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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 8, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. the biggest daily rise in petrol prices for 17 years. by the end of the week, filling a family car could cost more than £100. the rmt union is called selfish and irresponsible by number ten as plans take shape for days of crippling rail strikes later this month. us lawmakers hear harrowing evidence from families of victims of the texas school shooting as they consider gun control measures. she was intelligent, compassionate, athletic. she was quiet, shy, unless she had a point to make. the cinema chain cineworld has cancels its screening of a controversialfilm based on revered figures in the islamic faith. and ukraine's second city of kharkiv comes under renewed
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attack with a number of russian missile strikes, including on this supermarket. welcome to bbc news. the next few weeks are expected to be a perfect travel storm for commuters on the road, railand air. the price of petrol saw its biggest dailyjump in 17 years yesterday, straining family budgets even more than they are already. on the railways, the rmt union is planning a walk—out of thousands of its members onjune 21st, 23rd and 25th. downing street has called the move selfish and both the union and industry officials are under pressure to renew talks. and then there's the disruption
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to flights caused largely by staff shortages which are unlikely to be resolved soon. our travel correspondent, katy austin, has more. prices at the pumps are up again. i paid £2 a litre. it was a big surprise. i do deliveries part—time and it is not worth it any more. we'e gone electric- and that's the reason, because the price, as you can see, i £2 for diesel, it was impossible. i the rac says yesterday's petrol price jump of 2p a litre was the biggest in 17 years — a cocktail of factors are being blamed, including the fallout from russia's invasion of ukraine and the current exchange rate. as motorists pay more than ever to fill up their tanks, there's travel misery ahead for people planning to take the train if the biggest rail strike in decades goes ahead
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the week after next. the three days of proposed action will affect the whole week in which the first in—person glastonbury festival since 2019 will take place, among other events and some gcse exams. glastonbury volunteer robin was meant to be travelling down on the tuesday. it means i'll probably end up driving, which puts another car on the road, which is against everything that glastonbury stands for, it's against what i stand for. i try to be as environmentally friendly as i can, not to mention the cost with the fuel and the train tickets themselves. the rmt union says strikes are on the cards because after pay freezes, rail workers need a pay offer which reflects the rising cost of living. it'as also accused network rail, which maintains and operates the railway, of planning thousands ofjob cuts. we cannot passively sit round while our members become
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poorer and they are under threat of losing theirjobs. that is not acceptable to us and my members expect us to have a robust response to employers who are completely aggressive towards our members and who are putting them under threat threat. the rail industry is under pressure to save money. billions of taxpayers' cash was used to keep services running during the pandemic and the government effectively took control of the railways. passenger numbers and revenue haven't recovered to what they were before covid. network rail says no firm job losses have been proposed and rail bosses are hoping for talks with the rmt in the next few days. we recognise that, in order to run the rail more efficiently, - we need fewer people. we're using technology that was not possible ten years ago, _ but we want to do that in agreement with the rmt and with the people i who would volunteer to leave. what makes the planned strike unusual is the involvement of network rail whose staff include crucial signallers. freight, as well as passengers, would be severely affected.
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plans are now being worked on to keep vital goods moving as much as possible. for example, fuel for power stations and products travelling to supermarkets in scotland. freight could take priority over passengers at times. meanwhile, disruption at airports and flight cancellations continue amid staff shortages, including of baggage handlers. this footage of piled up luggage was taken at manchester airport today. the boss of heathrow has warned it could take up to 18 months for them to get back up to full capacity. whether it's by car, train or plane, it's looking like a turbulent summer ahead. katy austin, bbc news. sarah hogg was planning on travelling from newcastle to glastonbury by train on one of the days of the planned strike. she is with us now. you are planning, and let'sjust talk she is with us now. you are planning, and let's just talk us through. journey from newcastle, not to glastonbury itself. it gets as
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close as it can. but it's most of thejourney, isn't it? close as it can. but it's most of the journey, isn't it?— the journey, isn't it? yeah, so train from _ the journey, isn't it? yeah, so train from new— the journey, isn't it? yeah, so train from new patent -- - the journey, isn't it? yeah, so - train from new patent -- newcastle train from new patent —— newcastle from london and then onto the festival site. 50 from london and then onto the festival site.— from london and then onto the festival site. ., ., , ., , ., festival site. so at that stage, you could still be _ festival site. so at that stage, you could still be able _ festival site. so at that stage, you could still be able to, _ festival site. so at that stage, you could still be able to, but - festival site. so at that stage, you could still be able to, but it's - could still be able to, but it's getting from newcastle to london. your options are either hire a car, flyer walk. actually hitchhike —— flyer walk. actually hitchhike —— fly or walk talk flyer walk. actually hitchhike -- fly or walk tall— flyer walk. actually hitchhike -- fly or walk talk essentially, yeah. or helicopter. _ fly or walk talk essentially, yeah. or helicopter. laughter - or helicopter. laughter i'm struggling _ or helicopter. laughter i'm struggling for - or helicopter. laughterl i'm struggling for options. or helicopter. laughter l i'm struggling for options. i or helicopter. laughter - i'm struggling for options. i know car park pastors, you have to buy them by next week for £50 —— park passes. i don't know if that's a better option or not at the airport. can i ask a personal question? you
