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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 5, 2022 1:00am-1:31am BST

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this is bbc news. i'm simon pusey. our top stories: rock stars, including sir rod stewart, wow the crowds at the buckingham palacejubilee concert. prince charles gives a moving tribute to his mother for her 70 years of service. you continue to make history. you continue to make history. you laugh and cry with others and, most importantly, you have been there for us. for the 70 years. and a surprise appearance on screen from the queen with the nation's favourite bear, where we found out what she keeps in her handbag.
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perhaps you would like a marmalade sandwich? i always keep one for emergencies. so do i. i kee keep one for emergencies. so do i- i keep mine — keep one for emergencies. so do i. i keep mine in _ keep one for emergencies. so do i. i keep mine in here. _ hong kong police arrest six people close to victoria park where a candlelight vigil marking the 1989 tiananmen square crackdown in beijing would have been held. in other news, a senior ukrainian official says russia is throwing all its power at the key city of severodonetsk, where its soldiers are locked in fierce street battles. and, could mariah carey's multi—million selling, 1994 song, all i want for christmas land her in court? hello. celebrations have been continuing to mark the queen's platinum jubilee. a huge crowd gathered in front
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of buckingham palace for a spectacular open—air concert to mark the queen's 70 years on the throne. in a tribute to his mother, prince charles praised what he called "a lifetime of selfless service". veteran pop stars including diana ross, rod stewart and the band queen were among the performers. here's our royal correspondent nicholas witchell. cheering. after the ceremonial and spiritual it was time for ajubilee party. they had taken their seats in the royal box and tens of thousands had packed the mall and first on stage, who else but queen and brian may? the bbc concert had begun inside buckingham palace with one of those jaw—dropping moments. a tea party with the peruvian called paddington. thank you for having me.
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i do hope you're having a lovelyjubilee. tea? oh, yes, please! oh, dear. perhaps...you would like a marmalade sandwich? i always keep one for emergencies. so do i. i keep mine in here! 0h! for later. well, who would have believed it? this is a monarch who still enjoys springing a surprise. outside, the concert was getting into full swing. there was music and the waving of unionjack flags. some waved with rather
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more vigour than others, it must be said. and as day gave way to night, the focus shifted. prince william spoke of the need to protect the planet. my own grandmother has been alive for nearly a century. today, in 2022, as the queen celebrates her platinum jubilee, the pressing need to protect and restore our planet has never been more urgent. and the prince of wales spoke movingly of his mother and her dedication over 70 years. you have met us and talked with us. you laugh and cry with us and, most importantly, you have been there for us for these 70 years. you pledged to serve your whole life and you continue to deliver. that is why we are here. that is what we celebrate tonight. these pictures on your house
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are the story of your life and ours. so, your majesty, that is why we all say thank you. the crowd gave three cheers. cheering. it had been an evening of many emotions. the main ones were respect and gratitude. earlier, people thronged to the mall and areas around buckingham palace for the concert, with many queuing for hours to get a glimpse of the stars and to share in the heady atmosphere. 0ur entertainment correspondent steffan powell reports. the excitement was what a better _ the excitement was what a better way to bring people
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together better way to bring people to-ether with better way to bring people together better way to bring people to-ether with music better way to bring people together better way to bring people to-ether with music from together with music from different generations. it�*s different generations. it's amazing- _ different generations. it's amazing. it's _ different generations. it�*s amazing. it's electric. every one is a really good mood, it's nice. i think it's magical. gorgeous day, bank holiday weekend, it's amazing. it's electric, everybody is in a really good mood, it's nice. not many people in the world could get the likes of duran duran, sir rod stewart and diana ross to share the same stage on the same night, it's a testament to how well admired and respected the queen is across the world. this is a line—up that music festival bosses would die for, and don't take my word for it. # babyjane, don't leave me hanging on the line...# this party at the palace has been designed to appeal to her majesty's supporters, of all ages. # space man...
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# i'm overyou, i don't need your lies no more...# everyone isjust so happy to be here, happy to be i celebrating her majesty i the queen, and definitely i felt the energy when i was on stage that it was just - all about happiness and celebration. i and away from the more formal, traditional celebrations for thejubilee, it's been an opportunity for people to let their hair down, from key workers given tickets for their contribution during the pandemic to royalty itself. this was a night that the 22,000 with tickets and the crowd watching along the mall won't forget in a hurry. it hasn't happened before, and may not happen again. # this girl is on fire...# steffan powell, bbc news.
