and the ice creams, a normal ice cream with like a cone, that used to be 90p. 99p. and then it went to £1.20. every single thing... has gone up about 20p. in england, children who get free school meals during term time now receive vouchers
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during the holidays. according to the government an estimated four million children live in relative poverty. however, fewer than two million pupils are eligible for free school meals. in a letter to the government, head teachers are warning that change is urgently needed. with the need to level up in the country, then, there are a whole range of reasons why universal free school meals and ensuring that every child has a hot, nutritious meal every single day of the working week, itjust couldn't be more important, if i am honest with you. the department for education says it has expanded access for free school meals more than any other government in recent decades. here at the hub, rachel is determined not to send anyone away without a meal. but as prices continue to rise, so does the anxiety for working families struggling with the cost of living. joining us now is the former education secretary,
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and former conservative mp, justine greening, who is co—founder of the social mobility pledge. thanks for being with us. we heard in elena�*s report, especially from the children, just highlighting quite how much prices have risen and perhaps it�*s no surprise. the welfare system is just not keeping up welfare system is just not keeping up with the record rising prices. it's up with the record rising prices. it�*s a real challenge, and the spring statement where the chancellor set out a cost of living package, he did increase a welfare payment for people on universal credit but what he didn�*t do was operated in line with the inflation and as we know for families on the lowest incomes, their inflation and their experience is higher than that 9% headline rate, so we do need to look at other ways we can make get good support to families worst affected and therefore the government needs to look at its free school meal policies and honestly
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got in a mess last summer with the marcus rashford campaign and it now needs to get ahead of the curve and i would like to see a package on free school meals that doesn�*tjust increase eligibility as your piece set out, but also looks at the school holidays provision and we need to resolve that once and for all and then finally it needs to look at the amount that schools are being given to provide school meals and make sure it keeps in line with inflation. me and make sure it keeps in line with inflation. ~ . ., and make sure it keeps in line with inflation. ~ .., ., ., inflation. we will come onto the rovision inflation. we will come onto the provision for _ inflation. we will come onto the provision for school _ inflation. we will come onto the provision for school holidays - inflation. we will come onto the provision for school holidays in l inflation. we will come onto the | provision for school holidays in a moment but to talk about the marcus rashford issue it clearly brought it into the spotlight as he was getting involved, so how confident are you that the government can be on the front foot because as we saw they were very reactive and slow in responding to calls last summer, so do you get a sense that there is a strategy and plan to deal with it right now. hot
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strategy and plan to deal with it riaht now. ., ., ., , right now. not at the moment but i think it needs _ right now. not at the moment but i think it needs to _ right now. not at the moment but i think it needs to stay _ right now. not at the moment but i think it needs to stay that - right now. not at the moment but i think it needs to stay that way - right now. not at the moment but i think it needs to stay that way and | think it needs to stay that way and ministers can take simple decisions that will make a big decision and that will make a big decision and that will make a big impact and help parents who are worrying about how they make sure they keep their children fed and you mentioned in your package that the threshold for universal credit, that is the threshold i set when i was education secretary and that is several years ago and the challenge is that has not shifted in line with inflation, so it has meant that fewer people were eligible for free school meals and therefore its another reason why the government needs to get ahead of the government needs to get ahead of the curb. we are facing a difficult autumn ahead on cost of living and it�*s really important we take the steps now to avoid people getting into more hardship than they otherwise would be. $55 into more hardship than they otherwise would be. as ever, when sendin: otherwise would be. as ever, when spending decisions _ otherwise would be. as ever, when spending decisions are _ otherwise would be. as ever, when spending decisions are at _ otherwise would be. as ever, when spending decisions are at stake, i spending decisions are at stake, it�*s a matter of priorities. we know we will face one of the big squeeze
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on incomes in a generation and prices already at a 40 year high and the government has a finite amount of money and will have to look at where it spends the money but i don�*t know if you are able to hear any of the interview earlier and we spoke to one school teacher who said kids are coming to school without any mail, haven�*t had an evening meal the night before breakfast that morning. these formative years of children�*s education and getting them in a situation where they have eaten and can learn should quite clearly be a priority, should it not? h clearly be a priority, should it not? ~ . , clearly be a priority, should it not? ~ ., , ., , clearly be a priority, should it not? ~ ., , ., �*, ., not? i think it has to be and it's a aood not? i think it has to be and it's a good investment _ not? i think it has to be and it's a good investment to _ not? i think it has to be and it's a good investment to make - not? i think it has to be and it's a good investment to make sure i good investment to make sure children are getting into school and are able to concentrate and learn and make the most of that school experience, and i think going back to the longer term plan on levelling up to the longer term plan on levelling up the government has got, we have got to see more of that plan are fleshed out, but clearly we know education is at the heart of this and these are the children who have had the last two years of their education really disrupted by tui
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and we can�*t see any further disruption due to pressures on the cost of living —— disrupted by covid. when you look at the package the chancellor has set out, taking steps in relation to increasing eligibility for free school meals and making sure the amount schools are getting keeps up with inflation and having some provision, i think thatis and having some provision, i think that is a modest step for the government by comparison to the other steps it�*s already taken, but it would make a really big difference to parents across the country. difference to parents across the count . �* , difference to parents across the count . v . ~ difference to parents across the count . �*, ., ,, ., difference to parents across the count. �*, ., ,, country. let's talk about the issue durin: country. let's talk about the issue during school— country. let's talk about the issue during school holidays _ country. let's talk about the issue during school holidays and - country. let's talk about the issue during school holidays and half. during school holidays and half term, if children are not in school, they are not able to get free meals whether eligible for them or not, so talk to me about the importance of holiday provision as well.— holiday provision as well. indeed. one of the _ holiday provision as well. indeed. one of the challenges _ holiday provision as well. indeed. one of the challenges in - holiday provision as well. indeed. . one of the challenges in government as i know from my own experience as secretary of state for education is that that provision in terms of the policy often falls between the department for education which is in charge of free school meals and then the dwp but what we now need to see
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is a much morejoined up approach across government to finally have some decisions taken on what the permanent approach will be on school holiday meals provision for children because it is such an important issue and it always gets kicked around like a politicalfootball, but what parents need are some decisions made from a policy perspective so they can plan ahead and know what is going to be happening over the summer. itruihiiie and know what is going to be happening over the summer. while you are with us. — happening over the summer. while you are with us, justine _ happening over the summer. while you are with us, justine greening, - happening over the summer. while you are with us, justine greening, i - are with us, justine greening, i want to talk about the further pressure on the prime minister. you will know what life is like inside downing street and andrea leadsom now adding her name to the list of criticism calling the prime it is to�*s actions and unacceptable failure of leadership. do you support the idea that there was a massive failure of leadership in downing street and something has to change? downing street and something has to chance? ~ .,, downing street and something has to chance? ~ , .,, downing street and something has to chance? , ., , change? most people will have been shocked by the _ change? most people will have been shocked by the images _ change? most people will have been shocked by the images they - change? most people will have been shocked by the images they saw - change? most people will have been shocked by the images they saw and the fact that the prime minister got a fixed penalty notice for the very
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rules himself that he had set and i think that the parliamentary party, my former colleagues i speak to, there is a real nervousness around notjust there is a real nervousness around not just that, there is a real nervousness around notjust that, but there is a real nervousness around not just that, but also the there is a real nervousness around notjust that, but also the broader lack of plan and the sense that the government is getting blown around and i think the reality is that any prime minister in that situation, and theresa may found this herself, if you can�*t get a grip, you end up having to get out, and that, i think, is thejuncture having to get out, and that, i think, is the juncture that boris johnson is now facing. i think it is important that one way or another this government is able to step up to the plate and steer britain for a cost of living crisis but bring forward a comprehensive plan about how it will deliver on levelling up. that has to be the real question for conservative mps, how it can have the leadership in order to be able to do that. do the leadership in order to be able to do that. ,, the leadership in order to be able to do that. , ., ~ the leadership in order to be able to do that. ,, ~ , the leadership in order to be able to do that-— to do that. do you think it is time for him to — to do that. do you think it is time for him to get _ to do that. do you think it is time for him to get out, _ to do that. do you think it is time for him to get out, to _ to do that. do you think it is time for him to get out, to use - to do that. do you think it is time for him to get out, to use your i for him to get out, to use your words? hi for him to get out, to use your words? . , , . for him to get out, to use your words? ., , , ., ~ ., words? if i was still an mp i would be talkin:
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words? if i was still an mp i would be talking to _ words? if i was still an mp i would be talking to my — words? if i was still an mp i would be talking to my community i words? if i was still an mp i would be talking to my community that l words? if i was still an mp i would be talking to my community that i | be talking to my community that i represent and i would be talking very directly to the prime minister asking him what his plans are in relation to levelling up and cost of living. if there aren�*t any plans, then yes, i would be one of those mps setting out a letter but i would want to hear from mps setting out a letter but i would want to hearfrom him directly. ok. want to hear from him directly. ok, justine greening, thanks for being with us. there�*s more misery for thousands of travellers with the tour operator tui announcing the cancellation of six holiday flights a day from manchester airport until the end ofjune. in the past few miunutes tui has confirmed that 34,000 holidaymakers have been affected by the month of cancellations at manchester airport. like other travel companies, it�*s blaming staff shortages after the pandemic. but the government says the airline industry has had months to prepare for the half term rush and should have put extra staff in place. there are fears of more disruption over thejubilee weekend and into the summer.
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gareth barlow reports. it is set to be one of the busiest travel periods of the year, 2 million people taking to the skies for the bank holiday weekend but the surge in passenger numbers has led to a surge in disruption. in manchester, tui which calls itself the uk�*s leading travel brand has announced it will cancel six flights a day from the city airport until the end ofjune. in a statement, the company said this. the main reason for the disruption is said to be staff shortages in baggage handling and check in. swissport said rising flight numbers were exacerbating resource challenges across the industry and the firm is working hard
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to recruit more workers. but for holidaymakers like joanna and her family due to travel from manchester this morning, those extra workers are too little, too late. last night, the cases were packed, we were ready to go. we received a text last night at 730 saying the holiday had been cancelled. no explanation. nobody has been in touch. the chancellor rishi sunak defended the government�*s support for the industry and said ministers were focused on helping ease the current challenges. we have put in place billions of pounds of support for the travel industry particularly during the pandemic. right now, there are conversations to make sure that disruption can be eased, that is where the focus is. the government had been warned many months ago losing skilled workers from the aviation industry would cause significant delays when people started
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going back on holiday. they knew airports did not have staff for security, ground control, cabin crew, they knew people would be going on holiday at half—term. it is simply not good enough. despite the headlines and travel headaches, industry representatives say for the majority of passengers it is business and holidays as usual. the vast majority are able to travel, we are sendingl millions of people abroad, every single week, so, i it is in an evolving i state, getting better. with more of us are set to go away over the bank holiday weekend, holiday—makers and travel operators are still braced for more disappointment and disruption. gareth barlow, bbc news. in some respects it creates more questions than answers. with travel just after three thirty.
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if there�*s something you want to ask our travel experts or are wondering about, compensation, what are your rights if your flight is delayed... get in touch with the hashtag #bbcyourquestions — or email yourquestions@bbc.co.uk sir andy murray has told the bbc that last week�*s school shooting in texas left him angry and upset. when he was eight years old, murray surived the massacre at his primary school in dunblane, when a gunman killed 16 children and a teacher. murray says there need to be changes to america�*s gun laws. he�*s been speaking to our sports news correspondent laura scott. andy murray was busy preparing for the grass court season when he saw the news of the latest mass shooting in america... of a primary school in texas, where19 children and two on social media, murray described the incident as madness, and one survivor�*s account in particular brought back painful memories of the horrific shootings that took place at his own school in dunblane in 1996.
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unbelievably sad and disappointing and itjust makes you feel angry and incredibly upset for the parents. i heard something on the radio the other day and it was a child from that school. i experienced a similar thing when i was at dunblane and a teacher coming out and waving all of the children under tables and telling them to go and hide. and there was a kid telling exactly the same story about how she survived it. they were saying that they go through these drills as young children, seven, eight—year—old children, and it�*s like, how? how is that normal that children should be having to go through drills in case someone comes into school with a gun? i don�*t get it. murray feels strongly that the time has come for change. i think there have been over 200 mass shootings.
