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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 7, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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this good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay live at downing street and sally nugent in the studio. our headlines today. borisjohnson survives a vote of confidence in his leadership, but loses the support of more than 40% of conservative mps. i think it's a convincing result, a decisive result, and what it means is that as a government we can move on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters. i'll make a prediction. we're going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of the conservative party, by party conference this year. but what do voters away from westminster make of last night's vote and the result? i'm in bury
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north, the country's most marginal seat, to find out what voters make of it all. also this morning... holding out, but outnumbered. ukrainian forces struggle to keep russia out of key cities in the dombas region. good morning once again from normandy in northern france, where this year's d—day anniversary has been marked notjust by remembrance but also by gratitude. and as emma raducanu prepares for wimbledon, could a future partnership with andy murray be on the cards? good morning. we've got some patchy rain to clear parts of the east and south this morning, and for most of us it will be dry with variable amounts of cloud, some sunshine and amounts of cloud, some sunshine and a few scattered showers. but warmer today across england and wales. i will have all the details later on in the programme. hello, good morning. welcome to breakfast.
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it's tuesdayjune the 7th. the bunting is still up from the jubilee here at number 10, but i'm not sure howjubilant borisjohnson would be feeling this morning. he has survived an attempt by his own mps to force him to stand down as prime minister. we will be looking at the vote and what it means for downing street in the country. the vote of confidence started at 6pm yesterday and the result was announced at nine o'clock. it showed he still has the backing of 211 conservative mps — but 148 want him to go. more than most people were expecting. that means that mrjohnson, who led his party to a landslide victory in the general election just two and a half
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years ago this very week, now has the support of less than 60% of his own mps. we'll be bringing you reaction throughout this morning's programme. were going to hearfrom people inside and outside the conservative party, and also from you, your thoughts. first, our political correspondentjonathan blake looks back at a dramatic evening in westminster. a big moment for borisjohnson as last night conservative mps voted on whether to back him or sack him as their leader. nobody expected the prime minister to lose, but the result when it came was not the convincing win he needed. the vote in favour of having confidence in borisjohnson as leader was 211 votes, and the vote against was 148 votes. and therefore i can announce that the parliamentary party does have confidence. cheering. more than 40% of his own members of parliament had voted against him. his supporters cheered the victory, though, and for the prime minister, a win was a win. i think it's a convincing
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result, a decisive result. and what it what it means is that as a government, we can move on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters to people. as westminster weighed up what the result might mean, the prime minister's supporters rallied round while his critics said they weren't done yet. what i think is the best thing now is that the conservative party - respects the ballot result and stays united. - parties will often lose elections because they are disunited. - look at recent history. it's parties that are disunited that end up in opposition. _ ijust hope that given the mood of the public, the vote we've had here tonight, that the cabinet would go and tell the prime minister that in steve baker's words, the gig's up. i'll make a prediction. we're going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of the conservative party, by party conference this year. labour and other opposition parties seized on the vote as evidence of a divided party in government.
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the conservative party had a decision to make — to show some backbone or to back borisjohnson. they have ignored the british public and hitched themselves and their party firmly to borisjohnson and everything that he represents. boris johnson is now safe from any further votes of confidence for a year under his party's rules, but he's emerged from this test looking far from secure. jonathan blake, bbc news. i have a look at those front page is a bit later, because some of them more brutal perhaps than the prime minister and his team would have been hoping for this morning. let's get some more reaction. let's speak to our political correspondent damian grammaticas. what happens now, and where do we go from here? , ., , ., from here? yes, right now they are
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lickin: from here? yes, right now they are licking their — from here? yes, right now they are licking their wounds. _ from here? yes, right now they are licking their wounds. talking - from here? yes, right now they are licking their wounds. talking to - from here? yes, right now they are licking their wounds. talking to the i licking their wounds. talking to the rebels last night, they were not expecting to get this number of votes against this prime minister who as you were saying a couple of minutes ago got a huge majority, so they have a big job there but they also have many voices coming out. we have rating in the times today, we have rating in the times today, we have william hague, former tory leader, saying that borisjohnson should look for an honourable exit. we have other tory mps, peter aldous has said that the least worst outcome would have been for the prime minister to step aside, he should do that. julian sturdy, another conservative mp from york saying that he supported boris johnson in the leadership and boris johnson in the leadership and boris johnson should now consider his position. all of those voices, they have not been silenced by this result. so there is a lot for them to do. �* . , result. so there is a lot for them todo.�* , result. so there is a lot for them todo.�* result. so there is a lot for them todo. , to do. but has boris johnson wakes u . to do. but has boris johnson wakes u- in to do. but has boris johnson wakes up in there — to do. but has boris johnson wakes up in there this _ to do. but has boris johnson wakes up in there this morning, _ to do. but has boris johnson wakes up in there this morning, looks - to do. but has boris johnson wakes up in there this morning, looks at i up in there this morning, looks at those front pages, read those articles, watches the telly, everybody who knows him says the last thing he is going to do is walk away, he is going to leave here kicking and screaming, isn't he? absolutely, and the first thing he
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will do is to say, i am seizing back the agenda. they will have a cabinet meeting here today, i'm sure the cabinet will rally round him. he's going to come out and say he told his mps last night before they voted, i have lots of things i want to do, and some of those things we will see very quickly. northern ireland, he will try to press ahead with legislation in northern ireland. he has been talking about housing, he says he has got a big thing coming with michael gove to free up housing. he has hinted at an economic thing next week with rishi sunak to bring back growth. the trouble is, all these things, things he said before, thinks he has struggled with before, things that are not easy, and he now has that huge number of mps, and it really is a big number, a0%, who don't want him there, and that result hasn't changed it, so calling on them to say, we should have unity now, those calls don't make it happen. i say, we should have unity now, those calls don't make it happen.— calls don't make it happen. i think we should have _ calls don't make it happen. i think we should have a _ calls don't make it happen. i think we should have a bell _ calls don't make it happen. i think we should have a bell this - calls don't make it happen. i think| we should have a bell this morning that we should ring every time we hit a conservative say, it is time to draw a line and move on! damien, thank you very much indeed. that is
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the situation in downing street, but we are keen to find out this morning, what is the situation on your street, what are you talking about this morning as you reflect on last night's vote? ben's in bury for us this morning, where he's been getting reaction to last night's vote. it looks as though you have got rather more sunshine there than we have. yes, good morning, i'm standing next to this rather magnificent statue of robert peel, who was born here in bury in 1788 and went on to become conservative prime minister, not once but twice. i can't help but wonder what he would have made of the events in the last 24—hour is. the seat of bury north where i am now is currently conservative. but it's a seat that regularly changes hands between labour and the conservatives. labour lost it at the last election in 2019. the so—called redwall election.
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but the sitting mpjames daly has a tiny majority ofjust 105. it's the conservatives' most marginal seat. so what do people here make of last night's vote on boris johnson's leadership? i went to find out. bury. with a former prime minister and the very first leader of the conservative party looking on, plenty of people here have an opinion on the fate of the current resident of number10. sack him. what makes you say that? because of the way he's behaved, and he's not very truthful. knows how to make the right decisions, the right choices. just because the had a lockdown party doesn't change him from being a good prime minister. so, yeah, he's got... he's good at politics. he knows what he's talking about. he knows what he's doing. so, yeah, that's why i'd keep him as prime minister. he got you through brexitl
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and he seems to have built the economy up quite well, i and you know, you've just got to give him a chance, you know? i mean, he's not probably the best i prime minister in the world, but, i you know, i think he's probably as good as anything _ you've got down there. the birthplace of sir robert peel is represented by two mps who won their seats from labour in the so—called redwall election of 2019. one of them is sitting on the smallest conservative majority in the country, while the other defected to labour at the height of the partygate scandal. i'd get him out. why is that? i would get him out because he promised to level up in redwall areas, and he clearly hasn't. he promised to protect the nhs. he clearly hasn't. he's a liar, and he lied about partygate. the man is not honest. he is not a statesman. i think there's nothing wrong with boris. i think he's all right. it's not every day the result
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of a vote in westminster is being followed so closely here. the vote in favour of having confidence in borisjohnson as leader was 211 votes and the vote against was 148. cheering. come on, boris! paid off. they've been paid off. i think he's a great chap. i'll stand by him. yeah, same with any of them. you know, if you own up, be honest with everybody, you're fine. - the prime minister may be safe for now, but it's the opinion of voters in towns like bury that will determine forjust how long. well, let's talk about some of the issues really that are affecting people's day—to—day lives here in bury and places around the uk. we can speak to steve hughes from citizens advice. when you speak to people here, when they come to you
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for advice, what are the biggest pressures they�* re for advice, what are the biggest pressures they're facing? i for advice, what are the biggest pressures they're facing? i think we are in a very — pressures they're facing? i think we are in a very unprecedented - pressures they're facing? i think we are in a very unprecedented time. l are in a very unprecedented time. the cost of living crisis is really hitting home, so it is things like energy bills, putting food on the table, people going to food banks, food groups. applying for those extra grants and the schemes that have been announced recently, you know, all that sort of stuff is issues that people are coming to us on a day—to—day basis, and those issues are increasing the number of people coming to us on a day—to—day basis. people coming to us on a day-to-day basis. �* , ., people coming to us on a day-to-day basis. �* , . , people coming to us on a day-to-day basis. �* , ., , ., basis. and when they are trying to access the help, _ basis. and when they are trying to access the help, how— basis. and when they are trying to access the help, how easy - basis. and when they are trying to access the help, how easy is - basis. and when they are trying to access the help, how easy is it - basis. and when they are trying to access the help, how easy is it for| access the help, how easy is it for them to get that, the help they're entitled to?— them to get that, the help they're entitled to? ., , .., ., , entitled to? people can come to us for a range — entitled to? people can come to us for a range of— entitled to? people can come to us for a range of issues. _ entitled to? people can come to us for a range of issues. anybody - entitled to? people can come to us for a range of issues. anybody can | for a range of issues. anybody can come to us and access our support online, support on the phone, and we have drop—ins and appointments in and around community locations across the country and specifically here in bury as well. irate across the country and specifically here in bury as well.— here in bury as well. we talk a lot on bbc breakfast _ here in bury as well. we talk a lot on bbc breakfast about _ here in bury as well. we talk a lot
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on bbc breakfast about the - here in bury as well. we talk a lot on bbc breakfast about the cost l here in bury as well. we talk a lot| on bbc breakfast about the cost of living pressures. it is a very real worry for so many families across the country. are there any aspects of that that you notice are coming up of that that you notice are coming up time and again when people say, we are really struggling with this or that? irate we are really struggling with this or that? ~ . ., ., ., ., or that? we have had a range of --eole or that? we have had a range of peeple coming _ or that? we have had a range of people coming in, _ or that? we have had a range of people coming in, and _ or that? we have had a range of people coming in, and these - or that? we have had a range of i people coming in, and these aren't just people on benefits, these are people in work, working day—to—day, full—time and part—time jobs. people in work, working day—to—day, full—time and part—timejobs. we had a client come in recently who actually thought their energy metre had broken because their bill is astronomical, and that wasn't because it was broken, it was because it was broken, it was because of the cost of living and energy bills have just gone up. energy bills rising as a key thing that people are genuinely worried about, and that choice between heating and eating, we are coming into summer where heating homes isn't going to be a big issue, but heating water is going to be a big issue for people, and it is a big issue for people, and it is a big issue for people right now. so they are the type of things that they are coming for, simple things like how
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to save energy, turning down your heating slightly, spreading your council tax over 12 months instead of ten months is something that we can help people do, just to save that bit of extra money so that pound goes slightly longer in that month. �* . ., , pound goes slightly longer in that month. . ., , , pound goes slightly longer in that month. �* . ., , ., , month. and are there any examples of eo - le month. and are there any examples of peeple taking — month. and are there any examples of people taking drastic— month. and are there any examples of people taking drastic measures - month. and are there any examples of people taking drastic measures in - people taking drastic measures in order to just keep their head above water? irate order to 'ust keep their head above water? ~ . ., ., order to 'ust keep their head above water? . . ., ., , ., water? we have had a number of --eole water? we have had a number of peeple who _ water? we have had a number of peeple who are _ water? we have had a number of people who are taking _ water? we have had a number of people who are taking choices i water? we have had a number of. people who are taking choices where they are moving all their children into one bedroom so they don't have to hit the other rooms. we have had elderly people, people on a pension, just staying in their bedroom all day because they can't afford to put heating on in their living room and want to save that energy. people are taking drastic measures like that, and what we would always urge people to do is come to speak to us, ring us up, go online, come into one of our sessions, and have a chapter one of our volunteers or staff members, and we will be able to do something for you to help ease that burden.
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steve, thank you very much. steve hughes from citizens advice. ijust distressed that point, to reiterate, that in marginal seats like this where the majority as i say is just 105 votes, it is where things like the character of the prime minister, what voters make of him, can make all the difference in an election between a victory or defeat. we will have to see what voters' verdict is the next time they get to make that choice, but from the high street, jon, back to you on downing street. thank you very much indeed. i think thatis thank you very much indeed. i think that is why the prime minister wants to stress that he is getting on with the job, to stress that he is getting on with thejob, focusing on the to stress that he is getting on with the job, focusing on the agenda. they will be a cabinet meeting here later today, we will see the secretary of state arriving for that, the prime minister will want to concentrate on the cost of living in child care that matter to voters like we have just heard from, but how does he move on when we now know so many of his mps want him to move on? we will find out more about that
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during the programme this morning. lots more to come from downing street this morning. we'll be speaking to the deputy prime minister dominic raabjust after 7.30. still no sign of larry the cat, but fingers crossed for the next two hours! let's go back to the studio with sally. jon, i'm slightly disappointed. go and find larry for us for next time! back with career very, very soon. elsewhere. ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky says his forces are holding out in the eastern city of severodonetsk despite being outnumbered. meanwhile the number of injured ukrainian soldiers continues to rise and the bbc has been told that the country will need significant help to supply prosthetics to all who need them. laura bicker has been to meet some wounded soldiers in dnipro hospital just hours from the frontline. the full ugly force of modern warfare comes with the brutal cost. each blast can take a life, or alter it forever. so gay was hit by a
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mortar during a mission in mariupol. —— sergei was hit by a mortar. the surgeons rebuilt his thigh. translation:— surgeons rebuilt his thigh. translation: ., . , , translation: chances were slim, the surueons translation: chances were slim, the surgeons worked _ translation: chances were slim, the surgeons worked at _ translation: chances were slim, the surgeons worked at me _ translation: chances were slim, the surgeons worked at me from _ translation: chances were slim, the surgeons worked at me from the - surgeons worked at me from the beginning. the chances were slim, but they— beginning. the chances were slim, but they have put it in full screen it was _ but they have put it in full screen it was a _ but they have put it in full screen it was a very complete gated operation, the injury was too hard, so we _ operation, the injury was too hard, so we are — operation, the injury was too hard, so we are very grateful to the doctors _ so we are very grateful to the doctors. �* ., , ., ., ., doctors. but others are are not so luc . doctors. but others are are not so lucky- iyuri _ doctors. but others are are not so lucky. iyuri was _ doctors. but others are are not so lucky. iyuri was hit _ doctors. but others are are not so lucky. iyuri was hit by _ doctors. but others are are not so lucky. iyuri was hit by an - doctors. but others are are not so lucky. iyuri was hit by an air- lucky. iyuri was hit by an air strike translation: ' , strike translation: ~ , ,, ., ., , strike translation: g ,, ., ., translation: my sergeant was hit on the sot and translation: my sergeant was hit on the spot and did _ translation: my sergeant was hit on the spot and did not _ translation: my sergeant was hit on the spot and did not make _ translation: my sergeant was hit on the spot and did not make it _ translation: my sergeant was hit on the spot and did not make it to - the spot and did not make it to covet — the spot and did not make it to covet it — the spot and did not make it to cover. it was a good thing i had time _ cover. it was a good thing i had time to— cover. it was a good thing i had time to warn my comrades and make it to covet _ time to warn my comrades and make it to covet i_ time to warn my comrades and make it to covet iwas — time to warn my comrades and make it to cover. i was two metres short and in the _ to cover. i was two metres short and in the very— to cover. i was two metres short and
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in the very epicentre of the strike. he is_ in the very epicentre of the strike. he is now— in the very epicentre of the strike. he is now one of thousands who need a prosthetic limb. if he is now one of thousands who need a prosthetic limb. i! it he is now one of thousands who need a prosthetic limb.— a prosthetic limb. if it was up to me, i a prosthetic limb. if it was up to me. i would _ a prosthetic limb. if it was up to me, i would stand _ a prosthetic limb. if it was up to me, i would stand up _ a prosthetic limb. if it was up to me, i would stand up now- a prosthetic limb. if it was up to me, i would stand up now and l a prosthetic limb. if it was up to l me, i would stand up now and go a prosthetic limb. if it was up to - me, i would stand up now and go and fi-ht me, i would stand up now and go and fight the _ me, i would stand up now and go and fight the war. i really upset that my guys — fight the war. i really upset that my guys are fighting there and i'm 'ust my guys are fighting there and i'm just lying — my guys are fighting there and i'm just lying here unable to help. skills— just lying here unable to help. skills learned after the second world war i once again in demand. this prosthetics factory built in 1944 is just hours from yet another front line. they are ready to increase production, but the bbc has been told to ukraine will need more help if it is to supply prosthetics to all its wounded. translation: .,, ., , to all its wounded. translation: ., , , ., ., translation: losing a limb is not a life sentence- _ translation: losing a limb is not a life sentence. when _ translation: losing a limb is not a life sentence. when someone - translation: losing a limb is not a life sentence. when someone gets i life sentence. when someone gets admitted into our care and sees that there are others there missing both legs or an arm just like them, they see that life can carry are normally with what modern technology has to offer. ., . ~' with what modern technology has to offer. ., ., ,, _ , ., with what modern technology has to offer. ., .,~ _ , ., , offer. the toll taken by this war is matched by _ offer. the toll taken by this war is matched by a _ offer. the toll taken by this war is
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matched by a strong _ offer. the toll taken by this war is matched by a strong will- offer. the toll taken by this war is matched by a strong will to - offer. the toll taken by this war is - matched by a strong will to overcome its effects, but it will take money and time to ensure this cruel conflict doesn't haunt another generation of fighters. laura bicker, bbc news, dnipro. and we will be live in kyiv later on this morning with the latest from the situation there. the duke and duchess of sussex have shared a photograph of their daughter lilibet to mark her first birthday. the picture was taken by a close family friend at a birthday picnic held at frogmore cottage in windsor over the weekend. apparently there was face painting and cake at the party. sounds marvellous, doesn't it? it is 19 minutes past six. carol has the weather for this morning. 19 minutes past six. carol has the weatherfor this morning. it sounds a little bit like friday night run at your house? lots of cake! you are not wrong. good morning, everybody. there is
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some fog to watch out for this morning, albeit patchy. but is across the south and will lift quite quickly, then most of us are looking at a day of sunny spells with a chance of a shower, and this morning too we have got the risk of some showery outbreaks of rain along the north sea coastline, and also along the english channel coast line, but both of these should clear and it should brighten up and we will see some sunshine coming through. but through the afternoon you could catch a shower almost anywhere, and if you do, it could well prove to be heavy. the cloud sickening, and then we will see some rain coming in across west,. temperatures today a little higher across southern england and wales that they have been, but generally we are looking at 11 to about 22 degrees. through this evening and overnight, the reigning west, continues to advance northwards and eastwards, they will be some low cloud across parts of eastern and southern scotland, and clearer skies following on behind that band of rain with one or two showers. it is also going to be
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breezy in the south. temperatures between eight and 14 degrees. tomorrow the rain quite quickly clears england and wales and northern ireland, moves across scotland but you can see how it curls back round, and we will see more rain in the afternoon coming in across northern ireland a potentially north west wales. there will also be a scattering of showers, some heavy and thundery, sunshine in between and still quite breezy in the south, and a little cooler with highs up to 20 degrees. carol, thank you very much. we will see you again very soon. wimbledon is less than three weeks away, and it would be fair to say that this time last year most people had never heard the name emma raducanu. after a whirlwind year the us open champion prepares for what will be only her second senior appearance at the all england club there's a huge weight of expectation on her shoulders. i caught up with emma in nottingham.
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serve. welcome, emma raducanu! after what has been an incredible whirlwind year for you, you must feel like your feet have not touched the floor this year. what's it been like? it's been... watching it has felt a bit like that. what's it been like to live that? it has been a really tricky 12 months, to be honest. it hasn't always been easy, but i've definitely learnt a lot about myself and how to go about things, and i would say my approach is definitely different now. i mean, i'm a lot more focused on the progress and the process of what i'm doing every single day, because i know that's the only thing i can control. and everything external, everything that might be said about me, that is not what i can control. and that is not always a true reflection necessarily of what i'm doing and how i go about things. so, yeah, ijust really zone in and focus on internally what i'm doing and,
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yeah, trust that. do you ever pay attention to what's being said about you? i imagine on social media, which you're great at, obviously you engage with all the fans. do you ever see stuff that you don't like? i don't really look at it, because it is tough to to kind of, if you see a negative one, then, you know, it might stick in your head. so for me, ijust find it easier to not really look at that, and... but i really obviously love engaging online with people and sharing things about myself. you know, i like to share things that i've taken on my phone rather than professional ones. just coming up to a year ago, you had a wild card for wimbledon, and wimbledon didn't go to plan. how have you managed to get over that and get over it so successfully? wimbledon, i mean, what happened in the last match was was obviously pretty difficult at the time. and i had no idea how to sort of,
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how i would react after that, because it was the biggest court i've played on, you know, a lot of people. and, yeah, i was obviously really excited to sort of keep going, and to not be able to finish the match as was really tough for me. if you would have said to me in nottingham last year you're going to make fourth round wimbledon, i would have been like, yeah! and i had a really positive week and ifeel like i built on that. and, you know, throughout the summer i continued doing the right work and also had a great us win. what was the right work that then got you to the us win? i'd say it's a combination of a really good practice, you know, feeling really good about myself, trusting and believing the work i had done. you know, by the time i was playing the us open and qualifying, i was so match tight and match ready that i felt like i was almost on autopilot and it was automatic at how i was facing game situations. and that's something that's difficult to replicate on the practice court.
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you will know, of course, that the last british woman to win the singles title at wimbledon was virginia wade in 1977, the silverjubilee. yeah, i met virginia actually in the us open and i managed to speak to her a little bit. and when i was in the semifinal final stages, she was really supportive of me. and to kind of have that reassurance from someone who's already done it, it did mean a lot. we've just celebrated the platinum jubilee. do you feel like, going into wimbledon, that might be your inspiration? you've already had a letter from the queen anyway, haven't you? yeah. after the us open. it was obviously amazing this last weekend to see all the celebrations and all the street parties. it was quite fun to see everyone so happy. going into the grass court season, for me, i don't really feel like i can put any expectation or pressure on myself for results. i think that, you know, that might happen from people who aren't me. you know, they might put expectations and pressure on me. but no, ijust really believe in what i'm doing.