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let's get some of the day's other news. judges in tunisia are to strike for a week and stage sit—in protests against the president's firing of dozens of their colleagues. 57judges were dismissed on the accusation of corruption and protecting terrorists. in an attempt to consolidate power, president kais saied had dissolved the supremejudicial council which regulated judicial independence. brazil is offering all health workers and residents over the age of 50 a fourth coronavirus jab in a bid to stem the recent surge in cases. there have been more than 650,000 covid fatalities in since the beginning of the pandemic and the death toll is currently around 100, per day. the brazilian president has been heavily criticised for being too slow to react to the virus and delaying the purchase of vaccines. mercedes—benz is recalling nearly a million older vehicles worldwide. the callback is due to a potential problem with the brakes of the vehicles built between 2004 and 2015. the problem is related to corrosion which, in the worst cases, could lead to the connection between the brake pedal
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and the braking system failing. dozens of police officers patrolled hong kong's victoria park on saturday after authorities for a third consecutive year banned public commemoration of the anniversary of the deadly tiananmen square crackdown in 1989. six people were arrested. lea na hosea reports. for decades, the only place in china where people could commemorate those killed in the tiananmen square massacre in 1989. this used to be the place where vigils were held. victoria park. that is all changed with the introduction of the national security law banning vigils. 0n of the national security law banning vigils. on saturday, scuffles broke out as police tried to arrest those who turned up. they had already been warned that unauthorised assembly could see them imprisoned for up to five years. the threat didn't stop this democracy activist from
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observing a minute's silence privately indoors. translation: it has become _ privately indoors. translation: it has become part _ privately indoors. translation: it has become part of— privately indoors. translation: it has become part of our- privately indoors. translation: it has become part of our life - it has become part of our life and it is now how we practice in our everyday life. as long as we are willing to remember and pass it on, the truth will eventually come to light someday. eventually come to light someday-— eventually come to light someday. eventually come to light someda. ., ., ., , ., , someday. now taiwan is the only art of someday. now taiwan is the only part of the _ someday. now taiwan is the only part of the chinese _ someday. now taiwan is the only part of the chinese speaking - part of the chinese speaking world where it can be remembered openly. activists in taipei put up a new version of the pillar of shame, a statue commemorating tiananmen protesters that was removed from hong kong. they call out in support of tiananmen square, but this student is worried increasingly for his own freedom and that of taiwan. translation: in the face of ever—increasing military threats by china in recent years, we can learn through events like this that they will use whatever suppressive
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tactics they already use on their own people to suppress taiwan or any other place in the world. taiwan or any other place in the world-— taiwan or any other place in the world. ., ., ., , the world. taiwan will now be one of the — the world. taiwan will now be one of the main _ the world. taiwan will now be one of the main centres - the world. taiwan will now be one of the main centres of. one of the main centres of remembrance for those who lost their lives in tiananmen square. we're joined by jeffrey wasserstrom, a historian from the university of california, irvine, to understand how china deals with dissent more than three decades after tiananmen and why discussion is now wider to hong and macau. protests have long been rare in china. does this national security law that has been passed mean the communist party is stamped out descent in hong kong as well? it is stamped out descent in hong kong as well?— is stamped out descent in hong kong as well? it hasn't stamped our descent. _ kong as well? it hasn't stamped our descent, there _ kong as well? it hasn't stamped our descent, there is _ our descent, there is discontent. what is presented as large—scale mass marches and demonstrations which were an important part of hong kong life as recently as 2019. i was therefore the vigil in victoria park on this day in 2019 and
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there was a massive crowd there and even larger crowds turned out to protest soon after that but the space for that has been stamped out so that now descent, as on the mainland, has to express itself in more indirect ways, more subtle ways through satire and other things that keep alive a spirit of dissent but not the kind of mass marches that were part of the local landscape. find mass marches that were part of the local landscape.— the local landscape. and how else does _ the local landscape. and how else does the _ the local landscape. and how else does the chinese - else does the chinese government stop discussion of tiananmen in mainland china? social media is huge in china but they have ways to stop it there as well.— but they have ways to stop it there as well. there have been all kinds of _ there as well. there have been all kinds of forms _ there as well. there have been all kinds of forms of _ all kinds of forms of censorship but there's been an ongoing cat and mouse game for people who want to keep discussion alive and those want to crush it. one of early ways was to refer tojune to crush it. one of early ways was to refer to june four was banned so people would prefer to may 30 fifth, an imaginary date people knew was about this date people knew was about this date but what people are doing