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don't want to answer. how much was your train ticket? just don't want to answer. how much was your train ticket?— your train ticket? just that leg of the journey. _ your train ticket? just that leg of the journey. it's _ your train ticket? just that leg of the journey, it's probably - your train ticket? just that leg of the journey, it's probably about. thejourney, it's probably about £110. the journey, it's probably about £110. ., �* ., ., , the journey, it's probably about £110. ., ., , ., ., ., £110. you've already laid out that mone . £110. you've already laid out that money- the _ £110. you've already laid out that money. the best _ £110. you've already laid out that money. the best hope _ £110. you've already laid out that money. the best hope you - £110. you've already laid out that money. the best hope you get i £110. you've already laid out that money. the best hope you get it| £110. you've already laid out that - money. the best hope you get it back because you won't be able to reimburse the ticket, but it doesn't compensate for the inconvenience and the uncertainty, i suppose. ida. compensate for the inconvenience and the uncertainty, i suppose.— the uncertainty, i suppose. no, it shouldn't be _ the uncertainty, i suppose. no, it shouldn't be this _ the uncertainty, i suppose. no, it shouldn't be this stressful. - the uncertainty, i suppose. no, it shouldn't be this stressful. i've i shouldn't be this stressful. i've run out of options. why do have sympathy with the breakers of. == run out of options. why do have sympathy with the breakers of. -- do ou have sympathy with the breakers of. -- do you have sympathy? _ sympathy with the breakers of. -- do you have sympathy? that _ sympathy with the breakers of. -- do you have sympathy? that would - sympathy with the breakers of. -- do you have sympathy? that would be i you have sympathy? that would be nice, buti you have sympathy? that would be nice, but i think _ you have sympathy? that would be nice, but i think the _ you have sympathy? that would be nice, but i think the people - you have sympathy? that would be nice, but i think the people they're| nice, but i think the people they're impacting the most is people in the same position of them who are struggling, and it's such a... we bought our tickets in 2019 and we've been looking forward to and saving
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up. they're impacting people in the same position as them. i up. they're impacting people in the same position as them.— same position as them. i suppose they would _ same position as them. i suppose they would argue _ same position as them. i suppose they would argue the _ same position as them. i suppose they would argue the only - same position as them. i suppose they would argue the only way - same position as them. i suppose they would argue the only way to | same position as them. i suppose i they would argue the only way to get the decision—makers to shift their position is to impact people like them, like you, so that you guys complained to the train companies and then things change. it's the same for lots of people and lots of industries, but it's also about safety issues. particularly on network. people who do the maintenance. as a significant number of staff are to be made redundant. yeah, i can't comment on how much they get paid. i'm kind of ignorant to all that. ijust they get paid. i'm kind of ignorant to all that. i just want to get down to all that. i just want to get down to glastonbury, that's all! to all that. ijust want to get down to glastonbury, that's all!- to glastonbury, that's all! that's very honest _ to glastonbury, that's all! that's very honest of — to glastonbury, that's all! that's very honest of you. _ to glastonbury, that's all! that's very honest of you. let - to glastonbury, that's all! that's very honest of you. let me - to glastonbury, that's all! that's very honest of you. let me put l to glastonbury, that's all! that's| very honest of you. let me put it another way. what would you say to
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the real bosses? what do you think they should do? == the real bosses? what do you think they should do?— the real bosses? what do you think they should do? -- rail bosses. come to a compromise. _ they should do? -- rail bosses. come to a compromise. it's _ they should do? -- rail bosses. come to a compromise. it's affecting - they should do? -- rail bosses. come to a compromise. it's affecting so - to a compromise. it's affecting so many people. it's going to have a knock—on effect. people can't have trust in the rail network. i think a compromise needs to be made before action is taken. i think they've got the headlines, they've had the panic and surely that's enough. what the headlines, they've had the panic and surely that's enough.— and surely that's enough. what you ho -e this and surely that's enough. what you hope this might _ and surely that's enough. what you hope this might not _ and surely that's enough. what you hope this might not a _ and surely that's enough. what you hope this might not a few- and surely that's enough. what you hope this might not a few heads. . hope this might not a few heads. best of luck. we hope your train does run in the end. if not, let us know if someone offers you a helicopter. know if someone offers you a helicopter-— know if someone offers you a helico ter. ., ., , ., know if someone offers you a helicoter. ., ., , ., ., helicopter. that would be great to. sarah, helicopter. that would be great to. sarah. thank _ helicopter. that would be great to. sarah, thank you _ helicopter. that would be great to. sarah, thank you so _ helicopter. that would be great to. sarah, thank you so much and - helicopter. that would be great to. | sarah, thank you so much and good luck for glastonbury.— luck for glastonbury. thanks so much. and we'll find out how this
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story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are kevin schofield, political editor of huffpost uk, and martin bentham, home affairs editor of the evening standard. martin is a familiar face on the programme. dojoin us for martin is a familiar face on the programme. do join us for that. the uk economy is predicted to stagnate next year as inflation remains high — that's according to the economic think tank the organisation for economic cooperation and development. it says the cost of russia's attack on ukraine will lead to higher inflation and lower growth. our business editor, simonjack, has more these are forecast, it is a think tank, but this is a well—known one and its analysis is followed off the global developed economies, and on that, there's some good, some bad and some ugly for the uk. the good is, this year, the uk's forecast to be one the fastest growing economy of the g7 at 3.6%. bear in mind it had one of the steepest falls,
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so there's a bit of a trampoline effect when it comes back up, and it's helped by an earlier reopening of the economy. now, here's the bad — next year, the uk turns from the fastest to the slowest growing economy at 0%. these figures do not include the recent packages measures by rishi sunak, which may alter it a bit, but they say some of it is to do with brexit. the uk's own economic watchdog has already said that trade as a percentage of our economy has been hard—hit. and then, back to the top of the league, i'm afraid, for the ugly, which is inflation, forecast — as we know — to hit 10%. again, the uk imports more than it exports, and the uk economy has been weak. that's been particularly relevant when it comes to oil and gas, which is traded in dollars, and that's the key one influencing politics, people's lives at the moment. you've seen there from katy austin's package the fact that people are feeling their living standards are going down, they're getting a little poorer every day. the cost of living is outstripping wages at the rail networks, etc. so, you can see the battle for pay is well and truly under way. bank of england say, "we can't bow to pressure for higher pay. that will stoke inflation further."