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there is always talk about being something political but i don�*t see how it is. surely at some stage you do something different. the former world number one made light work of his first grass court match yesterday and has set himself lofty goals at wimbledon. there won�*t be ranking points available — punishment for the ban on russian and belarusian players over the war in ukraine. but he says the trophy is what matters. i�*d give every ranking point i have won back to win another grand slam or wimbledon. yes, i understand why rankings are important but a tournament like wimbledon is bigger than that. that is why i think all the players will still show up. as he embarks on another bid at wimbledon glory, it is clear events around the world are neverfarfrom his mind. police and prosecutors should immediately stop subjecting rape
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victims to excessive scrutiny according to a new report. the uk�*s information commissioner says that victims are being police and prosecutors should immediately stop subjecting rape the uk�*s information commissioner says that victims are being treated as suspects — with prosecutors collecting large amounts of personal information about them. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports it�*s known as the digital strip search. many rape complainants have to consent to hand over their phones as part of the criminal investigation. they are also being asked for a whole range of personal information. we spoke to one complainant whose case didn�*t get to trial and who has waived her right to anonymity to speak out. they got all of my medical records, which, unfortunately, are quite substantial. my social care records and a complete download of my mobile phone. looking back on it, it is such a violation. it felt as though i was the one that was being investigated, i was the one on trial, i was the one that had committed a crime.
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this trawl by police and prosecutors should stop immediately, says the uk�*s information commissioner, whose job it is to uphold information rights. he says that because victims are being treated as suspects, they are withdrawing from criminal cases. and this is contributing to the low conviction rates for rape. police chiefs and the crown prosecution service say they are working to improve the way complainants are treated and to rebuild confidence in the system. and the home office says there will be a public consultation on requests for personal information. june kelly, bbc news. here with me now is dame vera baird, the victims�* commissioner for england and wales. thank you for being with us on bbc news this afternoon. injune�*s report we got a sense of some of the information requested. what you make of the report question
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it is our independent authority to safeguard information rights and he is in no doubt whatsoever that the cps and police.— cps and police. firstly they don't understand _ cps and police. firstly they don't understand the _ cps and police. firstly they don't understand the laws _ cps and police. firstly they don't understand the laws they - cps and police. firstly they don't understand the laws they should | cps and police. firstly they don't i understand the laws they should be keeping about protecting individuals privacy, and that the over intrusive demands for all of the kinds of documents that the lady who had waived anonymity told you about, medical notes from birth, school records, social services, notes of any therapist from who you get trauma are asked for as a matter of course in these cases are no other case. mr edwards, the information commissioner, makes it clear that he feels this interferes with justice and causes people to be deterred from reporting the crime of knowing this is coming and it is investigating the complainant and not the defendant and re—victimising her, so often people withdraw and that means people who may be guilty of free and on the streets, so he
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has said this must stop straightaway and we in the victim sector have said this for five or six years and i�*m extremely pleased to have this substantial authority reporting what has been said. fight! substantial authority reporting what has been said.— has been said. and to touch on why some police — has been said. and to touch on why some police forces _ has been said. and to touch on why some police forces are _ has been said. and to touch on why some police forces are asking i has been said. and to touch on why some police forces are asking for i some police forces are asking for this information, but is it a lack of education and they are not aware what data they need and may be a heavy—handed approach means they are asking for everything and that is the problem? i asking for everything and that is the problem?— asking for everything and that is the problem? i think it's not quite so. it is the problem? i think it's not quite so- it is very _ the problem? i think it's not quite so. it is very easy _ the problem? i think it's not quite so. it is very easy if— the problem? i think it's not quite so. it is very easy if you _ the problem? i think it's not quite so. it is very easy if you are i the problem? i think it's not quite so. it is very easy if you are an i so. it is very easy if you are an experienced police officer, it�*s reasonable to work out what a reasonable to work out what a reasonable line of inquiry and nobody would dispute that by alleged this against a boy went out for six months that all of our messages between us are very relevant, but what on earth has got to do with who is right when i say this happened
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and i said it was consent. what are my school reports going back to the age of five and my medical records going back farewell —— further to do with it? the cps drive this and will not let the police not to produce all of this stuff. when i was a police and crime commissioner in northumbria we had a pilot scheme of legal advice for the complainant to ask to argue with the cps about the human rights act and all of the intrusion on privacy and the police thwarted this completely and found 57% of the cases were not extreme demands but the other 50% were, and the two lawyers were able to come to an agreement about what was appropriate and what was not on the police then have a much less owner of a job. they don�*t have to get of material and search through it for something to her discredit, which frankly is what the cps are looking for, so they are able to investigate
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with far more ease.— with far more ease. what is the im act with far more ease. what is the impact on _ with far more ease. what is the impact on victims _ with far more ease. what is the impact on victims themselves, | with far more ease. what is the i impact on victims themselves, who with far more ease. what is the - impact on victims themselves, who we should remember, who have been through one of the most horrific experiences of their lives? what impact does this request was so much personal information have on them? it is dreadful, because they go to the authorities thinking they will get help, and desperately wanting to be believed, to be given some support and to get some justice, but what greets them is frankly victim blaming, suspicion and one would really find it hard not to say misogyny, although the same does apply to men when they go, but overwhelmingly it is women who are rates, but attention focuses on them, and there was a recent report from the inspectors of the police and the cps who said they had found innumerable cases where women had
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had all of these documents trawled through unmercifully and had given their phone up often for the best part of a year and the account given by the defendant had never been investigated and we have a lot of cases in which that has proven to be the case and the focus is not on the defendant, it�*s on whether this victim is good enough for us to put faith into her and start investigating the defendants. this is utterly wrong. there is a move in the police, a project which tells them clearly that you must look at them clearly that you must look at the area where there�*s been relationship to what the messages were and what is relevant and the complainant should give up and will, and as the inspector said, they do
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not have this intrusive treatment and it is in no other kind of case and it is in no other kind of case and i report someone is trying to snatch my handbag and he says, no i attacked as they won�*t want this from birth, but want to make a complaint. it from birth, but want to make a complaint-— complaint. it is fascinating and thank you _ complaint. it is fascinating and thank you for— complaint. it is fascinating and thank you for clarifying - complaint. it is fascinating and thank you for clarifying that. i complaint. it is fascinating and l thank you for clarifying that. we are really grateful for your insight this afternoon. thank you. the mp for carlisle — john stevenson has become the latest conservative backbencher to confirm submitting a no—confidence letter in the prime minister, borisjohnson — in the wake of partygate. earlier the former cabinet minister, dame andrea leadsom, hit out at the pm�*s "unacceptable failures of leadership" — but dame andrea did notjoin the ranks of tory mps to call on mrjohnson to resign. our political correspondent helen catt is following all
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the developments as pressure mounts on borisjohnson. andrea leadsom does have some striking criticism of the prime minister here but she stopped short of saying he should step down and does not say she submitted a letter calling for a vote of no confidence, but the criticism is striking, and striking and significant coming from somebody like andrea leadsom who was a prominent brexit backer supported borisjohnson in his leadership bid after she dropped out of the race and she is has been in his cabinet and was the business secretary so it is quite striking when you get criticism from those quarters and as you said the language she uses is strong and she talked about how if this came out in a statement that was sent to some of her constituents and in it she said that while the police investigation found that the prime minister�*s own personal rule breaking was limited to a surprise birthday party,
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looking at the sue gray report, she said the conclusion she drew was there had been unacceptable failures of leadership that could not be tolerated and were the responsibility of the prime minister and then added it was up to her and each of her conservative mp colleagues to decide individually on what is the right course of action that will restore confidence in the government, so somebody like andrea leadsom coming forward with such strong criticism does show it comes from different parts of the conservative party and notjust one area. and as you said there was a separate issue of who had gone so far as to submit a letter calling for a vote of no confidence and there�*s been another one of those today as john stephenson the mp for carlisle became the 28th conservative mp to call for borisjohnson to go and most of those had submitted a letter of no confidence. the scottish finance secretary kate forbes has criticised the uk government claiming they�*re sitting on their hands, whilst she�*s been setting out her resource spending review.
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it is the result of a deliberate choice by the uk government as they sit on their hands whilst the chancellor has provided welcome if a limited and late support for households, the chill winds of tory austerity, and it lays bare the constraints of the current fiscal framework. the budget largely decided by others, denied sufficient borrowing powers yet facing the same demand for increased spending as governments with much greater levers do. , ., ., ., ., do. lets find out more about what was said for— do. lets find out more about what was said for marc _ do. lets find out more about what was said for marc scotland - do. lets find out more about what| was said for marc scotland political reporter. just bring this up to date on what has been discussed here. this was the statement, the spending review update, only a ten minute statement so there weren�*t any big tax policies in the end it was an update on the challenges facing the scottish economy and what might be
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donein scottish economy and what might be done in dealing aware money spent and as you heard, kate forbes was pointing the finger at the uk government said there was austerity from westminster and the scottish government is dealing with inflation and we are seeing that notjust in price rises but also in the government budgets because if budgets were set last year and we have 9% inflation, the money they are spending is worth less today thanit are spending is worth less today than it was and we are also wrestling with the cost of recovering the nhs after the pandemic and kate forbes said that the government is doing all they can to deal with all of that in scotland but she said they had limited powers and they don�*t have the same borrowing powers that you the uk government has and they cannot borrow money when they are in a pinch so she wants more money to come here to deal with that and they do have tax powers, but as i say, those are not involved in a statement and that will be later in the year before we hear about it at the year before we hear about it at the full budget. in terms of what they are doing, she said in a statement there will be reforms to the public sector to make savings
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and they will be digitalisation and things are moving online and they will improve procurement and the are going to reshape the public sector which means they will try to get the payback to pre—pandemic levels. and then when we come to future spending there are certain areas of priority which the government will make sure they protect, those are health and a lot of money going into covid recovery, social security and again, thatis recovery, social security and again, that is the cost of living crisis with a gun and putting some money into welfare payments and other benefits being operated in scotland, and a net zero, with the snp and power with the greens at holyrood meaning they will do what they can to tackle the climate crisis in their spending commitments, so it means other departments might be looking at having their budgets standstill over the coming years which frankly means a real terms cut, so we will hear a lot of protest from local government in the future about how their budgets go, so not a cheery picture overall but perhaps we have a better picture about what the government long term
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plan is to deal with it. and thanks for that update. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris. we are looking at an unsettled day today, a day broadly speaking of sunshine and showers but the showers are particularly extensive today across all areas of the uk. there are so many showers around, even the hay bales in the countryside have decided it�*s a day for the waterproofs. this afternoon some of the heaviest showers will turn thundery with hail mixed in, especially wet over north—east england down to yorkshire and lincolnshire and heavy downpours in the south—east but becoming drier for wales and south—west england this afternoon. we end the day with a band of rain moving into northern ireland and overnight that will spill south—eastwards into parts of wales, staying damp for a time across the south east of scotland. temperatures similar to recent nights, a little on the chilly side for the time of year. and then for tomorrow, we have another showery day
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on the cards with this area of rain turning showery, some thunderstorms pushing across east anglia and south east england through the day but the weather should become a bit drier and more in the way of sunshine across western areas, so feeling a touch warmer. sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. stuart broad has taken more than 500 test wickets but says he�*s going to approach his england comeback as if he hadn�*t taken any at all. the bowler is back in the squad after being left out for the west indies tour earlier this years and could start the first test against new zealand on thursday. it�*s the first match under new coach brendan mccullum who along with recently appointed captain ben stokes decided to recall both broad and james anderson to the squad. i�*m very forward focused and excited to be here at lord�*s and i�*m going in with the mindset ofjust attacking each week as hard as i can, but in my heart and soul on the
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field and taking my mindset back to it if i had played a zero test cricket. and have zero experience. you don�*t look too far ahead before you have made your test debut and you have made your test debut and you are just excited to play the next game. meanwhile essex have been threatened with punishment if they contniue to fail to meet diversity targets set by the ecb. the club has been placed into a non—compliance process following the release of the latest figures. in line with the ecb�*s action plan to increase diversity in board representation that was formed following azeem rafiq�*s claims of institutional racism in cricket. coco gauff is going into her first ever grand slam semi final after beating fellow american sloane stephens in straight sets. she will face martina trevisan who has also never made it to a grand slam semi before. she beat canada�*s leylah fernandez who was in the us open final with emma radacanu last year. it was the italian�*s 10th straight victory — this time winning over three sets.
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coming up later a match fitting of a final — indeed it has been three times at the french open. rafa nadal against novak djokovic. this year they�*re meeting in the quarter finals. they share 41 grand slam titles between them — nadal has won 13 at roland garros, but djokovic famously won their last meeting in paris 12 months ago. i�*m not sure if the fact they are playing so early will affect either of them unduly. they probably both had in their mind that they need to be absolutely up to speed a bit quicker than usual given the magnitude of the meeting, but what is the disadvantage for nadal, he only had five clay—court matches going into roland garros because of the rib fracture he suffered at indian wells which forced him to take 4—6 weeks off and he�*s not playing as well as he would like. taken to five sets in one of his previous games and he has a foot problem in the back
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of his mind which is chronic and long—term, and novak djokovic is playing so well. two days after winning the monaco grand prix, sergio perez has signed a new two year contract with red bull. the mexican has agreed the deal until 2024 and sits third in the current drivers standings behind his teammate max verstappen, who signed his own new deal in march. perez�*s win in monte carlo made him the most successful driver from his country in f1 history. hollie doyle says becoming the first female jockey to win a british classic would be a "dream come true." she�*s riding second—favourite nashwa in the cazoo oaks on friday. doyle has already broken several records in her career, setting a new mark for the most wins by a british female rider in one year. doyle says she sometimes forgets just how significant her achievements have been. because i compete on a day—to—day basis on level terms with men i suppose when i pop my head out of my little racing bubble what i�*m doing is quite unique.