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and in the long run, it will pay off. talking about wimbledon, your dreams double partner, you have said already is...? andy murray. now, is that going to happen? well, we haven't actually spoken about it. it's something that we both, i feel, want to do. and i don't know if this year is going to be the year, but hopefully it will definitely happen at some point, yeah. soon? soon. ish. we're seeing a lot of you, aren't we, at the moment, in glossy magazines doing these beautiful fashion shoots. how much do you enjoy that side of yourjob? you look like you really do. yeah, i really enjoy it. for me, i think tennis is obviously a massive part of my life, but it's not the only thing in my life. and i like to to look at other industries and the people i'm working with.
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they're the best of the best, you know, in the fashion industry, for example. so i get to learn a lot of things and, for example, you know, the production that goes behind it, thatjust as much perfectionists as i sort of am on the tennis court, and the level that they hold of themselves and their work i think is inspiring. and when you're done with all of this and you eventually get to go home and you shut the door, what do you do? honestly? me? sometimes i read a bit. i'm trying to do more of that now. i like keeping my brain active. i get bored if not, so... right now i found reading. but yeah, sometimes it's taiwanese drama shows, to be honest. i speak mandarin and i'm just trying to improve it. and you know, the plots are so far from reality that it is kind of refreshing and just takes your mind so far away. well, it obviously works on some level, because look what we have to bring in now. a trophy that i'm sure you're very familiar with. yeah. thanks. oh, my word.
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you like it! i can tell. yeah, i heard it's been doing a little tour, and i'm really, really happy that, you know, many young kids can sort of see it and hopefully get a little bit inspired. when they saw it here they were so excited. so for me to think that, you know, i feel really good and happy. there is something really magical about it, isn't it? yeah. congratulations. thank you. that trophy, and who can blame her? more from jon live in downing street coming up injust a moment. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. transport for london is advising
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passengers to avoid travelling until eight o'clock this morning, as the network recovers from yesterday's tube strike. the walkout of about 4,000 staff is part of a dispute over pensions, jobs and conditions. the rmt union says it's protecting jobs, but tfl insists they're are not under threat. the inquest into the death of music entrepreneur jamal edwards will open today. he was the founder of sbtv — an online entertainment platform which helped launch the careers of artists like ed sheeran and stormzy. he died suddenly in february at the age of 31. westminster council has removed a set of spikes on a tree in mayfair, after criticism from animal lovers. the local authority originally claimed they were needed for public safety, to stop birds defecating on a bench below. it now it says there may be better alternatives. if you're heading to barking, there's now another way to get there using public transport.
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you can catch the thames clipper, which has extended its services in east london. it runs at peak times on weekdays, and throughout the day on weekends. it's great to see crossrail opening, which happened in the top of our borough, and at the same time having the riverboat service and the new gospel oak extension. so this is really good for us building the homes that our communities want and need. travel now, and this is how tfl services are looking right now. as you can see, all lines are still suspended due to that strike by the rmt yesterday. the advice is to travel from eight onwards, if possible, as many stations are still closed. the overground, elizabeth line and dlr are running though and have a good service. and for more info on the strike, why it was called and the impact, head over to our website. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another unsettled day today. we've got a little more
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cloud in the south, some mistiness, but some sunshine to the north first thing. now the cloud in the south will break up and we will see some sunny spells, but also some showers. temperatures today getting up to 22 celsius, feeling warmer than yesterday. those showers clearing to start with this evening. we get one or two clearer spells then. another band of quite heavy showers moves through the early hours and the wind starts to strengthen. the minimum temperature dropping to 13 celsius, so quite a mild night. now for wednesday, we've got a breeze that is driving some potentially quite heavy, sharp showers through. you mightjust hear a rumble of thunder. but still some sunny spells. despite the wind, we are looking at a maximum temperature of 21 celsius on wednesday. through wednesday night into thursday, a ridge of high pressure starts to build. so thursday is looking largely dry with some sunny spells. for friday, we are under the influence of this low pressure system, and that is the remnants of tropical storm alex. it is going to be a breezy day. not so much in the way of rain around on friday. it should be largely dry with some sunny spells.
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and temperatures, as we head through to the weekend, staying in the low twenties. that's it for the moment. you can find more updates on our website and social media. now it's back to sally and jon. good morning. you're watching bbc breakfast with sally nugent in salford, and me, jon kay, on downing street. we are trying to take in that a confidence vote result that happened at nine o'clock yesterday evening. what would you give to be a fly on the wall in there as borisjohnson looks through those numbers and tries to come to terms with what happened? borisjohnson will remain a resident here on downing street, as prime minister, after he survived a rebellion by his own mps last night. he won a vote of confidence by a relatively narrow margin — around six in ten tory mps want him to stay, and four in ten want him to go.
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after that vote was announced, many of the prime minister's cabinet colleagues took to social media to express their support. the chancellor rishi sunak — who is often tipped as a potential successor to number 10 — said mrjohnson has "won the confidence vote, and now it's time to move forward". the levelling up secretary michael gove — who once stood against borisjohnson to be party leader — tweeted a similar message. he said: and mrjohnson also received strident support from the culture secretary nadine dorries. that was only two and a half years ago this very week, that landslide
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victory for the conservatives. and here we are in a rather different place. let's speak to the leader of the liberal democrats, sir ed davey. hejoins us from he joins us from millbank. hejoins us from millbank. good morning. you called on conservative mps do have a confidence vote. they have had one, he has won? weill. mps do have a confidence vote. they have had one, he has won? well, only narrowl , have had one, he has won? well, only narrowly. and — have had one, he has won? well, only narrowly. and i — have had one, he has won? well, only narrowly, and i think— have had one, he has won? well, only narrowly, and i think you _ have had one, he has won? well, only narrowly, and i think you didn't - have had one, he has won? well, only narrowly, and i think you didn't win . narrowly, and i think you didn't win for the _ narrowly, and i think you didn't win for the british people. i think the 148 tory— for the british people. i think the 148 tory rebels who resigned the conservative whip said as independents and work with opposition parties like the liberal democrats to hold this discredited prime _ democrats to hold this discredited prime minister to account. there are millions— prime minister to account. there are millions of— prime minister to account. there are millions of people who are suffering with the _ millions of people who are suffering with the cost of living crisis. we have _ with the cost of living crisis. we have got — with the cost of living crisis. we have got of the nhs and care crisis. we also _ have got of the nhs and care crisis. we also now have the travel and holiday— we also now have the travel and holiday chaos. this government is incompetent. the prime minister is not showing the interests of the british— not showing the interests of the british people. i think these rebel tories _ british people. i think these rebel tories now— british people. i think these rebel tories now need to work with opposition parties to to account.
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you don't — opposition parties to to account. you don't really expect them all to resign the tory whip and join you on the other side of the commons, do you? the other side of the commons, do ou? ~ , ., , the other side of the commons, do ou? ~ , . , ., you? well, if they had integrity and decen , you? well, if they had integrity and decency. they _ you? well, if they had integrity and decency, they would _ you? well, if they had integrity and decency, they would do _ you? well, if they had integrity and decency, they would do that. - you? well, if they had integrity and decency, they would do that. this l decency, they would do that. this prime _ decency, they would do that. this prime minister is a lying lawbreaker. and i think that's why some _ lawbreaker. and i think that's why some tory— lawbreaker. and i think that's why some tory mps voted against him yesterday — some tory mps voted against him yesterday. and i think they should now follow that up and have the courage — now follow that up and have the courage to work with us because there _ courage to work with us because there are — courage to work with us because there are millions of people suffering at the moment. these are rcatty— suffering at the moment. these are really difficult times for so many people — really difficult times for so many people. and the prime minister is too busy— people. and the prime minister is too busy saving his own skin. parliament has got to hold him to account — parliament has got to hold him to account. and i think it is now the patriotically duty of these tory rebels — patriotically duty of these tory rebels to — patriotically duty of these tory rebels to work in the national interest— rebels to work in the national interest and work with opposition parties _ interest and work with opposition parties like the liberal democrats, who want— parties like the liberal democrats, who want to put the interests of the public _ who want to put the interests of the public first, — who want to put the interests of the public first, in front of saving boris — public first, in front of saving borisjohnson. we public first, in front of saving boris johnson.— public first, in front of saving borisjohnson. ~ . ., ., boris johnson. we have also heard fell from voters _ boris johnson. we have also heard fell from voters this _ boris johnson. we have also heard fell from voters this morning - boris johnson. we have also heard fell from voters this morning in . fell from voters this morning in bury north reacting to the vote. a
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lot of them saying, look, we just want to move on. that is what the prime minister says he wants to do. a lot of voters clearly feel the same and they want him to knuckle down and focus on government and the cost of living, the kinds of things you have mentioned. is there a danger that you are misreading the national mood?— danger that you are misreading the national mood? well, i knocked on a lot of doors — national mood? well, i knocked on a lot of doors during _ national mood? well, i knocked on a lot of doors during the _ national mood? well, i knocked on a lot of doors during the recent - national mood? well, i knocked on a lot of doors during the recent local i lot of doors during the recent local elections _ lot of doors during the recent local elections across the country, and so many— elections across the country, and so many people told me the best way to move _ many people told me the best way to move on— many people told me the best way to move on from this awful moment is to -et move on from this awful moment is to get rid _ move on from this awful moment is to get rid of— move on from this awful moment is to get rid of borisjohnson. and at the moment— get rid of borisjohnson. and at the moment i_ get rid of borisjohnson. and at the moment i am campaigning in east devon— moment i am campaigning in east devon in— moment i am campaigning in east devon in the tiverton and honiton by—election. talk to a lot of lifelong _ by—election. talk to a lot of lifelong conservatives, people who voted _ lifelong conservatives, people who voted for _ lifelong conservatives, people who voted for boris johnson, lifelong conservatives, people who voted for borisjohnson, and lifelong conservatives, people who voted for boris johnson, and they say he _ voted for boris johnson, and they say he needs to go so the country can move — say he needs to go so the country can move on _ say he needs to go so the country can move on and deal with the cost of living _ can move on and deal with the cost of living crisis, the nhs crisis, the transport and holiday chaos. they— the transport and holiday chaos. they say, — the transport and holiday chaos. they say, these are tory voters, that _ they say, these are tory voters, that they — they say, these are tory voters, that they will vote for parties like the liberal democrats in order to send _ the liberal democrats in order to
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send a _ the liberal democrats in order to send a message to the conservative mps _ send a message to the conservative mps and _ send a message to the conservative mps. and i'm afraid of those tory mps. and i'm afraid of those tory mps who— mps. and i'm afraid of those tory mps who backed the prime minister, this lying. _ mps who backed the prime minister, this lying, lawbreaking prime minister, they are tone deaf to what the vast _ minister, they are tone deaf to what the vast majority of the british public— the vast majority of the british public want. they want to see this prime _ public want. they want to see this prime minister gone. sir public want. they want to see this prime minister gone.— public want. they want to see this prime minister gone. sir ed davey, leader of the _ prime minister gone. sir ed davey, leader of the liberal _ prime minister gone. sir ed davey, leader of the liberal democrats, i leader of the liberal democrats, thank you forjoining us on breakfast. let's talk to somebody who knows borisjohnson very well, who knows borisjohnson very well, who can give us a sense of how the prime minister might be feeling inside there this morning. his former communications director will waldenjoins us. good morning. we saw him gung ho, full of energy, it's time to move on, on the telly last night. but what is really going on in there, do you think? home last night. but what is really going on in there, do you think? none of boris's reaction _ on in there, do you think? none of boris's reaction surprised - on in there, do you think? none of boris's reaction surprised me. i on in there, do you think? none of| boris's reaction surprised me. what is really_ boris's reaction surprised me. what is really going on in his head i suspect— is really going on in his head i suspect is— is really going on in his head i suspect is the usual mix of contradictions in boris's head, which — contradictions in boris's head, which is — contradictions in boris's head, which is total frustration, annoyance, fed up, slight sense of pettiness— annoyance, fed up, slight sense of pettiness of why these people have
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done this— pettiness of why these people have done this to me, but i suspect the deepest _ done this to me, but i suspect the deepest feeling is he will be incredibly worried. he needed a decisive win last night, and no amount of saying from him or its allies— amount of saying from him or its allies that — amount of saying from him or its allies that it was decisive, is going — allies that it was decisive, is going to _ allies that it was decisive, is going to disguise the fact it wasn't, _ going to disguise the fact it wasn't, it wasn't convincing, it wasn't — wasn't, it wasn't convincing, it wasn't decisive, it wasn't what he needed — wasn't decisive, it wasn't what he needed. and his suggestion that we all need _ needed. and his suggestion that we all need to— needed. and his suggestion that we all need to move on, i'm afraid, is for the _ all need to move on, i'm afraid, is for the birds. _ all need to move on, i'm afraid, is forthe birds, because it is all need to move on, i'm afraid, is for the birds, because it is done exactly— for the birds, because it is done exactly the _ for the birds, because it is done exactly the opposite. short of losing. — exactly the opposite. short of losing. it _ exactly the opposite. short of losing, it is the worst possible result— losing, it is the worst possible result for— losing, it is the worst possible result for borisjohnson losing, it is the worst possible result for boris johnson personally. it is probably the worst possible result _ it is probably the worst possible result for— it is probably the worst possible result for the conservative party and the — result for the conservative party and the country. it is now unlikely he would — and the country. it is now unlikely he would be allowed to move on. and ithink— he would be allowed to move on. and i think most— he would be allowed to move on. and i think most significantly, the suggestion from his allies yesterday that this _ suggestion from his allies yesterday that this was all a remainer plot and a _ that this was all a remainer plot and a few— that this was all a remainer plot and a few disgruntled mps who have always _ and a few disgruntled mps who have always hated borisjohnson, is for the birds — always hated borisjohnson, is for the birds. 148 votes against is a problem — the birds. 148 votes against is a problem and a big problem for the prime _ problem and a big problem for the prime minister. so problem and a big problem for the prime minister.— problem and a big problem for the prime minister. so how do you think this -la s prime minister. so how do you think this plays out _ prime minister. so how do you think
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this plays out now? _ prime minister. so how do you think this plays out now? well, _ prime minister. so how do you think this plays out now? well, i - prime minister. so how do you think this plays out now? well, i think i this plays out now? well, i think from itoris's _ this plays out now? well, i think from boris's point _ this plays out now? well, i think from boris's point of _ this plays out now? well, i think from boris's point of view, i this plays out now? well, i think from boris's point of view, it i this plays out now? well, i think i from boris's point of view, it plays out as— from boris's point of view, it plays out as it _ from boris's point of view, it plays out as it always and normally would. there _ out as it always and normally would. there was _ out as it always and normally would. there was no contrition last night. if there was no contrition last night. if you _ there was no contrition last night. if you contrast theresa may's statement after the vote of confidence against her, there was an element _ confidence against her, there was an element of— confidence against her, there was an element of sort of contrition, an element — element of sort of contrition, an element of sort of contrition, an element of understanding the other point of— element of understanding the other point of view. boris only knows forward — point of view. boris only knows forward gear, and that's what we -ot. forward gear, and that's what we got he — forward gear, and that's what we got he is — forward gear, and that's what we got. he is going to hang on for dear life. got. he is going to hang on for dear life they— got. he is going to hang on for dear life. they will have to take on kicking — life. they will have to take on kicking and screaming through the front door— kicking and screaming through the front door or back door of number 10 to get— front door or back door of number 10 to get rid _ front door or back door of number 10 to get rid of— front door or back door of number 10 to get rid of him. he is not a guitter~ _ to get rid of him. he is not a guitter~ i_ to get rid of him. he is not a quitter. i think we will see a blitz of quitter. ! think we will see a blitz of policy— quitter. i think we will see a blitz of policy announcements. i think one of policy announcements. i think one of the _ of policy announcements. i think one of the things that is probably needed — of the things that is probably neededis of the things that is probably needed is a complete shake—up, he has done _ needed is a complete shake—up, he has done the number 10 team, but those _ has done the number 10 team, but those around him, a significant cabinet — those around him, a significant cabinet reshuffle and a rag —— radical— cabinet reshuffle and a rag —— radical approach going forward. but boris _ radical approach going forward. but borisjohnson doesn't radical approach going forward. but boris johnson doesn't really do change — boris johnson doesn't really do change. he certainly doesn't do apology— change. he certainly doesn't do apology and it doesn't really do change — apology and it doesn't really do change i— apology and it doesn't really do change. i think that is unlikely. the next — change. i think that is unlikely. the next big test are these two
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by—elections. perhaps there is a small— by—elections. perhaps there is a small window for him there that if the results are, if they hold onto one or— the results are, if they hold onto one or both— the results are, if they hold onto one or both of those by some miracle _ one or both of those by some miracle, elderly polls indicate they will not. _ miracle, elderly polls indicate they will not, that give malcontents pause — will not, that give malcontents pause. but i think what happens next is that— pause. but i think what happens next is that boris — pause. but i think what happens next is that borisjohnson hangs on by his fingernails, by his fingers, whatever, _ his fingernails, by his fingers, whatever, and it will take a move from _ whatever, and it will take a move from someone, or several senior people _ from someone, or several senior people in— from someone, or several senior people in the tory party, to convince _ people in the tory party, to convince him otherwise. the question is, is _ convince him otherwise. the question is, is the _ convince him otherwise. the question is, is the by—election, are the by—election is the trigger for that? and how— by—election is the trigger for that? and how quickly, if so, will they move _ and how quickly, if so, will they move against him a man who will move against _ move against him a man who will move against him? _ move against him a man who will move against him? the one thing he has -ot against him? the one thing he has got in _ against him? the one thing he has got in his— against him? the one thing he has got in his favour is that, unlike i990 _ got in his favour is that, unlike i990 and — got in his favour is that, unlike 1990 and margaret thatcher and michael — 1990 and margaret thatcher and michael heseltine, there is no big beast— michael heseltine, there is no big beast successor. that is probably why he _ beast successor. that is probably why he won last night, and won micro adjust, _ why he won last night, and won micro adjust, not _ why he won last night, and won micro adjust, not convincingly, because those _ adjust, not convincingly, because those considering voting against him no that— those considering voting against him no that there isn't a likely candidate to take over and will probably— candidate to take over and will probably have thought, can we junk are my— probably have thought, can we junk are my greatest election winner in the last— are my greatest election winner in the last 30 —
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are my greatest election winner in the last 30 years, for the unknown? that is— the last 30 years, for the unknown? that is all— the last 30 years, for the unknown? that is all that is keeping boris johnson — that is all that is keeping boris johnson in paris this morning. that— johnson in paris this morning. that is— johnson in paris this morning. that is the _ johnson in paris this morning. that is the political side of things. —— npowerthis that is the political side of things. —— npower this morning. that is the political side of things. —— npowerthis morning. i'm fascinated by the psychological side of things, as someone who knows him well. this is a prime minister who likes to be liked, who likes to be popular. i wonder whether his head micro —— when his head hit the pillow last night, what was he going to be thinking about the fact that 40% of his mps voted against him? how will he deal with that? well. how will he deal with that? well, ou how will he deal with that? well, you know. _ how will he deal with that? well, you know, boris _ how will he deal with that? well, you know, boris is _ how will he deal with that? well, you know, boris is not _ how will he deal with that? well, you know, boris is not anything l you know, boris is not anything other— you know, boris is not anything other than— you know, boris is not anything other than resilient. and i think that, _ other than resilient. and i think that, you — other than resilient. and i think that, you know, he is a contradiction. they will be a deep sense _ contradiction. they will be a deep sense within him, which he would never— sense within him, which he would never admit sense within him, which he would neveradmit to, sense within him, which he would never admit to, certainly in public, and probably not, you know, with friends _ and probably not, you know, with friends and — and probably not, you know, with friends and allies, that he will be deeply— friends and allies, that he will be deeply worried and confused. but i think— deeply worried and confused. but i think there is also an element of forest _ think there is also an element of forest whichjust kind of think there is also an element of forest which just kind of wage through— forest which just kind of wage through this tough and it is almost like he _ through this tough and it is almost like he convinces himself it is not a problem — like he convinces himself it is not a problem. what is interesting is that if— a problem. what is interesting is that if you — a problem. what is interesting is that if you listen to his statement
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last night, — that if you listen to his statement last night, you would almost think there _ last night, you would almost think there hasn't been a vote. you would almost _ there hasn't been a vote. you would almost think— there hasn't been a vote. you would almost think it was absolutely fine, business _ almost think it was absolutely fine, business as usual, and we go. 148. what _ business as usual, and we go. 148. what is _ business as usual, and we go. 148. what is that— business as usual, and we go. 148. what is that figure? 211 was my figure. — what is that figure? 211 was my figure. i— what is that figure? 211 was my figure, i won. what is that figure? 211 was my figure, iwon. it is what is that figure? 211 was my figure, i won. it is that that has seen _ figure, i won. it is that that has seen them _ figure, i won. it is that that has seen them survive. he has convinced himself— seen them survive. he has convinced himself that — seen them survive. he has convinced himself that it isn't a problem when probably— himself that it isn't a problem when probably deep down he knows it is. and that _ probably deep down he knows it is. and that means that his default position— and that means that his default position is simply to come out swinging _ position is simply to come out swinging. and i think, you know, what _ swinging. and i think, you know, what are — swinging. and i think, you know, what are the 148 have shown him is, maybe _ what are the 148 have shown him is, maybe it's _ what are the 148 have shown him is, maybe it's time for contrition, not swinging — maybe it's time for contrition, not swinging i— maybe it's time for contrition, not swinging. i don't think he knows any swinging. idon't think he knows any other— swinging. i don't think he knows any other way _ swinging. i don't think he knows any other way. any suggestion we will have different borisjohnson going forward _ have different borisjohnson going forward is — have different borisjohnson going forward is for the birds. interesting insights. will walden, former communications director with borisjohnson, former communications director with boris johnson, thank former communications director with borisjohnson, thank you forjoining us this morning. let's bring in george parker, political editor of the times, and anna isaac from the independent. good morning. late
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night, exciting night for political journalists. anna, you are nodding! where are we this morning? prettr; where are we this morning? pretty sha , i where are we this morning? pretty shaky. i think _ where are we this morning? pretty shaky. ! think it— where are we this morning? pretty shaky, i think it is _ where are we this morning? pretty shaky, ! think it is fair— where are we this morning? pretty shaky, i think it is fair to _ where are we this morning? pretty shaky, i think it is fair to say. i where are we this morning? pretty shaky, i think it is fair to say. we l shaky, i think it is fair to say. we have got a cabinet meeting coming up. there is going to be a lot of language around delivery. this was the big promise in the letter to mps when borisjohnson asked them for his backing yesterday. we are going to deliver, we are going to deliver cuts to government. what is going to be difficult is, why do we fit in the cuts to government now with the hand—out narrative as well? we are here to support everyone, but we are also here to return to a small state. a very divided party ideological. —— ideological. it will be a hard circle to square today. george, how does he deliver given those results last night? fir george, how does he deliver given those results last night?— those results last night? or as johnson said — those results last night? or as johnson said the _ those results last night? or as johnson said the result - those results last night? or as johnson said the result was i johnson said the result was extremely good and decisive. the result— extremely good and decisive. the result is— extremely good and decisive. the result is the exact opposite. it was very bad _ result is the exact opposite. it was very bad for— result is the exact opposite. it was very bad for boris johnson and indecisive. he needs to get a grip on a _ indecisive. he needs to get a grip on a party— indecisive. he needs to get a grip on a party that is divided, where discipline — on a party that is divided, where discipline has broken down, and
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where _ discipline has broken down, and where abuse has become commonplace between _ where abuse has become commonplace between members of his party. once you have _ between members of his party. once you have got that poison running through the bloodstream of a party, _ running through the bloodstream of a party, it's— running through the bloodstream of a party, it's very difficult to control _ party, it's very difficult to control. he has to get a grip very quickly — control. he has to get a grip very quickly. he — control. he has to get a grip very quickly. he will try to move on, try to set— quickly. he will try to move on, try to set the — quickly. he will try to move on, try to set the agenda. there is a big speech— to set the agenda. there is a big speech on— to set the agenda. there is a big speech on the economy next week, a speech— speech on the economy next week, a speech on— speech on the economy next week, a speech on housing this week, to get his grip _ speech on housing this week, to get his grip on _ speech on housing this week, to get his grip on the government, that things— his grip on the government, that things are — his grip on the government, that things are moving forward. lots of conservative mps will be thinking, what do _ conservative mps will be thinking, what do we do next to get the additional 30 mps who need to get him out _ additional 30 mps who need to get him out of— additional 30 mps who need to get him out of the building? but additional 30 mps who need to get him out of the building?— him out of the building? but you can't have _ him out of the building? but you can't have another— him out of the building? but you can't have another vote - him out of the building? but you can't have another vote for i him out of the building? but you can't have another vote for a i him out of the building? but you i can't have another vote for a year. the rules can be changed in an afternoon _ the rules can be changed in an afternoon. and the people who make the rules, _ afternoon. and the people who make the rules, the so—called men in grey suits, _ the rules, the so—called men in grey suits, including a number of critics of boris _ suits, including a number of critics of borisjohnson, so i things continue _ of borisjohnson, so i things continue to deteriorate for boris johnson — continue to deteriorate for boris johnson and the party, i can guarantee you another context would be possible within the year.— be possible within the year. anna, will walden _ be possible within the year. anna, will walden was _ be possible within the year. anna, will walden was talking _ be possible within the year. anna, will walden was talking about i be possible within the year. anna, will walden was talking about the | will walden was talking about the fact that boris johnson may will walden was talking about the fact that borisjohnson may be slightly reassured, feel slightly more comfortable this morning in there, because there is no obvious
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successor. there is no candidate who can unite the party and stand up and say, iam can unite the party and stand up and say, i am the do you agree with that? is there anybody your eye? it has become a little more complicated. rishi sunak was seen as an obvious candidate. much less so since revelations came out. but i think what is true in politics is that a vacuum somehow gets filled. what happens here is we have created a vacuum with this vote. while there may not be the obvious leading figure, there are certainly a lot of people who want the job. if the right people get behind them, they suddenly look very obvious. i don't think we can be complacent about the fact that just because think we can be complacent about the fact thatjust because there isn't an obvious candidate at this point in time, there aren't people who haven't been cultivating backbench support. haven't been cultivating backbench su ort. �* �* haven't been cultivating backbench su--ort. �* �* support. andrew bridgen said last niuht he support. andrew bridgen said last night he thought _ support. andrew bridgen said last night he thought they _ support. andrew bridgen said last night he thought they would i support. andrew bridgen said last night he thought they would be i support. andrew bridgen said last night he thought they would be a | support. andrew bridgen said last i night he thought they would be a new leader, despite borisjohnson leader, despite boris johnson winning leader, despite borisjohnson winning last night, and by the autumn, by the tory party conference. i autumn, by the tory party conference.— autumn, by the tory party conference. ., , ., , conference. i think it is unlikely. boris johnson — conference. i think it is unlikely. boris johnson will _ conference. i think it is unlikely. boris johnson will only _ conference. i think it is unlikely.
