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tv   World Business Report  BBC News  June 6, 2022 5:30am-6:01am BST

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this is bbc news with the latest business headlines for viewers in the uk and around the world. travel chaos for thousands of passengers, as easyjet and others cancel more than 80 flights, leaving many with their holiday plans ruined. out with the new and in with the old — love island is back for its latest series and this yea r�*s contestants are swapping fast fashion for second—hand outfits. we go behind the scenes on their plans. and fewer days for the same pay. 70 companies across the uk trial out the four—day week. but will work—life balancing act actually work?
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let's start here in the uk, where thousands of passengers have had their holiday plans disrupted after numerous flights were cancelled on sunday. it comes at a time when the aviation industry is struggling to recruit full—time staff after laying off workers during the pandemic. easyjet said it had cut 80 flights on sunday, and apologised to customers for the disruption, blaming the the �*ongoing challenging operating environment�*. flights from british airways and wizz air were also affected. the uk government has provided £8 billion of support to the aviation sector during the pandemic. transport secretary grant shapps believes the industry cut too manyjobs during the pandemic and said it should not oversell flights. joining me now is fiona cincotta from city index.
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some cincotta from city index. strains explained because this some strains explained because this has been an especially busy travel weekend, not just in the uk but other parts of europe, some highlight —— summer holidays not far away. can this be sorted out before then? ., �* , can this be sorted out before then? . �* , , , ., then? that's the big question that's going _ then? that's the big question that's going to _ then? that's the big question that's going to be _ then? that's the big question that's going to be weighing i then? that's the big question | that's going to be weighing on everybody�*s minds, also investors in stocks and shares as well. a lot of people who have gone to the airport the first time they are looking to get away since kilometre pro two years ago, and the scenes are quite disastrous, there are only seven or six weeks until summer school holidays kick off, what other chances these airlines being able to recruit and get themselves back up into and get themselves back up into an orderly fashion by then and it's looking doubtful, which means people will be questioning, those who haven't already booked holidays abroad will be questioning whether
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it's worth taking the risk or just have a another holiday in the uk or maybe not to go with a low—budget airline, perhaps pay that orbit more to try and secure that except flight from the uk. ., , the uk. one of the things airlines in _ the uk. one of the things airlines in the _ the uk. one of the things airlines in the uk - the uk. one of the things airlines in the uk have i the uk. one of the things i airlines in the uk have been calling for is a relaxation of visa regulations to allow them to hire from the eu, might that meet some of the issues on time, summer is only six or seven weeks?— time, summer is only six or seven weeks? , , , seven weeks? the time pressure is the big problem _ seven weeks? the time pressure is the big problem here, - seven weeks? the time pressure is the big problem here, there i is the big problem here, there really isn't that much time to get this sorted, i don't think that's necessarily going to be the golden ticket answer to getting this absolute disaster sorted by the time the holidays kick off. i don't quite know how they would do it, because trying to recruit such a huge amount of people in such a short amount of time and get them trained up will be extremely challenging, it could mean the cost of flights will go mean the cost of flights will 9° up, mean the cost of flights will go up, at a time when inflation
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is already very high and households are struggling the cost of living crisis, even higher expenses for flights is going to be hit hard.- higher expenses for flights is going to be hit hard. thank you very much _ going to be hit hard. thank you very much for— going to be hit hard. thank you very much forjoining _ going to be hit hard. thank you very much forjoining us. - let's get some of the day's other news. german car maker mercedes—benz has announced that it will recall nearlyi million of its older vehicles worldwide because of a potential problem with their brakes. the recall involves some suv and minivan models built between 2004 and 2015. china's government has announced that some covid restrictions in the capital of beijing will ease gradually this week with the city reporting a drop in new cases. starting today, most public transport will be resume operation, and people will be allowed to return to work or dine in restaurants. unlike shanghai, beijing never announced a full lockdown. and the average price of a pint of beer in london has topped £8 for the first time — a 70% increase compared
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to 15 years ago. the price hikes have been driven by a combination of factors, including inflation and the war in ukraine. the country was the world's fourth largest producer of barley, a key ingredient in beer. the conflict in ukraine has led to many countries opening up their borders to welcome over 10 million ukrainian refugees displaced by the war. here in the uk, schemes are now in place to help ukrainians settle in the country. 0ne plan includes bp, curry�*s and the department store harrods, which are among the latest supporters of the uk ukraine business consortium network, a uk—based scheme to provide long—term support for refugees. joining me now is emma sinclair, ceo of enterprise alumni. you started this scheme back in march, how many ukrainians have you helped so far?
