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tv   BBC News Special  BBC News  June 4, 2022 5:00pm-6:01pm BST

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this is bbc news, i'm katty kay outside buckingham palace, with a special programme on the queen's platinum jubilee. it's day three of the celebrations and right now racing is under way at the epsom derby. it's an event the queen — who is a prolific racehorse owner and breeder — has only missed twice during her 70—year reign. she's not there this time, but we're told she is watching it on television at windsor castle. and here last minute preparations are taking place for the platinum jubilee concert at the palace. it will start in three hour and it will feature the likes of diana ross,
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sir eltonjohn and sir rod stewart. during the concert, prince charles and prince william will pay tribute to the queen. so far, it's been a busy couple of days. the queen appeared in public on thursday when she was on the balcony at buckingham palace at the end of the trooping the colour ceremony. she was joined by senior royals to watch an raf fly—past. we actually saw the queen twice on thursday as she also took part at a lighting ceremony in windsor castle. more than 3,000 beacons were lit across the uk — and commonwealth countries around the world. yesterday the main event was in sant paul's cathedral in london. a national service of thanksgiving — honouring queen elizabeth's seventy years on the throne. prince charles officially represented his mother at the service — while the duke and duchess of sussex were also in attendance — for their first royal event together since leaving the uk to live in the united states two years ago. with me throughout the programme is emily nash, royal editor of hello magazine.
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it is you and me and the dj taking part in this. i it is you and me and the dj taking part in this-_ it is you and me and the dj taking part in thie— part in this. i think we can out shout ten- _ part in this. i think we can out shout ten. we _ part in this. i think we can out shout ten. we can _ part in this. i think we can out shout ten. we can try! - part in this. i think we can out shout ten. we can try! what l part in this. i think we can out l shout ten. we can try! what are part in this. i think we can out - shout ten. we can try! what are we expecting tonight? _ shout ten. we can try! what are we expecting tonight? we _ shout ten. we can try! what are we expecting tonight? we are - shout ten. we can try! what are we | expecting tonight? we are expecting a lot of noise. _ expecting tonight? we are expecting a lot of noise, we _ expecting tonight? we are expecting a lot of noise, we had _ expecting tonight? we are expecting a lot of noise, we had the _ a lot of noise, we had the soundtrack going on here earlier on, and i think any later, it will be very challenging to be heard, but we are going to have spectacular music, lights, displays, things being projected onto the front of the palace, and of course, we will hopefully hear from the prince of wales and the duke of cambridge, both paying tribute to the queen. they are playing by. now abba is not exactly of today. the? they are playing by. now abba is not exactly of today-— exactly of today. they are evergreen. _ exactly of today. they are evergreen. a _ exactly of today. they are evergreen. a bit - exactly of today. they are evergreen. a bit like - exactly of today. they are evergreen. a bit like herl exactly of today. they are - evergreen. a bit like her majesty. evergreen. a bit like her ma'esty. absolutely. — evergreen. a bit like her ma'esty. absolutely. there * evergreen. a bit like her ma'esty. absolutely. there are i evergreen. a bit like her ma'esty. absolutely. there are some h evergreen. a bit like her majesty. absolutely. there are some acts l evergreen. a bit like her majesty. . absolutely. there are some acts here tonight who have been at the top of their game for a long time, but no one has quite managed to stay in the public eye and spotlight in the same way as the queen. fin
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public eye and spotlight in the same way as the queen.— public eye and spotlight in the same way as the queen. on thursday, i was down on the — way as the queen. on thursday, i was down on the mall _ way as the queen. on thursday, i was down on the mall and _ way as the queen. on thursday, i was down on the mall and it _ way as the queen. on thursday, i was down on the mall and it was _ down on the mall and it was packed. it was a little the pomp and circumstances that the bricks do so much better when it comes to the rails. tonight is a younger crowd. absolutely. people are here, coming to see the younger acts, george as her, liz banks. a lot of them are also here to see queen, to see these big iconic bands that the uk has produced over the years, strout and john, i'm sure. everybody wants to be able to say that they had seen these people live at some point. it's a draw for all ages, really. you have been watching the proceedings of the last couple of days. anything surprise you? i think i have been — days. anything surprise you? i think i have been surprised _ days. anything surprise you? i think i have been surprised and _ days. anything surprise you? i think i have been surprised and yet - days. anything surprise you? i think i have been surprised and yet not i i have been surprised and yet not surprised atjust how huge that turnout has been. i guess we forgot what it's like to have these massive state events to the coved years, and seeing the numbers of people on the mall has been really quite special, i think. it's a really quite
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long—overdue celebration. to i think. it's a really quite long-overdue celebration. to what extent has the _ long-overdue celebration. to what extent has the last _ long-overdue celebration. to what extent has the last couple - long-overdue celebration. to what extent has the last couple of - long-overdue celebration. to what extent has the last couple of days| extent has the last couple of days been a postcode that national party with a lot of pent up enthusiasm for socialising? and to what extent has this been a focus on 70 years of the reign of queen elizabeth.— reign of queen elizabeth. there's somethin: reign of queen elizabeth. there's something for— reign of queen elizabeth. there's something for everyone - reign of queen elizabeth. there's something for everyone here. - reign of queen elizabeth. there's i something for everyone here. there are loyalists out here who want to come and pay tribute to the queen can catch a glimpse of the royal family, but some many other people who are going to use this is a fantastic excuse to get together with friends and family and let their hair down, and why not take their hair down, and why not take the opportunity? we will be hearing more from you through the programme. a glittering group of performers from the worlds of music and dance have been rehearsing ahead of the platinum party at buckingham palace. queen and adam lambert will open the concert. alicia keys, duran duran or andrea bocelli are some of the other acts that will be performing their biggest hits to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne. the line up is a mixture of established musicians and others on their way up, like sam ryder, who recently finished second at the
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eurovision song contest. and closing the two—and—a—half hour show will be legend diana ross, with her first live performance in the uk in 15 years. let's cross to our entertainment correspondent lizo mzimba who is near the stage. what are you hearing, who is with you? what are you hearing, who is with ou? ~ ., �* ., what are you hearing, who is with ou? ., ,, you? we don't have any guests with us. the you? we don't have any guests with us- they seem _ you? we don't have any guests with us. they seem to _ you? we don't have any guests with us. they seem to think— you? we don't have any guests with us. they seem to think that - us. they seem to think that rehearsing or getting themselves in the mindset for the performance is more important than talking to me. who would've thought it? we are expecting to see a lot of the people who will be performing here later on. we did manage to speak to sam writer, we will be hoping to speak to the huge performers who are going to the huge performers who are going to be here throughout the night performing for the crowds and for her majesty the queen's celebrated at platinum jubilee. the great thing about this evening is there is a wonderful line—up of people crossing generations, genres, the theory being that for everybody watching weather here in person or at home, there will be something for
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everyone, whatever their tastes are, so the queen well, sorry, the band queen will be opening the show with adam lambert. ithink queen will be opening the show with adam lambert. i think clean with adam lambert. i think clean with adam lambert. i think clean with adam lambert will be opening that show, famously people we remember, brian may, opening the queen's goldenjubilee celebrations back in 2002 with the performance of the national anthem on the roof of buckingham palace. we don't know if they've got anything similar lined at this year but they say they do have something special up their sleeve. the likes of rod stewart taking part, not necessarily on the stage, all be people like sir elton john, there will be a contribution from sir david attenborough. and then more up and coming people, we spoke about the pop star made all performing, a real range of people, notjust a range of people who are there because they are good, strong p0p there because they are good, strong pop act, also people making wider social points, elbow will be
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performing with a choir of refugees from more than a dozen different countries. everyone is hoping that this evening is going to be something that, compared to the rest of thejubilee something that, compared to the rest of the jubilee celebrations, something that, compared to the rest of thejubilee celebrations, is probably not going to be —— probably going to be that loudest. probably not going to be -- probably going to be that loudest.— going to be that loudest. people from the sporting _ going to be that loudest. people from the sporting world - going to be that loudest. people from the sporting world tonight, going to be that loudest. people - from the sporting world tonight, but notjust bricks, we've got some americans in there, people from all around the world. niall americans in there, people from all around the world.— around the world. niall rogers will be performing- _ around the world. niall rogers will be performing. he's— around the world. niall rogers will be performing. he's been - be performing. he's been tight—lipped about what is actually going to be doing, something with his band chic, or perhaps playing as a band with other artists, an unexpected duet or multi—artist performance, we don't know. and as you mentioned, the legend that is diana ross is going to be up on stage at the end of the concert, as you say. herfirst live performance in the uk for more than a decade,