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boris johnson will only be i conference. i think it is unlikely. l boris johnson will only be dragged out of— boris johnson will only be dragged out of this building. william hague writing _ out of this building. william hague writing in— out of this building. william hague writing in the times today said boris _ writing in the times today said borisjohnson needs to writing in the times today said boris johnson needs to seek an honourable way out to save the country — honourable way out to save the country. borisjohnson will honourable way out to save the country. boris johnson will be looking — country. boris johnson will be looking for a way out, honourable or otherwise _ looking for a way out, honourable or otherwise. he will be clinging onto that means people will be —— will have _ that means people will be —— will have to _ that means people will be —— will have to move against him in a way. jeremy— have to move against him in a way. jeremy hunt— have to move against him in a way. jeremy hunt said yesterday he was going _ jeremy hunt said yesterday he was going to _ jeremy hunt said yesterday he was going to vote against boris johnson. that is— going to vote against boris johnson. that is the _ going to vote against boris johnson. that is the first sign we have seen that potential candidates for the leadership will start to position themselves, start to be much more prominent — themselves, start to be much more prominent and shake the tree from outside _ prominent and shake the tree from outside. �* g , ,., , , , outside. afterjeremy hunt passed my comments, there _ outside. afterjeremy hunt passed my comments, there was _ outside. afterjeremy hunt passed my comments, there was a _ outside. afterjeremy hunt passed my comments, there was a pylon - outside. afterjeremy hunt passed my comments, there was a pylon onto i comments, there was a pylon onto him, with cabinet ministers having a go at him. it could get nasty, this? absolutely. with blue on blue attacks like that, this notion we have heard of tory party coups, he who wield the knife never gets the crown, that starts to change when everything becomes a free for all. thank you. a busy day today? i think it is auoin thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to — thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to be _ thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to be a — thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to be a busy _ thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to be a busy day. -
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thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to be a busy day. it - thank you. a busy day today? i think it is going to be a busy day. it is i it is going to be a busy day. it is what _ it is going to be a busy day. it is what we — it is going to be a busy day. it is what we look for.— it is going to be a busy day. it is i what we look for._ thank what we look for. absolutely. thank ou for what we look for. absolutely. thank you forjoining _ what we look for. absolutely. thank you forjoining us. _ what we look for. absolutely. thank you forjoining us. the _ what we look for. absolutely. thank you forjoining us. the sun - what we look for. absolutely. thank you forjoining us. the sun is - you forjoining us. the sun is coming out in downing street. it is always a bit cold on the side of the street. is it going to warm up, carol? it certainly is,. for england and wales today it is going to be warmer than yesterday. for parts of wales, central and southern england, there is patchy fog. but that should live readily. we are about to get sunny spells today. the chance of a shower or two. spells today. the chance of a shower ortwo. low spells today. the chance of a shower or two. low pressure is drifting towards the east. we have a front in the south producing some rain. we take your eyes all the way over to the atlantic where we have a deep area of low pressure. this is tropical storm alex. later in the week it is going to pass by the north of aaron my country and it will introduce some light rain and the wind will pick up as well. today, a few showers along the north coast line. they will tend to fade. a lot of dry weather, sunny spells developing and some showers
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almost anywhere through the course of the afternoon. they will be fairly well scattered. this afternoon they will be thick cloud in the south—west and some rain getting into, before the end of the afternoon. temperatures 21, 22 in the south. 11 to 19 in the north. as we head through the evening and overnight, that band of cloud and rain continues to advance northwards and eastwards. there will be low cloud coming in across eastern and southern scotland. behind this band of rain it will be breezy in the south, with some clear skies and a few showers. eight to 14 degrees are the overnight lows. as we head into tomorrow, rain moves out of england, wales and northern ireland and into scotland. we still have the low cloud along the shoreline. if we follow this front all the way around, you can see how it brings rain back into northern ireland and eclipse north wales through the course of the day. they will be some sunshine to look forward to and again some showers, some will be heavy and thundery as well. we are
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looking at top temperatures up to 20. so dipping a little bit on today. then for a thursday, variable amounts of cloud, sunny skies, some showers. and you can see the first signs of that low pressure with its affront to micro—coming in from the west. that is going to introduce more cloud. some rain, and the wind will strengthen. temperature —wise we're looking at 12 to 21 degrees. if we take all that are up, here is the area of low pressure, with the remnants of tropical storm alex entwined in it. it is passing by us. if you look at these isobars it is telling you it is going to be a windy day, particularly in the north—west, and that weather front moving south across the country will bring in some patchy rain and again, through the weekend, we could see some showers in the north of the country. windy on friday in the north—west and also on saturday. further south, drier north—west and also on saturday. furthersouth, drierand north—west and also on saturday. further south, drier and brighter with some sunshine. all in all, not looking too bad all.
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thank you, carol. thousands of people gathered in northern france yesterday, to mark the 78th anniversary of the d—day landings. john maguire is in ver—sur—mer for us this morning. john, it's been a particularly significant event this year, hasn't it? yes, sally, partly because, or mainly because, i would suggest, this memorial, the british normandy memorial trust, was able to host veterans, theirfamilies memorial trust, was able to host veterans, their families and anybody else wanted to come along on the anniversary of d—day for the first time. it was officially opened a year ago, time. it was officially opened a yearago, but time. it was officially opened a year ago, but because of covid restrictions people could not travel here. it was a very different event yesterday. think back to the 75th anniversary three years ago, just how busy it was what an extraordinary spectacle, how many veterans came over. the veterans are the real stars of the show. this year slightly different. only a
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small handful made the journey. perhaps to some of those are saving themselves for the 80th anniversary in two years. we very much hope they get there. perhaps theyjust in two years. we very much hope they get there. perhaps they just felt that still there are elements of travel restrictions they didn't want to cope with. but talking to some people in arromanches, the nearby town last night, they felt that was missing this year, the fact the veterans weren't in town to take pride of place surrounded by people. here in france it is very much a celebration. they have three days of salaries racing along this coastline, fireworks on sunday night, the bars, the restaurant absolutely packed. not so much of that element this year. a different feel, i think, that element this year. a different feel, ithink, but that element this year. a different feel, i think, but still one where remembrance was at the heart of it, but also gratitude, gratitude by the local french people. today, the normandy coastline,
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with its calm sea and cobalt blue sky, belies its history. the chaos and carnage of d—day, a lifetime away. with the beaches they stormed 78 years ago as the backdrop, men who fought here laid wreaths to honour the fallen. it's been a long time coming, but the british normandy memorial, officially opened last year under covid restrictions, could at last host veterans for the 6th ofjune anniversary. seeing it for the first time is ken cooke. it's a beautiful place. i didn't expect it to be as beautiful as what it is, and it will be a very lasting memorial. ken was just 18 years old when he landed here at ver—sur—mer — or gold beach, as it was known — on the first day of battle.
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i've always thought that the lads that didn't come back are the heroes. we are not the heroes who've survived. the heroes are the lads that's still over there. there's still a lot of memories. i've tried to get rid of some of them, but some of them will never go away. a fly—past by a spitfire from the battle of britain memorial flight recreated a fraction of the soundscape that would have assaulted the senses. ken hay was still a teenager when he first landed in normandy, his thoughts summed up in a poem he wrote and read at a remembrance service. lord, keep me safe. i'm just 18, and still a lot of life to live.
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for many of the veterans visiting graves of mates, now seeing their names immortalized here, means so much to them. we were in signal platoon together with the essex. ken remembers denny circus, who'd intended to return home and marry his sweetheart. he was talking about, "we'll get married after the war." they were already making their plans. there he is. and i suppose that girl was left hot and dry. he was a really good guy. not because he's dead. he was a really good guy. the memorial was built to give remembrance a physical form, the names of the 22,442 men and women under british control who died in normandy. among those chiselled into the stone is raymond carr. we found his name, and of course, he's under the royal air force there. and then you come down that column,
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13, and there you are, "carr r, sergeant, 21." his brother peter is here, along with his granddaughter, to find raymond's name. why does it mean so much? 0h, your brother, yeah. yeah, very emotional. yeah, it is. they've done such a brilliantjob. wonderful. in one sense i'm very sad. and on the other, i'm very proud. he's there. yeah. he was part of it, wasn't he? that's it, really. it gets me a bit. but, there you go. casey will now pick up the baton and carry on the family's history. when my dad said, "oh, granddad wants to take you to france for the d—day memorial", it's like, "yeah, i'll go."
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i was so happy they wanted me to go with them. despite their age and their dwindling number, the veterans take part in a packed programme of events when they visit the former battlefields. here in normandy, d—day is defined notjust by remembrance, but also by gratitude. the french celebrate their liberation, their freedom, delivered by men and women, all courageous, many terrified, and many who will forever rest in the land they set free. yeah, a highly emotional day yesterday. i wanted to show you a part of the memorial i don't think we have shown you before. this is over to the side of the main site, a memorial to the french civilians. a quote from charles de gaulle at the
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top, it is the battle of france and it is france's battle. and below, for the civilian population the joy of liberation was often accompanied by the anguish of loved ones lost or homes destroyed. they bore their suffering with fortitude. when you saw the french air force doing that fly—past last night with the smoke blowing behind, red, white and blue, frank stricker, of course, there was a ceremony down below with the veterans on the top of the clip. —— the french tricolour. thank you for continuing to visit to make this day very special. he said the people of arromanches and normally will never forget. we will have more from the memorial after the news, travel and weather where you are. this good morning from bbc london. i'm alison earle.
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tube passengers are being told to avoid travelling until eight o'clock this morning as the network recovers from yesterday's tube strike. 100 stations were closed as around 4,000 rmt union members walked out in a dispute overjobs, pensions and conditions. but tfl insists jobs are not under threat. the inquest into the death of music entrepreneur jamal edwards will open today. he was the founder of sbtv, an online entertainment platform which helped launch the careers of artists like ed sheeran and stormzy. he died suddenly in february at the age of 31. westminster council has removed a set of spikes on a tree in mayfair after criticism from animal lovers. the local authority originally claimed they were needed for "public safety" to stop birds defecating on a bench below. it now it says there "may be better alternatives". if you're heading to barking, there's now another way to get there using public transport. you can catch the thames clipper, which has extended its
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services in east london. it runs at peak times on weekdays and throughout the day on weekends. it's great to see crossrail opening, which happened in the top of our borough, and at the same time having the riverboat service and the new gospel oak extension. so this is really good for us building the homes that our communities want and need. travel now, and this is how tfl services are looking right now. as you can see most lines are still suspended due to that strike by the rmt yesterday. the bakerloo and jubilee lines have just reopened. the overground and elizabeth line are running and have a good service. the dlr has no service between shadwell and bank/tower due to signal failure. and for more info on the strike, why it was called and the impact, head over to our website. on to the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another unsettled day today. we've got a little more cloud in the south, some mistiness, but some sunshine
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to the north first thing. now, the cloud in the south will break up and we will see some sunny spells, but also some showers. temperatures today getting up to 22 celsius, feeling warmer than yesterday. those showers clearing to start with this evening. we get one or two clearer spells then. and now the band of quite heavy showers moves through the early hours and the wind starts to strengthen. the minimum temperature dropping to 13 celsius, so quite a mild night. now for wednesday, we've got a breeze that is driving some potentially quite heavy, sharp showers through. you mightjust hear a rumble of thunder. but still some sunny spells. despite the wind, we are looking at a maximum temperature of 21 celsius on wednesday. through wednesday night into thursday, a ridge of high pressure starts to build. so thursday is looking largely dry with some sunny spells. for friday, we are under the influence of this low pressure system, and that is the remnants of tropical storm alex. it is going to be a breezy day. not so much in the way of rain around on friday. it should be largely dry with some sunny spells.
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and temperatures, as we head through to the weekend, staying in the low 20s. that's it for the moment. now it's back to breakfast. good morning. to seven o'clock. you are watching breakfast. our headlines today. boris johnson survives a vote of confidence in his leadership, but loses the support of more than 40—percent of conservative mp's. i think it is a convincing result, a decisive result, and what it all means is as a government we can move means is as a government we can move on means is as a government we can move on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters. i on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters.— on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters. i can announce that the parliamentary _ think really matters. i can announce that the parliamentary party - think really matters. i can announce that the parliamentary party does i that the parliamentary party does have confidence... cheering
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em cheering _ . i will make a prediction. cheering — . i will make a prediction. we cheering . i will make a -rediction. we are . i will make a prediction. we are auoin . i will make a prediction. we are aoian to . i will make a prediction. we are going to have _ . i will make a prediction. we are going to have a — . i will make a prediction. we are going to have a new _ . i will make a prediction. we are going to have a new prime i . i will make a prediction. we are i going to have a new prime minister, a new— going to have a new prime minister, a new leader— going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of— going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of the _ going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of the conservative i a new leader of the conservative party. _ a new leader of the conservative party. by— a new leader of the conservative party. by party— a new leader of the conservative party, by party conference - a new leader of the conservative party, by party conference this l party, by party conference this year~ _ party, by party conference this ear. �* party, by party conference this ear, �* , ., ., party, by party conference this ear. ~ ., , ., ., , year. also on the programme this mornina. holding out, but outnumbered. ukrainian forces struggle to keep russia out of key cities in the dombas region. good morning. in sport, with wimbledon three weeks away we're hearing from emma raducanu as she talks about a possible linkup with andy murray ahead of the grass court season. some patchy cloud this morning should clear quite quickly, and we have also got rain across parts of the east and south coast, but for many of us it will be dry with sunny intervals and a few showers. all the details throughout this morning's programme. hello, good morning. the date is tuesdayjune the 7th.
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our main story. borisjohnson has survived an attempt by his own mps to force him to stand down as prime minister. but this morning were asking, at what cost has that victory come? the bunting is still up here at number 10, but thatjubilee weekend seems like a long time ago. this time yesterday on breakfast we were hearing rumours that there might be a vote of confidence at some point, and by nine o'clock last night we had the result. where does that leave boris johnson had the result. where does that leave borisjohnson this morning and the country? the vote of confidence started 6pm yesterday and the result was announced at nine o'clock. it showed he still has the backing of 211 conservative mps — but 148 want him to go. that never was much higher than most politicians, most people inside downing street, were expecting. so what does it mean?
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it means mrjohnson, who led his party to a landslide victory in the general election just two and a half years ago, now has the support of less than 60 % of his own mps. we will be bringing you reaction from the deputy prime minister, dominic raab. first, our political correspondent jonathan blake looks back at a dramatic evening in westminster. a big moment for borisjohnson as last night conservative mps voted on whether to back him or sack him as their leader. nobody expected the prime minister to lose, but the result when it came was not the convincing win he needed. the vote in favour of having confidence in borisjohnson as leader was 211 votes, and the vote against was 148 votes. and therefore i can announce that the parliamentary party does have confidence. cheering. more than 40% of his own members of parliament had voted against him.
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his supporters cheered the victory, though, and for the prime minister, a win was a win. i think it's a convincing result, a decisive result. and what it what it means is that as a government, we can move on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters to people. as westminster weighed up what the result might mean, the prime minister's supporters rallied round while his critics said they weren't done yet. what i think is the best thing now is that the conservative party i respects the ballot result and stays united. - parties will often lose elections because they are disunited. i look at recent history. it's parties that are disunited that end up in opposition. _ ijust hope that given the mood of the public, the vote we've had here tonight, that the cabinet would go and tell the prime minister that in steve baker's words, the gig's up. i'll make a prediction. we're going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of the conservative party,
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by party conference this year. labour and other opposition parties seized on the vote as evidence of a divided party in government. the conservative party had a decision to make — to show some backbone or to back borisjohnson. they have ignored the british public and hitched themselves and their party firmly to borisjohnson and everything that he represents. boris johnson is now safe from any further votes of confidence for a year under his party's rules, but he's emerged from this test looking far from secure. jonathan blake, bbc news. this some of those papers this morning are pretty brutal for the prime minister. i imagine he is looking at the front pages right now. around westminster, people are always looking for signs and indications and hints to what is actually going on, a prediction of
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the outcome of the vote last night. it came from a rather unexpected but entirely accurate one. this is a bus stop in parliament square, and if you have a look it had the result long before anyone else did — stopping point for the 148 and the 211 services, the exact numbers in last night's vote. spooky! it is on the sign. but let's deal with reality. let's get some reaction to the vote from the deputy leader of the labour party, angela rayner. i'm not going to ask you about predictions on bus stops, angela. but let's look at the real numbers. the reality is borisjohnson has the support of 60% nearly of his mps. he won. ~., , ., support of 60% nearly of his mps. he won. y., ~,., ., won. many of those mps are on the -a roll, won. many of those mps are on the payroll. over _ won. many of those mps are on the payroll. over 70kr _ won. many of those mps are on the payroll, over 70% of _ won. many of those mps are on the payroll, over 70% of his _ payroll, over 70% of his backbenchers didn't support him. that is catastrophic for the prime minister, but what is more important
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is the overwhelming public opinion that borisjohnson broke the rules and should be prime minister, but this prime minister thinks he doesn't have to follow the rules and he will keep carrying on. he doesn't put anyone first, including the country, he always thinks of himself. it country, he always thinks of himself. , , , ., himself. it is interesting you talkina himself. it is interesting you talking about _ himself. it is interesting you talking about public - himself. it is interesting youj talking about public opinion, because there are a lot of people out there this morning who are thinking, borisjohnson is right to say it is time to move on, who are fed up with partygate and all the speculation, and who just do want him to crack on with governing and trying to sort out the cost of living crisis. is there a danger that you are misreading the public mood this morning?— that you are misreading the public mood this morning? there are many more in the — mood this morning? there are many more in the public _ mood this morning? there are many more in the public that _ mood this morning? there are many more in the public that will - mood this morning? there are many more in the public that will not i more in the public that will not move on because they lost relatives, they followed the rules and they feel the hypocrisy of the prime minister who set out the rules were breaking the rules notjust once but multiple times, where he attended gatherings. number
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10 was the most fixed penalty notices of any other building within the whole country. it is shambolic that he thinks he can carry on. but of course, yes, the cost of living crisis is a significant issue for our country, and because the prime minister has spent all of this time trying to defend his actions that are indefensible, and the nhs crisis we find with the waiting list, the problems we face in this country at the moment, the chaos in travel, the prime minister has done nothing to alleviate that because he has been too busy trying to save himself. you mentioned partygate, i suppose the problem that you and keir starmer haveis problem that you and keir starmer have is there are still questions for you about be a gate, so it is hard for you to come out talk about boris johnson's hard for you to come out talk about borisjohnson's position because at least that has been sorted out now, and you are still under a cloud of investigation. where does that stand at the moment? to have any timings and when you will get a resolution? we don't, but we have been very clear. if it was myself or keir as
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prime minister at the moment, we would have resigned by now. he made it absolutely clear, we didn't break any rules and we are happy to correspond with the police over their investigation, and we said that if we did break the rules unintentionally then we would resign, and we think that is fundamental to the british people. integrity matters. this prime minister has taken the word integrity and honesty out of the ministerial code, and that is why we are bringing a vote today to push forward standards in public life, because we think there is matter and both myself and keir starmer date back have been very clear that if we break the rules we would resign our position. the prime minister thinks he doesn't have to follow the rules, and if the prime minister can lie and if the prime minister can lie and not follow his rules, that is a dangerous precedent for anything else happening for our country, and i think the public are losing confidence in the prime minister's ability to tell the truth and follow rules. ., ., . ., . rules. you mentioned confidence. what about _
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rules. you mentioned confidence. what about a _ rules. you mentioned confidence. what about a vote _ rules. you mentioned confidence. what about a vote of _ rules. you mentioned confidence. what about a vote of no _ rules. you mentioned confidence. | what about a vote of no confidence in parliament, is that something that you will consider now? like i say today. _ that you will consider now? like i say today, labour _ that you will consider now? like i say today, labour has _ that you will consider now? like i say today, labour has formed i that you will consider now? like i say today, labour has formed a l say today, labour has formed a motion which i will put through the house which is about implementing the full independent report into standards in public life, which at the moment borisjohnson has cherry picked and watered down the ministerial code. we think it should be fully implemented, and therefore we raise the standards, that is the first thing we need to do, to set the bar. the british people deserve the bar. the british people deserve the best from our politicians, not the best from our politicians, not the worst course in the bar should be set at a reasonable level which says, if you lie to the british public, if you get a fixed penalty notice because you break the law in office by your own rules, you shouldn't be the prime minister of this country.