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good morning, we are already in the tens and we are about to hit hundreds soon, as you can imagine people have applied and their droves, having just launched this in march, is just starting to hit the 100 point. a process still under way, can you give us some insight into the challenges there are preparing people from ukraine for work in the uk, i guess it depends on what skills they have? ., ., , depends on what skills they have? . ., , ., have? there are a number of challenges. _ have? there are a number of challenges, the _ have? there are a number of challenges, the first - have? there are a number of challenges, the first one - have? there are a number of challenges, the first one is i challenges, the first one is english, the second one is finding peoplejobs finding people jobs commensurate with finding peoplejobs commensurate with experience, what you don't want to do is find you have got nurses being taxi drivers, doctors stacking shelves, heb drivers working at a supermarket tell, you want people to continue on with the jobs they have got in the uk, and europe, we have a real
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history of having an extremely high level of over qualification and underemployment among refugees. with the syrian crisis, there were approximately 30 people that were professional in syria, 82% were unemployed in europe so we look to avert that. , , ,., europe so we look to avert that. , , , that. there must be some people with especially — that. there must be some people with especially in _ that. there must be some people with especially in demand - with especially in demand skills that will be snapped up by employers desperate to fill vacancies?— vacancies? you talked about snapped. — vacancies? you talked about snapped. it's _ vacancies? you talked about snapped, it's not _ vacancies? you talked about snapped, it's not as - vacancies? you talked about snapped, it's not as easy - vacancies? you talked about snapped, it's not as easy as| snapped, it's not as easy as that and that is the thing you learn when you get under the skin of people who are qualified, for example i had dinner last wednesday with an amazing woman, a refugee, she was a maths and english a—level teacher, she has got two years of recertification to do to be allowed to teach so that two years she has to recertify, she has to pay for the teaching qualifications, at a point when she has only recently arrived
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and low on resources and in particular money, the second thing she can't teacher do the job she loves to do, the same goes for a dentist for example, they can spend years requalifying, the dentistry association as a result of covid—19 has a backlog of a couple of years for exams, even if you can get the uk, even if you can find a grant or a way to do that certificate, you might otherwise not be able to afford, can you imagine get to afford, can you imagine get to a foreign country, there is nothing in one bag and you have to pay anything from 500 to £50,000 to requalify in the thing you have been doing 1a or 20 it's very challenging at a time when the nhs need nurses and they need doctors. tell time when the nhs need nurses and they need doctors.- and they need doctors. tell us about perspective _ and they need doctors. tell us about perspective of— and they need doctors. tell us about perspective of some - and they need doctors. tell us about perspective of some ofl about perspective of some of the countries who need volunteers, is this a charitable thing for them or putting people on the right jobs would mean business sense for them? _, ,., ,
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for them? the consortium is sunporting _ for them? the consortium is supporting refugees - for them? the consortium is supporting refugees have i supporting refugees have already helped people find jobs commensurate with experience, we are accelerating it with 400 people on site to help us teach six months of english, from the perspective of the employers, everybody wants to do the right thing and realise there is a better way to do this and make sure people do the jobs they are able to do. it's good for everybody, there are a million job positions in the uk open, we have a lot of skills desperately required, as you rightly say, a lot of companies that want to recruit, finding the right people in the right job at the right time benefits all of us, the economy, the corporate �*s we work with the corporate �*s we work with the corporate �*s we aren't working with and the british economy and mean people who are here working can establish themselves faster, it's a position of pride, but also a position of pride, but also a position of pride, but also a position of financial