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that infuriated the unions. as i say, this will not be the last industrial battle we see this summer. simonjack. a us congressional committee has been hearing evidence from survivors and families of a mass shooting at a primary school in uvalde, texas. an 18—year—old gunman used a powerful assault rifle to kill 19 students and two teachers. since then, there's been yet another nation—wide debate about the sale of firearms. 0ur north america editor, sarah smith reports, and some of what you'll hear is quite distressing. this is the last photograph of lexi, getting a school prize just hours before she was shot dead, the last time her parents or her. the last time her parents saw her. we don't want to think of lexi as just a number. she was intelligent, compassionate and athletic. she was quiet, shy unless she had a point to make. when she was right, as she so often was, she was firm, direct.
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kimberly rubio is demanding lawmakers take action on gun control to ban assault weapons like the one used in uvalde, texas. so, today, we stand for lexi and as her voice, we demand action. we seek a ban on assault rifles and high—capacity magazines. we understand that for some reason, for some people, to people with money, to people who fund political campaigns, the guns are more important than children. at this moment, we ask for progress. mia was in the classroom when the gunman burst in. in this video recorded for the committee, she describes smearing herself in the blood of a classmate to pretend she was dead. he shot my friend and i thought he was going to come back to the room, so i grabbed some blood and put it all over me.
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there are now cross—party talks on gun control, but unless democrats and republicans can agree, there can be no new laws. any legislation will fall far short of what has been demanded. there will not be a ban on assault weapons, expanded background checks is likely to be the most they can agree on, and even that is farfrom certain. the school shooting in texas has forced a national conversation on gun control, highlighting an epidemic of mass shootings, nearly 250 already this year, but it has not provoked any kind of consensus about what action to take. sarah smith, bbc news, washington. a report commissioned by the health secretary, sajid javid, into nhs england has concluded better training for managers would lead to better outcomes for patients. the review also found evidence of discrimination, bullying and blame cultures. 0ur health editor, hugh pym,
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begins his report at an a&e department in essex. a patient�*s view of the a&e department at harlow in essex on monday night. see if you think that's acceptable. i discussed that video in an interview today with the health secretary, sajid javid. this is not what anyone wants to see. and they are... that's people's real experience in an a&e unit, waiting hours and hours and hours. it is in some parts of the country, and it's not what i want to see. it's not what anyone in the nhs wants to see. and that is exactly why we're providing this record level of support. 0n the day where i'm not crying at the end of a shift, i'm just glad i survived.
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carmen, who's a member of the royal college of nursing, says staff shortages and stress have left her considering herfuture in thejob. not a week goes by where i don't think that maybe i'll have to leave eventually. how close to it are you? in an ideal world, i'd love to stay. i trained, you know, a few years to enter this profession, and i'd very much regret leaving. i'd be extremely upset about leaving colleagues behind. but ijust don't see a long—term future in nursing. this is the general. so, could improved leadership help solve some of these staff retention problems? a retired general was brought in to help run a review. i think that, with better. leadership at every level, the outcomes for patients i and service users of all kinds and the productivity _ of the organisation can be improved. mrjavid said he would accept the report's recommendations,
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including improving diversity and getting the best managers into the most challenging areas. i think, in some regions, the nhs trust has just been constantly challenged there with poor leadership, and one of the difficulties is getting the best leaders to move to those regions. and what this report talks about is exactly how you can do that, how you can incentivise that, how you can have the right packages. the health secretary and the general opened a new ward on today's visit. the question now — will their leadership review cut through for staff and patients? hugh pym, bbc news. sport, and for a full round—up from the bbc sport centre, gavin ramjaun. how are you? good evening. i'm hope you are as well. the six—time major winner phil mickelson says he shouldn't have to give up his lifetime exemption to play on golf�*s pga tour. well, traditionally, the pga tour has always been the premier week—by—week competition
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in the men's game, and organisers have threatened to ban any players who compete in the new saudi arabia—backed liv golf series. the first tournament of the controversial new series starts tomorrow at the centurion club in hertfordshire. mickelson has been one of the marquee names for the new competition, but he doesn't believe he should be banned from the pga tour. certainly, i have made, said and done a lot of things that i regret and i am sorry for that and for the herd that has and for the hurt that has caused a lot of people. i don't condone human rights violations at all, nobody here does throughout the world, and i am certainly aware of what's happened with the saudi journalist and i think it's terrible. i also think it's good for the game of golf is done throughout history and i think that liv golf is going to do a lot of good for the game as well.