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let's just stick with this, on a no—confidence vote in parliament, is that something you would consider now? you have seen how many conservative mps say they don't have confidence in the prime minister, maybe they would vote with you next time. is that something you would consider doing again? we time. is that something you would consider doing again?— consider doing again? we will consider doing again? we will consider more _ consider doing again? we will consider more options, i consider doing again? we will consider more options, but i consider doing again? we will consider more options, but to consider doing again? we will i consider more options, but to be honest i think the prime minister is once again making it very difficult to deal with the issues at hand today, the cost of living crisis in the chaos around our transport and nhs that needs vital support, so therefore we do need to get onto those issues, but we can't do that while the prime minister continues to limp on because he has got no confidence of his backbenchers, no confidence of his backbenchers, no confidence from any other political party, and he has lost the will of the british people, so he should do the british people, so he should do the right thing and resign, and we should be able to move forward with parliament dealing with the vital issues that matter today. angela ra ner, issues that matter today. angela rayner. deputy _ issues that matter today. angela rayner, deputy leader _ issues that matter today. angela rayner, deputy leader of - issues that matter today. angela rayner, deputy leader of the i issues that matter today. angela i rayner, deputy leader of the labour party, thank you very much indeed forjoining us on breakfast. let's speak to our political correspondent damian grammaticas. what is going on in there? they are regrouping. — what is going on in there? they are regrouping. planning _ what is going on in there? they are regrouping, planning out _ what is going on in there? they are regrouping, planning out how- what is going on in there? they are regrouping, planning out how theyl regrouping, planning out how they try and move things forward is, and talking to people this morning, the
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message coming from there is they are characterising those who voted against the prime minister is a disparate group of disgruntled people, and they are saying that they should look at these results and accept it, and move on. they are saying it is like a football match. if your team loses, time to accept that and move on, but the trouble is this isn't a football match, this is an ongoing process and situation. you heard angela rayner talking about it, and those rebels who we might not hear too much from, them or their opponents, they voted no confidence in borisjohnson. while you hear other voices in the papers today, william hague, former tory leader, he has called on boris johnson to do the honourable thing and leave, and he said a narrow victory is not the defeat of a rival faction of the squashing of an alternative candidate but the fending off of a gathering feeling of hopelessness. they want to be
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able to say, this week we are doing things on the economy, improving child care, housing. but those 140 plus mps now, they know they do not have confidence in the prime minister. , , ., minister. interesting, there is a cabinet meeting _ minister. interesting, there is a cabinet meeting a _ minister. interesting, there is a cabinet meeting a bit _ minister. interesting, there is a cabinet meeting a bit later i minister. interesting, there is a l cabinet meeting a bit later today. this morning, i'm told. so cabinet meeting a bit later today. this morning, i'm told.— cabinet meeting a bit later today. this morning, i'm told. so you will have to sit — this morning, i'm told. so you will have to sit at _ this morning, i'm told. so you will have to sit at the _ this morning, i'm told. so you will have to sit at the table _ this morning, i'm told. so you will have to sit at the table and... i'ml have to sit at the table and... i'm sure the have to sit at the table and... l“n sure the ministers will be asked when they get to hear about it. i’m when they get to hear about it. i'm sure they will. but as the situation as things stand here this morning as the prime minister wakes up to in one way good news that he won that confidence vote last night, but not by as big a margin as he would have liked, and now he has to think about how he goes forward. we'll be speaking to the deputy prime minister dominic raab within the next half hour. let's go back to sally in the studio. jon, thanks very much indeed. ukraine's president volodymyr zelensky says his forces are holding out in the eastern city of severodonetsk despite being outnumbered.
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meanwhile the number of injured ukrainian soldiers continues to rise and the bbc has been told that the country will need significant help to supply prosthetics to all who need them. laura bicker has been to meet some wounded soldiers in dnipro hospital just hours from the front line . the full ugly force of modern warfare comes with a brutal cost. each blast can take a life, or alter it forever. sergei was hit by a mortar during a mission in mariupol. the surgeons used parts of his thigh to rebuild his lower leg. translation: the chances were slim. the doctors started working on me from the very beginning. the surgery was successful. they put in a lot of effort. it's a miracle. it's a very complicated operation, and the injury was too hard, i so we are happy and very grateful to the doctors and to _ everybody who supports us.
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but others are not so lucky. yuri was hit by an air strike. translation: my sergeant ma'or was killed on the spot, i and i did not make it to cover. it's a good thing i managed to warn my brothers in arms, and they had time to get to cover. i wasjust ten metres short, and ended up in the very epicentre of the strike. he's now one of thousands who need a prosthetic limb. translation: if it was up to me, i would stand up now _ and go and fight the war. i really upset that my guys are fighting there and i'm just lying here unable to help. skills learned after the second world war are once again in demand. this prosthetics factory, built in 1944, isjust hours from yet another front line. they're ready to increase production, but the bbc has been told to ukraine will need more help if it's to supply prosthetics
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to all its wounded. translation: losing a limb is not a life sentence. - when someone gets admitted into our care and sees that there are others there missing both legs or an arm just like them, they see that life can carry on normally with what modern technologies have to offer. the toll taken by this war is matched by a strong will to overcome its effects, but it will take money and time to ensure this cruel conflict doesn't haunt another generation of fighters. laura bicker, bbc news, dnipro. our correspondentjoe inwood is in kyiv and joins us now. morning. we are hearing in laura's report they are about the fighting, but what is the latest you can tell us about the situation in
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severodonetsk? i us about the situation in severodonetsk?- us about the situation in severodonetsk? ., us about the situation in severodonetsk? ~' , severodonetsk? i think there will be more young — severodonetsk? i think there will be more young men — severodonetsk? i think there will be more young men and _ severodonetsk? i think there will be more young men and women - severodonetsk? i think there will be more young men and women facing| more young men and women facing situations like the people in laura's report. the fighting is intense, there are huge levels of bombardment, it is incredibly bloody with heavy losses on both sides. there have been confusing reports over the last few days of the russians first making large gains on the counterattack from the ukrainians taking back half the city, so the report said. but the russians have pushed the ukrainians back to an industrial area. it is worth saying it is difficult to get accurate information from the city at the moment. there aren't any journalist providing reports that we have seen, and there are no phone signals there, so you do get rather conflicting reports. what we do know for certain is that artillery is playing a huge role here, very heavy bombardment and it is going to be causing a difficult situation for the ukrainian defence. joe. causing a difficult situation for the ukrainian defence. joe, thank ou ve the ukrainian defence. joe, thank you very much — the ukrainian defence. joe, thank you very much indeed, _ the ukrainian defence. joe, thank you very much indeed, we - the ukrainian defence. joe, thank you very much indeed, we will i the ukrainian defence. joe, thankl you very much indeed, we will talk to again later in the programme.
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the duke and duchess of sussex have shared a photograph of their daughter lilibet to mark her first birthday. the picture was taken by a close family friend at a birthday picnic held at frogmore cottage in windsor over the weekend. apparently there was face painting and cake at the party. also looks like there was quite a lot of sunshine. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning to you. i am starting off with quite a sunny picture this morning myself, and this was taken earlier in dumfries and galloway, but there is an sunshine to start the day everywhere. some of us are starting with patchy fog, as you can see in hereford. but it is also parts of wales, central and southern england. it should lift quite readily this morning. if you are stepping out, pollen levels are moderate or high across much of england, wales and also northern
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ireland, and increasingly it is grouse and nettle pollen that we are looking at at the moment. so what we haveis looking at at the moment. so what we have is a few showers coming along this east coast this morning that will affect south—east scotland, move away from here, we are looking at brighter skies, particularly when this morning's low cloud does left. for northern ireland you have cloud as well, that should break up, a few showers skirting down this north sea coastline and another few coming on the south coast, but in between we are looking at some sunshine, particularly through parts of wales in the midlands. through the day, most of those showers will tend to ease, but we will see further showers developed through the afternoon and we could see one pop almost anywhere, but they will be well scattered and many of us will miss them and have a dry day. the cloud will thicken towards the south—west, and later we will see rain arrived, temperatures in the midlands for example a good five or 6 degrees warmer than yesterday. but we are looking at 11—21 . through this evening and overnight, the cloud and rain continue to march quite quickly northwards and
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eastwards, again we will see low cloud and behind the rain once again some clear skies, but also a few showers. that rain quite smartly clears england, wales and northern ireland in the morning, moving across scotland, but this weather front curls background and brings rain back into northern ireland to north west wales later. for the rest of the country we are looking at a mixture of bright spells, sunshine and showers, but tomorrow some of the showers could be heavy and thundery, and temperatures once again will take a bit of a dip, looking ata again will take a bit of a dip, looking at a top temperature of around 20 degrees. carol, thank you very much. we will see you later in the programme. the number of fines issued to parents in england for truancy from school is increasing, as the penalties return after the pandemic. they were largely set aside in recent years because of coronavirus. but a bbc investigation found £3.7 million in fines have been given out in the academic year to easter. our education editor branwenjeffreys has this report. you may go a little bit further.
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i'm going to steal your idea from what we talked about the gradient... getting pupils into school every day isn't an exact science. but this school has seen a massive turnaround. once the attendance was among the worst in england. kane and olivia rarely missed school now, but over the last couple of years they hadn't always turned up, as the pandemic created pressures at home. this ijust wanted time to myself, just time away from things that cause stress on that could cause stress. it feels better being back rather thanjust on the street with my mates. i didn't want to see anyone, didn't want to talk. - ijust felt so, like, miserable, and i know i made it worth. staying in the house, - and i'm so glad that i'm not doing that any more, _ because i wouldn't be in the same place i am now. your grades are good after your last paper. praising hard work and better grades is part of it. posh teas for tutor groups that do well. rewards and treats like this tea or trips out a part of a system
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of incentives here to make sure that good attendance is recognised. although at the end of the line, if parents don't make sure their children come to school, they will be fined. during the pandemic, there was more leeway around attendance, but across england, fixed penalty fines for parents have returned. 130 out of 152 local authorities shared their data with us. in 2018—19, just over 272,000 fines were issued, leading to £14 million being paid by parents. in 2021-22, 71,000 fines were issued by easter, with £3.7 million paid by parents. i think we should visit this one. at this school, there's a team chasing up families warning poor attendance can lead to fines, but also finding out what's going on and offering support.
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a lot of work goes on behind the scenes of trying to help parents trust us that we are here to help, we're notjust there to, why is your child not at school, and to bang on and define and send them to court and things like that. there's a lot of factors that we take into consideration first and foremost, and are here to support with. after the disruption of covid, they're trying to reset, rebuilding the daily habit of school. branwen jeffreys, bbc news, middlesbrough. it is exactly 24 minutes past seven, and you are watching breakfast from bbc news. john maguire's in normandy for us this morning — he's been talking to veterans who have been marking the anniversary of the d—day landings. john, it's been a particularly significant event this year, hasn't it? it has, because they were unable to
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come lastly of course because of restrictions, and this year they have campaigned, they have raised money, we have told you about harry billinge over the many years to see this memorial built. many of them came last autumn when they were able to do so, not on the anniversary of d—day itself, a day that is so particularly important to them. i wanted to show you a little bit about how the memorial works, especially if you have relatives that died in the battle of normandy and want to come here and pay tribute to them. the main structure of the memorial in the centre there, the main wall, harry billinge's name is on there as we know, but also those are the men who died on d—day. around the rest of it, 22,442 names, men and two women, nurses who died out at sea in a hospital ship, are inscribed on these columns around. date order, so it fans out from the 6th ofjune, but gives you an idea
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really of how long the battle of normandy lasted. so this is the 12th of august. they are split into navy, army, air force, merchant navy, other divisions as well. butjust let me show you some names, for example. raymond bramham, a fusilier in the royal welch fusiliers. just 19 years old. and that is the thing that really strikes you when you visit here, the ages. 19, 19, 21, 23. the oldest age i can find on here, 36 years old, a sergeant major there, so one of the oldest at the battle. harry was here with us in october, he wanted to come and find a name of a certain soldier who was around about that age, in his mid—30s, and harry, who was 18 at the time, i remember saying to me, he was like a dad to us, you seem so much older. some of these men will have had families and children back at home, and of course families and
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children that they never got to see. special couple of a very emotional day, and we will tell you so much more about it, and more from normandy after the news, travel and weather where you are watching the programme this morning. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. tube passengers are facing a second day of disruption as the network slowly recovers after yesterday's strike. a hundred stations were closed, as around 4,000 rmt union members walked out in a dispute overjobs, pensions and conditions. but tfl insists jobs are not under threat. the inquest into the death of music entrepreneur jamal edwards will open today. he was the founder of sbtv — an online entertainment platform which helped launch the careers of artists like ed sheeran and stormzy. he died suddenly in february at the age of 31.
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westminster council has removed a set of spikes on a tree in mayfair, after criticism from animal lovers. the local authority originally claimed they were needed for public safety to stop birds defecating on a bench below. it now it says there may be better alternatives. if you're heading to barking, there's now another way to get there using public transport. you can catch the thames clipper, which has extended its services in east london. it runs at peak times on weekdays and throughout the day on weekends. it's great to see crossrail opening, which happened in the top of our borough, and at the same time having the riverboat service and the new gospel oak extension. so this is really good for us building the homes that our communities want and need. travel now, and this is how tfl services are looking right now.
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there are severe delays on the dlr between tower gateway and bank, and canning town and canary wharf. that's due to signal failure. and for more info on the strike, why it was called and the impact, head over to our website. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another unsettled day today. we've got a little more cloud in the south, some mistiness, but some sunshine to the north first thing. now the cloud in the south will break up and we will see some sunny spells, but also some showers. temperatures today getting up to 22 celsius, feeling warmer than yesterday. those showers clearing to start with this evening. we get one or two clearer spells then. another band of quite heavy showers moves through the early hours and the wind starts to strengthen. the minimum temperature dropping to 13 celsius, so quite a mild night. now for wednesday, we've got a breeze that is driving some potentially quite heavy, sharp showers through. you mightjust hear a rumble of thunder. but still some sunny spells. despite the wind, we are looking at a maximum temperature of 21
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celsius on wednesday. through wednesday night into thursday, a ridge of high pressure starts to build. so thursday is looking largely dry with some sunny spells. for friday, we are under the influence of this low pressure system, and that is the remnants of tropical storm alex. it is going to be a breezy day. not so much in the way of rain around on friday. it should be largely dry with some sunny spells. and temperatures, as we head through to the weekend, staying in the low twenties. that's it for the moment. now it's back to breakfast. i'm back in an hour. hello. this is breakfast with jon kay in downing street and sally nugent in salford. we are about to hear from the deputy prime minister, dominic raab, after that dramatic evening in
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westminster, with the prime minister facing the confidence vote. he won eight but did he win it by enough to move on as he wishes? you wouldn't want to be the person taking the papers over breakfast this morning. not quite the headlines he would have wanted. the daily telegraph calls it a hollow victory for boris johnson. the sun front page says it was the night of the blunt knives and borisjohnson has been stabbed in the bag by 148 of his fellow tory mps. —— blonde knives. that is exactly two and a half years since the general election when many of those mps were elected may be because of borisjohnson. joined now by our political correspondent damian grammaticas. you have got the time here, don't you? i do. damian grammaticas. you have got the time here, don't you?— time here, don't you? i do. i've ricked time here, don't you? i do. i've picked out _ time here, don't you? i do. i've picked out this _ time here, don't you? i do. i've picked out this one. _ time here, don't you? i do. i've picked out this one. a - time here, don't you? i do. i've picked out this one. a wounded j picked out this one. a wounded victor. those two papers and this
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one, these are the papers that usually are squarely backing, or the ones you would expect to be cheerleading for boris these and of the daily express. and all of them, over his cornflakes, maybe he is a marmalade on toast kind of guy, i'm not sure, they will be the ones he will look at and be worried about. he used to write for the daily telegraph. that one he will particularly listen to because that really reflects a lot of what his readership will be thinking. —— its readership. that will be uncomfortable for him. and i think just the numbers. that 148 is way more than he expected. interestingly, they are saying that they think this is now a long game. they don't think he is going to be there, some of them were saying last night, by the end of the year. this is what andrew bridgen said. i just hope that given the mood of the public, _ just hope that given the mood of the public, they vote we have had here tonight, _ public, they vote we have had here tonight, that the cabinet would go and tell— tonight, that the cabinet would go
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and tell the prime minister that in steve _ and tell the prime minister that in steve baker's words, the gig is up. iwill— steve baker's words, the gig is up. i will make — steve baker's words, the gig is up. i will make a — steve baker's words, the gig is up. i will make a prediction. we will have _ i will make a prediction. we will have a _ i will make a prediction. we will have a new— i will make a prediction. we will have a new prime minister by party conference — have a new prime minister by party conference this year. you _ conference this year. you mentioned marmalade on toast. ac toast, long term? you mentioned marmalade on toast. ac toast. long term?— toast, long term? well, that is what a-eole like toast, long term? well, that is what people like andrew _ toast, long term? well, that is what people like andrew bridgen - toast, long term? well, that is what people like andrew bridgen thing. . people like andrew bridgen thing. talk about cabinet coming. cabinet will be coming here at half past nine this morning. remember, previous prime ministers,, those private messages behind closed doors when they have had confidence votes, won them and then the message coming has been, this is not sustainable. the men in grey suits, as they used to be called?— to be called? yes, what they are sa ina to be called? yes, what they are saying this _ to be called? yes, what they are saying this morning _ to be called? yes, what they are saying this morning is _ to be called? yes, what they are saying this morning is that i to be called? yes, what they are saying this morning is that all i saying this morning is that all those cabinet direct my cabinet ministers were out yesterday in front of the cameras. they were asked to go out and they did go out. they said publicly they supported mr
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johnson. now is the time to focus on the fight we have this agenda. they point to their election victory, that boris johnson point to their election victory, that borisjohnson led the party too. but none of those things, i think, change very much for the 148, who simply don't have confidence in leadership. that is the key question. is the man in there now behind that door, the way he is running things... it is not clear that he can plug any policy out, he can make any of changes. tobias ellwood saying this morning they should be a reshuffle, he needs new personnel in there. possibly. but a reshuffle may shunt out more ministers and create more enemies. he reshuffled his team around him a few weeks ago. new people coming in, new strategy, new communications, tried to relaunch. that does not seem to have placated a lot of his own mps? �* ., ,., .,
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seem to have placated a lot of his own mps? �* ., ., ., , own mps? and the reason for that is what they are _ own mps? and the reason for that is what they are listening _ own mps? and the reason for that is what they are listening to _ own mps? and the reason for that is what they are listening to other i what they are listening to other voters in their constituencies. they were all back there over thejubilee period and the holiday. and what they are concerned about is their own electoral prospects. so that is really their calculation. for some of them it is a question of the integrity in government. for many, it is an electoral question. boris johnson might say that what they are trying to say here is that in his leadership bid he got 51% of now he got more than that. the 51% he got was when they were three candidates standing, different system. candidates standing, different s stem. ., ., candidates standing, different sstem. ., ., ., ,, candidates standing, different s stem. ., ., ., ,, candidates standing, different 5 stem. ., ., ., ~' ~ candidates standing, different sstem. ., ., . . ., system. for now, thank you. we are 'oined b system. for now, thank you. we are joined by the — system. for now, thank you. we are joined by the deputy_ system. for now, thank you. we are joined by the deputy prime - system. for now, thank you. we are | joined by the deputy prime minister. dominic raab is with us on breakfast micra. morning to you. 148 of your own conservative mps don't want the prime minister in charge. how surprised when you that number? well, it's always difficult to say
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in a process like this but of course the prime — in a process like this but of course the prime minister won with 59% of mps's _ the prime minister won with 59% of mps's support. 63 in numerical terms — mps's support. 63 in numerical terms it— mps's support. 63 in numerical terms it is— mps's support. 63 in numerical terms. it is important to listen to those _ terms. it is important to listen to those dissenting voices but ultimately, the prime minister won very clearly this vote of confidence. now the important thing is to come _ confidence. now the important thing is to come together and focus on not talking _ is to come together and focus on not talking to _ is to come together and focus on not talking to ourselves within westminster, an internal conservative process, but to come together, — conservative process, but to come together, galvanised together, to talk to— together, galvanised together, to talk to the country about their priorities _ talk to the country about their priorities. we have got a tax cut and insurance coming injuly. that is important — and insurance coming injuly. that is important to deliver for the people — is important to deliver for the people. and a cash grant of £400 on energy— people. and a cash grant of £400 on energy bills — people. and a cash grant of £400 on energy bills in october. actually last night missed all of the froth of the _ last night missed all of the froth of the westminster chatter around the vote — of the westminster chatter around the vote, we also passed its second reading. _ the vote, we also passed its second reading, the national security bill. that is— reading, the national security bill. that is really important if you think— that is really important if you think about ukraine and the threat from _ think about ukraine and the threat from russia and other hostile states — from russia and other hostile states. we have got the levelling up