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independence which means when these countries are rebuilt they are able to go back. thank ou ve they are able to go back. thank you very much _ they are able to go back. thank you very much for _ they are able to go back. thank you very much forjoining - they are able to go back. thank you very much forjoining us - you very much forjoining us with your thoughts today. renting a home is so difficult at the moment, that tenants are being asked to stump up more cash orjump through hoops to secure a property. a survey of uk—wide letting agents has shown that the average number of properties available in a branch to rent has halved since the pandemic, as many landlords sell up. but demand to rent is high. consumer affairs correspondent colletta smith has been to nottingham to find out more. i'll take you into the kitchen first. , , . ., , ., first. this is the sanctuary of schurrie- — first. this is the sanctuary of schurrie. she _ first. this is the sanctuary of schurrie. she moved - first. this is the sanctuary of schurrie. she moved from i first. this is the sanctuary of - schurrie. she moved from sydney to nottingham a couple of years ago to make her rent stretch further. she loves this place. this is where i chill after a very long day of teaching. figs very long day of teaching. as time ticks on there is a worry in the back of her mind. i
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time ticks on there is a worry in the back of her mind.- in the back of her mind. i am in the back of her mind. i am in a funny — in the back of her mind. i am in a funny old _ in the back of her mind. i am in a funny old position, - in the back of her mind. i am in a funny old position, my i in a funny old position, my lease i have to renew it in this timber, will they put the rent up? any level increased when we are all stretched with every other bill, would push it over to being unaffordable. that security of owning a home, and my monthly rent i'm not going to have with the landlord saying you have to move out because i'm putting up the rent ljy because i'm putting up the rent by two or £300, because they could do that.— could do that. there will be eo - le could do that. there will be people willing _ could do that. there will be people willing to _ could do that. there will be people willing to pay - could do that. there will be people willing to pay that i could do that. there will be . people willing to pay that now, who can afford that. but people willing to pay that now, who can afford that.— who can afford that. but where does that leave _ who can afford that. but where does that leave me? _ who can afford that. but where does that leave me? hello. - who can afford that. but where l does that leave me? hello. the industry body — does that leave me? hello. the industry body property - does that leave me? hello. the industry body property says - industry body property says since the pandemic, the number of properties available to rent has halved. you don't expect this to still be on your books in a week?—
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this to still be on your books in a week? no, properties are lettin: in a week? no, properties are letting quickly. _ in a week? no, properties are letting quickly, there - in a week? no, properties are letting quickly, there will- in a week? no, properties are letting quickly, there will be i letting quickly, there will be good demand for this. that means record _ good demand for this. that means record prices - good demand for this. that means record prices and i good demand for this. that means record prices and bidding wars. ., , wars. the trend we are seeing more of now. _ wars. the trend we are seeing more of now, which _ wars. the trend we are seeing more of now, which was - wars. the trend we are seeing. more of now, which was almost unheard of two or more years ago tenant going about the application price to get there applications. sometimes we see tenants offering three your six months rent in advance, people sending cvs of family and pets saying we are good tenants. of the kids? background bio of who they are and photographs. it’s they are and photographs. it's not record _ they are and photographs. it's not record science to work out why the number of properties to rent has plummeted across the uk. since the pandemic property prices have been on the rise, with extra regulations and hassle and taxes and charges that landlords are facing, has tempted a lot more of them to sell up and get out of the game. that means fewer houses to rent. that is what happened
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to rent. that is what happened to this small—scale landlord. stress is huge, nobody seems to consider the on landlords, i'm not a professional, big company with lots of people working for me who can manage these things, this all fell on my shoulders. two years ago he was faced with a nightmare tenant who didn't pay for 16 months and administer the neighbours. this cost me administer the neighbours. try 3 cost me something like £20,000. as a result lou says he is selling up. as a result lou says he is selling up-_ as a result lou says he is selling up. as a result lou says he is sellin: u-. , , selling up. many people in the same situation _ selling up. many people in the same situation have _ selling up. many people in the same situation have just - selling up. many people in the same situation have just had i same situation have just had enough. h0 same situation have 'ust had enou:h. ., . ., enough. no matter how you feel about landlords, _ enough. no matter how you feel about landlords, the _ enough. no matter how you feel about landlords, the knock-on i about landlords, the knock—on results causes huge problems for anyone renting. colletta smith, bbc news. stay with us on bbc news, still to come: out with the news and in with the old — love island is back for its latest series and this yea r�*s contestants swap fast fashion for
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second—hand outfits. we take a look at the plan behind the scenes.