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and i'm excited about this opportunity and that's why i'm here. well, england's lee westwood and ian poulter have also signed up, and they were quizzed on the moral questions around the funding from saudi arabia. is there anywhere in the world you wouldn't play? if vladimir putin had a tournament, would you play in it? i'm not even going to comment on speculation. is there anywhere you wouldn't play on a moral basis? i don't need to answer that question. lee, do you want to answer that question? you're just asking us to answer a hypothetical question there. i they're moral questions, aren't they? very interesting to see that. dan evans' strong start to the grass
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court season has continued. the british number one comfortably made his way through to the quarterfinals of the nottingham 0pen after a straight sets win over italian thomas fabiano. evans is still yet to drop a set in nottingham, and after battling through a tight opener 7—5, the brit comfortably raced to victory, taking the second set 6—0. things didn't go so well for fellow brit heather watson, though. she was beaten in straight sets by viktoria golubic of switzerland, the swiss winning 7—5, 6—2 to reach the quarterfinals. harriet dart was also in action. wales are in action nowjust four days on from qualifying for a first world cup in 64 years. scotland are also playing tonight in the nation's league after they missed out on a spot in qatar last week. it's also worth keeping an eye on the republic of ireland. they are also playing against ukraine, who were defeated by wales in that world cup play—off on sunday. these are the latest scores at the moment. goals between wales and the
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netherlands, it's also goalless between the republic of ireland and ukraine. scotland are up against armenia. that is just about it, but we will be back later on throughout the evening. see you then. gavin, thank you very much. now to devon. a total of six people were on the boat at the time. jen smith is there for us now. what more do we know about what happened? it looks very peaceful and calm there now, but that clearly wasn't the picture of you hours ago? == but that clearly wasn't the picture of you hours ago?— but that clearly wasn't the picture of you hours ago? -- a few hours. details are — of you hours ago? -- a few hours. details are still— of you hours ago? -- a few hours. details are still few _ of you hours ago? -- a few hours. details are still few and _ details are still few and far between. this is roughly what i can tell you. emergency services were called around 1:30 p:m., and this is a popular spot between 0ak hampton
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and cornwall. reports of boat had capsized on the water behind me. the police gave us their latest information. they said two people were safely recovered from the water and had been checked and discharged by paramedics. another two people were recovered and taken to hereford hospital in plymouth. there condition isn't known. a further two people remain missing at this time. searches are ongoing. we've been here for a few hours and we've seen various search and rescue craft behind us. you just missed one going across the water. we don't know much about the actual boats involved. we do know that six people were on board, all of whom were adults and all of whom are believed to be local
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to devon. the police say they don't expect any more updates this evening. expect any more updates this evenina. . , . the cinema chain cineworld has cancelled its screening of a controversialfilm based on revered figures in the islamic faith. more than 120,000 people have signed a petition for the film the lady of heaven to be pulled from uk cinemas, with protests in front of venues that were set to screen the film. the film has been criticised for being divisive. 0ur religion editor aleem maqbool explains why the film has caused offence. this in films in the past where there has been so, in films in the past where there has been these kind of protests, it is often about the portrayal of the prophet muhammad. in this case, that is not the central objection for a lot of those people who are protesting. he is depicted in this film, briefly. but it is cgi generated. there's no one actor who is attributed as having played the prophet muhammad. mainly, it is about the way
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prominent figures from early sunni islam have been depicted by a shia muslim film—maker and the comparisons that have been drawn to some of those prominent figures with the way that isis for example behaved in iraq. so, that's what has caused offence that's why people went out, when the film was released last friday. they went out and protested in birmingham and sheffield and bradford and other places as well. of course, the film—makers are saying that they have the right to be offended, but what they don't have the right to do is to intimidate cinema staff to the point where they feel that they can't show this film any more. just to say that aleem maqbool has a report on the ten o'clock news —— ten o'clock news of the film tonight. in a statement, the cineworld cinema chain said they had cancelled all showings of the lady of heaven to "ensure the safety
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of our staff and customers". a protestor we spoke to earlier rejected allegations of intimidation. protests are basically to voice our rights and concerns that this film is offensive to us, it is insulting and we find it to be misrepresenting our religion. and therefore, we oppose it, you know, and we are well within our democratic rights to protest and voice our concern. aleem maqbool has also been speaking to the executive producer of the film, who begins here by describing his reaction to cineworld pulling his movie. just purely from the production side, it was a positive - reaction because, i mean, i it's free publicity at the end i of the day, and i tell you, a large, | large population across the uk have just heard of the film for the first time. - so, that's brilliant for us. from the other side, i was, of course, disappointed, i very disappointed about this - because, of course, no one should
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dictate for the british public what they can and cannot i watch or discuss. and on that point, are you disappointed in the cinema chain? are you disappointed that others haven't spoken out about that cinemas pulling it? or do you understand their position? i'm extremely disappointed first i and foremost in the cinemas, to be very frank, because they are... to be honest, it's notjust _ about one film here or one incident. it's something more broader for me. it's... i mean, cinema has been in this country for over i 150 if not 170 years. but if they're worried about the safety of their staff, you can understand that? i know that, from that side, i definitely understand. i i can appreciate that concern, but, i mean, these are just _ small fringe groups. police should have no problem| keeping them at least at a safe distance from the cinema. and for me, personally, i mean, i've been working in this - field for five years, - my colleagues for decades. we know it's empty threats.