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and that is sure to be a very, very special moment for so many of her fans watching here in the uk and around the world. talk fans watching here in the uk and around the world.— fans watching here in the uk and around the world. talk to me about the audience _ around the world. talk to me about the audience a _ around the world. talk to me about the audience a little _ around the world. talk to me about the audience a little bit. _ around the world. talk to me about the audience a little bit. i _ around the world. talk to me about the audience a little bit. i can - the audience a little bit. i can see some of them, i don't know if you can come over my shoulder, they are below us. certainly noisy and appreciative. who is watching tonight here? we've got approximately 22,000 people, the tickets were done by a nationwide ballot, and on top of that, many fans have been —— many seats have been given to essential workers. that's going to be more and more people outside that area that's going to be more and more people outside that are- that's going to be more and more people outside that area outside the front of the palace _ people outside that area outside the front of the palace watching - people outside that area outside the front of the palace watching down i front of the palace watching down the mall. and there is a real atmosphere, i think, the mall. and there is a real atmosphere, ithink, as the mall. and there is a real atmosphere, i think, as people have been saying from the crowds who have been saying from the crowds who have been gathered waiting for this, the weather seems to be holding off, they are hoping that this will be a very, very special evening of music. 0k, back there behind the scenes with all of the artists. we will be
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talking to you later on as you manage to grab people who are passing by ready to go and perform. crowds have been gathering, as i said, outside of buckingham palace head of the concert. ——ahead of the concert. ashleyjohn—baptiste is in green park, where those lucky enough to have tickets are coming in to take their seats. iama i am a stone's throw away for buckingham palace, where the crowds are gathering quick and fast for tonight's concerts. the people you can see, they have ticket for the event tonight, and there's a lot of excitement. how are we feeling? there you have it. we can speak to people who have come for tonight's concert. we have you come from? flame concert. we have you come from? come from marne concert. we have you come from? come from marge cambridge _ concert. we have you come from? come from marge cambridge r. _ concert. we have you come from? come from marge cambridge r. how - concert. we have you come from? come from marge cambridge r. how about. from marge cambridge r. how about ou au s? from marge cambridge r. how about you guys? left _ from marge cambridge r. how about you guys? left bro- _ from marge cambridge r. how about you guys? left bro. you _ from marge cambridge r. how about you guys? left bro. you are - from marge cambridge r. how about you guys? left bro. you are to - from marge cambridge r. how about you guys? left bro. you are to the i you guys? left bro. you are to the nines. you guys? left bro. you are to the nines- look— you guys? left bro. you are to the nines. look incredible. _ you guys? left bro. you are to the nines. look incredible. if- you guys? left bro. you are to the nines. look incredible. if you're i nines. look incredible. if you're auoin to nines. look incredible. if you're going to do _ nines. look incredible. if you're going to do it. _ nines. look incredible. if you're going to do it, do _ nines. look incredible. if you're going to do it, do it _ nines. look incredible. if you're going to do it, do it well. - nines. look incredible. if you're going to do it, do it well. what| going to do it, do it well. what does tonight's _ going to do it, do it well. what does tonight's concert - going to do it, do it well. what does tonight's concert mean i going to do it, do it well- does tonight's concert mean to you guys? we does tonight's concert mean to you au s? ~ ., does tonight's concert mean to you t u 5? ~ ., . , ., ., does tonight's concert mean to you us? ., ., guys? we need a celebration, and this is the best _ guys? we need a celebration, and this is the best one _ guys? we need a celebration, and this is the best one we _ guys? we need a celebration, and
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this is the best one we have. - guys? we need a celebration, and this is the best one we have. and | guys? we need a celebration, and i this is the best one we have. and we have an array — this is the best one we have. and we have an array of _ this is the best one we have. and we have an array of icons _ this is the best one we have. and we have an array of icons gracing - this is the best one we have. and we have an array of icons gracing the i have an array of icons gracing the stages tonight. eltonjohn, clean, diana ross. i mean that nick glide diana ross. i mean that nick alicia ke s! i diana ross. i mean that nick alicia keys! i would _ diana ross. i mean that nick alicia keys! i would like _ diana ross. i mean that nick alicia keys! i would like to _ diana ross. i mean that nick alicia keys! i would like to see _ diana ross. i mean that nick alicia keys! i would like to see sam - diana ross. i mean that nick alicia keys! i would like to see sam ryder as well _ keys! i would like to see sam ryder as well. it�*5 — keys! i would like to see sam ryder as well. 3 ., keys! i would like to see sam ryder as well. �*, ., ~ keys! i would like to see sam ryder as well. �*, . ,, as well. it's all kicking off tonight- _ as well. it's all kicking off tonight. who _ as well. it's all kicking off tonight. who are - as well. it's all kicking off tonight. who are you - as well. it's all kicking off. tonight. who are you excited as well. it's all kicking off- tonight. who are you excited to as well. it's all kicking off— tonight. who are you excited to see? rod stewart, queen, brian may. duran duran, rod stewart, queen, brian may. duran duran. someone _ rod stewart, queen, brian may. duran duran, someone has— rod stewart, queen, brian may. duran duran, someone hasjust _ rod stewart, queen, brian may. duran duran, someone hasjust said. - rod stewart, queen, brian may. duran duran, someone hasjust said. 70 - duran, someone hasjust said. 70 years marking this platinum jubilee. it's fantastic.— it's fantastic. what does the queen mean to you? _ it's fantastic. what does the queen mean to you? everything. - it's fantastic. what does the queen mean to you? everything. she - it's fantastic. what does the queen mean to you? everything. she has| mean to you? everything. she has been so on — mean to you? everything. she has been so on the _ mean to you? everything. she has been so on the ball, _ mean to you? everything. she has been so on the ball, shall- mean to you? everything. she has been so on the ball, shall we say. | been so on the ball, shall we say. what _ been so on the ball, shall we say. what does — been so on the ball, shall we say. what does the queen represent to you? what does the queen represent to ou? ,, �* , , ., ., , what does the queen represent to ou? ,, �*, ., , ., you? she's given us an example to follow, i think, _ you? she's given us an example to follow, ithink, over— you? she's given us an example to follow, i think, over the _ you? she's given us an example to follow, i think, over the years, - follow, i think, over the years, hasn't — follow, i think, over the years, hasn't she? _ follow, i think, over the years, hasn't she? she _ follow, i think, over the years, hasn't she? she has _ follow, i think, over the years, hasn't she? she has done - follow, i think, over the years, hasn't she? she has done well| follow, i think, over the years, - hasn't she? she has done well over the 70 _ hasn't she? she has done well over the 70 years. — hasn't she? she has done well over the 70 years, she _ hasn't she? she has done well over the 70 years, she has, _ hasn't she? she has done well over the 70 years, she has, she - hasn't she? she has done well over the 70 years, she has, she has. - the 70 years, she has, she has. if” you the 70 years, she has, she has. you could say anything to the the 70 years, she has, she has.“ you could say anything to the queen, what would your message be? just well done. she been an inspiration
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to everybody. well done. she been an inspiration to everybody-— well done. she been an inspiration to everybody. luck, there you have it. just a to everybody. luck, there you have it- just a glimpse — to everybody. luck, there you have it. just a glimpse of— to everybody. luck, there you have it. just a glimpse of the _ to everybody. luck, there you have| it. just a glimpse of the atmosphere thatis it. just a glimpse of the atmosphere that is really heating up ahead of tonight's concert. that that is really heating up ahead of tonight's concert.— tonight's concert. that crowd nettina tonight's concert. that crowd getting very _ tonight's concert. that crowd getting very excited. - someone who is going to the party at the palace is the canadian high commissioner to the uk, ralph goodale. you can hear the dj warming the crowd up, and someone who will be there when the music starts is that canadian high commissioner to the united kingdom. canada is the country the queen has visited the most: 22 times in total. 22 times, and i'm not quite sure if that total includes the one time in 1951 when she visited as a princess before taking the throne, but we are very proud of the fact that she has visited canada more than any other country in the world.— country in the world. have you met her her south? _ country in the world. have you met her her south? yes, _ country in the world. have you met her her south? yes, on _ country in the world. have you met her her south? yes, on several - her her south? yes, on several occasions- it's _ her her south? yes, on several occasions. it's always - her her south? yes, on several occasions. it's always a - her her south? yes, on several occasions. it's always a great l occasions. it's always a great thrill. she is a wonderful conversationalist, she puts you at ease immediately and really process, you know, she wants to know your