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this is bbc world news, the latest headlines: britain says it will send long—range rocket launchers to ukraine — russia's president putin threatens to attack new targets, if those weapons are handed over to kyiv. now let's focus on tech, because the worldwide developer conference 2022, hosted by apple, kicks off today. the virtual week long event will feature some of the world's leading experts and advocates within the tech field and the potential revealing of new apple products. joining me now is tony fadell, who is a co—creator of the ipod and the iphone. + what can we expect in term of hints orfirm what can we expect in term of hints or firm launches of what's at this event? your
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cuess what's at this event? your guess is — what's at this event? your guess is as _ what's at this event? your guess is as good - what's at this event? your guess is as good as - what's at this event? your guess is as good as mine. | what's at this event? your. guess is as good as mine. we will see refreshed software across the board from the watch, the phone, the ipad. a lot of it will be focused on ar and vr capabilities especially on the phone and ipad where you will see all kinds of interesting new things. as the hardware, i think we're just going to see more laptops, refreshed laptops with the new apple class processes which will be wonderful news. beyond that, it's going to be anyone's guess what is there but really software and a bit of refreshed hardware. ., �* , ., ., hardware. you've been following these events _ hardware. you've been following these events for _ hardware. you've been following these events for many _ hardware. you've been following these events for many years, . these events for many years, you are somebody in the mix when it came to creating the ipod and iphone, truly game changing devices. do you think we will ever see another game—changer like the iphone, for example? i’m game-changer like the iphone, for example?— for example? i'm sure we will. what is that — for example? i'm sure we will. what is that exactly? -
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for example? i'm sure we will. what is that exactly? i - for example? i'm sure we will. what is that exactly? i think i what is that exactly? i think it might not have a screen, it will be something you would have in your ear all the time, it's not going to necessarily be glasses you wear all the time. notjust voice driven, where you don't have to take it out and look at a screen like an apple watch.— out and look at a screen like an apple watch. that is many ears an apple watch. that is many years away- _ an apple watch. that is many years away. those _ an apple watch. that is many years away. those glasses . an apple watch. that is many i years away. those glasses never really caught on. as someone involved in the creation of the ipod, how did you feel when you heard recently that it was going to be discontinued? well, the ipod had _ going to be discontinued? well, the ipod had a _ going to be discontinued? well, the ipod had a long _ going to be discontinued? well, the ipod had a long run, - going to be discontinued? well, the ipod had a long run, 21 - the ipod had a long run, 21 years. i couldn't believe it lasted 21 years, frankly. technology always moves it the speed of light so to see the ipod go, it change the world, change the world of music, it changed apple, cornerstone of apple. so for me, while the ipod might be gone, it will never be forgotten. it's a part
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of history and it's changed many things and it was the only reason, if not for the ipod, we wouldn't have the iphone so there are a lot of good things that came from the time. apple has really _ that came from the time. apple has really made _ that came from the time. apple has really made its _ that came from the time. apple has really made its may - that came from the time. apple has really made its may name i that came from the time. apple | has really made its may name -- has really made its may name —— name, by making better versions of things we have. i wonder if you think the next game—changer could be something like that, something already in existence, a nice user—friendly version of it. there is nothing i see right now that is out in the world that needs to have the apple touched with that's going to be a new platform or a new real product. i don't see anything like that at this point. thank you forjoining us with your thoughts about this developer conference. let's now talk about love island, because it's back on uk screens for its latest edition. not everyone is a fan though, it's previously been criticised for promoting fast fashion. this year, the producers have a sponsorship deal with ebay and, for the first
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time, contestants will be dressed in second—hand outfits. amy bannerman has styled celebrities like dua lipa and was recruited by ebay to curate the contestants outfits. here's an insight into her creative process. this one, one she sought, one of the girls. i this one, one she sought, one of the girls-— of the girls. i thought she was auoin to of the girls. i thought she was going to start _ of the girls. i thought she was going to start crying, - of the girls. i thought she was going to start crying, she - of the girls. i thought she was going to start crying, she got| going to start crying, she got completely overwhelmed. this stress, everyone is freaking out about because it is from the collection that j—lo wharf work come back, it's the saatchi. hawaiian shirts for the boys were popular but
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in the past, they've been quite right. we look for ones that were a bit more earthy. the girl could wear that is address. i think it would be really cute to see. this is a bit of a wildcard but ijust saw them, they are vintage. i can't really imagine the occasion but i'm hoping someone would be they've enough to wear them. the first one is blurred lines which blurs the lines between gendered dressing. making yourself feel joyful. y2k which is paris and whitney circa 2000 and love me forever, which is buying things you will have forever. irate which is buying things you will have forever.— which is buying things you will have forever. ~ . , , have forever. we have seen pre- loved fashion _ have forever. we have seen pre- loved fashion cell— have forever. we have seen pre- loved fashion cell very _ have forever. we have seen pre- loved fashion cell very well - have forever. we have seen pre- loved fashion cell very well on i loved fashion cell very well on ebay.