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whereas i�*m so engaged in my industry, i�*m like one of the lads, almost, as bad as it sounds, so you forget what you�*re doing, really. some breaking transfer news. spurs have signed the croatian player lee van perisic who joins after leaving inter milan at the end of last season —— ivan perisic. that deal just announced. that�*s all the sport for now. now on bbc news, your questions answered on travel disruption. around 2 million people are set to fly over the bank holiday. however, thousands of passengers have seen flights cancelled and delays at airports. tui has announced it will cancel six
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flights a day until the end ofjune while easyjet continues cancelling flights ahead of the jubilee celebrations. here with me in the studio withjulia, ceo at advantage travel partnership. and travel correspondent simon calder. so much to get through but thanks forjoining us. let�*s begin with how we are in this mess. i spoke about tui saying they will cancel six flights per day, 34,000 flights per day, 34, 000 holiday—makers flights per day, 34,000 holiday—makers will be affected, they say. why are we in this mess, julia? ~ ., ., , ., _ julia? we have to start by looking back at the _ julia? we have to start by looking back at the last _ julia? we have to start by looking back at the last couple _ julia? we have to start by looking back at the last couple of - julia? we have to start by looking back at the last couple of years i julia? we have to start by looking i back at the last couple of years and you really can�*t shut down an entire global system without unfortunately, as we start to recover, trying to build back businesses, to get it back into a place where operationally it can scale up quickly and be resilient, and it really is a consequence of trying to build back over a period of real
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surging demand. something like a 20% increase over 2019 just for this week alone. it is the ability to scale up really quickly over a short period of time at which is really exasperated some of these issues. some of the questions really cover this but simon, you could say the industry knew this was going to happen. it is half term holidays and thejubilee weekend, coming up to summer, not a great surprise that people want to get away? that summer, not a great surprise that people want to get away?- people want to get away? that is what the government _ people want to get away? that is what the government is - people want to get away? that is what the government is doing, i people want to get away? that is what the government is doing, it| people want to get away? that is i what the government is doing, it is blaming _ what the government is doing, it is blaming the airports and the airlines. _ blaming the airports and the airlines, saying it is clearly predictable, and if you are not ready. — predictable, and if you are not ready, that is your fault. the aviation— ready, that is your fault. the aviation industry is absolutely furious — aviation industry is absolutely furious because they are pointing the finger— furious because they are pointing the finger back and saying, hang on, for most _ the finger back and saying, hang on, for most of— the finger back and saying, hang on, for most of the last couple of years we have _ for most of the last couple of years we have had the most own arrests irrational — we have had the most own arrests irrational and expensive travel restrictions of any country in europe — restrictions of any country in europe -- _ restrictions of any country in europe —— we have had the most own.
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we had just gone into the traffic li-ht we had just gone into the traffic light phase this time last year, in portugal— light phase this time last year, in portugal was the only country, the only major— portugal was the only country, the only major country you could go on holiday— only major country you could go on holiday to, — only major country you could go on holiday to, and i know that we went there _ holiday to, and i know that we went there on— holiday to, and i know that we went there on the first possible day and within— there on the first possible day and within two— there on the first possible day and within two weeks it was on the amber list again— within two weeks it was on the amber list again and you had a quarantine again— list again and you had a quarantine again and — list again and you had a quarantine again and that carried on pretty much _ again and that carried on pretty much all— again and that carried on pretty much all through the summer. anybody remember— much all through the summer. anybody remember amber much all through the summer. anybody rememberamber pass? much all through the summer. anybody remember amber pass? suddenly france was effectively put on the no—go list -- _ was effectively put on the no—go list -- plus _ was effectively put on the no—go list —— plus. it has been pretty awfut — list —— plus. it has been pretty awfut so _ list —— plus. it has been pretty awful. so the airlines and airports said they— awful. so the airlines and airports said theyjustly want to fight people. _ said theyjustly want to fight people, but suddenly they can't, but there _ people, but suddenly they can't, but there is— people, but suddenly they can't, but there is also optimism bias, because this is— there is also optimism bias, because this is the _ there is also optimism bias, because this is the industry of human happiness and everyone hopes everything will go well and very often _ everything will go well and very often it— everything will go well and very often it does, and the vast majority often it does, and the vast majority of people _ often it does, and the vast majority of people are on holiday having a lovely _ of people are on holiday having a lovely time but it is sad for the many— lovely time but it is sad for the many people who aren't, of course. so much _ many people who aren't, of course.
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so much frustration. the government would say that this is what the furlough scheme was designed to do, to keep people injobs so they furlough scheme was designed to do, to keep people in jobs so they were not sacked so they would be ready when things picked up again. but that does not happen?— when things picked up again. but that does not happen? there are lots of thin . s that does not happen? there are lots of things happening _ that does not happen? there are lots of things happening and _ that does not happen? there are lots of things happening and as _ that does not happen? there are lots of things happening and as we - that does not happen? there are lots of things happening and as we know, | of things happening and as we know, you have _ of things happening and as we know, you have talked about many times, quite _ you have talked about many times, quite a _ you have talked about many times, quite a lot— you have talked about many times, quite a lot of people who have thought. — quite a lot of people who have thought, work, i don't think i will bother— thought, work, idon't think i will bother any— thought, work, i don't think i will bother any more, if they are comfortable enough that is great for them, _ comfortable enough that is great for them, but _ comfortable enough that is great for them, but there is a particular brexit— them, but there is a particular brexit issue as well and this is to do with— brexit issue as well and this is to do with the — brexit issue as well and this is to do with the large number of eu citizens— do with the large number of eu citizens who left during the covid pandemic— citizens who left during the covid pandemic and who haven't come back partly— pandemic and who haven't come back partly because a brexit and their 'obs partly because a brexit and their jobs in _ partly because a brexit and their jobs in the — partly because a brexit and their jobs in the hospitality industry that they left behind, anecdotally, i'm hearing a lot of people from aviation— i'm hearing a lot of people from aviation who have moved into those 'obs aviation who have moved into those jobs to _ aviation who have moved into those jobs to backfill the spaces and they are not— jobs to backfill the spaces and they are not going to be enticed back into aviation anytime soon to work into aviation anytime soon to work in a very— into aviation anytime soon to work in a very high stress environment which _ in a very high stress environment which involves getting up at three o'clock— which involves getting up at three o'clock in— which involves getting up at three o'clock in the morning and yelled
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at. ~ ~' ., o'clock in the morning and yelled at. ~ ~ ., ., ., , ,, �*, at. we know what that is like. let's “um into at. we know what that is like. let's jump into the _ at. we know what that is like. let's jump into the questions. _ at. we know what that is like. let's jump into the questions. thanks i at. we know what that is like. let's| jump into the questions. thanks for all your questions. charles says, why are airlines over booking flights? he says you will not find a supermarket take your money for a loaf of bread and then saying, ok, sorry, we don�*t have any. for loaf of bread and then saying, ok, sorry, we don't have any.- sorry, we don't have any. for a lot of airlines — sorry, we don't have any. for a lot of airlines they _ sorry, we don't have any. for a lot of airlines they don't _ sorry, we don't have any. for a lot of airlines they don't know - sorry, we don't have any. for a lot of airlines they don't know what i of airlines they don�*t know what their low factors are until much nearer departure so they are having to manage crew rotors and capacity and sometimes it is very last minute before they can make sure they can put the right number of flights on and know exactly what they have available to sell so it becomes again a very difficult operational balance that they are looking to do. we have seen a number of flights consolidated so when you have multiple departures to a destination, those rights have been consolidated to get consumers out but on a different fight time, but to the destination on the same day. of all the industries where you can
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predict what is going to happen, this is quite a clear one, people have to book a seat on a plane and they know they will turn up at the airport and go through security and they might have bags. it is quite an organised system and the rules make it so, so why is it so difficult to plan? it so, so why is it so difficult to ian? ., , . ., , plan? so many challenges, operational _ plan? so many challenges, operational challenges, i plan? so many challenges, | operational challenges, and plan? so many challenges, i operational challenges, and in plan? so many challenges, - operational challenges, and in the main the booking period between departure and booking has reduced, so we are seeing a significant portion of bookings coming in at the last minute, so trying to manage thatis last minute, so trying to manage that is difficult. let alone when you are coming through. also trying to manage when you have less staff and crew and you are trying to manage crew timetables and work hours and it becomes very challenging. it is one issue after another which exacerbates the problem but very last minute bookings, on top of the pent—up demand, in a peak period, it is really causing huge amounts of issues for the industry. titer? issues for the industry. very similar question _ issues for the industry. very similar question here - issues for the industry. very similar question here from l issues for the industry. very similar question here from john he
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says, is it legal to continue selling tickets when they are not enough staff to make the trips possible? enough staff to make the trips ossible? �* , ., , ., possible? airlines are putting on what they think _ possible? airlines are putting on what they think they _ possible? airlines are putting on what they think they will - possible? airlines are putting on what they think they will be i possible? airlines are putting on what they think they will be able j possible? airlines are putting on i what they think they will be able to cope with _ what they think they will be able to cope with and clearly they have been found _ cope with and clearly they have been found out _ cope with and clearly they have been found out i_ cope with and clearly they have been found out i have not got the resources _ found out i have not got the resources and that might be anything from cabin— resources and that might be anything from cabin crew being sick and still plenty— from cabin crew being sick and still plenty of— from cabin crew being sick and still plenty of covid around, unfortunately, to recruiting people and talking to recruiting consultants, they say the more —— there _ consultants, they say the more —— there are — consultants, they say the more —— there are more vacancies than people coming _ there are more vacancies than people coming forward and very often people are applying forjobs and then are not turning up for interview because they have _ not turning up for interview because they have got many other options. add to _ they have got many other options. add to that the problem of security checking _ add to that the problem of security checking and making sure everyone is a properly— checking and making sure everyone is a properly qualified to work in an airport. — a properly qualified to work in an airport. on— a properly qualified to work in an airport, on top of the usual training, _ airport, on top of the usual training, and it is looking pretty miserable. ifi training, and it is looking pretty miserable. if i can be optimistic, it could — miserable. if i can be optimistic, it could well be a tough weekend again. _
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it could well be a tough weekend again, although tui and easyjet are trying _ again, although tui and easyjet are trying to— again, although tui and easyjet are trying to minimise that by cancelling flights up front, but from _ cancelling flights up front, but from monday onwards it will get a lot easier— from monday onwards it will get a lot easier for a good month or so and that— lot easier for a good month or so and that gives the airports and the airlines— and that gives the airports and the airlines time to throw money at the problem _ airlines time to throw money at the problem which will entice new people in with— problem which will entice new people in with better rates of pay, and one canadian _ in with better rates of pay, and one canadian airline has this afternoon said they— canadian airline has this afternoon said they are celebrating international flight attendants day by increasing their pay and anyone starting _ by increasing their pay and anyone starting with this airline is on almost — starting with this airline is on almost £30,000 per year as you start training. — almost £30,000 per year as you start training. so— almost £30,000 per year as you start training. so it can be solved but they— training. so it can be solved but they have — training. so it can be solved but they have only got a few limited weeks _ they have only got a few limited weeks before you get intojuly and august— weeks before you get intojuly and august which isjulie knows is make and break— august which isjulie knows is make and breaktime. —— make or break. it and breaktime. —— make or break. if! is an and breaktime. —— make or break. fit is an appreciation of the work the staff do, that this is giving us, i suppose. simon mentioned training and recruitment, how long does the
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process last? it is not as though you can click your fingers and the staff are ready to work. this is an anonymous question but one we would like to know, how long until the staff are ready for work? in like to know, how long untilthe staff are ready for work? in normal times, pre-pandemic, _ staff are ready for work? in normal times, pre-pandemic, the - staff are ready for work? in normal times, pre-pandemic, the process| times, pre—pandemic, the process probably would take between 6—8 weeks and so we are now seeing again, with the increase of recruitment and the increase of staff that airlines are trying to train, it is taking a lot longer. with that you need to get security clearance and it can take up to three months depending upon the airlines and how many staff they are trying to work through the process. it does take time. simon, let�*s talk about your rights, if you are facing about your rights, if you are facing a cancellation or delay. ian says what are my rights if the airline vouchers expire? it is particularly busy at the moment because people are trying to use the vouchers from fights that were cancelled over the last couple of years.—
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last couple of years. yes, the idea of everybody _ last couple of years. yes, the idea of everybody trying _ last couple of years. yes, the idea of everybody trying to _ last couple of years. yes, the idea of everybody trying to redeem i last couple of years. yes, the idea l of everybody trying to redeem their vouchers _ of everybody trying to redeem their vouchers. it depends what kind of voucher— vouchers. it depends what kind of voucher it — vouchers. it depends what kind of voucher it is. sorry to be nonspecific for top many people who book flights especially during 2020 and 2021, when the fight did not actually— and 2021, when the fight did not actually take off, everybody should have actual money back by now, and there _ have actual money back by now, and there were _ have actual money back by now, and there were some horrible stresses and strains — there were some horrible stresses and strains of people getting vouchers when they needed money, and also, vouchers when they needed money, and also. the _ vouchers when they needed money, and also, the travel industry has issued also, the travel industry has issued a refund _ also, the travel industry has issued a refund or— also, the travel industry has issued a refund or credit notes which are basically— a refund or credit notes which are basically backed by the scheme by atol_ basically backed by the scheme by atol the — basically backed by the scheme by atol the idea is you don't need all your money— atol the idea is you don't need all your money back now and that you might— your money back now and that you might get— your money back now and that you might get another holiday with them, but if not. _ might get another holiday with them, but if not, they will get the money back _ but if not, they will get the money back but — but if not, they will get the money back. but looking at this particular example. — back. but looking at this particular example, it involves having got one third of— example, it involves having got one third of the — example, it involves having got one third of the money back and then the rest as— third of the money back and then the rest as a _ third of the money back and then the rest as a voucher which looks to me as though _ rest as a voucher which looks to me as though it— rest as a voucher which looks to me as though it is possibly some kind of online — as though it is possibly some kind of online travel agent may be not in