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on social media is putting up images of candles. the communist party is in a position of having to block the use of images of candles because that is also associated with the vigils that used to be taking place in hong kong. i think one of the interesting things about this year's commemoration ofjune four, it looks back at what happened on the mainland in 1989 but is also commemorating what happened in hong kong in 2019. it's a kind of longing for the ability to commemorate and discuss these kinds of events that the communist party wants people to forget but many people to forget but many people are determined to keep alive and is being kept alive, the memory of it, now increasingly in the dyas per and parts of the world. find and parts of the world. and there have _ and parts of the world. and there have been _ and parts of the world. and there have been vigils in taiwan. theories those as well will one day be stamped out. that of course is a fear but there are vigils in many other parts of the world where hong kong is in exile are playing an important role, in london and
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toronto and other places, there are images of that and even where statues are being taken down in hong kong that refer back to the events of 1989, the pillar of shame, goddess of democracy statue, these used to stand on hong kong campuses but replicas are popping up and other spaces and small replicas of the goddess of democracy statue were created and placed on the university of hong kong campus in a really daring action of defiance to show that not everybody is willing to just look the other way is the communist party tries to block out any kind of reference to this in hong kong.— out any kind of reference to this in hong kong. that's all we've got — this in hong kong. that's all we've got time _ this in hong kong. that's all we've got time for, - this in hong kong. that's all we've got time for, thank i this in hong kong. that's all. we've got time for, thank you forjoining us, talking to us about the commemorations of tenormin square in 1989. you are watching bbc news, the headlines: huge crowds enjoy a star—studded concert at buckingham palace, and members of the royal family tour the uk nations, during a third day of jubilee celebrations. a senior ukrainian official
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says russia is throwing all its power at the key city of severodonetsk, where its soldiers are locked in fierce street battles. the country says bridges have been blown up to stop russian reinforcements from coming into severodonetsk. it is the focus of the offensive in the dock is reason, cuba says it has recaptured part of the territory lost to russian forces, but as our correspondent reports, both sides present very different pictures of how the conflict is unfolding. russian armour still rolling forward, moving to encircle ukraine's forces in the donbas, an advancing army, liberating the people of this region, providing them with humanitarian aid. that is the picture the russians want to present of the invasion they still refused to call a war.
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they say they are destroying western weapons and killing foreign mercenaries. but, from the ukrainians, you get quite the ukrainians, you get quite the opposite impression. this is a coalition of soldiers defending their homeland, all joining from around the world to face down a global threat. we are on the right side of the history so we're going to make sure, all ofare history so we're going to make sure, all of are going to get back home with their families, and will make sure that the occupants are not going to do the same. now, the truth of what is really going on is shrouded in the fog of war, both sides put out the messages they want the world to hear. translation: a ., translation: as soon as we have enou:h translation: as soon as we have enough western _ translation: as soon as we have enough western long-range - enough western long—range weapons we will push their artillery away from our positions, and then, believe me, the russian infantry, they'lljust run. they'll just run. what we they'lljust run. what we do know for certain is that it what we do know for certain is thatitis what we do know for certain is that it is the people of this region who are paying the price. this is the town of
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alyssa strengths, just across the river from severodonetsk. thousands already here. there is no electricity, water, our grandchildren have left. we don't know how they are. as the battle for severodonetsk continues, on the streets, ukrainian police evacuate stranded residents. if russia can take the city, it will have a path into the donbas. if the ukrainians can stop them, they will win a battle that could determine the outcome of this war. joe inwood, bbc news, kyiv. 28 years after the release of all i want for christmas is you, mariah carey and her writer are facing a lawsuit. andy stone accuses them of exploiting a song he co—wrote in 1989 which had the same name. let's see if you can have