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bill coming through the house of commons — bill coming through the house of commons for a second reading later this week _ commons fora second reading later this week i— commons for a second reading later this week. i am working on a bill of rights. _ this week. i am working on a bill of rights. the — this week. i am working on a bill of rights, the crime—fighting agenda, with the _ rights, the crime—fighting agenda, with the attorney general. we need to focus _ with the attorney general. we need to focus on— with the attorney general. we need to focus on the people's priorities and that— to focus on the people's priorities and that is— to focus on the people's priorities and that is how we move forward, deliver— and that is how we move forward, deliver for— and that is how we move forward, deliver for the country. and also bind _ deliver for the country. and also bind and — deliver for the country. and also bind and build and glue the conservatives behind a really positive _ conservatives behind a really positive agenda. but conservatives behind a really positive agenda.— conservatives behind a really positive agenda. but there is no aettina positive agenda. but there is no getting away — positive agenda. but there is no getting away from _ positive agenda. but there is no getting away from the _ positive agenda. but there is no getting away from the fact i positive agenda. but there is no getting away from the fact that| positive agenda. but there is no i getting away from the fact that when borisjohnson getting away from the fact that when boris johnson stands getting away from the fact that when borisjohnson stands up in the house of commons, stands at the dispatch box, not only are all the people opposite him in opposition against him, but 40% of its own mps sitting on his own backbenchers don't want him there. that is not tenable, is it? ., , him there. that is not tenable, is it? . , , ., , , him there. that is not tenable, is it? ., ~ ., it? the reality is that 59% do. it is a clear majority. _ it? the reality is that 59% do. it is a clear majority. it _ it? the reality is that 59% do. it is a clear majority. it is - it? the reality is that 59% do. it is a clear majority. it is a - is a clear majority. it is a democratic process. the one thing you do— democratic process. the one thing you do in— democratic process. the one thing you do in a — democratic process. the one thing you do in a democratic process is respectively result and move on. as i respectively result and move on. as i said. _ respectively result and move on. as i said. when— respectively result and move on. as i said, when the prime minister was elected _ i said, when the prime minister was elected leader of the conservative
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party. _ elected leader of the conservative party. he — elected leader of the conservative party, he won less than that. so actually, — party, he won less than that. so actually, i— party, he won less than that. so actually, i think the right thing to do is _ actually, i think the right thing to do is to— actually, i think the right thing to do is to come together, respectively result _ do is to come together, respectively result it _ do is to come together, respectively result. it wasn't a vote the government wanted, the majority of mps wanted, but it was important for those _ mps wanted, but it was important for those dissenting voices. it important they are listening to, but what matters now is to focus on the country. _ what matters now is to focus on the country. the — what matters now is to focus on the country, the bread—and—butter issues facing _ country, the bread—and—butter issues facing people, the cost of living, the situation in ukraine, the packed agenda _ the situation in ukraine, the packed agenda we — the situation in ukraine, the packed agenda we have got coming through the house _ agenda we have got coming through the house of commons. as i said, you mentioned _ the house of commons. as i said, you mentioned that, the dissenting voices. — mentioned that, the dissenting voices, but the national security bill passed at second reading without — bill passed at second reading without a vote at all last night. that _ without a vote at all last night. that shows that actually we have got an important agenda delivering for the country and we should be spending all our energies on that. you just— spending all our energies on that. you just mentioned comparing it with the leadership of the vote that borisjohnson got. we just heard from damian grammaticas explaining that was a totally different system against two other candidates and so it's very hard to compare. let's go back to something we can compare it with, theresa may, when she faced a similar confidence vote back in
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2018. she got more votes than boris johnson did back then and you said at the time that he didn't have the mandate to go forward. so surely by the same rules borisjohnson doesn't have the same mandate now? h0. the same rules borisjohnson doesn't have the same mandate now? ha. i have the same mandate now? no, i have the same mandate now? no, i have to disagree _ have the same mandate now? no, i have to disagree with _ have the same mandate now? no, i have to disagree with you _ have the same mandate now? no, i have to disagree with you on - have the same mandate now? no, i have to disagree with you on both counts _ have to disagree with you on both counts in — have to disagree with you on both counts. in the leadership contest, which _ counts. in the leadership contest, which you — counts. in the leadership contest, which you referred to first, they were _ which you referred to first, they were a — which you referred to first, they were a series of other candidates going _ were a series of other candidates going forward. i don't think, if i'm honest. _ going forward. i don't think, if i'm honest, there is a credible alternative candidate with a plan, with the — alternative candidate with a plan, with the kind of backing that you are talking about. and i think that was also — are talking about. and i think that was also clear from the result yesterday. in relation to the vote of no _ yesterday. in relation to the vote of no confidence in theresa may, you had a _ of no confidence in theresa may, you had a hung _ of no confidence in theresa may, you had a hung parliament there. we don't _ had a hung parliament there. we don't have — had a hung parliament there. we don't have a hung parliament. we have _ don't have a hung parliament. we have a _ don't have a hung parliament. we have a working majority of 75, or around _ have a working majority of 75, or around about that, depending on precisely— around about that, depending on precisely how it is calculated. that is a very— precisely how it is calculated. that is a very different situation. and whilst _ is a very different situation. and whilst we — is a very different situation. and whilst we couldn't have got the brexit — whilst we couldn't have got the brexit deal through, under theresa may, _ brexit deal through, under theresa may, we _ brexit deal through, under theresa may, we did get through under this
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prime _ may, we did get through under this prime minister. as i said, last night — prime minister. as i said, last night we — prime minister. as i said, last night we voted at second reading, the national security bill passed without — the national security bill passed without a vote. that shows you have -ot without a vote. that shows you have got forward — without a vote. that shows you have got forward momentum. that is what we are _ got forward momentum. that is what we are going to be focused on. it important — we are going to be focused on. it important we come together to deliver— important we come together to deliver for the people of this country _ deliver for the people of this count . ~ ., . deliver for the people of this count .~ ., ,, .. country. what is striking when you look at the — country. what is striking when you look at the tories _ country. what is striking when you look at the tories are _ country. what is striking when you look at the tories are speaking i country. what is striking when you | look at the tories are speaking out against the prime minister, last night and this morning, is that they come from such a broad range of the party. wejust come from such a broad range of the party. we just heard from andrew bridgen. you have also got lord haig, william hague, former tory leader, writing in the times this morning saying he thinks it is time for the prime minister to move on. i mean, that must be a concern for you and for him? i’m mean, that must be a concern for you and for him?— and for him? i'm not sure i would aaree and for him? i'm not sure i would agree with _ and for him? i'm not sure i would agree with you — and for him? i'm not sure i would agree with you on _ and for him? i'm not sure i would agree with you on your _ and for him? i'm not sure i would agree with you on your particularl agree with you on your particular choice. _ agree with you on your particular choice. and _ agree with you on your particular choice, and of course, william is a commentator now. but as i said, the conservatives have always bring a hi i conservatives have always bring a big tent, — conservatives have always bring a big tent, bringing forward, bringing together— big tent, bringing forward, bringing together different backgrounds. that
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is one _ together different backgrounds. that is one of— together different backgrounds. that is one of the formulas for the recipe — is one of the formulas for the recipe for— is one of the formulas for the recipe for success. you will have dissenting — recipe for success. you will have dissenting voices. as i said, the prime _ dissenting voices. as i said, the prime minister won with 58% of the vote _ prime minister won with 58% of the vote we _ prime minister won with 58% of the vote. we have a working majority of 75, a _ vote. we have a working majority of 75, a packed — vote. we have a working majority of 75, a packed agenda going forward, delivering _ 75, a packed agenda going forward, delivering the national insurance tax cut, — delivering the national insurance tax cut, through to the crime—fighting agenda i am working very hard _ crime—fighting agenda i am working very hard with the home secretary and the _ very hard with the home secretary and the attorney general on. we have -ot and the attorney general on. we have got the _ and the attorney general on. we have got the levelling up bill coming through— got the levelling up bill coming through that michael gove is driving forward _ through that michael gove is driving forward. nadhim zahawi working on the skills— forward. nadhim zahawi working on the skills agenda. that is the glue that brings us all together. even more _ that brings us all together. even more importantly...— that brings us all together. even more importantly... sorry, you've mentioned _ more importantly... sorry, you've mentioned a _ more importantly... sorry, you've mentioned a lot _ more importantly... sorry, you've mentioned a lot of _ more importantly... sorry, you've mentioned a lot of these - more importantly... sorry, you've mentioned a lot of these things. i more importantly... sorry, you've. mentioned a lot of these things. at the glue that binds a government together, really, comes from the top, doesn't it, from the prime minister? and what is now clear, we have the numbers, isjust minister? and what is now clear, we have the numbers, is just how many conservative mps don't want him there. and the fact you say there is no credible alternative to him, no leader in waiting, that is not really a great endorsement, is it, for borisjohnson, the fact there is
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nobody else obvious? h0. for boris johnson, the fact there is nobody else obvious?— for boris johnson, the fact there is nobody else obvious? no, i making the obvious — nobody else obvious? no, i making the obvious point _ nobody else obvious? no, i making the obvious point because - nobody else obvious? no, i making the obvious point because you i nobody else obvious? no, i making. the obvious point because you asked about— the obvious point because you asked about the _ the obvious point because you asked about the comparison between the vote last _ about the comparison between the vote last night in the leadership contest — vote last night in the leadership contest. so i am answering that. in relation _ contest. so i am answering that. in relation to— contest. so i am answering that. in relation to the agenda we've got a prime _ relation to the agenda we've got a prime minister with the vision, the energy. _ prime minister with the vision, the energy. if— prime minister with the vision, the energy, if anything redoubled his commitment to get back onto the conservative agenda from levelling up conservative agenda from levelling up to _ conservative agenda from levelling up to dealing with the cost of living — up to dealing with the cost of living. and i think that that action and that— living. and i think that that action and that momentum, that drive that he provides, and the gender that we have got, _ he provides, and the gender that we have got, and the team that we have -ot, have got, and the team that we have got, and _ have got, and the team that we have got, and the — have got, and the team that we have got, and the desire to deliver a four— got, and the desire to deliver a four hour— got, and the desire to deliver a four hour my constituents and the public _ four hour my constituents and the public at — four hour my constituents and the public at large, is the formula, the recipe. _ public at large, is the formula, the recipe. that— public at large, is the formula, the recipe, that will give us forward momentum. and it's critically important _ momentum. and it's critically important we come together to make that happen. 0k~ - that happen. 0k. let's look forward. at the end ok. let's look forward. at the end of this month you have got two crucial by—elections in tiverton and in wakefield. not looking good for the conservatives in either. you have got to be privilege committee report coming in the next few months into partygate. looking at parties
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that maybe we haven't heard about so far. . �* ., that maybe we haven't heard about so far. , �* ., ., ., , that maybe we haven't heard about so far. , �* ., ., far. isn't going away? look, there are all sorts _ far. isn't going away? look, there are all sorts of _ far. isn't going away? look, there are all sorts of challenges, - far. isn't going away? look, there are all sorts of challenges, some l are all sorts of challenges, some short— are all sorts of challenges, some short term, _ are all sorts of challenges, some short term, some longer term. the reality— short term, some longer term. the reality is— short term, some longer term. the reality is you — short term, some longer term. the reality is you could point to the opinion— reality is you could point to the opinion poll that came out in the last 24. — opinion poll that came out in the last 24. 48— opinion poll that came out in the last 24, 48 hours, which showed the conservatives gaining a point in labour~ — conservatives gaining a point in labour. what really matters in the next two — labour. what really matters in the next two years, when we look forward to the _ next two years, when we look forward to the next— next two years, when we look forward to the next general election, it sadly— to the next general election, it sadly delivered on the agenda which supports _ sadly delivered on the agenda which supports the people of this country from the _ supports the people of this country from the challenges of making ends meet with— from the challenges of making ends meet with the cost of living, through— meet with the cost of living, through to the skills agenda that nadhim — through to the skills agenda that nadhim zahawi is driving forward, -et nadhim zahawi is driving forward, get in _ nadhim zahawi is driving forward, get in the — nadhim zahawi is driving forward, get in the nhs back, dealing with all the _ get in the nhs back, dealing with all the non—covid challenges, the bill of— all the non—covid challenges, the bill of rights, the crime—fighting agenda, — bill of rights, the crime—fighting agenda, and those of the bread—and—butter issues that will disco _ bread—and—butter issues that will disco correct might decide the next general— disco correct might decide the next general election. i believe we have a detailed — general election. i believe we have a detailed plan to deliver on those things _ a detailed plan to deliver on those things. the labour party simply don't _ things. the labour party simply don't. what is important as we spend the next _ don't. what is important as we spend the next two — don't. what is important as we spend the next two years delivering, delivering, delivering for the people — delivering, delivering for the people of this country. i'm _ people of this country. i'm surprised you want to talk about
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opinion polls this morning, because you might have clawed back a point, but generally, they are not looking good, are they? aha, but generally, they are not looking good. are they?— good, are they? a mid-term government _ good, are they? a mid-term government of _ good, are they? a mid-term government of any _ good, are they? a mid-term government of any political. government of any political persuasion, you would expect to be behind _ persuasion, you would expect to be behind even more than we are now, which _ behind even more than we are now, which is _ behind even more than we are now, which is why— behind even more than we are now, which is why after the local elections, which were much commentated on at the time, notwithstanding the mid—term challenges we've got, i think it was very clear— challenges we've got, i think it was very clear that labour are not in a position— very clear that labour are not in a position to — very clear that labour are not in a position to take power in two years. but what _ position to take power in two years. but what we should be focused on is not snapshot polls, but actually, the next — not snapshot polls, but actually, the next two years, the sustainable things— the next two years, the sustainable things that — the next two years, the sustainable things that we can deliver on for the people of this country up and down _ the people of this country up and down the — the people of this country up and down the country, from the cost of living _ down the country, from the cost of living through to fighting crime, through— living through to fighting crime, through to get in the nhs, dealing with the _ through to get in the nhs, dealing with the non—covid challenges, the levelling _ with the non—covid challenges, the levelling up agenda. we are the ones with a _ levelling up agenda. we are the ones with a detailed agenda. we talked about— with a detailed agenda. we talked about national security yesterday. we talk _ about national security yesterday. we talk about the levelling up agenda — we talk about the levelling up agenda in parliament tomorrow, today _ agenda in parliament tomorrow, today. that is the agenda we should
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come _ today. that is the agenda we should come together and to deliver for the country _ come together and to deliver for the count . . . .. come together and to deliver for the count . , , ,, ., ., ., country. yes, but i think a lot of our viewers _ country. yes, but i think a lot of our viewers this _ country. yes, but i think a lot of our viewers this morning - country. yes, but i think a lot of our viewers this morning will i country. yes, but i think a lot of our viewers this morning will be j our viewers this morning will be thinking, how do you move on when so many of your own mps want him to move on? i've learned from long experience of the views _ i've learned from long experience of the views of political reporters at westminster are not necessarily at one with _ westminster are not necessarily at one with what the public expect. i�*m one with what the public expect. i'm not a one with what the public expect. l“n not a political reporter. i might be standing here this morning but we have been hearing from viewers who have been hearing from viewers who have been hearing from viewers who have been saying that. we have been in bury north this morning. that is what many people have been saying for us. �* . ., , what many people have been saying for us. �* . . , ., what many people have been saying for us. ~ . . , ., .,, for us. actually, what the vast ma'ori for us. actually, what the vast majority of — for us. actually, what the vast majority of people _ for us. actually, what the vast majority of people in - for us. actually, what the vast majority of people in this i for us. actually, what the vast i majority of people in this country will feel— majority of people in this country will feel is— majority of people in this country will feel is enough when spinster internal conversation, focus _ when spinster internal conversation, focus on _ when spinster internal conversation, focus on us — when spinster internal conversation, focus on us. so what i am saying to you with _ focus on us. so what i am saying to you with the — focus on us. so what i am saying to you with the greatest respect is the government will be focused with a laser-like — government will be focused with a laser—like precision, with all of our energies on delivering for the people _ our energies on delivering for the people of— our energies on delivering for the people of this country, from the cost of— people of this country, from the cost of living through to the skills agenda, — cost of living through to the skills agenda, through to delivering on the
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nhs services, particularly as we get rid of— nhs services, particularly as we get rid of the _ nhs services, particularly as we get rid of the covid backlogs which have been such _ rid of the covid backlogs which have been such a — rid of the covid backlogs which have been such a talent, the crime—fighting agenda. our energies are going _ crime—fighting agenda. our energies are going to be on that. we make no apologies— are going to be on that. we make no apologies for that. i also think it will bring — apologies for that. i also think it will bring colleagues together at this important time. that— this important time. that said, we know that there can't be another confidence vote for 12 months as things stand, but there is talk around westminster this morning that may be the rules will be changed to allow another confidence vote may be sooner. what would you think of that, if the 1922 committee decided we might have these more regularly? i decided we might have these more reaularl ? .. regularly? i think fiddling the rules when — regularly? i think fiddling the rules when you _ regularly? i think fiddling the rules when you don't - regularly? i think fiddling the rules when you don't like i regularly? i think fiddling the rules when you don't like the | regularly? i think fiddling the i rules when you don't like the result is a bad _ rules when you don't like the result is a bad look. again, more westminster navel—gazing, more internal — westminster navel—gazing, more internal conversation. that's not the right— internal conversation. that's not the right direction which is dead. i do think— the right direction which is dead. i do think it's — the right direction which is dead. i do think it's important to listen to those _ do think it's important to listen to those dissenting voices. i think it's important to show that you are listening — it's important to show that you are listening. what matters is to drive forward _ listening. what matters is to drive forward, deliverforthe listening. what matters is to drive forward, deliver for the country, listen _ forward, deliver for the country, listen to— forward, deliver for the country, listen to the country and focus on their— listen to the country and focus on their issues — listen to the country and focus on their issues from the cost of living
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to crime _ their issues from the cost of living to crime to — their issues from the cost of living to crime to the nhs, quality public services _ to crime to the nhs, quality public services and the skills agenda and levelling _ services and the skills agenda and levelling up the country. that is what _ levelling up the country. that is what the — levelling up the country. that is what the might will be doing. you will be what the might will be doing. gm, will be pleased to hear will be built hearing more from voters around the country as the morning goes on. thank you forjoining us. that is the situation here at downing street. we are expecting cabinet minister would be arriving, including dominic raab, for that coveted meeting in the next hour. first, back to sally in the studio. thank you. 7:47am. john watson is here with the sport. we are talking about an interview i did with emma raducanu. rem interesting chat. it was. it's been such an interesting year for her. herfirst proper year on such an interesting year for her. her first proper year on the wta tour. rewind back to last year, she is playing in nottingham today, her first match on grass since the brilliant run to the fourth round at wimbledon last year, and last year she lost in the opening round. who
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would have ever predicted the kind of year that unfolded? she would have ever predicted the kind of year that unfolded?— would have ever predicted the kind of year that unfolded? she said she was at nottingham _ of year that unfolded? she said she was at nottingham last _ of year that unfolded? she said she was at nottingham last year- of year that unfolded? she said she was at nottingham last year when l of year that unfolded? she said she i was at nottingham last year when she found out about her wild card with —— for wimbledon, so she loves nottingham. she visited schoolkids yesterday. with the us open trophy. that is inspiring. that is something she is keen to stress. she is having to juggle she is keen to stress. she is having tojuggle a lot, isn't she is keen to stress. she is having to juggle a lot, isn't she? she is keen to stress. she is having tojuggle a lot, isn't she? when she is keen to stress. she is having to juggle a lot, isn't she? when you talk about the expectation on her shoulders. it talk about the expectation on her shoulders. ., . . . talk about the expectation on her shoulders. . , , . ., talk about the expectation on her shoulders. , . ., ,, . ., shoulders. it was such a special moment when _ shoulders. it was such a special moment when they _ shoulders. it was such a special moment when they handed i shoulders. it was such a special moment when they handed the | shoulders. it was such a special- moment when they handed the trophy back to her. that is it. it is moment when they handed the trophy back to her. that is it.— back to her. that is it. it is what is u- all back to her. that is it. it is what is up all about. _ back to her. that is it. it is what is up all about. it's _ back to her. that is it. it is what is up all about. it's not - back to her. that is it. it is what is up all about. it's not been i back to her. that is it. it is what i is up all about. it's not been easy. it has been a tough year. she has had criticism. john mcenroe, for example, has been very vocal. one of the most telling things that came out of it, is a possible linkup with a well known doubles partner. have a listen to this possible matchup. andy murray. and is that going to happen? well, we haven't actually spoken about. it's something that we both,
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i feel, want to do. and i don't know if this year is going to be the year, but hopefully, it will definitely happen at some point, yeah. soon? soon—ish. ish! what does that mean? soon! anne keothavong is with us. she will be playing with you in the billiejean cup? playing with you in the billie jean cu - ? , playing with you in the billie jean cu . ? , , , . playing with you in the billie jean cu - ? , , , . , cup? yes, super exciting news. huge news. the cup? yes, super exciting news. huge news- the lt — cup? yes, super exciting news. huge news. the lt have _ cup? yes, super exciting news. huge news. the lt have been _ cup? yes, super exciting news. huge news. the lt have been successful i cup? yes, super exciting news. huge news. the lt have been successful in their bid _ news. the lt have been successful in their bid to— news. the lt have been successful in their bid to host the billie jean cup finals. that is the women's world _ cup finals. that is the women's world cup— cup finals. that is the women's world cup of tennis. it will be played — world cup of tennis. it will be played in _ world cup of tennis. it will be played in glasgow in november. there isa is a huge amount of excitement in brillsh— is a huge amount of excitement in british tennis about it. we is a huge amount of excitement in british tennis about it.— british tennis about it. we know that andy murray _ british tennis about it. we know that andy murray can't - british tennis about it. we know that andy murray can't play - british tennis about it. we know that andy murray can't play in l british tennis about it. we know i that andy murray can't play in that. what about that possible matchup? yeah, i am sure emma and andy would be a yeah, i am sure emma and andy would he a fierce— yeah, i am sure emma and andy would be a fierce team. not too many people — be a fierce team. not too many people would want to take them on.