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the uk _ of online travel agent may be not in the uk and — of online travel agent may be not in the uk and i'm afraid in that position— the uk and i'm afraid in that position you are on tricky territory _ position you are on tricky territory-— position you are on tricky territo . ,, ., .,~' ., territory. simon makes an important oint and territory. simon makes an important point and one _ territory. simon makes an important point and one of— territory. simon makes an important point and one of the _ territory. simon makes an important point and one of the things - territory. simon makes an important point and one of the things to - territory. simon makes an important point and one of the things to learn l point and one of the things to learn from this has been to be careful about who you book with because your rights will vary and think about what travel company you are booking with and where are they based and can they help you, an important point. can they help you, an important oint. . can they help you, an important oint, , , can they help you, an important oint. , , ., point. chris says, can i get a refund if— point. chris says, can i get a refund if i — point. chris says, can i get a refund if i miss _ point. chris says, can i get a refund if i miss my - point. chris says, can i get a refund if i miss my flight i point. chris says, can i get a i refund if i miss my flight because the airline doesn�*t open more check—in desk? there is a danger that a lot of different stages pass the buck to the other so they say the buck to the other so they say the flight is ready to go but you could not get through security but then your bag went missing. can he get a refund if he misses his fight because there are not check—in desks open? hf because there are not check-in desks o en? . because there are not check-in desks o en? , ., ., open? if it is the fault of the airline, absolutely. - open? if it is the fault of the airline, absolutely. that i open? if it is the fault of the i airline, absolutely. that would be in this case? _ airline, absolutely. that would be in this case? absolutely. - airline, absolutely. that would be in this case? absolutely. once i airline, absolutely. that would be | in this case? absolutely. once you have cleared _ in this case? absolutely. once you have cleared security _ in this case? absolutely. once you
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have cleared security and - in this case? absolutely. once you have cleared security and i - in this case? absolutely. once you have cleared security and i was i in this case? absolutely. once you have cleared security and i was at| have cleared security and i was at stansted have cleared security and i was at sta nsted yesterday, have cleared security and i was at stansted yesterday, very busy, and if you are queueing up and spending lots of times in the shops and then trying to get on your fight, you might have an issue, so some of those things we need to take on board now and think about how we can make sure that we are not putting ourselves in a situation where we will miss the flight, but where it is the fault of the airline it is up to them to compensate you and make sure they can get you on a different flight or a full refund.— flight or a full refund. speaking of alternative flights, _ flight or a full refund. speaking of alternative flights, this _ flight or a full refund. speaking of alternative flights, this question | alternative flights, this question says, can we get our money back if the airline has rescheduled a fight for the next day and maybe you can�*t travel then? for the next day and maybe you can't travel then?— travelthen? yes. the rules are secific, travelthen? yes. the rules are specific. if _ travelthen? yes. the rules are specific, if your _ travelthen? yes. the rules are specific, if your flight _ travelthen? yes. the rules are specific, if your flight is - travelthen? yes. the rules are| specific, if your flight is delayed by five — specific, if your flight is delayed by five hours, you have an automatic i’i l ht by five hours, you have an automatic right to _ by five hours, you have an automatic right to a _ by five hours, you have an automatic right to a refund, and if it is a package — right to a refund, and if it is a package holiday it is slightly dependent on the overall extent of your trip— dependent on the overall extent of your trip but a 24—hour delay for a two-week— your trip but a 24—hour delay for a two—week holiday seems a candidate for getting _
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two—week holiday seems a candidate for getting a full refund. nice two-week holiday seems a candidate for getting a full refund.— for getting a full refund. nice and clear, we like _ for getting a full refund. nice and clear, we like that. _ for getting a full refund. nice and clear, we like that. claire - for getting a full refund. nice and clear, we like that. claire says, i for getting a full refund. nice and clear, we like that. claire says, is it whether setting off to the airport for my tui flight of the company keeps cancelling flights? claire will be one of the people who could be affected by those six cancellations per day out of manchester, presumably. should you set off if you think it is at risk? difficult one. if you haven�*t been notified there is every chance and in the vast majority of cases, 37 fights out of their full capacity, thatis fights out of their full capacity, that is a small percentage, not great for claire at all but if you haven�*t been notified you will need to set off to the airport and hopefully your fight will be fine but in the vast majority of cases flights will take off and millions of people will be able to enjoy their holiday. i of people will be able to en'oy their holiday.i of people will be able to en'oy their holiday. of people will be able to en'oy their holida . , ., ., their holiday. i understand that tui have told everyone _ their holiday. i understand that tui have told everyone who _ their holiday. i understand that tui have told everyone who is - their holiday. i understand that tui have told everyone who is in - their holiday. i understand that tui have told everyone who is in this i have told everyone who is in this contingent— have told everyone who is in this contingent for the six flights per day that— contingent for the six flights per day that your flight is cancelled so
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they know — day that your flight is cancelled so they know and anybody who is travelling over the next two weeks is entitled — travelling over the next two weeks is entitled to cash compensation on top of— is entitled to cash compensation on top of what — is entitled to cash compensation on top of what tui is doing on top of the refunds and giving everybody a £200 _ the refunds and giving everybody a £200 voucher although i have spoken to people _ £200 voucher although i have spoken to people today who said if they think— to people today who said if they think they are travelling with tui again— think they are travelling with tui again they have got another thing coming _ again they have got another thing coming. however, i have always turned _ coming. however, i have always turned up — coming. however, i have always turned up if they have got the right product _ turned up if they have got the right product at — turned up if they have got the right product at the right price.— product at the right price. glutton for punishment! _ product at the right price. glutton for punishment! after _ product at the right price. glutton for punishment! after such - product at the right price. glutton for punishment! after such a i for punishment! after such a difficult two years for the aviation industry and for the tourism and travel industry, they are now spending even more cash having to compensate people? that spending even more cash having to compensate people?— spending even more cash having to compensate people? that is where the situation is going _ compensate people? that is where the situation is going to _ compensate people? that is where the situation is going to be _ compensate people? that is where the situation is going to be resolved. i situation is going to be resolved. by situation is going to be resolved. by the _ situation is going to be resolved. by the fact that, just look at the easyjet — by the fact that, just look at the easyjet cancellations, they said on easyjet cancellations, they said on friday— easyjet cancellations, they said on friday they will cancel 240 flights over the — friday they will cancel 240 flights over the next ten days and i think they are — over the next ten days and i think they are actually cancelling more,
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they are actually cancelling more, they cancelled 40 just today alone. but if _ they cancelled 40 just today alone. but if you _ they cancelled 40 just today alone. but if you look at the money they will have — but if you look at the money they will have to hand out to each passenger, £10 million, before they have even— passenger, £10 million, before they have even started paying for hotel accommodation and buying tickets on other airlines as they are obliged to do _ other airlines as they are obliged to do that— other airlines as they are obliged to do. that will be repeated at the tui who _ to do. that will be repeated at the tui who are losing a lot of revenue as well— tui who are losing a lot of revenue as well as — tui who are losing a lot of revenue as well as having to compensate people _ as well as having to compensate people and effectively that's a great — people and effectively that's a great incentive, the incentive they need _ great incentive, the incentive they need to— great incentive, the incentive they need to start trying to make things a lot better. what they are terrified _ a lot better. what they are terrified of is that the government will say. _ terrified of is that the government will say, effectively, easyjet, tui, we don't _ will say, effectively, easyjet, tui, we don't think you can run all these trips. _ we don't think you can run all these trips. we _ we don't think you can run all these trips. we are — we don't think you can run all these trips, we are going to get you to cancel— trips, we are going to get you to cancel 10% — trips, we are going to get you to cancel 10% of your operation now for july and _ cancel 10% of your operation now for july and august which would mean holiday— makers july and august which would mean holiday—makers would july and august which would mean holiday— makers would find their trip has been _ holiday— makers would find their trip has been cancelled even though it may be _ has been cancelled even though it may be the company could have run it. may be the company could have run it very— may be the company could have run it. very difficult situation. but money— it. very difficult situation. but money talks as we know and it will be, money talks as we know and it will be. i_ money talks as we know and it will be. ithink. — money talks as we know and it will be, ithink, question money talks as we know and it will be, i think, question of them
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desperately trying to turn things around — desperately trying to turn things around because quite rightly consumers have some very valuable entitlements. consumers have some very valuable entitlements-— entitlements. interesting that tui are t in: entitlements. interesting that tui are trying to _ entitlements. interesting that tui are trying to get _ entitlements. interesting that tui are trying to get this _ entitlements. interesting that tui are trying to get this out - entitlements. interesting that tui are trying to get this out in - entitlements. interesting that tui are trying to get this out in the i are trying to get this out in the open upfront and then hopefully save themselves problems later down the line. we will see how it plays out. a question here from joan, any recommendations when travelling from airports? she is flying from manchester. i was caught up in some chaos in dublin at the weekend and it felt like i should have taken stakes and water for the queue to get into the airport building. —— taken snacks. ibe get into the airport building. -- taken snacks.— get into the airport building. -- taken snacks. be prepared, if you are travelling, _ taken snacks. be prepared, if you are travelling, when _ taken snacks. be prepared, if you are travelling, when is _ taken snacks. be prepared, if you are travelling, when is she - are travelling, when is she travelling?— are travelling, when is she i travelling?_ likely to are travelling, when is she - travelling?_ likely to be travelling? tomorrow. likely to be bus , in travelling? tomorrow. likely to be busy. in half— travelling? tomorrow. likely to be busy, in half term, _ travelling? tomorrow. likely to be busy, in half term, so _ travelling? tomorrow. likely to be busy, in half term, so be - travelling? tomorrow. likely to be busy, in half term, so be prepared because there might be cute and she may have to queue a bit longer. —— there might be queues. take stacks and games and check her flights before she departs, and check she has the right paperwork because
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let�*s not forget, when we are travelling there are still restrictions at the other end and it is very easy to forget. i went to spain yesterday and forgot you had to wear a mask. you have got to remember there are still restrictions and by other small things that will help us minimise some of the anxiety and stress where haven�*t travelled. flan some of the anxiety and stress where haven't travelled.— haven't travelled. can i be slightly counterintuitive _ haven't travelled. can i be slightly counterintuitive and _ haven't travelled. can i be slightly counterintuitive and say, - haven't travelled. can i be slightly counterintuitive and say, don't i haven't travelled. can i be slightly | counterintuitive and say, don't turn up counterintuitive and say, don't turn up too _ counterintuitive and say, don't turn up too early. — counterintuitive and say, don't turn up too early, because this is causing _ up too early, because this is causing some of the problems. individual— causing some of the problems. individual point of view, if you have _ individual point of view, if you have a — individual point of view, if you have a ten— individual point of view, if you have a ten o'clock flight from manchester airport in the morning, you might — manchester airport in the morning, you might think i will turn up at five o'clock— you might think i will turn up at five o'clock and make absolutely sure i_ five o'clock and make absolutely sure i will— five o'clock and make absolutely sure i will get on my flight, and that will— sure i will get on my flight, and that will happen, but you will be in the way— that will happen, but you will be in the way of— that will happen, but you will be in the way of me turning up for my seven— the way of me turning up for my seven o'clock flight where i thought a couple _ seven o'clock flight where i thought a couple of hours will be enough, and actually the fact you are there means— and actually the fact you are there means i_ and actually the fact you are there means i will be delayed. so actually it is not— means i will be delayed. so actually it is not a _ means i will be delayed. so actually it is not a popular thing for the airports — it is not a popular thing for the airports to— it is not a popular thing for the airports to say, but some of this is down _ airports to say, but some of this is down to— airports to say, but some of this is down to rational individual passenger behaviour which taken as a whole _
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passenger behaviour which taken as a whole means that things get government up even more than they might— government up even more than they might be _ government up even more than they might be. we government up even more than they miaht be. ~ , ., government up even more than they miahtbe.~ , ., , might be. we should remember -- throw things _ might be. we should remember -- throw things get _ might be. we should remember -- throw things get government i might be. we should remember -- throw things get government up. i i have had a tough time? yes, so be kind and nice _ i have had a tough time? yes, so be kind and nice because _ i have had a tough time? yes, so be kind and nice because they - i have had a tough time? yes, so be kind and nice because they are i kind and nice because they are trying hard to get this right and the only thing they want is for people to have a nice holiday and a great time. people to have a nice holiday and a treat time. �* . people to have a nice holiday and a great time-— great time. let's hope people get awa after great time. let's hope people get away after a _ great time. let's hope people get away after a difficult _ great time. let's hope people get away after a difficult couple i great time. let's hope people get away after a difficult couple of. away after a difficult couple of years. thanks to both of you. plenty more still coming in over the course of the afternoon. much more information about what to do if your flight is cancelled and what rights you have, that was on the bbc news website.