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loved fashion cell very well on eba . ~ ., ., ebay. we have a huge opportunity _ ebay. we have a huge opportunity to - ebay. we have a huge opportunity to make i ebay. we have a huge opportunity to make a ebay. we have a huge - opportunity to make a cultural change — opportunity to make a cultural change to impact our consumer behaviour— change to impact our consumer behaviour works when it comes to pre- — behaviour works when it comes to pre— loved fashion. i think there — to pre— loved fashion. i think there is— to pre— loved fashion. i think there is a _ to pre— loved fashion. i think there is a lot of negativity that — there is a lot of negativity that can _ there is a lot of negativity that can be associated with secondhand. we really want to change — secondhand. we really want to change that message, with people _ change that message, with people saying, i really want that — people saying, i really want that. ,, , ., , people saying, i really want that. ,, , . that. selling your things and bu in: that. selling your things and buying things _ that. selling your things and buying things you _ that. selling your things and buying things you want - that. selling your things and buying things you want and l buying things you want and keeping your wardrobe rotating, but has a huge impact on the environment, and the fashion industry. how does a 4—day week sound? a day off on friday or monday and no reduction in productivity or output? well from today 70 uk companies with more than 3 thousand staff are starting a trial of just that. the 4 way week campaign will be monitored by researchers from cambridge and oxford universities to make sure productivity doesn't fall. (read on joining me now is andrew barnes, who's the founder of 4 day week global.+ cynics
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will argue this cannot work. —— cynics will argue this cannot work. you can't be just as much done in 4 days as 5. what are your thoughts? i started this because i did the experiment in my own company, the idea was good we do things smarter and we could stop doing those busy things every day that stop you being productive and we've been doing it in my company forfour years and we've been doing it in my company for four years and we been doing just as much, in four days rather than five. what are those busyness things talking about? the what are those busyness things talking about?— talking about? the internet, attending — talking about? the internet, attending meetings. - talking about? the internet, attending meetings. when i attending meetings. when microsoft tried this in japan, a stop meetings being microsoft tried this injapan, a stop meetings being longer than half—an—hour, they found they got in 39.9% improvement in productivity. they got in 39.9% improvement in productivity-— in productivity. how do you think this _ in productivity. how do you think this trial— in productivity. how do you think this trial will- in productivity. how do you think this trial will actually | think this trial will actually measure success?-
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think this trial will actually measure success? what we want to do is measure _ measure success? what we want to do is measure how _ measure success? what we want to do is measure how companiesj to do is measure how companies are performing at the start of the trial, during the trial and at the end of the trial. comparing the to what they did before and seeing whether you get an improvement in productivity. what we are finding around the world is that in general terms, yet between 25 and 40% improvement in productivity by asking your people to work smarter rather than longer. people to work smarter rather than longer-— than longer. your campaign u-rou than longer. your campaign group which _ than longer. your campaign group which has _ than longer. your campaign group which has been - than longer. your campaign | group which has been calling for this reform, we will be prepared to admit the trial doesn't work out, certain sectors of industry were it's not going to work? absolutely, that's why _ not going to work? absolutely, that's why we _ not going to work? absolutely, that's why we are _ not going to work? absolutely, that's why we are doing - not going to work? absolutely, that's why we are doing a - that's why we are doing a trial. a safe environment for both business and employees to work together to find a better way of working but let's remember, the 5— day week itself is a construct of repetitive manufacturing industry from the 1920s and 30s. why is that relevant for