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the difference. let's start with the song you have probably heard before. # i don't want our lot for christmas, there isjust one thing i need. i christmas, there is 'ust one thing i needh thing i need. i don't care about their _ thing i need. i don't care about their presence, i about their presence, underneath the christmas tree. # i don't need to put my... that was mariah carey's all i want for christmas is you. now, let's speak to forensic musicologist, sandy wilbur, who has previously testified on copyright infringement issues in court. what do you make of this case? is there any merit? i'm not involve the case, and i haven't even looked into it until a couple of hours ago. i will tell you this, it seems like an absurd case. the title — it is common knowledge that a title cannot be copyrighted. it
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lacks originality. there are many songs out there with that title. in fact, many songs out there with that title. infact, sesame many songs out there with that title. in fact, sesame street has a song, all i want for christmas is you, that came out in 1996. all i want for christmas is my two front teeth was written in 1964, so the lowest, the music, there is not enough similar, it is not sufficient. why has he brought this case forward, is it opportunistic? i would say, probably so. i don't know, i don't know what the motives are, i have seen many kinds of motives, but some can believe that they can make a settlement because most people don't want to go to court. and they can get something out of it. some people actually believe they have a stronger claim, some people do it for attention. i have no idea what the
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motivation is here, but i can tell you about the outcome should be quick and decisive. and is there consideration of all writers and musicians before the public the works that they could get sued down the line, and therefore they may be need to look at what is out there already? you know, obviously, there is a lot of concern. i was the expert in the blurred lines versus marvin gaye case, we lost. i was on the side that lost, but it did blur the line between what is your —— infringement and what is inspiration. even in this case, which i don't know the facts, evenif which i don't know the facts, even if mariah carey had heard the song and said, that's a great title, all right, she is completely entitled to do so. there is nothing that said she can't. what i did notice is
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that they were well over 125 listings to the us copyright office since 1978, so this is our common title. if that is the only thing that is, between these two songs, there is no case here. these two songs, there is no case here-— case here. exactly, and 30 ears case here. exactly, and 30 years since _ case here. exactly, and 30 years since it _ case here. exactly, and 30 years since it first - case here. exactly, and 30 years since it first came i case here. exactly, and 30 i years since it first came out. do you expect to see more cases like this, given the nature of the fact that, as you say, being litigious is expensive, and i think often lawyers and people realise it is much easier to settle out of court? i think that does happen, i think there is a backlash with that, as has been the case with the ed sheeran case where he was willing to go to court and show that this was not a case of merit. but, i knowi show that this was not a case of merit. but, i know i have been pretty busy, and since the blurred lines because they have been many cases that have come in that haven't had merit, so i
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would say that that is a trend and there is a backlash. i think artists are getting tired of being sued. it'll be really interesting to see what happens with this case but it sounds like it is open and shut as far as you are concerned, in terms of not being able to co—operate at idle, but really interesting to speak to you, thank you for joining us. speak to you, thank you for joining us— in the 70 years the queen has been on the throne many politicians have come and gone, including 14 us presidents. the bbc�*s sophie long reports on the queen's relationship with america and its leaders. queen elizabeth's leading role in the special relationship between britain and the united states dates back to before her succession to the throne. princess elizabeth plays host to the trim and family. the first of the 13 us leaders her majesty matt was president truman in 1951. she was princess elizabeth. dwight eisenhower was president when she made herfirst state
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eisenhower was president when she made her first state visit in 1957. �* , ., in 1957. neil armstrong, the first man — in 1957. neil armstrong, the first man on _ in 1957. neil armstrong, the first man on the _ in 1957. neil armstrong, the first man on the moon... i first man on the moon... americans have had some issues with american protocol. after landing on the moon, astronauts neil armstrong, collins and aldrin visited buckingham palace. collins almost fell down the stairs in his efforts not to turn his back on the queen. we're going to do photo? i see. subsequent presidents and first ladies have been more relaxed. michelle 0bama famously laid a hand on her back, and not only did the restriction ditch the bow in favour for a handshake, but then walked in front of her. i'd dwell royal commentators grasped, the queen displayed nothing but good humour. i think that when she meets with american presidents, and evenjust going out with american presidents, and even just going out and about with the general public, she