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now it's time for a look at the weather. we are looking at an unsettled day of weather today. it is a day of sunshine and showers and if i show you the radar picture you can see just how extensive the showers have been recently nationwide. with so many showers around even the hay bales out in the countryside have decided to don their waterproofs. for the west of the afternoon the showers are going to turn heavy with hail and thunder mixed in. some of the wettest will tend to be across north england close to this area, the winds will converge, with heavy downpours from northumberland down to yorkshire and lincolnshire as well. a few big storms as well across the south—east of england but showers should tend to become less frequent for wales and south—west england. becoming a bit drier here with some sunshine. we end the day with a band of rain pushing across northern ireland. overnight, that area of rain is going to be moving into wales and perhaps the west midlands.
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parts of eastern scotland overnight, too. temperatures similar to recent nights. 5—7c for some of you. tomorrow it is another unsettled day. this feature of a moving area across wales will turn more showery as it turns into east anglia through the afternoon. the showers will turn increasingly heavy, again with the risk of hail and thunder. between the showers a bit more in the way of sunny spells back into across western areas later in the day and that should start to lift the temperatures. indeed, as we get towards the end of the week, generally, the weather will turn a bit drier but we do have a little system trying to come in off the atlantic. now, for thursday, many areas will have a dry day with spells of sunshine. it is going to feel warmer in the sunshine, too, but there is the threat of some getting nearer to northern ireland as we go through thursday afternoon. temperatures higher, 19 in glasgow, around the low 20s for parts of england and wales. a few showers across north—western
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areas on friday but otherwise, many areas again dry, with some spells of sunshine and feeling quite warm in the sunshine. 19 in glasgow, 22 is the top temperature around the cardiff area. now, looking into the weekend, we're probably going to see some rain move in to southern areas. it could be humid and thundery and starts to turn more humid across the south. the driest weather for the weekend will be across northern areas of the uk so, for the platinumjubilee, a lot of dry weather, sunshine and there could be some rain around.
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calls for more children in england to be given free school meals to help tackle the cost of living crisis. everything is shooting up in price. things that were £1 are now £1.10. it adds to the panic as well and you are just thinking, how am i going to get through this month? _ more travel misery for airline passengers as the travel giant tui confirms 3a,000 holiday makers have been affected by a month of cancellations at manchester airport. andy murray — who as a child survived the dunblane school shooting — speaks out about us gun laws, and says the shooting in texas last week made him �*incredibly upset�*. surely at some stage you do something different, like, you can't keep approaching the problem, you know, by buying more guns and having more
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guns in the country. another conservative mp calls on the prime minister to resign over downing street lockdown parties. and former cabinet minister andrea leadsom criticises him for �*unacceptable failures of leadership.�* binley mega chippy! and coming up, the once humble chip shop in coventry, that�*s now at tiktok sensation. there are calls today to give more children in england free school meals to help tackle the cost of living crisis. teaching unions say all children from families on universal credit
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should be eligible forfree meals, as part of an �*urgent�* expansion of the scheme. the cost of food, fuel and other goods has surged in recent months — pushing inflation to a iio—year high. here�*s our education correspondent, elaine dunkley. more children than ever are coming through the doors. at capacity... we opened 11 minutes ago, we�*ve only got a small room, we are going to be busy. at this free half—term holiday club in stockport there are activities and, crucially, for some children, a meal. so the room is full and there will be kids down the street with take—out boxes of food. so, yes, more than we can handle. we know a lot of the families who come here are living in food poverty. and many of them aren�*t on free school meals. one of the things we have noticed is our food banks are always run in the morning and some people are asking if they can come at night, because people are working full—time, and still can�*t make ends meet.
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did you want one as well? lucy is a working mum of three and is currently on maternity leave. she doesn�*t qualify for free school meals because she earns above the eligibility threshold of £7,1i00 a year after tax not including benefits. everything even from the daily shop, getting bits in, even the cost of baby milk, everything isjust shooting up in price. things that were £1 are now £1.10. when it is half—term holidays, it adds, and it adds to the panic as well. you are thinking, how am i going to get food this month? and it is notjust parents who are feeling the impact of rising prices. tj, harley and ben get £5 a week pocket money. the ice cream man around here is very nice but... called pete! and the ice creams, a normal ice cream with like a cone, that used to be 90p. 99p. and then it went to £1.20. every single thing... has gone up about 20p. in england, children who get free school meals during term time now receive vouchers during the holidays.
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according to the government an estimated four million children live in relative poverty. however, fewer than two million pupils are eligible for free school meals. in a letter to the government, head teachers are warning that change is urgently needed. with the need to level up in the country, then, there are a whole range of reasons why universal free school meals and ensuring that every child has a hot, nutritious meal every single day of the working week, itjust couldn't be more important, if i am honest with you. the department for education says it has expanded access for free school meals more than any other government in recent decades. here at the hub, rachel is determined not to send anyone away without a meal. but as prices continue to rise, so does the anxiety for working families struggling with the cost of living. elaine dunkley reporting there and
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early i spoke to the former conservative mp and education secretaryjustine greening. i put it to her that the welfare system is just not keeping up with a record rise in prices. in the spring statement where the chancellor set out a cost of living package, he did increase a welfare payment for people on universal credit but what he didn�*t do was uprate in line with the inflation and as we know for families on the lowest incomes, their inflation and their experience is higher than that 9% headline rate, so we do need to look at other ways we can make sure we get good support to families worst affected and therefore the government needs to look at its free school meal policies and honestly got in a mess last summer with the marcus rashford campaign and it now needs to get ahead of the curve. i would like to see a package on free school meals that doesn�*t just increase eligibility
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as your piece set out, but also looks at the school holidays provision and we need to resolve that once and for all and then finally, it needs to look at the amount that schools are being given to provide school meals and make sure it keeps in line with inflation. we will come onto the provision for school holidays in a moment but to talk about the marcus rashford issue, it clearly brought it into the spotlight as he was getting involved, so how confident are you that the government can be be on the front foot, because as we saw they were very reactive and slow in responding to calls last summer, so do you get a sense that there is a strategy and plan to deal with it right now. not at the moment but i think it needs to stay that way and ministers can take simple decisions that will make a big impact and help parents who are worrying about how
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they make sure they keep their children fed and you mentioned in your package that threshold for universal credit, that is the threshold i set when i was education secretary and that is several years ago and the challenge is that has not shifted in line with inflation, so it has meant that fewer people were eligible for free school meals and therefore its another reason why the government needs to get ahead of the curve. we know we are facing a difficult autumn ahead on cost of living and it�*s really important we take the steps now to avoid people getting into more hardship than they otherwise would be. as ever, when spending decisions are at stake, it�*s a matter of priorities. we know we will face one of the big squeeze on incomes in a generation and prices already at a a0 year high and the government has a finite amount of money and will have to look at where it spends the money but i don�*t know if you are able to hear any of the interview earlier and we spoke to one school teacher
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who said kids are coming to school without any meal, haven�*t had an evening meal the night before, or breakfast that morning. these formative years of children�*s education and getting them in a situation where they have eaten and can learn should quite clearly be a priority, should it not? i think it has to be and it�*s a good investment to make sure children are getting into school and are able to concentrate and learn and make the most of that school experience. there�*s more misery for thousands of travellers with the tour operator tui announcing the cancellation of six holiday flights a day from manchester airport until the end ofjune. in the past few minutes tui has confirmed that 3a,000 holidaymakers have been affected by the month of cancellations at manchester airport. like other travel companies, it�*s blaming staff shortages after the pandemic. but the government says the airline industry has had months to prepare
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for the half term rush and should have put extra staff in place. there are fears of more disruption over thejubilee weekend and into the summer. gareth barlow reports. it is set to be one of the busiest travel periods of the year, 2 million people taking to the skies for the bank holiday weekend but the surge in passenger numbers has led to a surge in disruption. in manchester, tui which calls itself the uk�*s leading travel brand has announced it will cancel six flights a day from the city airport until the end ofjune. in a statement, the company said this. the main reason for the disruption is said to be staff shortages in baggage handling and check in.
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swissport and tui said rising flight numbers were exacerbating resource challenges across the industry and the firm is working hard to recruit more workers. but for holidaymakers like joanna and her family due to travel from manchester this morning, those extra workers are too little, too late. last night, the cases were packed, we were ready to go. we received a text last night at 730 saying the holiday had been cancelled. no explanation. nobody has been in touch. the chancellor rishi sunak defended the government�*s support for the industry and said ministers were focused on helping ease the current challenges. we have put in place billions of pounds of support for the travel industry particularly during the pandemic. right now, there are conversations to make sure that disruption can be eased, that is where the focus is. the government had been warned many months ago losing skilled workers from the aviation industry would cause significant
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delays when people started going back on holiday. they knew airports did not have staff for security, ground control, cabin crew, they knew people would be going on holiday at half—term. it is simply not good enough. despite the headlines and travel headaches, industry representatives say for the majority of passengers it is business and holidays as usual. the vast majority are able to travel, we are sendingl millions of people abroad, every single week, so, - it is in an evolving. state, getting better. with more of us are set to go away over the bank holiday weekend, holiday—makers and travel operators are still braced for more disappointment and disruption. gareth barlow, bbc news. let�*s speak now to mattjohnson. he was due to fly with his family to bulgaria from manchester airport this morning with tui but they were told last night their holiday was cancelled as they packed up the car.