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but i also _ people would want to take them on. but i also hope emma will be part of the great _ but i also hope emma will be part of the great britain team at the billie jean cup _ the great britain team at the billie jean cup finals. to add that event here _ jean cup finals. to add that event here on— jean cup finals. to add that event here on uk— jean cup finals. to add that event here on uk soil for the first time since _ here on uk soil for the first time since 1991 — here on uk soil for the first time since 1991 has created a buzz around tennis— since 1991 has created a buzz around tennis and _ since 1991 has created a buzz around tennis and hopefully it is an opportunity to inspire and get more women _ opportunity to inspire and get more women and girls involved in sport, which _ women and girls involved in sport, which we _ women and girls involved in sport, which we know is all very important. how tricky— which we know is all very important. how tricky is — which we know is all very important. how tricky is it to inspire new generations coming through? it is how tricky is it to inspire new generations coming through? it is a challenae generations coming through? it is a challenge because _ generations coming through? it is a challenge because we _ generations coming through? it is a challenge because we are _ generations coming through? it is a challenge because we are up - generations coming through? it is a challenge because we are up against so many— challenge because we are up against so many other, i guess, sports and things— so many other, i guess, sports and things for— so many other, i guess, sports and things for young people to get involved — things for young people to get involved in, but we have got some fantastic— involved in, but we have got some fantastic role models in british tennis — fantastic role models in british tennis. and emma led the way in april _ tennis. and emma led the way in april she — tennis. and emma led the way in april. she led the team really successfully against the czech republic. the result didn't come our way. republic. the result didn't come our way~ it— republic. the result didn't come our way~ it was— republic. the result didn't come our way~ it was a — republic. the result didn't come our way. it was a new experience for us -- for— way. it was a new experience for us -- for her— way. it was a new experience for us -- for her with— way. it was a new experience for us —— for her with the team. we are bringing— —— for her with the team. we are bringing a— —— for her with the team. we are bringing a group of individuals into a team _ bringing a group of individuals into a team environment, it is one player is thriving _ a team environment, it is one player is thriving and love to be part of. a huge _ is thriving and love to be part of. a huge head of excitement to bring a
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tear to _ a huge head of excitement to bring a tear to the _ a huge head of excitement to bring a tear to the uk. a huge head of excitement to bring a tearto the uk-_ tear to the uk. working with emma first hand, tear to the uk. working with emma first hand. how— tear to the uk. working with emma first hand, how did _ tear to the uk. working with emma first hand, how did she _ tear to the uk. working with emma first hand, how did she deal- tear to the uk. working with emma first hand, how did she deal with i first hand, how did she deal with the pressure and expectation? she is just 19. as you talk about a team event like yours, she is going in there as kind of one of the leading lights, one of the more experienced players. how howard has it been for her this year tojuggle players. how howard has it been for her this year to juggle the expectation after that break out when last year? —— how hard has it been? when last year? -- how hard has it been? ., , ' ., , when last year? -- how hard has it been? .,, ' ., , ., , been? the last 12 months have been an incredible — been? the last 12 months have been an incredible journey _ been? the last 12 months have been an incredible journey for _ been? the last 12 months have been an incredible journey for her. - been? the last 12 months have been an incredible journey for her. i - an incredible journey for her. i think— an incredible journey for her. i think the — an incredible journey for her. i think the next few weeks will be, yeah, _ think the next few weeks will be, veah. an — think the next few weeks will be, yeah, an exciting time for her. a difficult — yeah, an exciting time for her. a difficult challenge, perhaps. but one where i think a lot of people, a lot of— one where i think a lot of people, a lot of voices. — one where i think a lot of people, a lot of voices, could do with just giving — lot of voices, could do with just giving her— lot of voices, could do with just giving her a lot of voices, could do with just giving hera break and lot of voices, could do with just giving her a break and allowing her to play— giving her a break and allowing her to play her— giving her a break and allowing her to play her tennis and enjoy the moment— to play her tennis and enjoy the moment because i think she deserves that. regardless of the results, she is trying _ that. regardless of the results, she is trying to— that. regardless of the results, she is trying to do all the right things _ is trying to do all the right things. she has got good people around _ things. she has got good people around her. she is a fantastic tennis— around her. she is a fantastic tennis player. around her. she is a fantastic tennis player-— around her. she is a fantastic tennis -la er. , tennis player. there were people esterda tennis player. there were people yesterday in _ tennis player. there were people yesterday in nottingham - tennis player. there were people yesterday in nottingham who - tennis player. there were people | yesterday in nottingham who had tennis player. there were people - yesterday in nottingham who had gone specificallyjust yesterday in nottingham who had gone specifically just to get a look at her, to see her play some tennis and
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hit some shots. which is surely a good thing?— hit some shots. which is surely a good thing? which is great. she is -auttin good thing? which is great. she is putting bums _ good thing? which is great. she is putting bums on — good thing? which is great. she is putting bums on seats. _ good thing? which is great. she is putting bums on seats. there - good thing? which is great. she is putting bums on seats. there are | putting bums on seats. there are other— putting bums on seats. there are other players involved today. she is second _ other players involved today. she is second match on. i know the bbc are streaming _ second match on. i know the bbc are streaming it~ — second match on. i know the bbc are streaming it. it creates interest in the sport — streaming it. it creates interest in the sport. that is the only good thing _ the sport. that is the only good thin. ., ~ the sport. that is the only good thin. . ~' ,, the sport. that is the only good thin. . ~' , the sport. that is the only good thin. ., , . thing. thank you very much indeed. lovel to thing. thank you very much indeed. lovely to see _ thing. thank you very much indeed. lovely to see you. _ lovely to see you. john, thank you. as the co—host of the quiz show pointless richard osman is used to being the man with all the answers. but for his latest project he's been delving into the unknown to find out more about his family's history for the latest series of who do you think you are? let's take a look. many of these have verses, poetic accounts _ many of these have verses, poetic accounts of — many of these have verses, poetic accounts of what happened. and the verses— accounts of what happened. and the verses could be performed and learned — verses could be performed and learned. gabriel's roll is memorialised within these. on saturday a fisherman was going through a word, and they are a
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mangled corpse he spied which chilled his very blood. —— mikey wood. crikey. i mean, gabrieland his wife mary and mother elizabeth, they are the poorest of the poor fisherfolk from brighton. an amazing circus that they were suddenly at the heart of. and to think that they were the detectives of the day, and their investigations essentially lead to justice. their investigations essentially lead tojustice. i mean, yeah, i find it unbelievable. yeah. iam minded to write a detective duo which is gabriel gilham and his mum elizabeth solving crimes in 1830s brighton. actually, that's not a bad idea. richard joins me now. who would have even thought that might happen?— might happen? yes, it was very weird. i might happen? yes, it was very weird- i had _ might happen? yes, it was very weird. i had no _
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might happen? yes, it was very weird. i had no idea _ might happen? yes, it was very weird. i had no idea what - might happen? yes, it was very weird. i had no idea what i - might happen? yes, it was very l weird. i had no idea what i would find in my family. i suspect that i was not going to find dukes and earls. you can sort of your family. you go back a couple of generations. it was amazing to see generation after generation of grafters who never got out of poverty. but then to have this crime—fighting team of my great great great—grandfather and his wife and mother, which echoes my books are so ridiculously, you could see the production team. they never tell you what is happening. you could tell they had a good story that morning. when i turned over this thing saying there had been at murder, i knew that one of my relatives was a murder, and discovered one of my relatives was a detective. that was much more palatable. detective. that was much more alatable. , ., detective. that was much more palatable-— detective. that was much more alatable. ., ., . palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the _ palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the beauty _ palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the beauty of _ palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the beauty of it. - palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the beauty of it. i'm - palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the beauty of it. i'm a - palatable. so, you have no clue? that is the beauty of it. i'm a tv| that is the beauty of it. i'm a tv presenter, so i'm used to knowing anything about a production. when i turn up, who i talk to, etc. this thing, they say we are going to pick
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you up in a car. we are driving for a halfan hour. you up in a car. we are driving for a half an hour. wear you up in a car. we are driving for a halfan hour. weara you up in a car. we are driving for a half an hour. wear a coat. you meet the somebody. they tell you what this person is an expert in. you discover about your family at exactly the same time as the viewers. you turn over a bit of paper, the information is there, so you are seeing people's actual to sing the relatives. 50. you are seeing people's actual to sing the relatives.— sing the relatives. so, tell me about the _ sing the relatives. so, tell me about the crime _ sing the relatives. so, tell me about the crime solving - sing the relatives. so, tell me i about the crime solving history? tell me about those people? mr; tell me about those people? my famil , it tell me about those people? m family, it turns out, tell me about those people? m1: family, it turns out, i've tell me about those people? m1 family, it turns out, i've always thought they were from brighton, but i never knew how far back. they go back to the early fishing communities are brighton, 17th century and what have you. a time of huge poverty. i mean, grinding poverty. the prince regent was coming and all that sort of stuff. my coming and all that sort of stuff. my family lived in that community. somebody finds a body and goes to my great great great—grandfather. i think there is something to do this. my think there is something to do this. my great great great—grandfather goes over, takes a look, talks to his mum, who is clearly the hero of
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this story. gabriel is the one who is in the newspaper reports, but you can tell because history has been written about men. his mother says, we are going to go and investigate, find of his body. it is one of the trials of the century there were suddenly involved in. they are in court and all that kind of stuff. it's an extraordinary story. and just the three of them, they walked over the brighton downs, two miles, six in the morning on a saturday morning, watching as they uncovered the body. all these amazing things. i won't tell you if he got convicted, but it would be a weird story if we didn't.— story if we didn't. because of the -e of story if we didn't. because of the type of story _ story if we didn't. because of the type of story you _ story if we didn't. because of the type of story you were _ story if we didn't. because of the type of story you were telling, i story if we didn't. because of the type of story you were telling, it| type of story you were telling, it was documented?— type of story you were telling, it was documented? . , , ., was documented? that must be a gift. that is the thing. _ was documented? that must be a gift. that is the thing. on _ was documented? that must be a gift. that is the thing. on who _ was documented? that must be a gift. that is the thing. on who do _ was documented? that must be a gift. that is the thing. on who do you - that is the thing. on who do you think you are?, if you do come to from a family that is not connected, it is hard to delve into the archives because people's lives were not documented. you may get a marriage register, but stuff in the newspapers which you wouldn't get from somebody from a fishing
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community in brighton, and the story of my family, the same as everybody�*s at home, the british working class, is not documented. suddenly you have this extraordinary story that is documented. and it was so lovely. the fact i am talking about it on bbc breakfast, imagine how blown your mind would be to think this would happen. that is the joy think this would happen. that is the joy of doing this. it is to pay homage to the people who came before us, i think. homage to the people who came before us, ithink. irate homage to the people who came before us, i think. ~ ~' ., homage to the people who came before us, i think. ~ ,, ., i. ., homage to the people who came before us, ithink. ~ ,, ., ., , us, i think. we know you of course from pointless. _ us, i think. we know you of course from pointless. we _ us, i think. we know you of course from pointless. we know - us, i think. we know you of course from pointless. we know you - us, i think. we know you of course from pointless. we know you now| us, i think. we know you of course i from pointless. we know you now as us, i think. we know you of course - from pointless. we know you now as a fiction writer as well. we know you as a crime writer. where did that come from two i've always read crime. i come from two i've always read crime. ., ~ come from two i've always read crime. . ,, , ., , come from two i've always read crime. w , ., , ., crime. i make tv shows i would watch, crime. i make tv shows i would watch. read _ crime. i make tv shows i would watch, read books _ crime. i make tv shows i would watch, read books i _ crime. i make tv shows i would watch, read books i would - crime. i make tv shows i would | watch, read books i would read. crime. i make tv shows i would - watch, read books i would read. my grandfather was a detective. it is in the family? — grandfather was a detective. it is in the family? it _ grandfather was a detective. it is in the family? it is _ grandfather was a detective. it is in the family? it is absolutely -
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grandfather was a detective. it is in the family? it is absolutely in l in the family? it is absolutely in the family. _ in the family? it is absolutely in the family, solving _ in the family? it is absolutely in the family, solving crime - in the family? it is absolutely in the family, solving crime ratherj the family, solving crime rather than committing crime tends to be in the family. it was something i wanted to do. i'm delighted it has taken off because it feels, again, it pays homage to where i'm from and the people i am from and the gang in the people i am from and the gang in the first novels are these very strong, kind people, but who can solve stuff. i think we've probably got a shortage of strong, kind people who can solve stuff in our culture at the moment. that people who can solve stuff in our culture at the moment.— people who can solve stuff in our culture at the moment. that is why the books are _ culture at the moment. that is why the books are so _ culture at the moment. that is why the books are so popular. - culture at the moment. that is why the books are so popular. i - culture at the moment. that is why the books are so popular. i think. the books are so popular. i think so, i the books are so popular. i think so. i hope _ the books are so popular. i think so. i hope so- — the books are so popular. ! think so, i hope so. it's— the books are so popular. i think so, i hope so. it's hard - the books are so popular. i think so, i hope so. it's hard to - the books are so popular. i think so, i hope so. it's hard to go, i l so, i hope so. it's hard to go, i think you are right! i think people like a gang. we are in a world where we are constantly divided, we are constantly told we disagree with each other, constantly on social media, and that is not the britain i live in. i do live in a britain where think about your neighbours. i realise they are quite kind people who will help you out. i read about strength and kindness. in the read
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about the things that unite us with about the things that unite us with a great big mystery at the heart of it. murder as well.— it. murder as well. what's not to like? steven _ it. murder as well. what's not to like? steven spielberg _ it. murder as well. what's not to like? steven spielberg has i it. murder as well. what's not to i like? steven spielberg has noticed, hasn't he? he like? steven spielberg has noticed, hasn't he? . , like? steven spielberg has noticed, hasn't he? ., , ., , ., hasn't he? he has got the rights to make a film- _ hasn't he? he has got the rights to make a film. it _ hasn't he? he has got the rights to make a film. it happens _ hasn't he? he has got the rights to make a film. it happens before i hasn't he? he has got the rights to make a film. it happens before thej make a film. it happens before the books come out. that is the lovely thing. over here people know who i am, from pointless and whatever. he had never heard of me. just read the book, or ready manuscript of the book, or ready manuscript of the book and said, this is the story, these are characters i would like to put on screen. naturally, i agreed! i said, you know what, steve? you are right. they are making a film. hopefully it will be out next year. hopefully it will be out next year. hopefully filming this year. again, that a dream come true. i would love now to take gabriel guillamon and his mum and his wife, my relatives, that feels like a big drama you could do as well because the amazing thing about that story is the police hadn't been invented yet. that is
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why you go to someone in your community and say, i think there is a crime, and that feels like a netflix or bbc drama. it definitely does. i netflix or bbc drama. it definitely does- i have _ netflix or bbc drama. it definitely does. i have to _ netflix or bbc drama. it definitely does. i have to ask _ netflix or bbc drama. it definitely does. i have to ask you _ netflix or bbc drama. it definitely does. i have to ask you about i does. i have to ask you about pointless. does. i have to ask you about pointless-— does. i have to ask you about pointless. . , ., ., ., pointless. the decision to leave? i've done it _ pointless. the decision to leave? i've done it for _ pointless. the decision to leave? i've done it for 12 _ pointless. the decision to leave? i've done it for 12 years. - pointless. the decision to leave? i've done it for 12 years. i - pointless. the decision to leave? i've done it for 12 years. i love i i've done it for 12 years. i love it. i love alexander, love working with him. the books are taking me around the world. that is the truth. i have to sort of put all my emphasis on it. i was going to get to the stage where i wouldn't be able to put enough effort into it. if you are making a tv show you have to give 100% all the time. i thought, i don't laugh i got the time to do it. ifelt thought, i don't laugh i got the time to do it. i felt i would let other people have a go at it and get on with the books. here other people have a go at it and get on with the books.— other people have a go at it and get on with the books. here you are as a child presenting _ on with the books. here you are as a child presenting pointless! _ on with the books. here you are as a child presenting pointless! yes, i on with the books. here you are as a child presenting pointless! yes, my| child presenting pointless! yes, my earl 20s. child presenting pointless! yes, my early 20s. what _ child presenting pointless! yes, my early 20s. what is _ child presenting pointless! yes, my early 20s. what is going _ child presenting pointless! yes, my early 20s. what is going to - child presenting pointless! yes, my early 20s. what is going to be i child presenting pointless! yes, my early 20s. what is going to be like l early 20s. what is going to be like to what someone _ early 20s. what is going to be like to what someone else _ early 20s. what is going to be like to what someone else do - early 20s. what is going to be like to what someone else do the i early 20s. what is going to be like to what someone else do the job? j early 20s. what is going to be like i to what someone else do the job? it is going to be lovely. i am only —— the only person in britain who doesn't get to play along with pointless because i sit there with the answers. the idea, and i think the answers. the idea, and i think the new owners got to be quite soon,
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i found the new owners got to be quite soon, ifound my last the new owners got to be quite soon, i found my last one the new owners got to be quite soon, ifound my last one is the new owners got to be quite soon, i found my last one is already, the new owners got to be quite soon, ifound my last one is already, the idea that i can watch and actually play along and guess at the answers, i am really... amazing people replacing it. i am really... amazing people replacing it— i am really... amazing people replacing it. i am really... amazing people relacin it. �* ., ., ., replacing it. i'm looking forward to it. loads replacing it. i'm looking forward to it- loads of — replacing it. i'm looking forward to it. loads of luck— replacing it. i'm looking forward to it. loads of luck with _ replacing it. i'm looking forward to it. loads of luck with everything, l it. loads of luck with everything, with the books. thank you very much indeed. richard osman's episode of who do you think you are? airs this thursday, the 9th ofjune, on bbc one. and his third novel, the bullet that missed, is out in september. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast withjon kay live at downing street and sally nugent in the studio. our headlines today. borisjohnson survives a vote of confidence in his leadership, but loses the support of more than 40% of conservative mps. i can announce that the parliamentary party does have confidence... cheering i'll make a prediction. we're going to have a new prime minister, a new leader of the conservative party, by party conference this year. decisions, decisions, but what do people here in bury make of the decision made in westminster last night? this is the conservatives' most marginal seat in the country. i'm finding out what voters here in this cafe think of the outcome. also this morning... as emma raducanu prepares for wimbledon, could a future partnership with andy murray be
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on the cards? good morning from normandy in northern france, where this year's d—day anniversary has been defined notjust by remembrance but also by gratitude. good morning. a few showers across the east and south coast this morning, they should clear and then for many of us it will be a day of variable cloud, some sunshine, scattered showers but a bit warmer across england and wales than it has been. all the details later in the programme. hello there. good morning. welcome to breakfast. it's tuesdayjune the 7th. the bunting from thejubilee weekend is still up here at number 10, but i'm not sure howjubilant boris johnson will still be feeling inside. yes, he has survived that attempt by his own mps to force him
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to stand down as prime minister. he won the vote of confidence, but not by a big won the vote of confidence, but not bya big margin. let's won the vote of confidence, but not by a big margin. let's look at the numbers. the vote of confidence started 6pm yesterday and the result was announced at nine o'clock. it showed he still has the backing of 211 conservative mps — but 148 want him to go. that means mrjohnson, who led his party to a landslide victory in the general election just two and a half years ago, now has the support of less than 60% of his own mps. we'll be bringing you reaction throughout this morning's programme. first, our political correspondentjonathan blake looks back at a dramatic evening in westminster.
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a big moment for borisjohnson as last night conservative mps voted on whether to back him or sack him as their leader. nobody expected the prime minister to lose, but the result when it came was not the convincing win he needed. the vote in favour of having confidence in borisjohnson as leader was 211 votes, and the vote against was 148 votes. and therefore i can announce that the parliamentary party does have confidence. cheering. more than 40% of his own members of parliament had voted against him. his supporters cheered the victory, though, and for the prime minister, a win was a win. i think it's a convincing result, a decisive result. and what it what it means is that as a government, we can move on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters to people.
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as westminster weighed up what the result might mean, the prime minister's supporters rallied round while his critics said they weren't done yet. ijust hope that given the mood of the public. — ijust hope that given the mood of the public. the _ ijust hope that given the mood of the public, the vote _ ijust hope that given the mood of the public, the vote we _ ijust hope that given the mood of the public, the vote we had - ijust hope that given the mood of the public, the vote we had here i the public, the vote we had here tonight, — the public, the vote we had here tonight, that _ the public, the vote we had here tonight, that they— the public, the vote we had here tonight, that they will— the public, the vote we had here tonight, that they will tell - the public, the vote we had here tonight, that they will tell the i tonight, that they will tell the prime — tonight, that they will tell the prime minister, _ tonight, that they will tell the prime minister, the _ tonight, that they will tell the prime minister, the gig - tonight, that they will tell the prime minister, the gig is- tonight, that they will tell the prime minister, the gig is up.j i'll make a prediction. we're going to have a new prime minister, a new leader— of the conservative party, i by party conference this year. labour and other opposition parties seized on the vote as evidence of a divided party in government. the conservative party had a decision to make — to show some backbone or to back borisjohnson. they have ignored the british public and hitched themselves and their party firmly to borisjohnson and everything that he represents. boris johnson is now safe from any further votes of confidence for a year under his party's rules, but he's emerged from this test
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looking far from secure. jonathan blake, bbc news. i mention to thejubilee bunting thatis i mention to thejubilee bunting that is up there, and they started taking it down a few minutes ago. some of the workers arrived with their ladders and started underpinning it from above the door above number 10. maybe that signals the prime minister was my determination as we heard him in that piece to move on, move on from the weekend, from the confidence vote, and crack on with running the country and setting his own agenda. the question now, though, is bunting the question now, though, is hunting down, can he do that, how does he move on? let's speak to our political correspondent damian grammaticas. they're stung by this inside, aren't they? they're stung by this inside, aren't the ? , . ., , they? they are. the word this morning as — they? they are. the word this morning as they _ they? they are. the word this morning as they described i they? they are. the word this | morning as they described the they? they are. the word this i morning as they described the vote againstjohnson as a desperate group of disgruntled people, and they are now going to rally round and move on, but i'm not sure that description will make them feel very loved and wanting to just move on,
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but that is the second thing, they're trying to say, this is done and let's move onto the agenda, and thatis and let's move onto the agenda, and that is something thatjustice secretary dominic raab was saying to you a little bit earlier. i think it is important to listen to those _ i think it is important to listen to those dissenting voices, but what matters _ those dissenting voices, but what matters above all is to drive forward, _ matters above all is to drive forward, listen to the country and focus _ forward, listen to the country and focus on — forward, listen to the country and focus on their issues from the cost of living _ focus on their issues from the cost of living to — focus on their issues from the cost of living to crime to the nhs, the skills— of living to crime to the nhs, the skills agenda and levelling up the country. — skills agenda and levelling up the country, and that is what the government is going to be doing. but to what he didn't talk about was the leader, borisjohnson, and that is the problem for those rebels. he still has problems. there is talk today, that liberal democrats are going to try and force things, they are talking about tabling a demand for a vote of no confidence in parliament. this was about him as party leader, and it is not clear they can force parliamentary time to do this, but they want to press that and they are describing boris johnson as a lying lawbreaker and
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say all mps should have a chance to have their say on his position, and also we are hearing talk too that the rules in the leadership contest can easily be rewritten, and there is talk about the fact that later in the air, the by—elections coming late in the air, that 1922 committee that oversees things, the rules could be rewritten for another challenge. could be rewritten for another challenge-— could be rewritten for another challene. �* , ., ., challenge. because at the moment, once he has — challenge. because at the moment, once he has won _ challenge. because at the moment, once he has won a _ challenge. because at the moment, once he has won a vote _ challenge. because at the moment, once he has won a vote like - challenge. because at the moment, once he has won a vote like you i challenge. because at the moment, once he has won a vote like you did| once he has won a vote like you did last night, he is technically safe for a year. he last night, he is technically safe for a year-— last night, he is technically safe for a ear. , , for a year. he is under the rules, but the rules _ for a year. he is under the rules, but the rules can _ for a year. he is under the rules, but the rules can be _ for a year. he is under the rules, but the rules can be changed i for a year. he is under the rules, but the rules can be changed by| for a year. he is under the rules, i but the rules can be changed by the committee that oversees the whole process, and they can be changed at any time, and that committee, i think there will be a new committee voted on later on in the autumn, so there could be new people on it and with this number of rebels, they could put new voices on there and seek to change things. stand could put new voices on there and seek to change things.— could put new voices on there and seek to change things. and a lot can chane seek to change things. and a lot can change between _ seek to change things. and a lot can change between now— seek to change things. and a lot can change between now and _ seek to change things. and a lot can change between now and the - seek to change things. and a lot can i change between now and the autumn. damian grammaticas, thank you very much indeed. well, one mp who has made clear his lack of confidence in the prime minister for some time now is the chair of the defence select committee, tobias ellwood, whojoins us now.