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i can appreciate their position, but the british public- are echoing what i'm saying, - which is that the cinemas should not be cowering down to these requests because what does it mean - for the future? i mean, now they see any time i they are upset or mildly offended, they will do the same. i mean, you talked about the fact that the publicity was good. was part of the idea to provoke? no, not at all. this is very important point. the film, we are simply patrolling the life of lady fatimah, - the daughter of the prophet muhammad _ —— simply portraying. very historically accurate. everything happens in our film happened in history, - can be traced back in history books. and it's a narrative that hundreds of millions, believe me, - hundreds of millions of muslims take as a viewpoint — so, it's merely an expression of a certain view of history i we believe is historically accurate, and no one should be able - to dictate who can and can't discuss these things. -
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you can see more you can see more on you can see more on that on the ten o'clock news this evening. a legal attempt has been launched to halt the government's controversial plans to send asylum—seekers to rwanda. careltcalais and detention action are among the campaign groups who have issued the judicial review in the high court. the first flight taking migrants from the uk to rwanda is expected to leave next tuesday, though lawyers for more than 90 migrants have already submitted legal challenges against the move. our home editor mark easton has the latest. the government believes that the answer to the problem of people coming to the uk and small boats across the channel, described as an illegal route, challenged by others, but they say the answer to that and the people smugglers is to relocate those who come to the uk by those routes to rwanda. you may remember, they signed a deal with the rwandan
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government a few weeks ago. the home secretary went to the east african state and signed the deal. this is essentially a one—way ticket that those people who are relocated to cobol he will have their asylum claims heard in rwanda if they wish, and if successful, they can rebuild their lives in rwanda if they are unsuccessful, they would be deported by rwandan authorities. mark unsuccessful, they would be deported by rwandan authorities.— by rwandan authorities. mark easton. james will ste nt stent is —— james wilson said the home secretary would be acting unlawfully and said people should be punished for seeking asylum. irate unlawfully and said people should be punished for seeking asylum. we have an as lum punished for seeking asylum. we have an asylum system _ punished for seeking asylum. we have an asylum system and _ punished for seeking asylum. we have an asylum system and people - punished for seeking asylum. we have an asylum system and people have i punished for seeking asylum. we have| an asylum system and people have the right to claim asylum in the uk. what we're talking about in terms of
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the rwanda removals is not even outsourcing. there would be no route back whether or not somebody was recognised as a refugee or in need of protection. we would be sending people to rwanda with a one—way ticket, and we also have fundamental concerns about what would happen to them. in concerns about what would happen to them. , ,., , in response, a home office spokesperson said... "we have been clear from the start that we expected legal challenges however we are determined to deliver this new partnership. we have now issued formal directions to the first group of people due to be relocated to rwanda later this month. this marks a critical step towards operationalizing the policy, which fully complies with international and national law." now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. it will be turning drier overnight. the rain in scotland petering out, the heavy thundery showers are fading away this evening, and the rain in northern ireland becomes much lighter as it moves over the irish sea into northern parts of england. over the irish sea into northern so, many places will be dry by the morning,
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clearer skies in the south, and temperatures holding at around 10—12 celsius. we start with some early sunshine in wales, the midlands, southern england — the cloud further north could produce a few showers for a while, otherwise some sunny spells. out to the west, though, we've got this thickening cloud, bringing with it mostly light and patchy rain. something a bit wetter and rather misty and murky in south wales and the southwest of england. but ahead of that, some sunshine for a while, and it should be a warmer day than today in scotland. moving ahead into friday, and we've got some stronger winds in the northwest — this is where we'll see quite a number of heavy showers. a bit of a damp start in the southeast of england, but brightening up. most of england and wales will be dry. quite warm air, actually, on friday, and in the sunshine, highs of 23 celsius. hello, this is bbc news with me, shaun ley. the headlines — the biggest daily rise in petrol prices for 17 years. by the end of the week,
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filling a family car could cost more than £100. the rmt union is called "selfish" and "irresponsible" by number 10 as plans take shape for days of crippling rail strikes later this month. us lawmakers hear harrowing evidence from families of victims of the texas school shooting as they consider gun control measures. the cinema chain cineworld has cancells its screening of a controversialfilm based on revered figures in the islamic faith. and ukraine's second city of kharkiv comes under renewed attack with a number of russian missile strikes, including on this supermarket. borisjohnson has denied that the government failed to consult a senior legal adviser over its plans to unilaterally scrap elements of the northern ireland protocol. the uk government intends to use domestic law to override aspects of the post—brexit arrangements governing irish sea trade, which were jointly agreed by the uk and eu as part of the withdrawal agreement. the prime minister has rejected
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the claim that sirjames eadie, the government's independent barrister on major legal issues, had not been asked to give a view on the contentious bill, which is expected to be published in the coming days. i'm joined by tony connelly, rte's europe editor and author of brexit and ireland. good to speak to you again. thank you very much for being with us. this dispute has surfaced again in brussels to date with a speech by the taoiseach in the european parliament saying he does not think the british have dealt fairly on this, but in terms of this dispute, at the heart of it, it's about whether or not it is lawful in international terms to override this part of the brexit treaty. what is the interpretation of it as it is seen at least in brussels and in dublin? ~ ~
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dublin? well, it looks like the uk government _ dublin? well, it looks like the uk government is _ dublin? well, it looks like the uk government is essentially - dublin? well, it looks like the uk government is essentially saying | government is essentially saying that the good friday agreement, the belfast agreement, takes some precedence legally over the brexit withdrawal agreement and the northern ireland protocol. the word that has been used is that it has primordial weight or priority, if you like, over the northern ireland protocol, which of course is part of the brexit withdrawal agreement. there is certainly nobody in dublin... dublin lawyers have look at this, and nobody there believes that this holds any water whatsoever, and certainly nobody in brussels believes that it holds water either. the northern ireland protocol is part of the brexit withdrawal agreement which is eight treaty between the uk and the eu, and it is international law. it has been now for a year and a half. so,