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iam i am guessing you are not in bulgaria right now. unfortunately not, we bulgaria right now. unfortunately not. we are _ bulgaria right now. unfortunately not. we are in — bulgaria right now. unfortunately not, we are in overcast, - bulgaria right now. unfortunately not, we are in overcast, rainy - not, we are in overcast, rainy cleethorpes. not, we are in overcast, rainy cleethorpes-_ not, we are in overcast, rainy cleethores. , ., ., , , cleethorpes. tell us what happened when ou cleethorpes. tell us what happened when you got _ cleethorpes. tell us what happened when you got to _ cleethorpes. tell us what happened when you got to the _ cleethorpes. tell us what happened when you got to the airport. - when you got to the airport. thankfully we had not left for the airport and were in the process of loading up the suitcases and about seven o�*clock yesterday evening got a text saying to check your e—mails and an e—mailsaying a text saying to check your e—mails and an e—mail saying that due to operational difficulties the holiday was cancelled. 50. operational difficulties the holiday was cancelled.— was cancelled. so, cancelled out riuht. did was cancelled. so, cancelled out right- did they — was cancelled. so, cancelled out right. did they give _ was cancelled. so, cancelled out right. did they give you - was cancelled. so, cancelled out right. did they give you any - was cancelled. so, cancelled out| right. did they give you any other options for maybe going on a different day or rebooking or anything like that? the different day or rebooking or anything like that? the e-mail was ueneric anything like that? the e-mail was generic and — anything like that? the e-mail was generic and said _ anything like that? the e-mail was generic and said that _ anything like that? the e-mail was generic and said that a _ generic and said that a representative would be in touch and we�*ve not heard from anyone, no further e—mails or communication, nothing. 50 further e-mails or communication, nothin. _ . ., , further e-mails or communication, nothinu. ., , ., ., nothing. so clearly holiday are lookin: nothing. so clearly holiday are looking forward _ nothing. so clearly holiday are looking forward to, _ nothing. so clearly holiday are looking forward to, something nothing. so clearly holiday are i looking forward to, something all nothing. so clearly holiday are - looking forward to, something all of us are wanting to do after two years of not being able to go away at all. i guess it�*s an obvious question, but how disappointed are you all? very. when you have a toddler and
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you break the news to them that we are not going on holiday, and we know we are not the only ones and the whole industry seems to be in disarray at the moment, so it�*s one of those things unfortunately. i�*m more disappointed with and the inability to give us any updates or any detailed explanation as to why this happened. any detailed explanation as to why this happened-— any detailed explanation as to why this happened. that's what i wanted to ask. this happened. that's what i wanted to ask- how— this happened. that's what i wanted to ask. how much _ this happened. that's what i wanted to ask. how much information - this happened. that's what i wanted | to ask. how much information having been given, apart from being told your holiday is not happening? any sense of how might make this right, or even the cause of the problem? no. in the e—mail, fairly generic, saying there will be a full refund in 14 days and it mentioned something about being eligible for compensation but there was no follow—up or direction of how to go around the application process of getting that. there is nothing. we tried ringing in the morning. obviously we have been on twitter trying to get hold of someone, but nothing. i know they are
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understaffed and busy but a two—minute courteous phone call would make all the difference. what would make all the difference. what we are finding _ would make all the difference. what we are finding as _ would make all the difference. what we are finding as there _ would make all the difference. what we are finding as there are so many other expenses that go with going on holidays and have not recovered things like extra bought you might have bought to go on holidays, booked airport parking or had cabs and are you out of pocket for that sort of stuff?— and are you out of pocket for that sort of stuff? unfortunately we paid for airort sort of stuff? unfortunately we paid for airport parking _ sort of stuff? unfortunately we paid for airport parking and _ sort of stuff? unfortunately we paid for airport parking and it's - sort of stuff? unfortunately we paid for airport parking and it's not - for airport parking and it�*s not their fault the holiday was cancelled, you have to give 2a hours noticed and we are down hundred and £25 and we will close, suitcases, we got money transferred, and when you exchange it back you lose money. it's exchange it back you lose money. it�*s those little things that add up. they might not be a big hit in one go but it�*ll be 300 or £400 easy. one go but it'll be 300 or £400 eas . �* one go but it'll be 300 or £400 eas . ~ , ., one go but it'll be 300 or £400 eas.�* �* one go but it'll be 300 or £400 eas. , one go but it'll be 300 or £400 eas.~ �*, ., one go but it'll be 300 or £400 eas. , . ., easy. and you can't put a price on the disappointment _ easy. and you can't put a price on the disappointment as _ easy. and you can't put a price on the disappointment as well. - easy. and you can't put a price on l the disappointment as well. there's the disappointment as well. there�*s a lot of criticism that these airlines and airports should have seen it coming and been a bit more planned and new people are going on holiday and they knew you were going
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to turn up at the airport, so why were they not better prepared. do you have any sympathy when they say we have been through two years of chaos and we are just getting back up chaos and we are just getting back up and running? do you think they should have done this before now? i have a little bit of sympathy for the front facing staff, the ones who have to stand there and tell your holiday is cancelled but whole airline industry was raving to get back to full capacity after the capacity and get planes going and everyone has fallen flat on their face and booked holidays and we were under the assumption everything would be fine and they sold the dream and we would be working at full capacity and they can handle it and the last two and three months have been utter disarray. what and the last two and three months have been utter disarray. what will ou do have been utter disarray. what will you do now? _ have been utter disarray. what will you do now? have _ have been utter disarray. what will you do now? have you _ have been utter disarray. what will you do now? have you been - have been utter disarray. what will you do now? have you been able i have been utter disarray. what will| you do now? have you been able to look around to see if there is another holiday you can go on? we had a another holiday you can go on? , had a very frantic look last night but there was nothing and with it being thejubilee weekend, it�*s expensive to go away in this country, so i think we willjust settle for a few days out and then
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look to book next year but not with tui. i look to book next year but not with tui. . , look to book next year but not with tui. ., , ., ., look to book next year but not with tui. ., ., ., tui. i was going to say, are you minded to _ tui. i was going to say, are you minded to find _ tui. i was going to say, are you minded to find another - tui. i was going to say, are you minded to find another travel l minded to find another travel company?— minded to find another travel coman ? , ., ., , company? yes. you always see when thins company? yes. you always see when things personally _ company? yes. you always see when things personally hit _ company? yes. you always see when things personally hit you _ company? yes. you always see when things personally hit you and - company? yes. you always see when things personally hit you and our - things personally hit you and our council but the damage to the reputation for a lot of the airlines, especially tui, i think people will be reluctant to book with them and i think people will be wary of turning up to the airport and being able to enjoy that week before packing and getting exciting, knowing there are so many cancellations at the moment. yes, because. cancellations at the moment. yes, because- i — cancellations at the moment. yes, because. i really _ cancellations at the moment. yes, because. i really wish _ cancellations at the moment. yes, because. i really wish i _ cancellations at the moment. yes, because. i really wish i was - cancellations at the moment. yes, because. i really wish i was talking to you somewhere sunny like bulgaria and i wish you had been made bold to make it. but thank you for talking to us and if you have some time off, enjoy, even though you are at home. thank you very much.— thank you very much. more on that a little later- —
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police and prosecutors should immediately stop subjecting rape victims to excessive scrutiny according to a new report. the uk�*s information commissioner says that victims are being treated as suspects — with prosecutors collecting large amounts of personal information about them. our home affairs correspondent june kelly reports it�*s known as the digital strip search. many rape complainants have to consent to hand over their phones as part of the criminal investigation. they are also being asked for a whole range of personal information. we�*ve heard from complainants whose cases didn�*t get to trial and who have waived their right to anonymity to speak out. they got all of my medical records, which, unfortunately, are quite substantial. my social care records and a complete download of my mobile phone. looking back on it, it is such a violation. it felt as though i was the one that was being investigated,
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i was the one on trial, i was the one that had committed a crime. there are things in my medical records that are just personal, that you don't want, you know, an investigating officer, potentially even the defence, asking for as well, to be scrutinised. it's now sitting in a police cabinet somewhere, it's not destroyed, it's still out there. this trawl by police and prosecutors should stop immediately, says the uk�*s information commissioner, whose job it is to uphold information rights. in some cases school records are being examined. what�*s the line that can come from a forged letter justifying an absence, given when they were a teenager, to an event that happened last saturday night? we have called our report, "who is under investigation?", because the experience of many survivors of these offences is that they are the ones who are being investigated, not the suspects. the information commissioner is warning police and prosecutors
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they could be fined if they don�*t put a brake on the collection of information. they stress they are working to improve the system. the home office says it is launching a consultation exercise but campaigners say more legislation is needed to make the gathering of so much personal information illegal. june kelly, bbc news. silkie carlo, who is the director of big brother watch, which is a non—profit non—party british civil liberties and privacy campaigning organisation. silkiejoins me now why is all of this extra information being sought by investigators in these cases?— being sought by investigators in these cases? that is a very good auestion these cases? that is a very good question and _ these cases? that is a very good question and the _ these cases? that is a very good question and the question - these cases? that is a very good question and the question we i these cases? that is a very good l question and the question we have been asking for years in campaigning against this because we can see, year after year, there are thousands of assaults going on prosecuted and women who are dropping out of the system or their cases are being closed because they are not willing to subject themselves to these digital strip searches. if you think about it, the sheer volume of
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information on all of our phones far exceeds the kinds of information that police would get in a house search, for example. you have work, e—mail, photos, messages that might date over a decade and all of that is being taken by the police. our impression has been, i have to say that it impression has been, i have to say thatitis impression has been, i have to say that it is used as effectively a character reference and exactly as many women have said, that they do feel when they are reporting these offences, they are the people who are under suspicion and who are investigated, not the suspect. earlier we were talking to one prosecutor who said that what is so troubling about this is that you would never ask for this sort of data for any other crime, it seems to be just related to these cases. do we get any sense of any justification as to why this is deemed to be necessary? i think there have _ deemed to be necessary? i think there have been _ deemed to be necessary? i think there have been a _ deemed to be necessary? i think there have been a lot _ deemed to be necessary? i think there have been a lot of- deemed to be necessary? i think there have been a lot of myths l there have been a lot of myths perpetuated about women lying about
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this kind of crime, and even if that were the case, in the course of investigation, and these investigations can be very robust with the powers police have, if there is not evidence that a crime has happened, nobody is going to go to jail, and instead what seems to happen is that the complainant of the offence is investigated and police will delve into her medical records, even school records that we have seen. i�*ve been advising a woman in a case where even when she was hospitalised after an attack, the first thing the police asked her for what i phone. which is mind blowing, really. lots of people feel that they are under investigation. this is not a difficult thing to fix for the government and we�*ve just had new legislation going through parliament, the police bill and their new digital instruction powers but they have not the kinds of reforms in the report is all
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welcome. it was a bit too little and welcome. it was a bit too little and we need more torque and actual reforms. ~ . , we need more torque and actual reforms. ~ ., , ., reforms. what is the impact on victims who — reforms. what is the impact on victims who have _ reforms. what is the impact on victims who have been - reforms. what is the impact on victims who have been throughj reforms. what is the impact on - victims who have been through one of the most horrendous experiences they have ever faced but are being asked to provide this information and you touched on the fact that some will say i will not prosecute and i don�*t want to hand over all of this information and just walk away. it�*s information and 'ust walk away. it's a ve information and just walk away. it�*s a very daunting experience and i would encourage any women in that situation, if they can, to try to go through the process and contact groups like us if they are faced with these demands. because they do deserve justice and that is what we are still trying to fight for, but i have to say the impact i have seen for many women has been extraordinary, and this also goes on for a very long time. so people find themselves caught in the criminal justice process for two or three years, sometimes whilst they try to negotiate with the police about the
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sheer volumes of data that the police request on them while the suspect walks free, and all of this is happening in a year where we have had record sexual offences recorded and a record failing to prosecute, only i% are being prosecuted now at all, so it really is important that this is seriously reformed and urgently. i this is seriously reformed and uraentl. , , ., ., this is seriously reformed and uruentl. , , ., ., ., urgently. i suppose this works on a case-by-case _ urgently. i suppose this works on a case-by-case basis. _ urgently. i suppose this works on a case-by-case basis. certain - urgently. i suppose this works on a case-by-case basis. certain bits. urgently. i suppose this works on a case-by-case basis. certain bits of| case—by—case basis. certain bits of information or evidence will be more relevant in different cases. but is there a guide? what would you like to see is a basic approach that says you don�*t need that, and these are the things that we think are acceptable to request? b, the things that we think are acceptable to request? a lot of the data that police _ acceptable to request? a lot of the data that police want _ acceptable to request? a lot of the data that police want is _ acceptable to request? a lot of the data that police want is sensitive, l data that police want is sensitive, personal data because of the nature of the stuff we have on our phones and it shouldn�*t be strictly necessary. too often we see this casual approach buet before even investigating the case, the police willjust
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investigating the case, the police will just ask the phone investigating the case, the police willjust ask the phone and all of the contents and what they should be doing is identifying a line of inquiry, and what do they need? are there other ways they can get it like screen shots rather than downloading the whole content of the phone and something very simple that we�*ve asked for that could make a huge differences for the complainant to have a right to review of a request so if the review says i want to take masses of gigabytes of data from the phone, so many can say, i would like that request to be reviewed by a more senior officer. it's reviewed by a more senior officer. it�*s a simple thing and i don�*t understand why they are dragging their heels. bud understand why they are dragging their heels. �* ., ., , ., ,., their heels. and one wonders about their heels. and one wonders about the safeguards _ their heels. and one wonders about the safeguards with _ their heels. and one wonders about the safeguards with the _ their heels. and one wonders about the safeguards with the data - their heels. and one wonders about the safeguards with the data where | the safeguards with the data where it is dispersed to and where it is used and stored ultimately because we know increasingly we live our lives on our digital handsets, tablets, that sort of things, and much of our life is there and our personal information and into whose hands could it fall?— hands could it fall? absolutely. one ofthe hands could it fall? absolutely. one of the problems _ hands could it fall? absolutely. one of the problems we've _ hands could it fall? absolutely. one of the problems we've seen - hands could it fall? absolutely. one of the problems we've seen with - hands could it fall? absolutely. one | of the problems we've seen with the of the problems we�*ve seen with the existing system is that complainants
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told by police that we will take all of the contents of your phone and store it for 100 years. that is really unthinkable. even suspects are not subjected to these kinds of investigations, are really serious crimes, so it�*s a really extraordinary extremes —— intrusion and understandably it�*s when people find the courage to report offences to the police they are facing these extraordinary barriers, and an impossible choice between protecting their privacy and their dignity and seeking justice and trying to keep other people say.— other people say. thank you. it's been really _ other people say. thank you. it's been really fascinating, - other people say. thank you. it's been really fascinating, the - other people say. thank you. it's i been really fascinating, the insight into this and many people went up in aware of, say thank you very much. the canadian government has introduced tough new legislation to crack down on the sale, transfer, and importation of handguns. the country�*s prime minister,
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justin trudeau, said no one needs guns in their everyday lives except for hunting or sports shooting. he added that his government has a duty to act against rising gun violence. the world health organisation has said it doesn�*t yet know if it will be able to completely contain the spread of monkeypox. the uk health security agency says 11 new cases of monkeypox have been detected in england with the total number of cases confirmed in the uk now at 190. health officials say the risk to the population remains low. the mp for carlislejohn stevenson has become the latest conservative backbencher to confirm submitting a no—confidence letter in the prime minister, borisjohnson — in the wake of partygate. earlier the former cabinet minister, dame andrea leadsom, hit out at the pm�*s "unacceptable failures of leadership" — but dame andrea did notjoin the ranks of tory mps to call on mrjohnson to resign.