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the fourth industrial age? i5 the fourth industrial age? is it a danger some employers might see as a button and opportunity to cut costs and cut pay. opportunity to cut costs and cut -a . , . . cut pay. there is that. while there are — cut pay. there is that. while there are a _ cut pay. there is that. while there are a number - cut pay. there is that. while there are a number of - there are a number of initiatives out there which are seeing a reduction in hours for a reduction in pay, we are very clear, 100% pay, 80% time, provided you are getting 100% productivity because we are not paying people for the time they were, we are paying them for what they do.— what they do. thank you very much for _ what they do. thank you very much forjoining _ what they do. thank you very much forjoining us _ what they do. thank you very much forjoining us here. - brea kfast breakfast is starting shortly for viewers in the uk. and breakfast is starting shortly for viewers in the uk. and on our website for more on laptops toys including the story of those people who have gone on holidays and can't come home because of those flight cancellations. more details.
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stay in touch with me on social media. i'm @tadthnright. it was a soggy end to the weekend across england and wales in particular, but we start the new week off on a largely dry and settled note. increasing amounts of sunshine for monday and tuesday. it will start to turn wet, though, on wednesday, windier by the end of the week but, generally, temperatures will be around the seasonal average throughout the week, both by day and by night. so, monday starts off rather cloudy, rather murky for england and wales. outbreaks of rain affecting eastern england, east anglia. fairly strong northerly winds, which will clear away. then, it's an improvement in the afternoon — we should start to see some sunshine breaking through that cloud for england and wales. could set off the odd shower. again, the best of the sunshine will be across scotland, where we could see 21 degrees, but even further south, given more sunshine around, we could make 18—20 celsius.
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as we head through monday night, could see this little feature bring some rain to south west england through the channel and spread its way eastwards. elsewhere, though, it should be largely dry but across south east scotland, north east england, we'll see a return to some rain there. and we start tuesday off with double—figure values in the south, single values there for eastern scotland, north east england. for tuesday, it's a bit of a similar story. we're in between weather systems, so a largely calm day, i think. variable amounts of cloud to start the day. early rain in the south will clear away and we should see the rain in south east scotland, north east england ease down as well into the afternoon. elsewhere, increasing amounts of sunshine — more for england and wales — so it'll feel warmer. could set off the odd shower again, but most places dry — highs of 22 degrees. later in the day, we start to see some rain getting in towards the far south—west — that's because we've got this frontal system working its way in across the country as we head on into wednesday. now, some of this rain could be quite heavy — particularly for england and wales for a time — before it clears its way eastwards. winds more of a feature, as well, across the south
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of england, south wales, certainly through the channel. into the afternoon, it'll be one of sunshine and showers and some of these showers will be heavy and perhaps slow—moving as, further north, those winds will be lighter. top temperatures, 16—20 degrees. that little area of low pressure clears away. a brief ridge of high pressure to start thursday but a deep low develops out in the atlantic to the north—west of the uk later thursday into friday — that's going to bring some very windy weather to the north and the west of the uk in particular, and it's here where we'll have most of the showers or longer spells of rain. the further south and east that you are, although breezy, it should stay largely dry with some sunshine.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. 0ur headlines today: the queen takes centre stage at the end of four days of platinum jubilee celebrations and sends a message of thanks to the nation. from street parties and bonfires to parades and concerts — one estimate says nearly 17 million people took part. pressure on the pm — there's mounting speculation borisjohnson could face a confidence vote within days. good morning from the cardiff city stadium, where wales' 64—year wait to get to the world cup came to an end last night.

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