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objectives, your ambitions, how you are going to do this, how you are going to do that. it is great to have a conversation.- going to do that. it is great to have a conversation. when i ask eo - le have a conversation. when i ask people who _ have a conversation. when i ask people who watch _ have a conversation. when i ask people who watch the _ have a conversation. when i ask people who watch the queen i have a conversation. when i ask. people who watch the queen much have a conversation. when i ask- people who watch the queen much more closely than i do, something that surprises them about her, they often say it's her sense of humour. and we have seen that with the previous canadian prime minister, pierre trudeau, where she had a little bit of a joke. rget trudeau, where she had a little bit of a 'oke. , ., trudeau, where she had a little bit ofa 'oke. , ., , , trudeau, where she had a little bit ofa 'oke. , . , , ., trudeau, where she had a little bit of a 'oke. , ., , , ., ., trudeau, where she had a little bit ofa 'oke. , ., , , ., ., ., of a 'oke. get a sense of humour to, and of a joke. get a sense of humour to, and did that — of a joke. get a sense of humour to, and did that appear— of a joke. get a sense of humour to, and did that appear wet _ of a joke. get a sense of humour to, and did that appear wet behind - and did that appear wet behind her. she was going down the stairs. the one incident that i recall very vividly with her was about horses, and the rcmp, of course she is the commissioner and chief of the rcmp from the rcmp were presenting her with a horse, and traditionally she would present one back i'll stop it wasn't ready, the fall wasn't ready to come back. so instead, she
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presented a rocking horse, a beautiful piece of work done by the royal maker, it was a very, beautiful piece of art, but she showed the commissioner bob paulson at that time, a tough burly policeman, and she was showing him the hobbyhorse, and she sort of patted the horse on the rump, a drawer popped out filled with maple syrup and she said we call that the bottom drawer. and with the look of great mischievousness in herface, she said, commissioner, get on the horse. now, bob paulson is no shrinking violet, and he looked at me with a look of great terror on his face, like minister, what should i do? i simply said she's the commissioner and chief, get on the horse, bob. commissioner and chief, get on the horse. bob-—
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commissioner and chief, get on the horse, bob. . ,, , , ., horse, bob. when the queen tells you to net on horse, bob. when the queen tells you to get on the — horse, bob. when the queen tells you to get on the horse, _ horse, bob. when the queen tells you to get on the horse, even _ horse, bob. when the queen tells you to get on the horse, even if— horse, bob. when the queen tells you to get on the horse, even if it's - horse, bob. when the queen tells you to get on the horse, even if it's a - to get on the horse, even if it's a hobbyhorse, you get on the horse. tell me more about canada's relationship of the united kingdom. in the queen first took over, there were braille symbols 0liver canada. has the relationship become a little bit more distant? not necessarily in a frosty way can i note the majority of canadian support having her as head of state, but a little bit more distance, perhaps?— distance, perhaps? probably over time. distance, perhaps? probably over time- that _ distance, perhaps? probably over time- that is _ distance, perhaps? probably over time. that is a _ distance, perhaps? probably over time. that is a natural _ distance, perhaps? probably over. time. that is a natural phenomenon, but i think the affection is still very deep and very strong. there have been events all over the country to mark the platinum jubilee, a royal visit most recently a couple of weeks ago, there are claims being minted from the canadian men's and stamps being printed by canada post. there is a great light show and problem intel depicting her majesty's reign over these 70 years and saying thank you.
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is it about her majesty, or is it about monarchy, when charles takes over, as he will one day, one assumes, as king. will there still be the same affection amongst the canadians? every monarch needs to prove themselves, every monarch is different. it was different, i presume when queen victoria was on the throne at the time of confederation. what's interesting, so, this clean has been on the throne for almost half of the life of canada. so she is a very familiar, very revered figure. naturally, when that 70 year tradition and more changes, then people will have to get used to a new monarch, and that will take affect both on the part of canadians and on the part of the monarch to demonstrate the relevance, the
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sensitivity committee understanding, and in the case of prince charles, when he was just there a couple of weeks ago, his relationship with indigenous people, which is so important in canada, was very strong, very real, very genuine. it was a very good sign for the kind of thing that he will deal when he ultimately takes the responsibility. canadian high commissioner, i know you have to get to the party, i will let you go, you're going to run down there and listen for the next four hours, i hope you have some earplugs or something it is getting noisy. it's going to be great. it’s or something it is getting noisy. it's going to be great.— it's going to be great. it's going to be a good — it's going to be great. it's going to be a good party. _ it's going to be great. it's going to be a good party. thank- it's going to be great. it's going to be a good party. thank you l it's going to be great. it's going - to be a good party. thank you so so much forjoining me. the queen, famously fond of both horses and riding, has received a cavalry horse as a platinum jubilee present from france. the seven—year—old grey thoroughbred gelding, called fabulous, travelled across the english channel from paris, to become the permanent property of elizabeth ii. the horse recently escorted president macron along the champs elysees during victory
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in europe day commemorations last month. fabulous was one of a70 horses serving with the french republican guard. joining me now from reading, here in england, is martha terry. she's the features editor for the horse & hound magazine. thank you so much forjoining us. how many horses? she has fabulous now, how many other presses does the queen have?— queen have? that's an impossible ruestion queen have? that's an impossible question to _ queen have? that's an impossible question to answer. _ queen have? that's an impossible question to answer. i _ queen have? that's an impossible question to answer. i don't - queen have? that's an impossible question to answer. i don't think l question to answer. i don't think anyone who works with her would be able to put an exact number, possibly... of course she has all the resources, or show horses, or highlands, the bells. she has so many horses and so many different areas of the country, i'm sure the queen is exactly how many, but it would be over 100.— queen is exactly how many, but it would be over 100. does she have a favourite? is there _ would be over 100. does she have a favourite? is there one _ would be over 100. does she have a favourite? is there one horse - would be over 100. does she have a favourite? is there one horse that i favourite? is there one horse that she has had over the course of her life that she has grown particularly
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fond of? ., v life that she has grown particularly fond of? ., �* . ~ life that she has grown particularly fond of? . �*, ,, ., fond of? that's like asking if someone has _ fond of? that's like asking if someone has a _ fond of? that's like asking if someone has a favourite - fond of? that's like asking if. someone has a favourite child. fond of? that's like asking if- someone has a favourite child. maybe she has one particular favourites, but she was getting off a couple of years ago to tell horse and hound via her racing manager who were her favourite 13 horses, so we can narrow down to that. there were these highlands, the famous racehorses, the horses that she wrote herself but no one knew about, one of one she was still writing. i think possibly one we can really pick out would be burmese, you are speaking to the canadians just then, this was a horse that was given to her from the canadian government in 1969. she went on to partner burmese, this beautiful black mayor at sidesaddle in that very public arena. —— ortoo. so at sidesaddle in that very public arena. —— or too. so she must�*ve had arena. —— or too. so she must�*ve had a very special bond with that one. we are watching == a very special bond with that one. we are watching— a very special bond with that one. we are watching- there l a very special bond with that one. i we are watching- there she we are watching -- mare. there she is as a child- — we are watching -- mare. there she is as a child. she _ we are watching -- mare. there she is as a child. she was _
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we are watching -- mare. there she is as a child. she was given - we are watching -- mare. there she is as a child. she was given her- is as a child. she was given her first pony by her father when she was just six. so she's been writing all her life. is she a good writer? i think she started even earlier than that. i think she got peggy when her grandfather gave her to her at four years old. i think she wrote independently at six. she is an extraordinarily good writer. there was an occasion when someone fired blanks from the crowd and the horse spooked, and in that public arena, shejust rode like spooked, and in that public arena, she just rode like an absolute professional and kept the horse and kept going. also, the fact that she carried on writing right into her mid 90s, the amount of core strength and balance and horsemanship you have to have to be able to do that, i think she didn't compete, she competed once as a child, but you can see from her relations that if she had competed, she would've been extremely successful.— extremely successful. there she is with ronald _ extremely successful. there she is with ronald reagan, _ extremely successful. there she is with ronald reagan, it _ extremely successful. there she is with ronald reagan, it was - extremely successful. there she is with ronald reagan, it was a - extremely successful. there she is with ronald reagan, it was a bondj with ronald reagan, it was a bond she can share with president reagan because he was a keen writer as