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thank you forjoining us this morning, mr ellwood. downing street apparently describing you rebels as apparently describing you rebels as a desperate and despondent —— disgruntled group. what do you think that? , ., , disgruntled group. what do you think that? , ., ~ ~ ., disgruntled group. what do you think that? , ., , ~ ~ ., ., disgruntled group. what do you think that? , ~ ., ., , that? this was knocked a defeat, but not a win that? this was knocked a defeat, but rrot a win that — that? this was knocked a defeat, but not a win that allows _ that? this was knocked a defeat, but not a win that allows us _ that? this was knocked a defeat, but not a win that allows us to _ that? this was knocked a defeat, but not a win that allows us to draw i that? this was knocked a defeat, but not a win that allows us to draw a i not a win that allows us to draw a line, and in normal times this result would probably end up with a resignation, but these are far from normal times, so i accept the democratic outcome and i encourage all colleagues to do the same. but two in five of us did not express support for the prime minister, and we now need to feel included in shaping the party's future, the conduct of the last couple of days was far from civil, conduct of the last couple of days was farfrom civil, and integrates there was work to be done to unite there was work to be done to unite the party. there was a bizarre spin
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that this was a plot, and referring to the article that i wrote about daring to improve things by rejoining the single market, the thing that margaret thatcher created, and this tactic to mislead and deliberately distract, this shows a worrying lack of grasp of the concerns of the vision and direction of the party. 50 the concerns of the vision and direction of the party. so what are ou auoin direction of the party. so what are you going to _ direction of the party. so what are you going to do — direction of the party. so what are you going to do about _ direction of the party. so what are you going to do about it? - direction of the party. so what are you going to do about it? where i direction of the party. so what are i you going to do about it? where does this leave you? we were talking about maybe changing the rules within the conservative party to maybe allow another confidence vote sooner than currently be allowed. is not likely, do think? {line sooner than currently be allowed. is not likely, do think?— not likely, do think? one bridge at a time, if not likely, do think? one bridge at a time. if you _ not likely, do think? one bridge at a time, if you like. _ not likely, do think? one bridge at a time, if you like. the _ not likely, do think? one bridge at a time, if you like. the prime i a time, if you like. the prime minister must urgently reshuffle his team, bringing fresh talent, the current cabinet construct is suboptimal. we need to focus on big issues, which means not appeasing tower base with like closing channel
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4 tower base with like closing channel [i and bringing tower base with like closing channel liand bringing back tower base with like closing channel [i and bringing back imperial measurements. the base our party wants to be led, inspired, not followed. as i say, this is the tail wagging the dog. the next part of the serious economic strategy that will appeal to the whole nation. if we don't see that genuine change, then yes, you are probably going to see rule changes as the storm clouds gather once again. 50 if see rule changes as the storm clouds gather once again.— gather once again. so if your phone ran: gather once again. so if your phone ran this gather once again. so if your phone rang this morning _ gather once again. so if your phone rang this morning and _ gather once again. so if your phone rang this morning and he _ gather once again. so if your phone rang this morning and he said, i gather once again. so if your phone | rang this morning and he said, come back, coming to government to be part of my team, would you accept thejob? part of my team, would you accept the 'ob? . ., , ., the job? there are a list of conditions _ the job? there are a list of conditions i _ the job? there are a list of conditions i would - the job? there are a list of conditions i would place i the job? there are a list of| conditions i would place on the job? there are a list of- conditions i would place on that. i want to see us tackle the cost of living crisis by leading in ukraine, to keep that port of odesa open. if you do that, globalfood prices will drop immediately, but there is no plan to do that. i would like to see those plans for modular reactors that are stuck in the treasury. rolls—royce has a design waiting, every six months they could produce a reactor, but we are still sitting
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on that. £400 billion... a reactor, but we are still sitting on that. £400 billion. . .- a reactor, but we are still sitting on that. £400 billion... sure, but what boris _ on that. £400 billion... sure, but what boris johnson _ on that. £400 billion... sure, but what boris johnson would - on that. £400 billion... sure, but what boris johnson would say i on that. £400 billion... sure, but what boris johnson would say and what borisjohnson would say and what borisjohnson would say and what his team in their would say is, we need to show unity. disunited parties will not win an election in a couple of years, and people like you now need to say, we've had our vote, we lost the vote, we might have done better than we thought, but we lost, and we now need to come together and fight is won. what do you say to them? i together and fight is won. what do you say to them?— together and fight is won. what do you say to them? i think i have 'ust illustrated. — you say to them? i think i have 'ust illustrated, i— you say to them? i think i have 'ust illustrated, i have i you say to them? i think i have 'ust illustrated, i have said i you say to them? i think i have 'ust illustrated, i have said that, i you say to them? i think i have just illustrated, i have said that, and i l illustrated, i have said that, and i absolutely agree with that. this will be time—barred. if we don't see an improvement in the next few months, then history will repeat itself. we have seen what has happened when there is a vote of confidence of where the party's fortunes go, and if we are to avoid that, then absolutely the entire party, the broad church that we are, needs to absolutely come together, and like i say, the tactics that were used over the last few days to
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spin this as some sort of remain plot, people like steve baker and so forth, they had concerns, jesse norman and so forth, they need to be listened to, as do others right across the party.— listened to, as do others right across the party. when you look at the results — across the party. when you look at the results now— across the party. when you look at the results now from _ across the party. when you look at the results now from last - across the party. when you look at the results now from last night, i across the party. when you look at| the results now from last night, do you think there are things you could have done, should have done, to win? do you think you could have got over the line? i do you think you could have got over the line? ., ~' do you think you could have got over the line? ., ,, ., ., , the line? i would like to have seen this vote take _ the line? i would like to have seen this vote take place _ the line? i would like to have seen this vote take place after- the line? i would like to have seen this vote take place after the i this vote take place after the by—elections. i think that would have given us a better understanding as to the current fortunes of the party given that the electorate themselves would have had another say after the local elections. it has happened. as i say, i accept the democratic outcome. i do encourage all colleagues now to support the government for the immediate future. but it doesn't sound like you are supporting the government, certainly
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not supporting the prime minister? do you want me to repeat what ijust said? i accept the democratic outcome, we need to support the government, but there is absolute conditions placed on that, but the government's style and substance must radically change. you can't continue with a divided approach thatis continue with a divided approach that is something to do with brexit. we are obsessed with the subject. the nation wants us to move into a post—brexit mode. let's do that, let's not live in the past, let's look to the future.— let's not live in the past, let's look to the future. that's all that exactly what _ look to the future. that's all that exactly what dominic _ look to the future. that's all that exactly what dominic raab i look to the future. that's all that exactly what dominic raab said l look to the future. that's all that - exactly what dominic raab said from a different side of the debate half an hour ago here on breakfast. tobias ellwood, thank you very much indeed forjoining us on breakfast this morning. what about what people are saying where you are. enough of downing street, what about your street? ben's in bury for us this morning. it was a close victory at the last election, the closest, wasn't it,
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ben? , , , ., election, the closest, wasn't it, ben? , , ' . ben? yes, plenty of difficult decisions — ben? yes, plenty of difficult decisions for _ ben? yes, plenty of difficult decisions for the _ ben? yes, plenty of difficult decisions for the customers| ben? yes, plenty of difficult - decisions for the customers here at the coffee and cream cafe to make, and places like this really, really matter. bury north is currently a conservative seat, but it is one that regularly changes hands between labour and the conservatives. labour lost it at the last election in 2019. but the sitting mpjames daly has a tiny majority ofjust 105. it's the conservatives' most marginal seat. so, places like this really do matter. they are those bellwether, those swing constituencies. because of that, we thought we would find out what people here make of it all, and here is what some of the people i spoke to yesterday told me about what they made of the outcome. bury. with a former prime minister and the very first leader
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of the conservative party looking on, plenty of people here have an opinion on the fate of the current resident of numberio. sack him. what makes you say that? because of the way he's behaved, and he's not very truthful. knows how to make the right decisions, the right choices. just because he had a lockdown party doesn't change him from being a good prime minister. so, yeah, he's got... he's good at politics. he knows what he's talking about. he knows what he's doing. so, yeah, that's why i'd keep him as prime minister. he got you through brexitl and he seems to have built the economy up quite well, i and you know, you've just got to give him a chance, you know? i mean, he's not probably the best i prime minister in the world, but, i you know, i think he's probably as good as anything _ the birthplace of sir robert peel is represented by two mps who won their seats from labour in the so—called redwall election of 2019. one of them is sitting on the smallest conservative majority in the country, while the other defected to labour at the height
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of the partygate scandal. i'd get him out. why is that? i would get him out because he promised to level up in redwall areas, and he clearly hasn't. he promised to protect the nhs. he clearly hasn't. he's a liar, and he lied about partygate. the man is not honest. he is not a statesman. i think there's nothing wrong with boris. i think he's all right. it's not every day the result of a vote in westminster is being followed so closely here. the vote in favour of having confidence in borisjohnson as leader was 211 votes and the vote against was 148. cheering. come on, boris! paid off. they've been paid off. i think he's a great chap. i'll stand by him. yeah, same with any of them. you know, if you own up, be honest
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with everybody, you're fine. - the prime minister may be safe for now, but it's the opinion of voters in towns like bury that will determine forjust how long. i can't help but wonder what they are having for breakfast in downing street this morning. i'm sure it's nowhere near as tasty as what we have here. we havejerry bakewell. getting slightly distracted! let's speak to gillian, the owner of the cafe. what do you make of it? i hope that they can — cafe. what do you make of it? i hope that they can move _ cafe. what do you make of it? i hope that they can move forward - cafe. what do you make of it? i hope that they can move forward and - that they can move forward and concentrate on what they need to concentrate on what they need to concentrate on. if boris is to stay, then he needs to put his foot down and get on with things. find then he needs to put his foot down and get on with things.— then he needs to put his foot down and get on with things. and what do ou make and get on with things. and what do you make of — and get on with things. and what do you make of what _ and get on with things. and what do you make of what he _ and get on with things. and what do you make of what he has _ and get on with things. and what do you make of what he has done - and get on with things. and what do you make of what he has done to i and get on with things. and what do l you make of what he has done to help cafe is on small businesses like yours that the tough couple of years? yours that the tough couple of ears? ~ . years? we were lucky with the furlou . h years? we were lucky with the furlough scheme _ years? we were lucky with the furlough scheme on _ years? we were lucky with the furlough scheme on the - years? we were lucky with the i furlough scheme on the grounds, years? we were lucky with the - furlough scheme on the grounds, and if it wasn't for those we would have shut down and that would have been us finished. we are hoping that
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things are picking up. stock prices. we have had boxes of eggs that have gone up to £60 when they were only 19.99, hopefully things will come back down and we can pass that on. and do you get the sense that customers you speak to are interested in the goings on at westminster, orare interested in the goings on at westminster, or are they concentrating more on the pressure in their own lives? the? concentrating more on the pressure in their own lives?— in their own lives? they are concentrating _ in their own lives? they are concentrating on _ in their own lives? they are l concentrating on themselves, in their own lives? they are - concentrating on themselves, which is rightly so. people do need to vote, because when you are struggling and moaning about the government, you need to make sure that you do vote, because it counts. we saw that power the votes have just last night. gillian, thank you very much. i also want to speak to des who is part of a children's charity based here in bury. in terms of the day—to—day pressures that families are facing, it was a big concern. do you feel that boris johnson is the right person to help the country through that crisis? we
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are based in manchester and we deal with children and families in manchester and salford, and last year alone the estimated figures for those _ year alone the estimated figures for those living in poverty, children living _ those living in poverty, children living in— those living in poverty, children living in poverty, is 65,000, and that will— living in poverty, is 65,000, and that will only worsen as people get dragged _ that will only worsen as people get dragged into the poverty trap. whether— dragged into the poverty trap. whether borisjohnson is dragged into the poverty trap. whether boris johnson is the dragged into the poverty trap. whether borisjohnson is the right man for— whether borisjohnson is the right man for the job remains to be seen. do you _ man for the job remains to be seen. do you think— man for the job remains to be seen. do you think you feel happier that theissue do you think you feel happier that the issue of his leadership has now been dealt with for the moment, so that there can be a bit more attention paid to dealing with the cost of living crisis and the poverty problem is that you are seeing day—to—day? poverty problem is that you are seeing day-to-day?_ poverty problem is that you are seeing day-to-day? sadly i think the situation is only _ seeing day-to-day? sadly i think the situation is only going _ seeing day-to-day? sadly i think the situation is only going to _ seeing day-to-day? sadly i think the situation is only going to get - situation is only going to get worse — situation is only going to get worse it_ situation is only going to get worse. it is getting worse day by day. _ worse. it is getting worse day by day, so — worse. it is getting worse day by day, so more and more ordinary working — day, so more and more ordinary working people are getting dragged into the _ working people are getting dragged into the poverty trap, and there is very little — into the poverty trap, and there is very little release for them, very little _ very little release for them, very little relief. and i can't see that being _ little relief. and i can't see that being concentrated upon when the infighting within the conservative party— infighting within the conservative party is_ infighting within the conservative
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party is such at the forefront of the party— party is such at the forefront of the party at the moment. we asked the party at the moment. we asked the government _ the party at the moment. we asked the government about _ the party at the moment. we asked the government about this, - the party at the moment. we asked the government about this, the - the party at the moment. we asked| the government about this, the cost of living pressures, and they said they are helping the most hard up households with up to £1200 in some cases. so some things are being done. what do you think is the best way to target that help? i done. what do you think is the best way to target that help?— way to target that help? i think it is the bigger— way to target that help? i think it is the bigger picture. _ way to target that help? i think it is the bigger picture. there - way to target that help? i think it is the bigger picture. there is - way to target that help? i think it is the bigger picture. there is a l is the bigger picture. there is a lack_ is the bigger picture. there is a lack of— is the bigger picture. there is a lack ofjoined up thinking across all areas. — lack ofjoined up thinking across allareas, so lack ofjoined up thinking across all areas, so it is notjust about giving — all areas, so it is notjust about giving people money, it is about dealing — giving people money, it is about dealing with energy bills and food hills _ dealing with energy bills and food hills it _ dealing with energy bills and food hills it is — dealing with energy bills and food bills. it is like child provision, early— bills. it is like child provision, early years— bills. it is like child provision, early years child provision in this country— early years child provision in this country is — early years child provision in this country is eye watering expensive, so people — country is eye watering expensive, so people who are out at work are being _ so people who are out at work are being strapped for cash because of the cost _ being strapped for cash because of the cost of— being strapped for cash because of the cost of that. public transport costs. _ the cost of that. public transport costs, germany have just released a thing _ costs, germany have just released a thing where — costs, germany have just released a thing where they have cheap travel throughout the country. that would help here _ throughout the country. that would help here to get people to and from work _ help here to get people to and from work every— help here to get people to and from work. every little thing that chips away _ work. every little thing that chips away at _ work. every little thing that chips away at the major problem, which is away at the major problem, which is a lack— away at the major problem, which is a lack of— away at the major problem, which is a lack of money in people's pockets. des, a lack of money in people's pockets. des. thank— a lack of money in people's pockets. des, thank you very much. it is
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manchester and salford that you working and not bury, thank you very much. my apologies. bury is the birthplace of sir robert peel, who later went on to become conservative prime minister not once but twice, and i can't help but wonder what he would make of all that we've seen over the last 204! was. from me here in bury, it is back tojon in downing street. i can't help but wonder how you get the place with the bakewell tarts and we get nothing, ben! we will be back with you a little bit later in the programme. what we do have is we have a bit of sunshine finally over downing street, the sun has broken through and it looks like it is going to be a rather lovelyjune day this morning. we have a shot of it just peeping through above the london eye, and it is looking rather gorgeous in the capital. there we 90, gorgeous in the capital. there we go, the house of commons, the houses of parliament, big ben. is the sunshine going to continue? let's ask who knows.
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here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. good morning, jon, and good morning to you too. beautiful picture here this morning of north wales. you can see on the satellite where we have got the blue skies, but the cloud has remained broken. but down the east coast and also the south coast, we are not immune to showers, and we have seen some of those already this morning. but most of them should tend to clear. we have got patchy fog across parts of the south—west and wales. that too will lift rapidly, and then we are looking at variable amounts of cloud, some sunny spells and showers developing through the afternoon, but they will be fairly well scattered. the cloud is going to thicken in the south—west, and then we will see some rain. temperatures 11—22, in the midlands for example we are looking at temperatures five or 6 degrees higher than they were yesterday. through this evening and overnight, there goes our band of cloud and rain, quite rapidly moving northwards and eastwards. there will
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be loads cloud coming across southern scotland, and we're looking at some clear skies and also some showers. overnight low 8—14. tomorrow the rain clears england, wales, northern ireland and moves across scotland, and if you follow it round, this is the weather front. eventually it comes back in across parts of northern ireland, and then later north west wales. we are also looking at a fair few showers across the rest of england and wales, some of those could be heavy and thundery. it will be breezy too across the south, temperatures down across the south, temperatures down a little bit at 20 degrees, and it is the north highlands that will see the best of the sunshine in scotland, with temperatures 11—111. carol, thank you very much indeed, we will talk to you very soon, and we will talk to you very soon, and we will talk to you very soon, and we will be back withjon in downing street again. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. gethin and sam can tell us what they have in store. good morning. you have got company, i'm feeling a bit lonely here all my
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own! we were just that with jon down in own! we were just that withjon down in number ten. we have got loads to keep you company today. coming up on morning live... with police across the country bracing themselves for a rise in crime due to the cost of living crisis, we'll be speaking to one of the founding members of neighbourhood watch, who'll be telling us three things you can do to keep your property safe. and with news of a game—changing wonder drug that may help obese people lose up to a fifth of their body weight, we'll be talking to dr xand to find out if it's too good to be true. plus, he'll be telling us about something that affects one in five of us and can cause crippling anxiety and great physical pain. yes, i'll be talking about varicose veins, explaining how to relieve the symptoms, the treatments available, and why them running in the family is more likely to be the cause than being on your feet all day. also, if you went to your doctor for your mental health, you might be expecting some medication to help, not a course of paddle—boarding. but, as new research finds that prescribing activities can reduce visits to the gp by more
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than a quarter, we've been to explore the health treatment that's really making a splash. it was always going to go that way! plus, we've got a double dose from the wild — bbc radio 3's petroc trelawny is on nessie watch from the shores of loch ness. and springwatch's michaela strachan gives us a baby badger update. 0h, oh, look! you might have seen this last niuht oh, look! you might have seen this last night on _ oh, look! you might have seen this last night on the _ oh, look! you might have seen this last night on the programme. - oh, look! you might have seen this last night on the programme. we i oh, look! you might have seen this i last night on the programme. we have got you covered today, but it was a gorgeous moment. it is the cutest thing ever, i will look forward to watching you again. thank you, guys. see you at 9:15. we also have an exclusive chat with emma raducanu. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm alison earle. the police watchdog is appealing
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for witnesses following the death of a man who was pulled from the thames after being tasered by officers. police were called on saturday morning to reports of a man shouting on chelsea bridge road and armed with a screwdriver. a taser was used to restrain him, before he ended up in the river. the independent office for police conduct is investigating. the inquest into the death of music entrepreneur jamal edwards will open today. he was the founder of sbtv, an online entertainment platform which helped launch the careers of artists like ed sheeran and stormzy. he died suddenly in february at the age of 31. a court hearing will continue today to decide what's in the best interests of a boy from southend who's having life—support treatment. doctors treating 12—year—old archie battersbee say it's highly likely that he can't be saved, but his parents disagree. archie suffered brain damage at home last month.
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the hearing is due to end tomorrow. if you're heading to barking, there's now another way to get there using public transport. you can catch the thames clipper which has extended its services in east london. it runs at peak times on weekdays and throughout the day on weekends. it's great to see crossrail opening, which happened in the top of our borough, and at the same time having the riverboat service and the new gospel oak extension. so this is really good for us building the homes that our communities want and need. travel now, and this is how tfl services are looking right now. all lines have now reopened following yesterday's strike. there are minor delays on the central line between white city and west ruislip/ealing broadway due to an earlier signal failure. there are also minor delays on the metropolitan line between moor park and chesham. onto the weather now with kate kinsella. good morning. it's another unsettled day today. we've got a little more cloud in the south, some
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mistiness, but some sunshine to the north first thing. now the cloud in the south will break up and we will see some sunny spells, but also some showers. temperatures today getting up to 22 celsius, feeling warmer than yesterday. those showers clearing to start with this evening. we get one or two clearer spells then. another band of quite heavy showers moves through the early hours and the wind starts to strengthen. the minimum temperature dropping to 13 celsius, so quite a mild night. now for wednesday, we've got a breeze that is driving some potentially quite heavy, sharp showers through. you mightjust hear a rumble of thunder. but still some sunny spells. despite the wind, we are looking at a maximum temperature of 21 celsius on wednesday. through wednesday night into thursday, a ridge of high pressure starts to build. so thursday is looking largely dry with some sunny spells. for friday, we are under the influence of this low pressure system, and that is the remnants of tropical storm alex. it is going to be a breezy day. not so much in the way of rain around on friday. it should be largely dry with some sunny spells.