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there is one of criticism about the validity of this particular legal approach and we have not seen the legal advice exactly from the british government on this and there has been a lot of claim and counterclaim about what exactly is involved and reporting about whether james eadie has given his opinion on the actual advice or his opinion on what others think of the advice but certainly from an irish and eu point of view, is fairly straightforward. the northern ireland protocol withdrawal agreement including the northern ireland protocol was freely entered into, and that ending its opening articles say that this treaty does not in any way impinge upon the constitutional provisions of the good friday agreement. i suppose the difficulty with this is a lot of this is about politics as much as it's about law. is there a sense in dublin that notwithstanding
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what they publicly have to say and indeed what brussels have to say that the reality is that the government is engaged in a bit of brinkmanship and there probably is not any particular desire to go through with this but the hope is that they can push it far enough that they can push it far enough that they can push it far enough that the european commission will compromise further on the arrangements for checking goods as they cross between northern ireland and great britain?! they cross between northern ireland and great britain?— and great britain? i mean there are definitely two _ and great britain? i mean there are definitely two ways _ and great britain? i mean there are definitely two ways to _ and great britain? i mean there are definitely two ways to look - and great britain? i mean there are definitely two ways to look at i and great britain? i mean there are definitely two ways to look at it. i definitely two ways to look at it. one is this would give the uk government leverage in the negotiations. it would essentially force the eu to be a lot more flexible to come up with more concessions, but there is another viewpoint that once this legislation is published than an unnatural momentum takes over that propels it towards the statute books and once it becomes law then that is a much more grave situation because one party to a treaty would be legislating for that treaty to not work any more and that will be seen
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as a very grave situation. the eu position and the irish position is that the european commission came out with a series of proposals last year. those were essentially open ended, discussion papers, that did get both sides some scope for genuine concessions or genuine flexibilities on how the protocol operates, and the view from brussels and london and dublin is that the uk has not really engaged in that negotiation properly and the suspicion is that what the uk is proposing through this legislation is a new protocol entirely, which would essentially turn back type two before the treaty was negotiated. and to dublin in brussels that is not suitable and will not happen. i suppose in the london point of view there is a a partnership on the european side as well in the sense
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that mumblings and grumblings about this and talk of a trade war, in truth nobody wants a trade war is certainly not in the middle of a kind of global recession, and not when they are also working cheek by jail on the military situation in ukraine and on the actions against russia in terms of sanctions. what do you think is most likely the outcome of this because in that sense it's nobody�*s benefit, nobody possibly can manage for this conflict to get worse?- possibly can manage for this conflict to get worse? that is certainly true. _ conflict to get worse? that is certainly true. the _ conflict to get worse? that is certainly true. the european | conflict to get worse? that is i certainly true. the european union, i think the last thing they want is to get into a trade war with the uk at the very time when the west is supposed to be standing shoulder to shoulder against russia's invasion of ukraine. the flip side of that is as you diplomats say frequently, if we are condemning russia for breaching international law and updating the international order,
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how then could the uk deliberately breach a treaty that it have negotiated with the european union two and a half years ago? so there are many ways to look at this and while i think the eu would like to get into negotiations to try and find a landing zone with the uk on making the protocol more manageable, if the uk goes ahead and legislates to completely overturn the protocol, thenit to completely overturn the protocol, then it cannot regard the uk as an anonymous partner in the negotiations and it will regard the threat of legislation as essentially a gun on the table. and they are simply not predisposed to entering into that scenario. so, while they don't want to get into a trade war, this certainly if this goes all the way and becomes law, then we are into a much more confrontational situation, and while it may not be a full—scale trade war, immediately them certainly the eu would take
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graduated steps towards some kind of retaliation, possibly initially legal action on freezing some of the legal action on freezing some of the legal action on freezing some of the legal action that they announced backin legal action that they announced back in 2021 and perhaps adding more infringement proceedings on the basis of what they would see as breaches of the protocol already by the uk. but all of that is a scenario that nobody really wants to get into, but if the uk goes ahead and overturns a mutually agreed treaty, then that would be seen as a very serious situation.— very serious situation. tony, good to talk to you _ very serious situation. tony, good to talk to you again. _ very serious situation. tony, good to talk to you again. thank- very serious situation. tony, good to talk to you again. thank you i very serious situation. tony, good i to talk to you again. thank you very much for your time. and tony mentioned that there is a link that some in brussels and dublin are making with ukraine and breaking international law. well, let's go to ukraine. ukraine's second city of kharkiv has come under renewed attack with a number of russian missile strikes over the past 21l hours. although russia's main focus remains the donbas region further south, kharkiv is just 20 miles from the border, and the strikes have raised concerns that it
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could again become a target for intensive russian artillery fire. wyre davies has this report from the city. after a relatively benign few weeks, kharkiv has again become the focus of russian attacks. a late—night missile strike on this shopping centre in the eastern suburbs caused considerable damage but no casualties. elsewhere in the city, a man was reportedly killed and several others injured in another bombing. explosions. right at the start of this war, as russian troops invaded, there was intense fighting around kharkiv, a key russian objective. ukraine's second largest city, an important industrial complex and just 20 miles from the russian border. but ukrainian troops prevailed... shouting. ..forcing the russians back, but not far.