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well. it four that she got peggy, just as a little child. it's something she's passed on to her daughter and granddaughter. she has had professional competitors and her family. had professional competitors and her famil . . , had professional competitors and her famil. , , had professional competitors and her famil . , , ., had professional competitors and her famil. , , ., ., family. yes, exactly. so one of the horses she — family. yes, exactly. so one of the horses she chose _ family. yes, exactly. so one of the horses she chose was _ family. yes, exactly. so one of the horses she chose was one - family. yes, exactly. so one of the horses she chose was one of- family. yes, exactly. so one of the horses she chose was one of the i horses she chose was one of the favourites, a horse called do tell, no, it was called the blitz, which was of course that princess anne road and became european champion, so i think she's quite proud of her being responsible for the horse and rider. another called columbus who won badminton with captain mark phillips. she spread horses that have one in every single sphere of equestrian is in from polo to event income to the show ring, race track. it's just an extraordinary way of owning and breeding. i it'sjust an extraordinary way of owning and breeding.— owning and breeding. i went to the kentucky derby _ owning and breeding. i went to the kentucky derby when _ owning and breeding. i went to the kentucky derby when the - owning and breeding. i went to the kentucky derby when the queen i kentucky derby when the queen went about ten years ago, and she was in the box along with me, and i could see her, she loved race racing, press she couldn't get to epsom
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derby today, but what is her impact on the british racing industry? i just, we couldn't overestimate on the british racing industry? l just, we couldn't overestimate her impact. she is raising past my greatest aspect. it is extraordinary to have someone like that as a figurehead, notjust for racing but for all a question arianism. she's amazing to have. just she has such a zest for the presses, their welfare, the consideration for how they get out even after racing is, it gives such a positive impact and puts the sport in such a great light. not only that, she has an incredible legacy and thoroughbred breeding because she has been so involved in the decisions in which mayors go to which stallions. some of them have spawned incredible dynasties of top class racehorses, and that legacy will go on forever, for years and years and years. will go on forever, for years and years and years-— years and years. thank you very much for 'oininr years and years. thank you very much forjoining us. — years and years. thank you very much forjoining us, and _ years and years. thank you very much forjoining us, and of— years and years. thank you very much forjoining us, and of course, - years and years. thank you very much forjoining us, and of course, the - forjoining us, and of course, the
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queen". forjoining us, and of course, the queen... she is disappointed not to be at epsom derby today. while many in britain feel thejubilee celebrations of a much loved queen have united them, feelings in some commonwealth countries are more ambivalent. barbados removed the queen as head of state last year and several other caribbean countries have indicated they plan to follow suit. but queen elizabeth is still the head of state of 15 countries in the commonwealth realm, including australia, canada, new zealand and jamaica. one of those places is saint vincent and the grenadines, a multi—island nation in the caribbean with a population of around one hundred and 10,000 people. now, so i am notjoined by them. we are going to tonga. joining me now is titilupe tuivakano, the tongan high commissioner to london.
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we were talking about saint and grenadines, we will get to that a little later on, let's talk about tonga's relationship with the queen. i believe that it was your great grandmother who is the only brave soul at the queen's coronation not to ride in a closed carriage. am i right? to ride in a closed carriage. am i rirht? . ., ~ to ride in a closed carriage. am i rirht? , ., ,, ,, , right? yes, indeed. thank you very much for having _ right? yes, indeed. thank you very much for having me. _ right? yes, indeed. thank you very much for having me. my _ much for having me. my great—grandmother was her majesty, and she actually attended her majesty queen elizabeth ii's coronation in 1953. her visit and impact was well documented by the press at that time, and during the coronation precession onjune two, she shared a carriage with the sultan and at one point it started raining heavily, but instead of putting the carriage roof up like everyone else in the precession, the queen left it down in the pouring rain. she engaged warmly with the
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crowds waving back and smiling. she was the only other female monarch at the time the queen was crowned, is that right? the time the queen was crowned, is that rirht? . the time the queen was crowned, is that rirht? , ., , that right? yes, that is right. the queen was _ that right? yes, that is right. the queen was the _ that right? yes, that is right. the queen was the on _ that right? yes, that is right. the queen was the on the _ that right? yes, that is right. the queen was the on the other - that right? yes, that is right. the - queen was the on the other monarch, commonwealth monarch that was present aside from queen elizabeth herself. interestingly, they do share a number of similar experiences, for example, queen elizabeth, she was crowned at a very young age having ascended to the throne at age 18. both young women had to navigate their roles as leaders in an arena dominated by men. ~ . ~' leaders in an arena dominated by men. ~ . ~ ., . leaders in an arena dominated by men. ~ . ~ ., ,, . men. we will talk about st vincent and the grenadines _ men. we will talk about st vincent and the grenadines and _ men. we will talk about st vincent and the grenadines and a - men. we will talk about st vincent and the grenadines and a second, | men. we will talk about st vincent i and the grenadines and a second, we had a little bit of a technical difficulty, but tell me about tonga's relationship at the united kingdom and with the monarchy. the country became independent in 1970 thenjoined the country became independent in 1970 then joined the commonwealth. how important is being a member of the commonwealth and having the queen
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ahead of the commonwealth to tonga? it's the only island in the south pacific that has never been colonised by a foreign power. traditionally, it dates back hundreds of years, but today we are a constitutional monarchyjust like great britain, and we have enjoyed many years of friendly relations, tongan soldiers fought and died with british allies in the first and second world war, but tonga has been a proud member of the commonwealth family of nations which is headed by their majesty the queen. and benefit from being a member based on our shared history and common values such as human rights, democracy and rule of law. so tonga has the greatest and deepest respect for her majesty and for the relationship we have for the united kingdom. high commissioner, _ have forthe united kingdom. high commissioner, thank you very much forjoining us from here in london. let's go to saint fe nton fenton ——
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——and we can now speak to the prime minister of saint vincent and the grenadines, ralph gonsalves. thank you forjoining us. i want to talk a little bit about your relationship with the united kingdom and particularly with the queen. in 2009, you lead a referendum to remove the cleaning as the head of state and replace her majesty with an elected president. the referendum failed. why did you think it was time for st vincent and the grenadines not to have the queen as your head of state any more. thank ou ve your head of state any more. thank you very much- _ your head of state any more. thank you very much. we _ your head of state any more. thank you very much. we respect - your head of state any more. thank you very much. we respect your i you very much. we respect your majesty very much and her tremendous service to britain and to the commonwealth. but we saw at this particular stage of our development that we ought to have a home—grown head of states. it was part of her
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root and branch reform for the constitution, which we got in 1979. and became independent. but it was reformed constitution that was rejected, 55% to 45%, and one of those reforms, as i said, related to the removal of her majesty, and not, i respect your majesty very much. it was a bit of a nancy story that the queen of england could really be the queen of england could really be the queen of st vincent and the grenadines. i queen of st vincent and the grenadines.— queen of st vincent and the grenadines. , ' . grenadines. i find it very difficult to acce -t grenadines. i find it very difficult to accept someone _ grenadines. i find it very difficult to accept someone who - grenadines. i find it very difficult to accept someone who lives - grenadines. i find it very difficult to accept someone who lives so | grenadines. i find it very difficult i to accept someone who lives so far away it to be the head of states. there is a local government general who represents them, but our relations with the royal family and my own personal relations have been very good, and as i said, we respect your majesty greatly. it's just one
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of these things that change is and takes place. even if we were to become a republic, we will remain in the commonwealth. it’s become a republic, we will remain in the commonwealth.— the commonwealth. it's interesting, because he mentioned _ the commonwealth. it's interesting, because he mentioned that - the commonwealth. it's interesting, because he mentioned that the - the commonwealth. it's interesting, because he mentioned that the 55%| the commonwealth. it's interesting, l because he mentioned that the 5596 of because he mentioned that the 55% of the people of your country rejected that referendum, but when prince edward visited the country in april of this year, it was met by protests. is there a growing feeling of sympathy for your position in the country do you think? it’s of sympathy for your position in the country do you think?— country do you think? it's difficult to sa . country do you think? it's difficult to say- luck- _ country do you think? it's difficult to say. luck. we _ country do you think? it's difficult to say. luck. we are _ country do you think? it's difficult to say. luck. we are an _ country do you think? it's difficult to say. luck. we are an open - to say. luck. we are an open and transparent democracy, and overall when prince edward and his wife came to st vincent and beth grenadines, overwhelmingly, people welcomed them, and even the protesters, not so much protesting against the members of the royal family but an
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issue specifically of reparations for native genocide in the enslavement of africans. that is what that was about, and the nations in the caribbean, we have this as part of our public policy, so i think that some persons in our country will simply engage in their democratic rights to raise the matter again because international media the programme went on very well for himself and this is not the first time they were coming to st vincent and the grenadines. prince charles came in 2019, the royal family and prince charles himself played an important role in helping us at the time that the red cross