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does give off a narrow approachability. and i think the way that she wasn't bothered, for instance, when somebody would break protocol and touch her, and i think that so—so to the public. she and touch her, and i think that so-so to the public. she wants with president _ so-so to the public. she wants with president ford, _ so-so to the public. she wants with president ford, rode i with president ford, rode horses with president reagan. president biden was a first head of state she met in person following the death of prince philip. he and the first lady had this message for her majesty. congratulations on your platinum jubilee. in america, the queen retains ratings most political leaders would last offer, including after meghan markle, of course, her majesty prince enforce the
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transatlantic relationship,. transatlantic relationship, . shall we watch transatlantic relationship,. shall we watch it together? yes. they have spoken so highly of her. _ yes. they have spoken so highly of her, they have major any sort — of her, they have major any sort of— of her, they have major any sort of feelings they have about _ sort of feelings they have about the firm are divorced from — about the firm are divorced from the _ about the firm are divorced from the queen as harry's grandmother. evenif grandmother. even if harry and meghan are backin even if harry and meghan are back in britain for the platinumjubilee back in britain for the platinum jubilee celebrations, there will be plenty of the queen's supporters here raising a cup of tea in her honour. sophie long, bbc news. let's bring you quick reminder of the top story — the huge crowds gathered in front of buckingham palace for a spectacular opener concert, marking the highpoint of the celebrations for queen elizabeth's 70 years on the british throne. in a tribute to his mother, prince charles praised what he called a of selfless service. —— called a lifetime of selfless service. you can get more information on the news from our website. from
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us on the team, thank you for watching. stay with us. hello there, heavy rain with thunder and lightning has continued to spread northwards across central and southern england, and wales. it means for part two of the weekend we will have a north — south divide again, with much of scotland and northern ireland staying dry. more cloud and rain across england and wales. a very wet start to wales, the midlands and eastern england through the morning. and then that rain will is down as it moves northwards. it will stay rather grey and damp. any sunshine that comes out across open areas may spark off a heavy shower or thunderstorm into the afternoon. temperatures reaching highs of around 18 or 19. much cooler under the around 18 or 19. much cooler underthe rain, around 18 or 19. much cooler under the rain, low teens, cool
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along the north sea coast, the better sunshine and warmth across northern scotland. 20 degrees also. 0vernight, cloudy, further pulses of rain across northern, central and eastern england. some of the ranges getting into southern scotland. double—figure values to start the day on monday in the south. single figures in the south. single figures in the north under clear skies. for monday, the pressure chart showers the low pressure pulling out into the north sea, taking the rain weathered. remember, in between weather systems for monday afternoon so many places should be dry over the more sunshine around. rather cloudier monday, through central england. rain and strong winds pull away from the east coast. more sunshine in the south. sunshine again across large parts of scotland where we can see the high teens there, maybe 20 degrees and warmer spots on the south. we'll have to watch that area of rain moving into southwest england and the channel islands during monday night. into tuesday, the range should clear away from southern areas, and then because we are
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in between weather systems again it looks largely quiet. maybe an odd shower here now, but good sunshine around. more sunshine in the salsa we could see highs of 21 degrees in the capital. 19 also through the central belt of scotland. more unsettled on wednesday onwards. areas of low pressure moving in off the atlantic. 0ne system will bring outbreaks of rain followed by sunshine and showers. the next system through thursday and friday could bring a spell of windy weather with outbreaks of rain followed by sunshine and showers. it is much more unsubtle to end the new week, with sunshine and showers, fairly strong winds, used temperatures around the temperatures around the temperatures around the seasonal average.
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this is bbc news, the headlines: huge crowds gathered in front of buckingham palace for a spectacular open—air concert — marking a high point of the celebrations for queen elizabeth's seventy years on the british throne. in a tribute to his mother, prince charles praised what he called "a lifetime of selfless service." russia says ukrainian troops in the eastern city of severodonetsk have suffered critical losses and are retreating. ukraine insists it's still pushing back russian forces, despite the city remaining the the main goal of russia's offensive. soldiers from both sides are locked in fierce street battles. police in hong kong have arrested six people close to victoria park, where a candlelight vigil

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