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and temperatures, as we head through to the weekend, staying in the low twenties. that's it for the moment. now it's back to breakfast. i'm backjust after nine. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay in downing street and sally nugent in the studio. wimbledon is less than three weeks away, and it would be fair to say that this time last year most people had never heard the name emma raducanu. after a whirlwind year, the us open champion prepares for what will be only her second senior appearance at the all england club. there's a huge weight of expectation on her shoulders. i caught up with emma in nottingham. welcome, emma raducanu! after what has been an incredible
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whirlwind year for you, you must feel like your feet have not touched the floor this year. what's it been like? it's been... watching it has felt a bit like that. what's it been like to live that? it has been a really tricky 12 months, to be honest. it hasn't always been easy, but i've definitely learnt a lot about myself and how to go about things, and i would say my approach is definitely different now. i mean, i'm a lot more focused on the progress and the process of what i'm doing every single day, because i know that's the only thing i can control. and everything external, everything that might be said about me, that is not what i can control. and that is not always a true reflection necessarily of what i'm doing and how i go about things. so, yeah, ijust really zone in and focus on internally what i'm doing and, yeah, trust that. do you ever pay attention to what's being said about you? i imagine on social media, which you're great at,
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obviously you engage with all the fans. do you ever see stuff that you don't like? i don't really look at it, because it is tough to to kind of, if you see a negative one, then, you know, it might stick in your head. so for me, ijust find it easier to not really look at that, and... but i really obviously love engaging online with people and sharing things about myself. you know, i like to share things that i've taken on my phone rather than professional ones. just coming up to a year ago, you had a wild card for wimbledon, and wimbledon didn't go to plan. how have you managed to get over that and get over it so successfully? wimbledon, i mean, what happened in the last match was was obviously pretty difficult at the time. and i had no idea how to sort of, how i would react after that, because it was the biggest court i've played on, you know, a lot of people. and, yeah, i was obviously really excited to sort of keep going, and to not be able to finish
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the match as was really tough for me. if you would have said to me in nottingham last year you're going to make fourth round wimbledon, i would have been like, yeah! and i had a really positive week and ifeel like i built on that. and, you know, throughout the summer i continued doing the right work and also had a great us win. what was the right work that then got you to the us win? i'd say it's a combination of a really good practice, you know, feeling really good about myself, trusting and believing the work i had done. you know, by the time i was playing the us open and qualifying, i was so match tight and match ready that i felt like i was almost on autopilot and it was automatic at how i was facing game situations. and that's something that's difficult to replicate on the practice court. you will know, of course, that the last british woman to win the singles title at wimbledon was virginia wade in 1977, the silverjubilee. yeah, i met virginia actually in the us open and i managed to speak to her a little bit.
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and when i was in the semifinal, final stages, she was really supportive of me. and to kind of have that reassurance from someone who's already done it, it did mean a lot. we've just celebrated the platinum jubilee. do you feel like, going into wimbledon, that might be your inspiration? you've already had a letter from the queen anyway, haven't you? yeah. after the us open. it was obviously amazing this last weekend to see all the celebrations and all the street parties. it was quite fun to see everyone so happy. going into the grass court season, for me, i don't really feel like i can put any expectation or pressure on myself for results. i think that, you know, that might happen from people who aren't me. you know, they might put expectations and pressure on me. but no, ijust really believe in what i'm doing. and in the long run, it will pay off. talking about wimbledon, your dreams double partner, you have said already is...?
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andy murray. now, is that going to happen? well, we haven't actually spoken about it. it's something that we both, i feel, want to do. and i don't know if this year is going to be the year, but hopefully it will definitely happen at some point, yeah. soon? soon. ish. we're seeing a lot of you, aren't we, at the moment, in glossy magazines doing these beautiful fashion shoots. how much do you enjoy that side of yourjob? you look like you really do. yeah, i really enjoy it. for me, i think tennis is obviously a massive part of my life, but it's not the only thing in my life. and i like to to look at other industries and the people i'm working with. they're the best of the best, you know, in the fashion industry, for example. so i get to learn a lot of things and, for example, you know, the production that goes behind it, thatjust as much perfectionists as i sort of am on the tennis court,
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and the level that they hold of themselves and their work i think is inspiring. and when you're done with all of this and you eventually get to go home and you shut the door, what do you do? honestly? me? sometimes i read a bit. i'm trying to do more of that now. i like keeping my brain active. i get bored if not, so... right now i found reading. but yeah, sometimes it's taiwanese drama shows, to be honest. i speak mandarin and i'm just trying to improve it. and you know, the plots are so far from reality that it is kind of refreshing and just takes your mind so far away. well, it obviously works on some level, because look what we have to bring in now. a trophy that i'm sure you're very familiar with. yeah. thanks. oh, my word. you like it! i can tell. yeah, i heard it's been doing a little tour, and i'm really, really happy that, you know, many young kids can sort
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of see it and hopefully get a little bit inspired. when they saw it here they were so excited. so for me to think that, you know, i feel really good and happy. there is something really magical about it, isn't it? yeah. congratulations. thank you. she loves that trophy, with good reason too. let's go tojon now who is in downing street this morning with all the reaction from last night's confidence vote. i noticed that when you got there this morning if there was pointing out around number 10. halfway through the programme it disappeared. what have you done? minute by minute, sally, hour by hour, those streets of bunting have been removed. men with letters have been removed. men with letters have been here and taken down some of it. you get the impression that the jubilee weekend is over, the
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celebrations are over. and maybe this is the prime minister saying, look, it's time to move on, notjust from the weekend but also from the whole question about his future. he had that confidence vote last night. he won it by a narrow margin. he has the support of six in ten of his mps behind him. and he will be hoping that today he can say, draw a line, move on, let's focus on our agenda. will you be able to do that? some people in westminster say he is severely weakened by this vote, the fact that 40% of his mps don't want him inside this address, don't want him inside this address, don't want him inside this address, don't want him in downing street. where does that leave him personally, where does that leave his party? it has been a really busy 24—hour sea in westminster. it was this time yesterday that sir graham brady, the senior backbench conservative, announced live on breakfast there was going to be a confidence vote. 13 hours later we had the result of it. it was all done in turbo speed.
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frances reid is outside the houses of parliament right now and has been having a look at what the reaction on social media has been. it will be a lively place again today, won't it? yes, i think that is fair to say. the _ yes, i think that is fair to say. the mood _ yes, i think that is fair to say. the mood of mps depends on which side of— the mood of mps depends on which side of the — the mood of mps depends on which side of the political spectrum they are on _ side of the political spectrum they are on. there is kind of almost a sense _ are on. there is kind of almost a sense this — are on. there is kind of almost a sense this morning, it is likely morning — sense this morning, it is likely morning after the night before at the moment, but it will definitely liven _ the moment, but it will definitely liven up _ the moment, but it will definitely liven up their later. i wanted to take _ liven up their later. i wanted to take you — liven up their later. i wanted to take you behind the scenes at westminster first. we don't often -et westminster first. we don't often get a _ westminster first. we don't often get a chance to do that. to give you a sense _ get a chance to do that. to give you a sense of— get a chance to do that. to give you a sense of how interested the rest of the _ a sense of how interested the rest of the world actually is in the kind of the world actually is in the kind of story— of the world actually is in the kind of story of— of the world actually is in the kind of story of boris johnson's political— of story of boris johnson's political survival. if you have a look _ political survival. if you have a look over— political survival. if you have a look over here, these are us networks. _ look over here, these are us networks, they are from around the globe, _ networks, they are from around the globe, from — networks, they are from around the globe, from europe. that is really significant — globe, from europe. that is really significant. they don't cover all of uk politics— significant. they don't cover all of uk politics blow by blow. the new york times ran it as their top story. — york times ran it as their top story, describing the prime minister as being _ story, describing the prime minister as being known for his houdini —like
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escape _ as being known for his houdini —like escape one — as being known for his houdini —like escape. one of france's main papers, lamont. _ escape. one of france's main papers, lamont. also— escape. one of france's main papers, lamont, also ran borisjohnson main, top and _ lamont, also ran borisjohnson main, top and centre of their coverage over— top and centre of their coverage over night _ top and centre of their coverage over night. so, really quite significant. there are tory mps here closer— significant. there are tory mps here closer to _ borisjohnson who are boris johnson who are trying to play that down, — boris johnson who are trying to play that down, play that media circus down _ that down, play that media circus down we — that down, play that media circus down. we can have a look at some of these _ down. we can have a look at some of these tweets — down. we can have a look at some of these tweets that have come on social— these tweets that have come on social media overnight. the chancellor of the exchequer, rishi _ the chancellor of the exchequer, rishi sunak, previously tipped as a potential— rishi sunak, previously tipped as a potential successor to boris johnson _ johnson. michael gove, who boris johnson. — michael gove, who borisjohnson beat in the _ michael gove, who borisjohnson beat in the leadership contest, tweeted that the _ in the leadership contest, tweeted that the pm had secured the support of conservative mps, now we must carry out what we were elected to deliver _ deliver. and the last words, deliver. — and the last words, perhaps, from someone — and the last words, perhaps, from someone very loyal to boris johnson,
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the culture _ someone very loyal to boris johnson, the culture secretary nadine dorries. _ the culture secretary nadine dorries, who said... some would call that fighting talk. but boris — some would call that fighting talk. but borisjohnson has fought some would call that fighting talk. but boris johnson has fought to see another— but boris johnson has fought to see another day. yes. - another day. yes, it is interesting. fighting talk. you get a real sense in downing street they are up for the fight, determined to fight on and keep this moving. thank you very much indeed. we have got loads of media here in downing street as well. we have got a tv crews and camera crews who have turned up from across london, from across the world, because this is a global story. borisjohnson is a famous globalfigure. he has been all over the telly. as part of thejubilee celebrations in recent days. quite a lot of talk in westminster this morning about what the impact of thatjubilee weekend might have been in the fact there was a vote yesterday. mps going back over the
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half term break to their constituencies and hearing from their constituents. and also wondering about whether that sense of unity we discovered over the weekend, does that now have an impact in borisjohnson persuading his party to unite behind him and carry on forward? westminster is always full of gossip and predictions at times like this. this is a bit spooky. there was a prediction of the actual numbers of the vote in a rather unexpected place last night. someone spotted this and put it on twitter. this is a bus stop in parliament square, outside the palace of westminster. if you look at that time, those numbers, the reason we are showing it is it is because it is the stopping point for the number one for eight and for the 211 service. "148. that was how the for eight and for the 211 service. —— 148. that was how the vote split. 148 votes against borisjohnson, 211 for him. an exact reflection of the numbers. i don't know who realised
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that. somebody obviously has a very good knowledge of the bus routes around westminster. we have sunshine this morning. someone has got hay fever by the sound of it as well! carol has got the weather. is this beautiful weather going to continue? for some of us, yes, it is. the pollen levels today are moderate to high across northern ireland, northern england, moderate and high across the rest of england and wales. low in scotland. i have got a lovely picture behind me. the pick of the season spring vote is now open. it is that time of the year again. we have ten stunning pictures for you to choose from. in order to do so, go to this link here. scroll all the way down to the bottom of the page and choose your favourite one. the other thing on that same link, you will find the terms and privacy notice, and also worth noting that voting closes at
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exactly 11:59pm on sunday, june 12. there are some beauties to choose from as well. the weather today is not too bad at all, if you like it dry and sunny. we have also got a variable cloud. it is —— there is a chance of a shower. most of us won't catch one. along this north sea coastline and the english channel coastline and the english channel coast we do have some showery outbreaks of rain. most of it will tend to ease. you can see where we have the clout through the afternoon, we could catch a shower almost anywhere. many of us will miss them. the cloud will build on the south—west of england and we will see some rain to come will the event of the day. temperatures 11 to 21 degrees. parts of the midlands temperatures today will be five or 6 degrees higher than they were yesterday. as we head through this evening and overnight, the band of cloud and rain continues to advance steadily southwards and eastwards.
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low cloud in eastern and southern scotland. behind this band of rain, a return to clear skies but also some showers. overnight lows of eight to 1a degrees. if we pick up this band of rain tomorrow, you can see how quite quickly it pushes northwards and eastwards out of england, wales and northern ireland, through scotland. this is a weather front that will bring some rain back eventually into northern ireland and north west wales. on the other side of it, there will be a lot of showers, some heavy and thundery, but once again, in between them there will be some sunshine. temperatures 11 to about 21 degrees. temperatures 11 to about 21 degrees. temperatures down a little bit on today. forthursday, temperatures down a little bit on today. for thursday, still a fair bit of cloud around. some sunny intervals. some showers. by the end of the day you can see thicker cloud in the win —— the wind will pick up a touch and we will see some light rain. temperatures 12 to 21 degrees. similar to wednesday. what is
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happening is from thursday into friday this deep area of low pressure in the atlantic is skirting to the north—west of us. it has got the remnants of tropical storm alex embedded in it. you can see it is going to be a windy day. we also have a weather front which is moving southwards and weakening. there is not going to be much rain on it. on friday it is going to be windy or breezy where you are. the strongest winds will be in the north—west of scotland, but we don't expect them to be as strong as we thought they would be this time yesterday. yesterday we thought there would be gales but we are not expecting that strength. on saturday in the north—west of scotland it will be stronger. high pressure starts to building from the south, so things start to settle down. we are more prone to seeing a few showers in the northern half of the country over the weekend. by sunday, ipswich could be up to 22 celsius, which in old the weekend. by sunday, ipswich could be up to 22 celsius, which in old money the weekend. by sunday, ipswich could be up to 22 celsius, which in old money is the weekend. by sunday, ipswich could be up to 22 celsius, which in old money is 72 the weekend. by sunday, ipswich could be up to 22 celsius, which in old money is 72 fahrenheit. sounds glorious. thank you very much
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indeed. i thank you for keeping me company this morning. see you tomorrow. been a pleasure, thank you. thousands of people gathered in northern france yesterday to mark the 78th anniversary of the d—day landings. john maguire is in ver—sur—mer for us this morning. john, it's been a particularly significant event this year hasn't it? it has, sadly. the d—day anniversary is always very special for the veterans, many of whom have come over a year on year. when you think about those significant years, the big years, the 78,70 about those significant years, the big years, the 78, 70 fifth anniversary, the 80th in a few years time, many veterans come here. they enjoy coming here, partly remembrance, partly a celebration, in a funny way, getting together with old mates, but meeting the local people as well, who are very, very appreciative of the sacrifices they made and what they did during they made and what they did during the day and the battle of normandy. this, the new british normandy
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memorial built after a very, very long campaign, after a huge amount of fundraising. it opened last year when covid restrictions mentally veterans were not able to come. this is the first year they have been able to come here on anniversary of d—day. a specially built here on the cliffs above what was gold beach, where the british forces arrived and the architects who designed and made sure that all of the sightlines ensured you could always see the beach. spending time with the veterans yesterday, they were not only very anxious to see the names of their fallen only very anxious to see the names of theirfallen comrades only very anxious to see the names of their fallen comrades on the walls and columns of the memorial, but to gaze out across the beach and remembered what happened 78 years ago. today, the normandy coastline, with its calm sea and cobalt blue sky, belies its history. the chaos and carnage of d—day, a lifetime away. with the beaches they stormed 78 years ago as the backdrop,
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men who fought here laid wreaths to honour the fallen. it's been a long time coming, but the british normandy memorial, officially opened last year under covid restrictions, could at last host veterans for the 6th ofjune anniversary. seeing it for the first time is ken cooke. it's a beautiful place. i didn't expect it to be as beautiful as what it is, and it will be a very lasting memorial. ken was just 18 years old when he landed here at ver—sur—mer — or gold beach, as it was known — on the first day of battle. i've always thought that the [ads that didn't come back are the heroes. we are not the heroes who've survived. the heroes are the lads that's still over there. there's still a lot of memories.
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i've tried to get rid of some of them, but some of them will never go away. a fly—past by a spitfire from the battle of britain memorial flight recreated a fraction of the soundscape that would have assaulted the senses. ken hay was still a teenager when he first landed in normandy, his thoughts summed up in a poem he wrote and read at a remembrance service. lord, keep me safe. i'm just 18, and still a lot of life to live. for many of the veterans visiting graves of mates, now seeing their names immortalized here, means so much to them. we were in signal platoon together with the essex. ken remembers denny circus, who'd intended to return home and marry his sweetheart.
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he was talking about, "we'll get married after the war." they were already making their plans. there he is. and i suppose that girl was left high and dry. he was a really good guy. not because he's dead. he was a really good guy. the memorial was built to give remembrance a physical form, the names of the 22,4112 men and women under british control who died in normandy. among those chiselled into the stone is raymond carr's. we found his name, and of course, he's under the royal air force there. and then you come down that column, 13, and there you are, "carr r, sergeant, 21." his brother peter is here, along with his granddaughter, to find raymond's name. why does it mean so much? oh, your brother, yeah.
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yeah, very emotional. yeah, it is. they've done such a brilliantjob. wonderful — in one sense i'm very sad. and on the other, i'm very proud. he's there. yeah. he was part of it, wasn't he? that's it, really. it gets me a bit. but, there you go. casey will now pick up the baton and carry on the family's history. when my dad said, "oh, granddad wants to take you to france for the d—day memorial", it's like, "yeah, i'll go." i was so happy they wanted me to go with them. despite their age and their dwindling number, the veterans take part in a packed programme of events when they visit the former battlefields.
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here in normandy, d—day is defined notjust by remembrance, but also by gratitude. the french celebrate their liberation, their freedom, delivered by men and women, all courageous, many terrified, and many who will forever rest in the land they set free. such a privilege to spend some time with those men yesterday, to hear some of those stories with those gentle men, as they are these days, as you can imagine. when they embarked on these beaches 78 years ago, it wasn't really a place for gentlemen. the brutality of war writ large across this entire coastline in northern france. earlier i spoke to lord dannatt, the former head of the british army. he is over here for the d—day anniversary. i asked
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him for his reflections on the last 24 him for his reflections on the last 2a hours. yesterday, for that small party of surviving — yesterday, for that small party of surviving veterans, yesterday was very special and a very busy day for them _ very special and a very busy day for them they— very special and a very busy day for them. they started here at the british— them. they started here at the british memorial early in the morning _ british memorial early in the morning and they were in arromanches and then— morning and they were in arromanches and then there wound up back here again— and then there wound up back here again for— and then there wound up back here again for a — and then there wound up back here again for a fabulous concert in the evening — again for a fabulous concert in the evening. so, wonderful to see them. wonderful— evening. so, wonderful to see them. wonderful they could be here in this british— wonderful they could be here in this british memorial amongst the names of the _ british memorial amongst the names of the 22,442 lost their lives in this campaign. very special time. we are so— this campaign. very special time. we are so pleased as the normandy memorial— are so pleased as the normandy memorial trust, we could do this for them, _ memorial trust, we could do this for them, veterans.— them, veterans. thinking about the memorial, them, veterans. thinking about the memorial. for— them, veterans. thinking about the memorial, for a _ them, veterans. thinking about the memorial, for a lot _ them, veterans. thinking about the memorial, for a lot of _ them, veterans. thinking about the memorial, for a lot of people - them, veterans. thinking about the memorial, for a lot of people the i memorial, for a lot of people the first time they saw it, i know some of the veterans had been here before, they managed to get over in the autumn, it is a very special place for them. we spoke yesterday to somebody who was here with his grand daughter. he will pass on the family bat onto her. she will take
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on the remembrance, the family connections, making sure this place has a future?— has a future? well, that is critically — has a future? well, that is critically important. - has a future? well, that is critically important. we i has a future? well, that is i critically important. we must remember the critically important. we must rememberthe 22,442 critically important. we must remember the 22,442 lost their lives but they— remember the 22,442 lost their lives but they lost allows to create peace and freedom and liberty in europe. let's _ and freedom and liberty in europe. let's never— and freedom and liberty in europe. let's never forget that. one of the things— let's never forget that. one of the things we — let's never forget that. one of the things we haven't finished yet is how we're — things we haven't finished yet is how we're going to tell the story in the future — how we're going to tell the story in the future. they will be a second phase _ the future. they will be a second phase of — the future. they will be a second phase of this project, and education facility— phase of this project, and education facility of— phase of this project, and education facility of some sort to be determined, that's really important. but also _ determined, that's really important. but also important is to maintain this memorial in the gita gordon kitchen — this memorial in the gita gordon kitchen it— this memorial in the gita gordon kitchen it is. —— beautiful that is. i hope _ kitchen it is. —— beautiful that is. i hope viewers will sign up to be a guardian — i hope viewers will sign up to be a guardian. we need funds, frankly, to keep this _ guardian. we need funds, frankly, to keep this place as pristine as wonderful and continue the memory of those _ wonderful and continue the memory of those men _ wonderful and continue the memory of those men who fought and lost their lives for— those men who fought and lost their lives for the peace and freedom of europe. _ lives for the peace and freedom of europe, but— lives for the peace and freedom of europe, but by and large the peace and freedom we have in europe, they .ave and freedom we have in europe, they gave their— and freedom we have in europe, they gave their lives that we could enjoy it.
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n. - picking up n. — picking up on that it. pickin- up on that point from picking up on that point from generaljanet, i rememberwhen picking up on that point from generaljanet, i remember when we were here with harry billinge in october, we were talking about what those men and women did back in the second world war, securing peace in europe. and by and large, apart from the balkans in the 90s, there has been peace in europe ever since. now because we have the russian nude invasion of ukraine. correct and now, of course we have the russian invasion of ukraine. understanding what happened out there. and indeed on the land what happened out there. and indeed on the [and behind. remember the battle of normandy went on for very many weeks. that is where the majority of people lost their lives, remembering what was happening and why it happened is extremely important. you will of course remember we were telling you the story of when harry came over here in october, we were with him. he filmed at the memorial. he saw the names of some of his former comrades. what did he do in the
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afternoon? he went and raised more money in arromanches at the invasion museum there. he was so keen that this place should have a future and in particular that they should be an education centre. so for future generations, they will understand in years to come with the men and women who fought and especially those who died here did, not only for themselves, for europe, for their own country, for the world at the time, but also for future generations. back to you. john, thank you so much. thank you for that beautiful film sharing the memories of the people you spoke to. john maguire in ver—sur—merfor people you spoke to. john maguire in ver—sur—mer for us people you spoke to. john maguire in ver—sur—merfor us this people you spoke to. john maguire in ver—sur—mer for us this morning people you spoke to. john maguire in ver—sur—merfor us this morning in northern france. much more coming up. reaction to the volta macron boris johnson's up. reaction to the volta macron borisjohnson's leadership last boris johnson's leadership last night. borisjohnson's leadership last night. borisjohnson sang last night i think it is a good result for politics and for the country. we will have plenty of analysis on
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that. for now, it i'm victoria derbyshire.
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good morning, welcome to bbc news, here are your headlines at nine o'clock. borisjohnson wins the vote of confidence in his leadership — and says it's now time for the government to bash on. i think it is a convincing result, a decisive result, and what it means is that as a government we can move on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters. i on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters.— on and focus on the stuff that i think really matters. i can announce that the parliamentary _ think really matters. i can announce that the parliamentary party - think really matters. i can announce that the parliamentary party does i that the parliamentary party does have confidence. but 148 conservative mps voted against the prime minister in a significant revolt against his leadership. ijust hope i just hope that, ijust hope that, given the mood of the public, the vote we have had here tonight, that the cabinet will tell the prime

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