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is this actually getting more serious for the prime minister and what does the intervention from andrea leadsom mean, if anything? it andrea leadsom mean, ifanything? it certainly seems the situation is getting more serious for him because we have 20 conservative mps calling publicly on borisjohnson to go and you are right to sayjohn stevenson, the mp for carlisle, is the latest. he says he would have liked the prime minister to have a vote of confidence in himself to make the decision and draw a line under all of this it feels like mps like him will have to take action that he has submitted a letter to that powerful backbench committee of tory mps, 1922 committee and of course that number if it reaches 54, there would be a vote of confidence in boris johnson�*s leadership although 28 have publicly called on him to go we don�*t know the number of letters that have been submitted because not all of them might have put in a letter and actually some people
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might have put in a letter quietly without making a fanfare. andrea leadsom is someone who has been slightly more vague about what action she has taken. she was a cabinet colleague in borisjohnson, business secretary under his leadership and she has written a letter to constituents in which she is very critical of what came out of the report and said there had been unacceptable failures of leadership that cannot be tolerated and she says it is now for her and her conservative colleagues to decide the right course of action, so keeping it a bit more vague about what she may or may not have done when it comes to submitting a letter. there is one person who knows how many letters calling for a leadership contest have been submitted, and that is sir graham brady, a conservative mp, the chair of that powerful 1922 committee and has actually been out and about today in grantham at the official unveiling of a statue of margaret
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thatcher and our bbc colleagues managed to grab him and ask the obvious question, how many letters are in and he said they were free to ask but he was going to retain his discretion for now, and then they askedif discretion for now, and then they asked if he had been spending a lot of his time counting up the number of his time counting up the number of letters and here is what he had to say. of letters and here is what he had to sa . ., .., of letters and here is what he had tosa. ., ., ., of letters and here is what he had tosa. ., ., to say. you can always ask and i say to say. you can always ask and i say to --eole to say. you can always ask and i say to people they _ to say. you can always ask and i say to people they are _ to say. you can always ask and i say to people they are free _ to say. you can always ask and i say to people they are free to _ to say. you can always ask and i say to people they are free to do - to say. you can always ask and i say to people they are free to do that, l to people they are free to do that, and i_ to people they are free to do that, and i shall— to people they are free to do that, and i shall retain my discretion. and i_ and i shall retain my discretion. and i can — and i shall retain my discretion. and i can say nothing more. do you add u- and i can say nothing more. do you add up the — and i can say nothing more. do you add up the letters _ and i can say nothing more. do you add up the letters daily? _ and i can say nothing more. do you add up the letters daily? how - and i can say nothing more. do you add up the letters daily? how often do you look at them? it is add up the letters daily? how often do you look at them?— do you look at them? it is not a reuular do you look at them? it is not a regular pastime. _ do you look at them? it is not a regular pastime. lots _ do you look at them? it is not a regular pastime. lots of- regular pastime. lots of speculation, _ regular pastime. lots of speculation, parliamentj regular pastime. lots of. speculation, parliament in regular pastime. lots of— speculation, parliament in recess, jubilee weekend, and even if the letters are in, he is not forced to and he may not decide to announce anything this week anyway. i and he may not decide to announce anything this week anyway.- anything this week anyway. i think that's entirely _ anything this week anyway. i think that's entirely true. _ anything this week anyway. i think that's entirely true. sir _ anything this week anyway. i think that's entirely true. sir graham . that�*s entirely true. sir graham does have quite a bit of discretion around exactly how process all works, and as you say, parliament is currently in recess, so quite a lot
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of speculation that he would not reveal, even if the threshold had been hit, while mps are worried from westminster because that could create a bit about power vacuum about what happens next —— away from westminster, and the queensjubilee weekend this weekend, he might think the appropriate thing to do is wait until that is all over before taking things forward, but like we say, he is the only person who knows the true number of letters that are in and all we can say at this point is that 28 have publicly called on borisjohnson to go, 28 of his own mps and we know quite a large proportion of them have submitted letters. one mp did say to me yesterday that they knew are quite a few who have also put in letters who have not gone public with that, so sir graham is the man who knows and is not saying much at the moment. absolutely. i know you will keep us posted if there is any change in that. for now, thanks very much. now it�*s time for a look
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at the weather with chris. looking a bit mixed for the weekend with some thundery rain in the south perhaps but otherwise largely dry. we had some downpours today with some localised flooding and also some localised flooding and also some funnel clouds which are tornadoes which don�*t quite make it tornadoes which don�*t quite make it to the ground. this is a shelf cloud and it shows a vigorous storm which you can get grief tornadoes from at times. the radar picture —— brief tornadoes. showers are widespread in scotland and we have some rain moving its way over northern ireland and overnight that will eventually work its way into wales but otherwise shower is slowly dying away and probably still a few for eastern scotland especially into the scottish borders. this feature across wales slides east so taking the rain eased and it will turn more showery in nature but those showers will not be a heavy as we head into
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the afternoon. many northern and western areas will be dry and a bit warmer as well. that is the latest. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines: calls for more children in england to be given free school meals — to help tackle the cost of living crisis. more travel misery for airline passengers — as the travel giant tui confirms 34,000 holiday makers have been affected by a month of cancellations at manchester airport. andy murray — who as a child survived the dunblane school shooting — speaks out about us gun laws, and says the shooting in texas last week made him "incredibly upset." another conservative mp calls on the prime minister to resign over downing street lockdown parties. and former cabinet minister andrea leadsom criticises him for "unacceptable
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failures of leadership." sport now and a full round up from the bbc sport centre. good afternoon. a new era for test cricket on thursday but not as many as usual to see it at lord�*s. thousands of tickets remain unsold. joe wilson has more. so much as changed in english cricket and it is pertinent to look at those who remain, who have been recalled. the selection of james anderson and stuart broad, reinforces how vital it is for england to win this test match and to win any match, and remember the first test match against new zealand here at the second in nottingham. a lot of the focus before this game has surrounded ticket sales, it can be an expensive business to watch a test match and we wonder if the possibility that thousands of these seats may remain empty. to attract
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the fans to _ seats may remain empty. to attract the fans to watch _ seats may remain empty. to attract the fans to watch the _ seats may remain empty. to attract the fans to watch the team - seats may remain empty. to attract the fans to watch the team play - seats may remain empty. to attract the fans to watch the team play it i the fans to watch the team play it is very much we have got to build on that style of cricket and have a style of cricket that people want to watch. trent bridge is sold out for the first three days so there is still the support for the team. but from the players perspective we have got to make the commitment that we are going to be exciting and we want to draw people through the gates. the main task with making england more exciting is down to the new coach brendon mccullum who has been a playerfor new coach brendon mccullum who has been a player for new zealand, coach brendon mccullum who has been a playerfor new zealand, and once again england looking to new zealand for inspiration, so what is that country�*s secret? in for inspiration, so what is that country's secret?— for inspiration, so what is that country's secret? for inspiration, so what is that count 's secret? ., ., country's secret? in new zealand we have learned — country's secret? in new zealand we have learned to _ country's secret? in new zealand we have learned to box _ country's secret? in new zealand we have learned to box above _ country's secret? in new zealand we have learned to box above our - country's secret? in new zealand we l have learned to box above our weight for quite _ have learned to box above our weight for quite a _ have learned to box above our weight for quite a time and we have challenged with being a small country— challenged with being a small country and the lack of people playing — country and the lack of people playing at the lack of resources around, — playing at the lack of resources around, and we just muck in and try and get _ around, and we just muck in and try and get the — around, and we just muck in and try and get the best out of what we have -ot. and get the best out of what we have not. , , ., . , ,
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got. the first test match begins here on thursday _ got. the first test match begins here on thursday and _ got. the first test match begins here on thursday and england l got. the first test match begins . here on thursday and england once again will start with an approach to be more kiwi. david payne of gloucestershire has been called up for the one—day squad and there is also a return to international cricket for just butler, after playing in the ipl, after his team made the final there —— just butler. he has been named in the 14 man squad for the one—day matches injune. meanwhile essex have been threatened with punishment if they continue to fail to meet diversity targets set by the ecb. the governing body have a plan to increase diversity in board representation following azeem rafiq�*s claims of institutional racism in cricket. earlier this month, essex were fined £50,000 for a racist comment made by former chair john faragher in 2017. coco gauff has reached her first ever grand slam semi final after beating fellow
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american sloane stephens at the french open. the 18 year old won her quarter final in straight sets and she will face martina trevisan, an italian who has also never made it to a grand slam semi before. she beat canada�*s leylah fernandez at roland garros for a 10th straight victory, a run that included winning the pre—french open tournamnet in ra bat. two days after winning the monaco grand prix sergio perez has signed a new two year contract with red bull. the mexican has agreed the deal until 2024 and sits third in the current drivers�* standings behind his teammate max verstappen, who signed his own new deal in march. perez�*s win in monte carlo made him the most successful driver from his country in f1 history. live french open tennis going on on
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a bbc radio and also on the bbc website. that�*s all the sport for now. sir andy murray has told the bbc that last week�*s school shooting in texas left him angry and upset. when he was eight years old, murray surived the massacre at his primary school in dunblane, when a gunman killed 16 children and a teacher. murray says there need to be changes to america�*s gun laws. he�*s been speaking to our sports news correspondent laura scott. andy murray was busy preparing for the grass court season when he saw the news of the latest mass shooting in america... on social media, murray described the incident as madness, and one survivor�*s account in particular brought back painful memories of the horrific shootings that took place at his own school in dunblane in 1996.
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unbelievably sad and disappointing and itjust makes you feel angry and incredibly upset for the parents. i heard something on the radio the other day and it was a child from that school. i experienced a similar thing when i was at dunblane and a teacher coming out and waving at all of the children under tables and telling them to go and hide. and there was a kid telling exactly the same story about how she survived it. they were saying that they go through these drills as young children, seven, eight—year—old children, and it�*s like, how? how is that normal that children should be having to go through drills in case someone comes into school with a gun? i don�*t get it. murray feels strongly that the time has come for change. i think there have been over 200 mass shootings. ijust
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i just can�*t understand ijust can�*t understand that. there is always talk about it as something political but i don�*t see how it is. surely at some stage you do something different. the former world number one made light work of his first grass court match yesterday and has set himself lofty goals at wimbledon. there won�*t be ranking points available — punishment for the ban on russian and belarusian players over the war in ukraine. but murray says the trophy is what matters. i�*d give every ranking point i have won back to win another grand slam or another wimbledon. yes, i understand why rankings are important but a tournament like wimbledon is bigger than that. that�*s why i think all the players will still show up and play. as he embarks on another bid at wimbledon glory, it�*s clear events around the world are neverfarfrom his mind.