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and 55 scholarships at the university wales. for our students at the time of volcanic eruption, so we have, we have this relationship, and members of the royalfamily we have, we have this relationship, and members of the royal family has been coming here, for decades, since the days of princess margaret. maw; the days of princess margaret. many ears of the days of princess margaret. many years of visits _ the days of princess margaret. many years of visits from _ the days of princess margaret. many years of visits from the _ the days of princess margaret. many years of visits from the royal family, and at the prime minister points out, this is about whether there should be a constitutional monarch, not about respect for the queen herself. thank you very much forjoining us. as we've been hearing the queen wasn't quite up to going to watch the derby at epsom, but we are told she watched it on television from windsor castle. our sports correspondent, laura scott, is there. what's going on? well, despite the absence of the _ what's going on? well, despite the absence of the queen _ what's going on? well, despite the absence of the queen for _ what's going on? well, despite the absence of the queen forjust - what's going on? well, despite the absence of the queen forjust the l absence of the queen for just the fifth time in her long rain, two of those because the pandemic, there has been a carnival atmosphere as it
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forms part of the celebrations. there have been several tributes to the queen. a guard of honour by a0 jockeys who have ridden for the queen. princess and was representing the queen —— princess anne. i'm joined by nick. talk us about the honour of riding for the queen. fight; honour of riding for the queen. any da ou honour of riding for the queen. any day you put on her majesty's colours is a good _ day you put on her majesty's colours is a good day. you'll always remember the first ride and it never -ets remember the first ride and it never gets old _ remember the first ride and it never gets old. the impact of that parade was a _ gets old. the impact of that parade was a privilege —— being part of. there _ was a privilege —— being part of. there were _ was a privilege —— being part of. there were great jockeys and i'm honoured — there were great jockeys and i'm honoured to say i was stood behind a man who _ honoured to say i was stood behind a man who was... richard king scott. that shows — man who was... richard king scott. that shows you how special it is. the queen— that shows you how special it is.
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the queen is hugely passionate about racing. an owner and a breeder, isn't she?— isn't she? she knows what she's talkinr isn't she? she knows what she's talking about — isn't she? she knows what she's talking about and _ isn't she? she knows what she's talking about and she _ isn't she? she knows what she's talking about and she knows - isn't she? she knows what she's. talking about and she knows what isn't she? she knows what she's i talking about and she knows what a -ood talking about and she knows what a good horse looks like. i think she'll— good horse looks like. i think she'll really enjoy today. she knowsm _ she'll really enjoy today. she knows... so she'll get a good kick out of— knows... so she'll get a good kick out of that — knows... so she'll get a good kick out of that-— knows... so she'll get a good kick out of that. nick was talking about desert crown. _ out of that. nick was talking about desert crown, the _ out of that. nick was talking about desert crown, the favourite - out of that. nick was talking about desert crown, the favourite in - out of that. nick was talking about desert crown, the favourite in the | desert crown, the favourite in the derby. there was also royal patronage and changing of the guard. it was a convincing win and the jockey who one has join it was a convincing win and the jockey who one hasjoin me. richard, what was it like? it jockey who one has 'oin me. richard, what was it like?— what was it like? it was surreal and from the pole. _ what was it like? it was surreal and from the pole, he _ what was it like? it was surreal and from the pole, he put— what was it like? it was surreal and from the pole, he put the - what was it like? it was surreal and from the pole, he put the race - what was it like? it was surreal and from the pole, he put the race to l from the pole, he put the race to bed _ from the pole, he put the race to bed he — from the pole, he put the race to bed he was— from the pole, he put the race to bed. he was very _ from the pole, he put the race to bed. he was very professional. from the pole, he put the race to. bed. he was very professional today and gave _ bed. he was very professional today and gave me — bed. he was very professional today and gave me a — bed. he was very professional today and gave me a very— bed. he was very professional today and gave me a very smooth- bed. he was very professional today and gave me a very smooth ride. . bed. he was very professional today and gave me a very smooth ride. i. and gave me a very smooth ride. i know and gave me a very smooth ride. know winning the derby in any
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and gave me a very smooth ride]. know winning the derby in any year is special, but it is it extra special event it is the platinum jubilee celebration? i special event it is the platinum jubilee celebration?— jubilee celebration? i think absolutely. _ jubilee celebration? i think absolutely. it's _ jubilee celebration? i think absolutely. it's a _ jubilee celebration? i think absolutely. it's a shame i jubilee celebration? i thinkl absolutely. it's a shame her jubilee celebration? i think - absolutely. it's a shame her majesty couldn't— absolutely. it's a shame her majesty couldn't be _ absolutely. it's a shame her majesty couldn't be here, _ absolutely. it's a shame her majesty couldn't be here, but _ absolutely. it's a shame her majesty couldn't be here, but nonetheless, l couldn't be here, but nonetheless, it's a _ couldn't be here, but nonetheless, it's a big _ couldn't be here, but nonetheless, it's a big occasion. _ couldn't be here, but nonetheless, it's a big occasion.— it's a big occasion. what was the emotion in _ it's a big occasion. what was the emotion in your _ it's a big occasion. what was the emotion in your head _ it's a big occasion. what was the emotion in your head when - it's a big occasion. what was the emotion in your head when you | it's a big occasion. what was the - emotion in your head when you cross the line? i5 emotion in your head when you cross the line? . , emotion in your head when you cross the line? , , ., ., emotion in your head when you cross theline? , , ., ., ,. , the line? is very hard to describe. i ruess the line? is very hard to describe. i guess it's _ the line? is very hard to describe. i guess it's a _ the line? is very hard to describe. i guess it's a little _ the line? is very hard to describe. i guess it's a little surreal- the line? is very hard to describe. i guess it's a little surreal to - i guess it's a little surreal to realise — i guess it's a little surreal to realise that— i guess it's a little surreal to realise that you've _ i guess it's a little surreal to realise that you've won - i guess it's a little surreal to realise that you've won the i i guess it's a little surreal to - realise that you've won the derby. lots realise that you've won the derby. lots of— realise that you've won the derby. lots of people _ realise that you've won the derby. lots of people don't _ realise that you've won the derby. lots of people don't get _ realise that you've won the derby. lots of people don't get the - lots of people don't get the opportunity— lots of people don't get the opportunity and _ lots of people don't get the opportunity and i'm - lots of people don't get the opportunity and i'm very - lots of people don't get the - opportunity and i'm very fortunate that i_ opportunity and i'm very fortunate that i have — opportunity and i'm very fortunate that i have-— that i have. richard, thank you so much forjoining _ that i have. richard, thank you so much forjoining us. _ that i have. richard, thank you so much forjoining us. the - that i have. richard, thank you so much forjoining us. the derby i much forjoining us. the derby winning jockey first time to have written the winner in the derby. although the queen wasn't here, there has been several tributes to there has been several tributes to the impact that she has had on racing during her seven years on the throne. . ., ., ~ racing during her seven years on the throne. . . . ~' , ., racing during her seven years on the throne. . . ., ~ , ., , racing during her seven years on the throne. . . . ~' ,. , . throne. laura, thank you very much. i have to admit _ throne. laura, thank you very much. i have to admit i'm _ throne. laura, thank you very much. i have to admit i'm feeling _ i have to admit i'm feeling underdressed. i didn't bring my nice hat, but we do have the party and it
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is popping up. there's another two or three hours to go. i'm not quite sure how they will keep going. joining me now in the studio is emily nash, royal editor of hello magazine. can you hear me? just about. we mirht can you hear me? just about. we might have _ can you hear me? just about. we might have to _ can you hear me? just about. we might have to break— can you hear me? just about. we might have to break into - can you hear me? just about. we might have to break into some i can you hear me? just about. we - might have to break into some moves. is this what it's going to be like was although i think it's going get louder. i was although i think it's going get louder. ~ ' :: :: :: was although i think it's going get louder. :: :: :: , . ., louder. i think 15,000 expected to come in. louder. i think 15,000 expected to come in- this _ louder. i think 15,000 expected to come in. this is _ louder. i think 15,000 expected to come in. this is full. _ louder. i think 15,000 expected to come in. this is full. everyone - louder. i think 15,000 expected to | come in. this is full. everyone who didn't get a ticket is lined up all the way down, almost as far as... and they can watch from the mall? there watching on big screens all over the place. there watching on big screens all over the place-— over the place. we've seen interviews _ over the place. we've seen interviews from _ over the place. we've seen interviews from other - over the place. we've seen _ interviews from other commonwealth countries, some of whom support the queen. some of whom launched a rep