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and that's the problem. from just across the border, kharkiv and its 1.4 million residents are still well within range of russian artillery and missiles. translation: we are worried i because people started coming back to the city with their children and families, yet it's all starting again, really bad things. the bombardments are even more intense. much of the focus of recent russian attacks has been down in the donbas region, but recent intelligence reports do suggest that the russians might be regrouping and refocusing, attacking again places like kharkiv further to the north. it's a monumental effort defending the donbas cities of severodonetsk and lysychansk, where civilians struggle to survive under relentless russian fire. if russia was to amplify the northern and eastern fronts,
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it would undoubtedly stretch limited ukrainian resources. president zelensky has appealed for more military help. longer range rocket launchers have been promised by the uk and others. but time is of the essence. explosion. wyre davies, bbc news, kharkiv. there's increasing concern about the knock—on effect of the war in ukraine across the world. the country is a major grain exporter, and today, the head of the world trade organization, ngozi okonjo—iweala, has told the bbc she fears a "dire situation worldwide" if it's not able to get its harvest out. she spoke to our global trade correspondent dharshini david. very stark words from her. she's saying we could face a food crisis that lasts years, not months, unless swift action is taken, and here's why. usually ukrainian crops can feed 400 million mouths, but russia stands accused of turning that breadbasket into a stealth missile because all those blockaded
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ports means that the stream of exports has slowed by about 80% to a trickle. that's really worrying for countries such as libya and egypt, which are really reliant on ukrainian grain, but it's also a problem for the rest of us because, of course, that's pushed up prices. wheat prices up by 35% since the start of the war. well, russia's foreign minister has been in talks today to try and look at the possibility of a grain corridor, safe passage for ships, but there's been no agreement and he's not taking any responsibility and the clock is ticking. another harvest is due in just a few weeks' time, and if that is wasted on top of what's already languishing in silos, that could mean the hunger pangs that are being experienced by some, the social unrest, risks becoming a humanitarian crisis for some of the most vulnerable on the planet. in his first commons appearance since winning monday's vote of confidence, borisjohnson said nothing would stop the government delivering for the british people. in just over two weeks, the voters of tiverton and honiton
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in devon will get a chance to give their verdict in a by—election, triggered after conservative neil parish admitted watching pornography in parliament and stood down. our political correspondent alex forsyth has been talking to some of them. tom's family has farmed this land for decades. it sits in a quiet corner of devon, usually considered safe tory turf. now, though, there's a lot of political noise here. opposition parties are trying to overturn the conservative vote. at this farming business, they're trying to decide which way to go. with rising costs and a labour squeeze, they are disillusioned. it's notjust the conservatives i think people are fed up with, i don't think there's anyone in westminster, really, that represents anyone on the ground. i mean, you know, labour and the lib dems have had a golden opportunity now. they seem to be lacking policy. everyone seems to be
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a career politician now. there seems to be a lack of people from industry. so, perhaps, a political hill to climb in this rural seat. the lib dems are keen to be seen as the main challengers to the tories here despite labour coming second last time round. in the market town of tiverton, annie, who runs a lifestyle shop, has been listening. ijust want to vote tactically to ensure that tories do not get in again at the moment. so, iwill vote lib dem. boris is ripping up everything that is democratic about our society, and that's not right. with so much riding on it, some residents can't help but notice they carry a lot of clout right now. we've certainly had more leaflets than ever. - a pile like that by the door, yeah. this isn't the only seat the conservatives are defending. there's another by—election in wakefield in west yorkshire on the same day, and they're trying to hold off labour there. both are a test for borisjohnson, with plenty of his own mps, including those are still unsure about his leadership,
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watching to see whether or not he can still win votes. here in devon, the stakes are particularly high, given it's been solid conservative for decades. in honiton, local bar ownerjim thinks it should stay that way. obviously we're pretty conservative down in this part of the world, have been for a long time. i don't know, it's an awkward one. my man, boris, what can you say about him? he's... i don't think anyone else could've done any better. but what do you do, you vote him out and go and vote in another party that will probably only do what he does. whichever road voters here end up choosing, the consequences could well travel far beyond this seat�*s boundaries. alex forsyth, bbc news, tiverton and honiton. details on all candidates in both by elections to be found on the bbc news website. a woman has been killed and 14 children injured after a car drove
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into a crowd on a street in berlin. the person who died was a schoolteacher who was on a trip with a class of teenagers. the incident happened during the morning rush hour in one of the city's busiest shopping streets. the driver, a 29—year—old man, has been detained, but police say it's unclear whether the incident was intentional or an accident. our correspondent damien mcguinness has the latest. it was just before 10:30am in the morning that a silver renault clio drove into a crowd of people standing on a corner near the main shopping centre of western berlin. packed with tourists and locals, this is one of the busiest parts of berlin. the car then carried on driving another 200 metres, again going onto the pavement, crashing into more people before ending up grinding to a halt, smashed into a shop window of a perfume shop. the driver was then detained by police. police have since said
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that the driver is a 29—year—old german—armenian man who lives in berlin. he is now being questioned because what's not clear is what is behind this terrible incident. was it intentional? did he lose control of the car, or was this a medical emergency? police say they still don't know. so, that's why it's very important not to speculate. the reason why the whole area was sealed off by so many emergency vehicles and some of the shopping centres were evacuated was because in 2016, just a few metres away from this incident, there was an islamist terror attack. a white lorry drove into a crowded christmas market, injuring 70 people and killing 12. the worry today was that this was also an islamist terror attack. police say, though, there is still no evidence of that, they still don't know if it was intentional or not. and that is why police are warning
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people not to jump to conclusions, and to send any videos they have straight to them so they can evaluate what happened. either way, though, whether it was an accident or whether it was intentional, it's bringing back memories of that tragedy in 2016, making what happened today, which is terrible in itself, even more tragic to the people here in berlin because of those painful memories. damien mcginnis there in berlin. sir cliff richard and paul gambaccini have been at the house of lords today campaigning for a proposed new law which would give people accused of sexual offences anonymity unless they are charged. they want it to be added as an amendment to the next criminaljustice bill to go through parliament. earlier, our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford spoke to sir cliff and paul gambaccini from our westminster studio. the proposed new law would effectively make it a criminal offence if you were to name someone who was accused of a sexual offence,
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but who hadn't been charged. that means they would be under investigation, but hadn't been charged. obviously that's a situation where someone could be cleared long before they got charged. i'm very glad to bejoined in the studio by sir cliff richard, who obviously infamously faced a horrendously damaging accusation, won a court case against the bbc for publicising that investigation. obviously never charged. you've been part of this campaign to get the law changed. it may seem obvious, but why is it important to you to get the law changed? well, in the end, it's impossible to understand what it's been like i went through four years of a disastrous time for me.