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only one police force in the uk is meeting a target to answer 90% of 999 calls in under 10 seconds, new data has shown. avon and somerset police was the only force to meet the standard, according to national statistics released for the first time by the home office. earlier, i asked our home affairs correspondent, daniel sandford to go through the findings. they want me target to be ten seconds, to get hold of the police, the force should meet 90% of the phone calls within ten seconds, and only avon and somerset have met that target. humberside police, by contrast, 2% of the phone calls are answered within ten seconds, so there is a massive difference there. the numbers of forces that are meeting at 10%, the number of people answering those calls is 70% so a lot of calls are not being answered
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within that critical ten second window. ~ . , ., , within that critical ten second window. . . , ., , , . window. what explains the difference from those who _ window. what explains the difference from those who are _ window. what explains the difference from those who are getting _ window. what explains the difference from those who are getting it - window. what explains the difference from those who are getting it right i from those who are getting it right to those who are missing the target tjy to those who are missing the target by a huge amount, is it down to resources? it by a huge amount, is it down to resources?_ by a huge amount, is it down to resources? it is about resourcing and anticipation _ resources? it is about resourcing and anticipation of— resources? it is about resourcing and anticipation of demand - resources? it is about resourcing and anticipation of demand and l and anticipation of demand and making sure that you don�*t staff at the same all the time and you need to have some idea of when you are likely to get more calls. some police forces have problems with technology and there is a lack, people dialled 999 before that gets through to them, often a second bike and that can explain the performance at times, and some forces have problems with prank calls and people not having confidence with the nonemergency services, they are dialling 999 when they shouldn�*t, but what forces can do apart from sorting out the attack is to make sure that they are resourcing in the same way that avon and somerset are to meet peak demand and make sure they are not having a one size fits
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all response to the 999 call answering. all response to the 999 call answering-— all response to the 999 call answerinu. ., ~ ., answering. often when we talk about these things. — answering. often when we talk about these things, often _ answering. often when we talk about these things, often it _ answering. often when we talk about these things, often it is _ answering. often when we talk about these things, often it is about - answering. often when we talk about these things, often it is about box i these things, often it is about box ticking and meeting targets but it should actually be about the care and the services provided once people have run the 999? —— run 999. there were a lot of targets in the 90s and 2000 and they were pretty much abandoned in 2010 because forces had tailored their entire operation around meeting home office targets and they were essentially gaming the system because that is what they were being told they had to meet. they were all abandoned and this is the beginning of targets creeping back in, and ministers would say, very specific, this is like a very specific thing about making sure that the phone calls are answered quickly but there is a risk if targets keep getting brought back that we will end up with police forces not thinking about the ballistic and had we give the best service but about meeting very specific targets —— thinking about the holistic. maybe the resources
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could be being used better. eu leaders have ended weeks of wrangling about how to reduce their reliance on russian energy by agreeing a compromise deal — to ban immediately more than two—thirds of oil imports from moscow. a total embargo was blocked by hungary, which is heavily dependant on russian supplies. but eu officials say imports will be cut by 90% by the end of the year. from brussels bethany bell reports. eu leaders given the green light to some of the toughest sanctions thanks to this, council should now be able to finalise a ban on almost 90% of all russian oil imported by the end of the year. two—thirds of russian oil imports
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arrive in the eu by sea. that will be banned first. but there will be a temporary exemption for pipeline oil because of objections by hungary. it says its economy can�*t cope with the ban. germany and poland have volunteered to wind down their pipeline imports by the end of this year. that leaves around 10% of pipe line oilfrom russia which will continue to go to hungary, slovakia and the czech republic. the eu is also taking measures against russia�*s biggest bank, and people accused of war crimes in ukraine. it has taken weeks of complicated negotiations for the eu to reach this compromise deal. earlier sanction packages were agreed quickly but the oil embargo has exposed divisions among european countries. eu leaders say they want to wean themselves off russian gas as well as oil, but that is likely to be far more complicated. the oil embargo will
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cost russia billions. with oil prices surging, it will hurt europe, too. in ukraine, fierce fighting continues, especially in the donbas region in the east of the country. the eu hopes the new sanctions will cut off a huge source of funds for russia�*s war effort there. bethany bell, bbc news, brussels. the hungarian leader viktor orban has welcomed his country�*s temporary exemption from the eu oil embargo against russia. our correspondent in budapest, nick thorpe, told me more. viktor orban has really stuck to a very stubborn position throughout these negotiations, he said basically that hungary gets 64% of its oil, and it is not alone in that, slovakia, the czech republic.
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he was also more public in his opposition to this initial proposalfrom the eu. he says because hungary gets this particularly high sulphur rich oil, russian oil, through their pipeline, that it would have cost hungary hundreds of millions of euros to change that technology and it would have taken many years. at one point, he was suggesting, perhaps, that money could be paid to hungary in orderfor it to sign up to the sanctions. in the end, the eu commission chose a different option, by exempting for the time being that oil pipeline. mr orban this morning has been presenting that as a great victory for his negotiating position. our russia editor, steve rosenberg, told us how moscow was reacting to the eu deal.
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this is a compromise deal with caveats, but it�*s still a big deal. two thirds of russian oil imports into the eu will be affected now and by the end of the year up to 90%, and that will cost russia billions of dollars a year in lost export revenue. moscow�*s position on this is that it is a big world out there and we will sell to other markets, africa, asia, and even if russia has to do that at a discount, it reckons that the high global oil price will help offset the losses and that might be wishful thinking on the part of moscow, but i suspect vladimir putin will not be sitting in the kremlin now thinking, "oh my goodness, i have miscalculated and "underestimated the economic consequences of this "for my country and i will pull my troops out of ukraine." i can�*t see that happening. more likely, based on the anti—western rhetoric he has been coming up with in recent weeks,
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president putin will say to himself, "ok, europe, you are already experiencing a degree of economic "pain, and expect more of that now as a result of this oil embargo." and one other thing, the kremlin will have seen how difficult it was for eu member states to sit down and come to an agreement over this oil embargo. the kremlin knows that there are differences of opinion in europe on relations with russia, on how much to support ukraine, and you can expect vladimir putin to exploit those differences as much as you can to his benefit. in moscow, jailed kremlin critic alexei navalny has said he�*s been charged in a new criminal case and faces up to 15 years in prison if found guilty. in a post on instagram, navalny said he had been accused of creating an extremist organisation and inciting hate towards the authorities. the charge comes on top of a nine—year sentence he received in march for alleged fraud and contempt of court.
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the war in ukraine has seen notjust soldiers captured but civilians too. for those who survive, many find themselves as bargaining chips for prisoner of war exchanges — orforced by the russians to accept their occupation. one soldier told the bbc�*s correspondent in kyiv, james waterhouse, his story. metal scaffolding... holding together hlib�*s broken pelvis. he also broke his jaw and lost vision in one eye. hlib is onlyjust taking his first steps. two months ago he was defending mariupol with the marines, watching for the enemy. translation: i turned my head and saw a tank aimed at me. -
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i saw a bright flash, ifelt the building collapsing. he survived, but was captured. no one knew whether he was dead or alive until this video was posted online by his captors. he was taken to a hospital in russian—occupied territory. translation: they held a dagger on my leg, up my throat, - and led to my ear and said, "it would be nice to cut off your ear." they did it to nearly everyone. i couldn�*t feed myself because myjaw was broken, and i couldn�*t sit up. some nurses would taunt me by leaving food down in front of me and say, "try and eat that, you lowlife ukrainian." this is hlib�*s testimony. we haven�*t been able to independently verify his claims. translation: we were lying there without any painkillers or anything. | so, only my faith, and the understanding that i had to survive helped me carry on. choir sings
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while hlib suffered, his church in poltava prayed. translation: i knew there were only two ways out of mariupol. _ death, or captivity. all that remained was to pray. the war has brought a lot of suffering, a lot of families are waiting for their sons to return. we pray and we suffer. after 17 days, he was released in a prisoner exchange. translation: the driver approached, patted us and said, "calm down, - guys, you are in ukraine." then i cried, and tears streamed down my face. i was very happy. james waterhouse there with that story. a new study on the best time of day for exercise suggests women enjoy greater benefits
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in the morning — while men get more out of it in the evening. according to the researchers — who monitored 60 people — differences in hormones, in biological clocks and sleep—wake cycles between the sexes, could all play a role — but it�*s not clear exactly why men and women�*s responses to the timing of exercise were so different, and the study concludes more research is needed to find out more. our health correspondent jim reed explains. pretty small numbers in the study, between 50 and 60 people. there were four groups, two by sex, male and female, two by the time of day, so half of them were given a job of exercising between 630 and 830 in the morning and the other half were given 12 hours later. 630 to 830 at night. they closely monitored what was going on with their bodies,
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their blood pressure, their blood samples and their metabolic rate, that kind of thing, before and afterwards. one of the results was completely unsurprising which is that everyone�*s health improved if they were on this regime over the 12 week period. the other one which you hinted at, they looked at the differences between men and women, and this is a very early signal but it looks like women who exercised in the morning did a betterjob at reducing their body fat and they have reduced blood pressure, and women who exercised in the evening seemed to reduce or increase upper body strength and muscle performance, but they did not lose weight in the same way and they did not lose weight across the middle of the body. it looked like if women were exercising in the morning they were more successful at losing that weight which is important because it is that weight around the centre of the body which is seen
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as being by dieticians as most dangerous to long—term health. when they looked at men it was slightly different, the differences were less pronounced, but it seemed to be slightly more beneficial for men to be exercising in the evening compared with the morning. studio: you heard it here first! look at this, this is the entire opposite of exercise, isn�*t it? until recently it was a just a humble chip shop — but now the binley mega chippy in coventry has gone viral on social media, becoming a tik tok sensation. people from as far away as australia are said to be flying in to sample its fish and chips and mushy peas. our correspondent navtej johal has been to see what all the fuss is about. binley mega chippy! it�*s the takeaway taking the world by storm. binley mega chippy! in recent days, this unassuming chip shop in a coventry suburb has become a tiktok sensation.
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we�*re from gloucester, and we saw it on tiktok, and we were like, we have to go. ijust explained to my mum that we are going to some fish and chip shop, like, two hours away, and that i need to be woken up early. we started off from worcester, and we were on our way to - bicester village, for a half term little day out. - and then my teenage son tom suggested that we came herel to the binley mega chippy. it�*s three hours before it opens. i know, but we are very keen. we wanted to get here before the crowds! - the trend is to take a photo or video of yourself at the chip shop and upload it with the catchy jingle that everyone seems to love. # binley mega chippy! videos with the hashtag binley mega chippy have been viewed more than 130 million times. # binley mega chippy! staff say the business has seen ten times the customers it usually does. we had a bus—load of 12 people from dundee yesterday. i was chatting to some
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people from newcastle. what do you make of all this? i don�*t know, but i�*m loving it. i�*m just going to go with it. today is the last official day of coventry�*s year as the city of culture. and no—one expected this chip shop to be the place everyone seems to want to visit. navteonhal, bbc news, coventry. now it�*s time for a look at the weather with chris fawkes. it is always fish and chips weather, isn�*t it? we might be getting some damp battered —— butter today because we have had some wet weather. , , . ., ,, ' ., ~ weather. this picture from suffolk shows eight _ weather. this picture from suffolk shows eight shelf _ weather. this picture from suffolk shows eight shelf cloud _ weather. this picture from suffolk shows eight shelf cloud which - weather. this picture from suffolk shows eight shelf cloud which is i shows eight shelf cloud which is associated with a vigorous thunderstorm and sometimes you get a tornado from that. we have had some localised flooding from some of the heaviest downpours. the showers have been extensive today and they
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continue to be extensive and you can see these on the radar picture. some of the heaviest showers work in over north—east england where we are close to the centre of low pressure at the showers will continue for a good part of the evening. the area of rain working over northern ireland will end the night in wales, further showers tending to be confined to south—eastern areas of scotland through the scottish borders area, and another chilly night with temperatures 5—7 c. tomorrow night we begin with rain in wales and it pushes east and it turns showery through the day and it will be heavy with hail and thunder mixed in and also a tendency for the weather to become a drier and sunnier across western areas. we will have more sunshine and it will feel warm and temperatures reaching a high of 17 in glasgow and 18 in cardiff. thursday, pressure builds across the uk but at the same time we have a feature trying to sneak its way in off the atlantic and what that will do, it will build the
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cloud into northern ireland with some showers are breaking out here and maybe even longer spells of rain, and for scotland, england and wales, mostly a dry day on thursday with more sunshine and it will feel warmer again with temperatures climbing, 19 in glasgow, in the low 20s in england and wales, which will feel warm in thejune sunshine. not far away from the sun being at its highest point of the sky which will happen in a couple of weeks. friday, more showers in the west of the country but the emphasis is mainly dry with it sunshine, warm in the sunshine again with temperatures 22 in the cardiff area, but further changes as we head into the weekend. low pressure in the continent drifting north and that will threaten showers or thunderstorms in the south and we might even see some at outbreaks of rain moving in as we go through the course of the weekend. uncertainty as to how far north that will get but the most part over the days many of you will have off work they will be a lot of dry and bright and sunny weather and
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it will feel pretty warm in the sunshine as well. goodbye for now.
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good afternoon. this is bbc news with ben brown. mar headlines. calls for more children in england to be given free school meals to help tackle the cost of living crisis. everything is going up in price. when it half again, it adds, and you�*rejust thinking, how when it half again, it adds, and you�*re just thinking, how will i get through this? more travel misery for airline passengers, as the travel giant tui confirms 34,000 holidaymakers have been affected by a month of cancellations at manchester airport. andy murray, who, as a child, survived the dunblane school shooting, speaks out about us gun laws, and says the shooting in texas last week made him �*incredibly upset�*. at some stage, you do something different. like, you can't keep approaching the problem by buying more guns

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