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to get rid of her as head of state. for her majesty herself, even those who don't want to be head of state any more, still a huge amount of respect absolutely. she has commanded people's attentions for so long. she is so ingrained into our psyche long. she is so ingrained into our -s ch long. she is so ingrained into our .s ch ~. ., long. she is so ingrained into our as ch ., ., ., long. she is so ingrained into our -s ch . . ., ., psyche here and around the world. peole psyche here and around the world. people respect _ psyche here and around the world. people respect her _ psyche here and around the world. people respect her longevity - psyche here and around the world. people respect her longevity and l people respect her longevity and steadfastness.— people respect her longevity and steadfastness. what about young eo - le steadfastness. what about young people here? _ steadfastness. what about young people here? how— steadfastness. what about young people here? how much - steadfastness. what about young people here? how much that - steadfastness. what about young | people here? how much that they steadfastness. what about young - people here? how much that they feel they can... that she like a grandmother to them? what their relationship? maybe they feel she's a little bit more in touch than she is to be. . �* . a little bit more in touch than she isto be. . v. a little bit more in touch than she isto be. ,, �*, , ., a little bit more in touch than she istobe. ,, fl. ., is to be. she's been on social media, she's _ is to be. she's been on social media, she's been _ is to be. she's been on social media, she's been taking - is to be. she's been on social l media, she's been taking video calls. she is the nation's grandmother in many ways and a lot of people respect her for it.- of people respect her for it. emily, thank ou of people respect her for it. emily, thank you for— of people respect her for it. emily, thank you for been _ of people respect her for it. emily, thank you for been bearing - of people respect her for it. emily, thank you for been bearing with i of people respect her for it. emily, |
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thank you for been bearing with me and the noise. i'm slightly lip—reading. it's not that i'm not listening. the platinum jubilee is also being marked in australia where a small island, visited by the queen more than 50 years ago, has been renamed in the capital, canberra. shaima khalil reports. in a few moments, the bells will be ready to play. their harmony will be a reminder of the enduring ties of kinship between britain and australia. in 1970, on her third visit to australia, queen elizabeth ii opened the national carillion, a belltower on lake burley griffin, here in the capital canberra. it was a gift from the british government to mark 50 years since canberra was established. now, as australia celebrates her australianjubilee, the island on which it stands has been named after the queen. applause.
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not quite the fervour of london, but still some pomp, ceremony and spectacle. and from australia's new prime minister, this tribute. for seven remarkable decades, her majesty has been the embodiment of grace, fidelity and dignity and australia has a deep affection for her. she is, after all, the only reigning monarch most of us have known. and the only one to have ever visited our great nation of australia. above all, she has stood with australia as a true and steadfast friend. warm sentiments, too, from a representative the traditional owners of the land here. i watched herjourney all the wayl and i want to wish her all the best from the land of the ngunnawall people, god bless you, keep safe and many, many more wishes. all love.
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she arrived at the shores of sydney in 195a, becoming the first reigning british monarch to visit australia. with her husband, the late prince philip by her side, canberra was one of the many cities she visited on her historic commonwealth tour. for four nights this week, old parliament house and the new building that replaced it as the seat of government, are being bathed in purple, as well as dozens of other landmarks across the country. the queen made her last trip to australia in 2011. in total, she visited 16 times. there is a growing sense that australia will inevitably become a republic one day. just this week, the new government appointed an official to start looking at this transition. but the queen's popularity
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is still going strong here. you can certainly feel the respect and admiration for the head of state as the country marks her 70 years on the throne. shaimaa khalil, bbc news. with me in the studio isjuliet rieden, royal correspondent and author of the book "the royals in australia". thank you. i'm going to speak up and hope you can hear me. and that your lip—reading is good. when will australia become a republic if ever? well, that is a question. i think australia has told a republic —— million dollar question. i think everyone knows that makes perfect sense to have an australian other head of state, but no one is anxious to make that happen soon. previous governments haven't put it on the agenda. we need to have a referendum in order to make that happen, and
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there's an awful lot of votes that are needed to make a republic happen. are needed to make a republic ha en. . �* ., are needed to make a republic hauen. ,�* ., , happen. isn't moving rapidly, slowl ? happen. isn't moving rapidly, slowly? very _ happen. isn't moving rapidly, slowly? very baby _ happen. isn't moving rapidly, slowly? very baby steps. - happen. isn't moving rapidly, slowly? very baby steps. i i happen. isn't moving rapidly, i slowly? very baby steps. i think it's because _ slowly? very baby steps. i think it's because the _ slowly? very baby steps. i think it's because the queen - slowly? very baby steps. i think it's because the queen is - slowly? very baby steps. i think it's because the queen is so - it's because the queen is so respected, but it's also this idea of stability. the queen gives us the ability, the queen, australians have only ever known her as her head of state. ~ �* . only ever known her as her head of state. . �* , .,, only ever known her as her head of state. . �* , ,. ,., state. we've seen those pictures of the queen visiting _ state. we've seen those pictures of the queen visiting australia. - state. we've seen those pictures of the queen visiting australia. do - state. we've seen those pictures of| the queen visiting australia. do you think... i guess it begs the question, if that's what he's... that would be the moment, is that what you're implying? that that would be the moment, is that what you're implying?— what you're implying? that is certainly the _ what you're implying? that is certainly the moment - what you're implying? that is certainly the moment the - what you're implying? that is - certainly the moment the australian republican movement will be really
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ratcheting up their programme, but i think it will still be a tough call. australians really do believe in the constitutional monarchy as the best way of running the country, and that is kind of separate from whether they are monarchists or not. it's just a very sensible, stable way of running the country. you just a very sensible, stable way of running the country.— running the country. you can also believe in — running the country. you can also believe in constitutional - running the country. you can also | believe in constitutional monarchy being a republican? i guess you just elected prime minister from the left who has a strong environmental record. prince charles also has the mental rhetoric. what do australians make of him?— mental rhetoric. what do australians make of him?_ yes. i mental rhetoric. what do australians make of him?_ yes.l make of him? prince charles? yes. i thinkthere's — make of him? prince charles? yes. i think there's a _ make of him? prince charles? yes. i think there's a fondness _ make of him? prince charles? yes. i think there's a fondness for - make of him? prince charles? yes. i think there's a fondness for him. - think there's a fondness for him. he's visited australia many times. he's visited australia many times. he went to school in australia. people like the fact that we know what he thinks. we don't know what
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the queen thinks, but we know what prince charles thinks, and australians quite like it. they support his ideas on environmentalism, sustainability. even though he's not as popular as the queen, he is not as popular as her in australia, definitely, i think they understand that he would nevertheless make a good leader. maybe not for australia. who knows? but there is not an anti—prince charles there. we but there is not an anti-prince charles there.— charles there. we heard about indigenous _ charles there. we heard about indigenous people _ charles there. we heard about indigenous people in - charles there. we heard about indigenous people in canada i charles there. we heard about i indigenous people in canada and their relationship with the queen. what about in australia? it’s a their relationship with the queen. what about in australia? it's a very interestin: what about in australia? it's a very interesting thing _ what about in australia? it's a very interesting thing because _ what about in australia? it's a very interesting thing because the - interesting thing because the indigenous people of australia have a strong bond with her majesty especially. throughout her reign, throughout all those 16 tours, she ensured that she met with indigenous
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elders. then she would have audiences back at buckingham palace. i think the indigenous elders felt they had the ear of the monarch, the head of state, when they didn't have the ear of the prime minister of the day or the government of the day. thanks very much forjoining us. in september 2015, queen elizabeth became the longest—reigning british monarch in history, when she surpassed the reign of her great—great—grandmother queen victoria, who was the head of state for 63 years. but queen elizabeth is not yet the longest serving monarch of all times. if there was a world ranking, she would be in third position. as you can see, so far, she's reigned for 70 years and 118 days since she became britain's head of state in 1952. the queen is just a week away from reaching thailand's king bhumibol adulyadej. he's the second longest—reigning monarch of all times. he was head of state from 1927 until 2016. that's a total of 70 years and 126 days. they are both two years away
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from king of france, louis the 1ath. he was on the throne from 16a3 to 1715. that's more than 72 years or 26,000 days! known as the "sun king", he became monarch at the age of four on the death of his father. that must be exhausting! but while louis was a child, his mother, anne of austria, served as regent. we are talking about longevity. in the 70 years the queen has been on the throne, many politicians have come and gone — including 1a us presidents. joining me now from louisville in kentucky, is the former ambassador to the uk, matthew barzun, who served under president 0bama from 2013 to 2017. he is also the author of "the power of giving away power". thank you very much forjoining me. we have spoken many times and it's great to have you on the programme. tell me about your relationship with the queen. . ~