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because the accuser could've got rid of me, they could've damaged my whole lifestyle. you just have to say, it would be ridiculous to think that any accusation that comes in is true _ we can't say that 100% of the accusations are true, 100% are not. i was one of the nots. this is notjust for the showbiz, the actor, the celebrity, it is for the man in the street. it is outrageous to think anybody would stop this from going through, it's just a compromise. it'sjust until you are charged. i wasn't even arrested. if i hadn't been named, nobody to this day would've known that i had a false accusation.
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you introduced paul gambaccini before i could. paul, you also faced horrendous accusations, you were very angry with how you were treated, from your experience, why is this the answer, to say that it should be illegal to name someone who is accused of a sexual offence before they have been charged? because it only does harm. i know that there are many people of good faith who think— that it is right to name someone who has just been accused - of something in the hope of more people coming forward, - but i have become an expert. on all of these cases in the past ten years and i can tell you that it does not flatter genuinely abused j people to be lumped together with liars and fantasists. i it doesn't do their cause any good. i've always been someone who was on the side - of abused women, and it is indeed because i went i
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on breakfast television i to defend abused women against jimmy savile that i was accused. _ i think people are tending to look against this, i they should realise that there | is a clause that says if a judge or magistrate believes - that the suspect is a menace in the current moment| then he can be named. and the example we give is of a cab driver, john worboys, _ who was molesting women. in that case, the judge i could say he was a threat in the present moment. when you are talking about events that are over and done with, - years behind, clearly if you believe about the professionalism - | of the police, you will give them | the time to sort it out and decide with the crown prosecution service if there is - justification for a charge. sir david attenborough has been officially appointed a knight grand cross of the order
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of st michael and st george. he was given the honour by the prince of wales at windsor castle for services to broadcasting and conservation. sir david, 96, was called a "visionary environmentalist" by the duke of cambridge at saturday's platinum jubilee party at the palace. needless to say, sir david is to carry on broadcasting and continue making documentaries. thank goodness. helena wilkinson has been at windsor castle for us. we talk about national treasures, don't we? sir david attenborough definitely falls into that category. a really special ceremony for the 96—year—old here at windsor castle earlier on. he was knighted for a second time. that ceremony, as you mentioned there, carried out by prince charles on behalf of the queen, and he looked very happy when he was receiving that honour. sir david was actually first knighted by the queen in 1985, and the award he received today
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is much more prestigious than that. he's been officially appointed a knight grand cross of the order of st michael and st george. it's all to highlight the work he has done on the natural world in his documentaries and also his campaigning to protect it as well. and if you watched platinum at the palace on saturday, jane, you will have seen sir david featured. his name was projected onto the front of the palace on that weekend. and he looked absolutely thrilled when we saw him after he received that honour. he looked very happy indeed. he's 96 years old, no sign of him slowing down, still making documentaries, still inspiring so many people across the world with his work. and lots of other people, jane, here also receiving honours today, but there was a lot of talk outside of the castle grounds with a lot of very excited people saying, "did you see sir david attenborough?" you may have seen this
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picture on social media, 16—year—old valaray in her prom dress outside her bombed—out school in kharkiv. the students in her class were determined to go ahead with their graduation despite the war and everything they've been living through. and they were going to look their very best for what will be a memorable location in their hopefully very long lives. valaray spoke to bbc news a little earlier. translation: i wanted the whole world to pay l attention to that our country and to my hometown is going on. and now the building where civilians live are destroyed. it was the idea of my classmates, and the ukrainian military helped us to do this. as for the photograph of me, i wanted to show that contrast between my school and me. it describes the situation in the country. i was surprised it received so much
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attention, but i'm proud that my country is very strong, and the ukrainian forces, as well, because they have been fighting against the enemy since the 21st of february. as for me, it was unexpected because i have never thought my photo would be seen by the whole world. it was not about me, it was more about bringing attention to the situation in my hometown, in my country. i wanted to add we are proud of our heroes and armed forces of ukraine. we believe we will win because kindness will always win over evil. especially i'm grateful to the military unit kraken who defended my school.
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now it's time for a look at the weather with darren. hello there. it will be turning drier overnight. the rain in scotland petering out, the heavy thundery showers are fading away this evening, and the rain in northern ireland becomes much lighter as it moves over the irish sea into northern parts of england. so, many places will be dry by the morning, clearer skies in the south, and temperatures holding at around 10—12 celsius. we start with some early sunshine in wales, the midlands, southern england — the cloud further north could produce a few showers for a while, otherwise some sunny spells. out to the west, though, we've got this thickening cloud, bringing with it mostly light and patchy rain. something a bit wetter and rather misty and murky in south wales and the southwest of england. but ahead of that, some sunshine for a while, and it should be a warmer day than today in scotland. moving ahead into friday, and we've got some stronger winds in the northwest — this is where we'll see quite a number of heavy showers. a bit of a damp start in the southeast of england, but brightening up. most of england and wales will be dry. quite warm air, actually, on friday, and in the sunshine,
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highs of 23 celsius. hello, i'm christian fraser. you're watching the context on bbc news. the survivors and family members of those killed in the mass shootings of buffalo and uvalde have testified before congress, as negotiations on gun reform continue in the us senate. one of those testifying was an 11—year—old schoolgirl who survived by covering herself in blood. i thought he was going to come back to the room, so i grabbed the blood and put it all over me. new forecasts on the global economy suggest uk growth will fall behind that of all the g7 nations in 2023, as inflation and the war in ukraine takes its toll. and in ukraine, momentum appears to be shifting in the battle for that eastern city of severodonetsk, with ukrainian troops pulling back from the outskirts of the city.

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