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tell me about your relationship with the queen. ., ,, , ., tell me about your relationship with the queen. . ~' ,. ., tell me about your relationship with the queen. ., ,, y., ., ., the queen. thank you for having me and bless you _ the queen. thank you for having me and bless you for— the queen. thank you for having me and bless you for keeping _ the queen. thank you for having me and bless you for keeping up - the queen. thank you for having me and bless you for keeping up with i and bless you for keeping up with attention with all that wonderful noise behind you. you pronounce it perfectly, named after king louis, where we say derby, not derby. so, greetings. my wife brooke and i got to go, as every ambassador who served in london gets to have an audience with her majesty, and they come and pick you up at the embassy and i get to wear a top hat and we get taken to buckingham palace and have the audience. and it was a wonderful and strange experience as an american for my wife and me to go to those dates, and it's not been pictured and we don't know —— they don't know who we are, then we get an end you can take off the hat
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because i don't think any american feels comfortable in a top hat unless you're may be a blinking. —— you our abraham lincoln. we were chatting and i said something bland about how amazing it is to come in and see those thousands of tourists with at least one tech gadget, but usually two or three. she said, and i'll neverforget it, usually two or three. she said, and i'll never forget it, "i'll miss it. " in the old days, they would put up the camera, take the picture and put it down. but she said now, and she had the white gloves in her hand and put her hand up in front of her face and she said they never take them down. she missed seeing their eyes. i thought that was so sweet and
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emblematic of these strange times we're in where we've never been so connectable. we're in where we've never been so connectable— connectable. she's also right, that is exactly what _ connectable. she's also right, that is exactly what people _ connectable. she's also right, that is exactly what people do. - connectable. she's also right, that is exactly what people do. i - connectable. she's also right, that is exactly what people do. i love i is exactly what people do. i love the fact that she pointed out to you. answer this question for me — why do the americans love british royalty so much? i why do the americans love british royalty so much?— why do the americans love british royalty so much? i don't know that if ou royalty so much? i don't know that if you phrase _ royalty so much? i don't know that if you phrase it _ royalty so much? i don't know that if you phrase it that _ royalty so much? i don't know that if you phrase it that way, - royalty so much? i don't know that if you phrase it that way, and - royalty so much? i don't know that if you phrase it that way, and i'm l if you phrase it that way, and i'm sure there's polling, i don't know it. if you take the abstraction that is british royalty and separate that from queen elizabeth ii, i don't know what the difference in numbers would be, but! know what the difference in numbers would be, but i suspect like your previous guess was saying, there's something about her grace, her history and the reason she's on the throne. you think about america and the uk. we were not always the best of friends. to put it mildly. yet
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the special relationship that's developed in the a0s, 50s, 60s until now, she has been this constant and almost a mirror to a set of country that's gone through so many changes __ up that's gone through so many changes —— up to us as a country. we're all connected in this wonderful way. matthew, former us ambassador under president 0bama to london, thank you very much. joining us from louisville where they say derby, not darby. as you can hear, preparations are under way. let's cross to the mall, outside buckingham palace. 0ur news reporter ashley john—baptiste is there. hello, how are we doing guys? as you can see and hear, the atmosphere is absolutely electric. we have a lady from? ., ., .
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absolutely electric. we have a lady from? . ., . to absolutely electric. we have a lady from?_ to be _ absolutely electric. we have a lady from?_ to be at - absolutely electric. we have a lady from?_ to be at tonight | from? harrogate. to be at tonight because 's — from? harrogate. to be at tonight because 's concert, _ from? harrogate. to be at tonight because 's concert, what's - from? harrogate. to be at tonight because 's concert, what's that. because 's concert, what's that mean? �* . . . because 's concert, what's that mean?_ which - because 's concert, what's that i mean?_ which artist because 's concert, what's that - mean?_ which artist are mean? it's amazing. which artist are ou mean? it's amazing. which artist are you excited — mean? it's amazing. which artist are you excited to _ mean? it's amazing. which artist are you excited to see _ mean? it's amazing. which artist are you excited to see tonight? - mean? it's amazing. which artist are you excited to see tonight? i - mean? it's amazing. which artist are you excited to see tonight? i last - you excited to see tonight? i last saw her in _ you excited to see tonight? i last saw her in the _ you excited to see tonight? i last saw her in the 1979, _ you excited to see tonight? i last saw her in the 1979, so _ you excited to see tonight? i last saw her in the 1979, so i'm - you excited to see tonight? i last saw her in the 1979, so i'm hoping he's not _ saw her in the 1979, so i'm hoping he's not changed too much. to saw her in the 1979, so i'm hoping he's not changed too much.- he's not changed too much. to be here. what _ he's not changed too much. to be here, what does _ he's not changed too much. to be here, what does it _ he's not changed too much. to be here, what does it mean - he's not changed too much. to be here, what does it mean to - he's not changed too much. to be here, what does it mean to you? | he's not changed too much. to be i here, what does it mean to you? it's a hue here, what does it mean to you? it's a huge honour and here, what does it mean to you? it's a huge honourand i here, what does it mean to you? it's a huge honour and i feel really grateful— a huge honour and i feel really grateful to— a huge honour and i feel really grateful to be _ a huge honour and i feel really grateful to be here. _ a huge honour and i feel really grateful to be here. it's- a huge honour and i feel really grateful to be here. it's a - grateful to be here. it's a once—in—a—lifetime - grateful to be here. it's al once—in—a—lifetime event. gratefulto be here. it's a once-in-a-lifetime event. you can see people — once-in-a-lifetime event. you can see people are _ once-in-a-lifetime event. you can see people are really _ once-in-a-lifetime event. you can see people are really excited. - see people are really excited. people are getting ready. 0ne see people are really excited. people are getting ready. one more time, how are we feeling? cheering i think that says it all. 0ver time, how are we feeling? cheering i think that says it all. over to you. i thought it was noisy appear. it is clearly... 0h, there's a pause. it is clear is clearly noisier. nice to have you back up there, i hope you can hear me. i have a postgraduate
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degree in lip—reading. i apologise if i missed anything. this degree in lip-reading. i apologise if i missed anything.— if i missed anything. this is fantastic. _ if i missed anything. this is fantastic. crosstalk - fantastic. crosstalk this is absolutely - fantastic. crosstalk - this is absolutely amazing. fantastic. crosstalk _ this is absolutely amazing. we've s - oken this is absolutely amazing. we've spoken about _ this is absolutely amazing. we've spoken about the _ this is absolutely amazing. we've spoken about the acts _ this is absolutely amazing. we've spoken about the acts that - this is absolutely amazing. we've spoken about the acts that will i spoken about the acts that will perform here. spoken about the acts that will perform here-— spoken about the acts that will erform here. . �* ., ., ., perform here. we're going to hear from the duke _ perform here. we're going to hear from the duke of— perform here. we're going to hear from the duke of cambridge - perform here. we're going to hear from the duke of cambridge and i perform here. we're going to hear i from the duke of cambridge and the prince of wales, we all remember ten years ago, prince charles getting up on stage and... which went down a storm. it's always lovely to see that personal side of their relationship. it is formal. he always describes her as her majesty in public, but he's there to pay tribute to her as the head of state, as this figurehead. but also as his mother. she's a grandmother and
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great—grandmother. it's lovely to remember that side of her. great-grandmother. it's lovely to remember that side of her. during the course — remember that side of her. during the course of _ remember that side of her. during the course of this _ remember that side of her. during the course of this weekend, - remember that side of her. during the course of this weekend, it's i the course of this weekend, it's prince charles who had stepped in. it's almost a moment for the british public to get used to seeing prince charles in this role. it’s public to get used to seeing prince charles in this role.— charles in this role. it's been in motion for _ charles in this role. it's been in motion for some _ charles in this role. it's been in motion for some time - charles in this role. it's been in motion for some time and - charles in this role. it's been in motion for some time and it's i charles in this role. it's been in i motion for some time and it's very slow and gradual. this is a glimpse into the future for all of us. emil?r into the future for all of us. emily nashe, into the future for all of us. emily nashe. thank _ into the future for all of us. emily nashe, thank you _ into the future for all of us. emily nashe, thank you very _ into the future for all of us. emily nashe, thank you very much. - into the future for all of us. emily i nashe, thank you very much. thank you for bearing with the noise. she's one of the most photographed women in history and over the past 70 years has defined what it means to dress like a queen. not trendsetting or daring, but iconic. she's become famous for her brightly coloured dresses and coats paired with a matching hat, accessorised with her signature square handbag, a string of pearls and a jewelled brooch. it sounds simple but the queen's style has become a powerfulformula.
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it's a style that has been honed and refined over seven decades, helped by the close relationships she has developed with trusted designers and dressers. joining me now to talk more about her majesty's famous headwear is bethan holt, who is fashion editorfor the uk telegraph newspaper. thank you very much forjoining us. i hope you can hear me. they are partying down there at buckingham palace. the queen has 5000 head accessories. hats, scarves, whatever you call those feathery things. what do you do with them all? she’s you call those feathery things. what do you do with them all?— do you do with them all? she's very luc . do you do with them all? she's very lucky- she's — do you do with them all? she's very lucky- she's got _ do you do with them all? she's very lucky- she's got a — do you do with them all? she's very lucky. she's got a whole _ do you do with them all? she's very lucky. she's got a whole team - do you do with them all? she's very lucky. she's got a whole team of. lucky. she's got a whole team of dressers who are there not only to prepare every outfit perfectly, but also to archive everything. almost every outfit is kept in pristine condition. but her hats tell us so
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much about her. there's a wonderful story that her corgis, when she's walking down the stairs and wearing a tiara, they sit down and they know they aren't going for a walk. when she has a scarf on, they know it's time. she kind of puts a different hat on for all the different roles in her life. that's why she needs so many. she has been such a busy woman. . . many. she has been such a busy woman. , , ., ~ many. she has been such a busy woman. ,, ., ~ ., many. she has been such a busy woman. ,, . ~ ., , ., woman. issue making a statement, do ou think? woman. issue making a statement, do you think? absolutely. _ woman. issue making a statement, do you think? absolutely. the _ woman. issue making a statement, do you think? absolutely. the queen - you think? absolutely. the queen knows she- -- _ you think? absolutely. the queen knows she... she _ you think? absolutely. the queen knows she... she needs _ you think? absolutely. the queen knows she... she needs to - you think? absolutely. the queen knows she... she needs to be - you think? absolutely. the queenl knows she... she needs to be seen you think? absolutely. the queen - knows she... she needs to be seen to be believed, she said. if you weren't queen, i think she perhaps wouldn't be very interested in faction. i don't think she's reading vogue, but she realises that in her role, she's been photographed, people will come from across the world, as we've seen, to spot a
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glimpse of her. she knows that she has to stand out, so by wearing these huge hats and brightly coloured outfits, she can stand out from a mile off. there's not many of us walking around wearing lime green and bright pink and jewelled coats and bright pink and jewelled coats and the way she is. do and bright pink and 'ewelled coats and the way she is._ and the way she is. do you have a favourite period _ and the way she is. do you have a favourite period for her _ and the way she is. do you have a favourite period for her majesty's| favourite period for her majesty's faction? favourite period for her ma'esty's faction? ~ ~ " :: . faction? well, i think the 1950s were real glory _ faction? well, i think the 1950s were real glory days. _ faction? well, i think the 1950s were real glory days. she - faction? well, i think the 1950s were real glory days. she was l faction? well, i think the 1950s i were real glory days. she was this glamourous young woman in the client of way that the duchess of cambridge or meghan markle are today. she could really where the fashions of the time. there are some absolutely beautiful pictures her commonwealth tours during the 1950s, but i think she's also really come into her own in the 90s —— her 90s as well. this is a time when so many women disappearfrom view and is a time when so many women disappear from view and there's so much talk about older women not
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being present in the media. i think she is someone who is a beacon for dressing up and looking amazing well into your nineties. {lila dressing up and looking amazing well into your nineties.— into your nineties. ok, thank you very much _ into your nineties. ok, thank you very much for— into your nineties. ok, thank you very much forjoining _ into your nineties. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. - into your nineties. ok, thank you very much forjoining us. we - very much forjoining us. we couldn't let you go without some of those pictures of her fashion. couldn't let you go without some of those pictures of herfashion. it has been iconic through the years. very definitely her majesty's own style. we are starting to... you can see all the crowd coming in. they will be treated to a string of performances from the united kingdom and around the world, celebrities who will be here to pay tribute to her majesty. we don't know if the queen herself is watching, but we know thousands of people will be watching. the square behind me is going to be packed. it is the
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highlight for people who want to party after two long years of covid. this is the moment for everyone to party. i hope you'lljoin the celebrations. is looking mainly dry for much of the uk. still some showers in the forecast. further showers to come across in england and wales. very different story across scotland and northern ireland. not a cloud in the sky earlier, and plenty of showers in cornwall through this morning. still some lingering this afternoon. this is where the shower, but i'm pulling away north and west, so becoming confined. mist and low cloud, making it feel cool, and highs of around 21
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or 22 celsius. we see this band of heavy rain working its way up from france, not likely to bring some torrential downpour is into wales and the midlands. with mist and low cloud, clear skies across a large school either of scotland, we've got the cloud —— a large swathe. this bank continues on its journey northwards through wales, the midlands into northern england. some brakes allowing for sunshine that could spark off further heavy showers. still some mist him and low cloud. best of the sunshine across a large swathe of scotland. we will see the highest temperatures in northern ireland. those showers continue to push their ways at northwards, could see some of those showers arriving into northern
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scotland. starts to gradually pull away he swears. it will take its time, they will start to ease through the day. fair amount of cloud, once again the best of the sunshine will be across scotland. temperatures up to 21 celsius. temperatures up to 21 celsius. temperatures struggling to get much above 13 or 1a celsius. tuesday looks to be a quieter day. wednesday will turn wetter as we see.
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this is bbc news. the headlines at 6pm. party preparations at the palace — as the stars get ready to come out for the platinum jubilee celebrations. everyone is together, everyone is smiling. the vibe in london today in the last few days has been just electric. up and down the country people have been holding street parties to celebrate the queen's 70 years on the throne. one of the biggest parties has been held at windsor great park's long walk — where tens of thousands of revellers turned up. there've beenjubilee celebrations at epsom too for derby day — but the queen hasn't been there as originally planned — she's been represented by her daughter the princess royal.

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