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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 11, 2022 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: the first flight to take asylum seekers from the uk to rwanda is given the go—ahead by the high court. it's reported that prince charles has described the deportation policy as "appalling" — his office insists the prince is politically neutral. brazilian police searching for british journalist dom philips and another man in the remote amazon rainforest, have found possible human remains. as you can see, this eye is not blinking. i can't smile on this side of my face. singerjustin beiber opens up
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to his fans about the facial paralysis that's forced him to cancel a series of shows. england's cricketers have it all to do at trent bridge today, after a dominant start to the second test by new zealand, who are building a big first innings. good morning, for many of us the weekend promises some warm sunshine, but the further north you are across the uk, there will be some pretty hefty showers around and it will be windy. i'll have all the weather details here on request. —— on breakfast. good morning, it's saturday "june. the high court has ruled that a flight taking asylum seekers from the uk to rwanda can go ahead on tuesday, despite a legal bid by campaigners. it's the first flight under a new government policy deporting those who illegally enter the uk to rwanda to apply for asylum there. mark easton reports. is it lawful to give people seeking asylum in the uk
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a one—way ticket to rwanda? telling them to pursue refugee status thousands of miles south in east africa? the first migrants are due to make thatjourney next tuesday, with campaigners today failing in their legal bid to stop the removals. the high court in london heard from home office lawyers that six asylum seekers who had been due to be deported have had their removal directions cancelled, but the judge was not persuaded to halt the flight carrying 31 others, dismissing arguments that the policy is unlawful. the government welcomed thejudgement — campaigners said the fight goes on. no, it's absolutely not a landmark day, and doesn't — it is important to note this isn't the substantive hearing, so this isn't in any way a vindication of the home secretary's policy — that is still to be tested in the courts in the next few weeks. the lawyer representing those trying to stop next week's flight, raza husain, pointed out that the home office has repeatedly claimed that their rwanda policy has been given the green light by the unhcr, the un agency responsible for the
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refugee convention. that's misleading and incorrect, he told the judge. the united nations has used rwanda for several years... priti patel has consistently claimed her deal with rwanda is lawful, under the refugee convention. this agreement is comparable with all our domestic and international legal obligations. but in court, a barrister for the un told thejudge: notjust once, but on numerous occasions, it was claimed. after the deal was signed in kigali in april, the un had two meetings with priti patel and told her the arrangement broke international law. the government's legal team, however, interprets the convention differently, noting that more than 10,000 asylum seekers have risked their lives crossing the channel in small boats already this year, and arguing there is a significant public interest
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in a policy that will deter people from making those journeys, and undermine the activities of criminal people smugglers. around 100 asylum seekers are now in immigration detention, threatened with deportation to rwanda. in brook house near gatwick, some have been on hunger strike. 0ne syrian spoke to the bbc. a translator has voiced his words. translation: i came to the uk because it's the only place - i have connections to. my brother, my uncle and my aunt live here. if i end up in rwanda, my future and the future of my two kids will be destroyed. the home office had always expected a legal challenge and welcoming the high court decision last night, the home secretary insisted she will not be deterred. however, campaigners have been given permission to appeal against thejudgement. the matter to be decided at a hearing on monday, just hours before the flight to kigali is due to take off. mark easton, bbc news, at the high court. the prince of wales has reportedly described the government's policy of flying asylum seekers to rwanda
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as "appalling". an article in the times newspaper claims prince charles made the remarks during private conversations. our correspondent helena wilkinson has more on this. good morning helena. this is a private conversation that has been overheard but has now been reported in the papers. take us through what we know? absolutely, members of the r0 al what we know? absolutely, members of the royal family — what we know? absolutely, members of the royal family are _ what we know? absolutely, members of the royal family are supposed - what we know? absolutely, members of the royal family are supposed to - the royal family are supposed to stay out of politics. we know from the past that prince charles has spoken very publicly on matters of public policy. a couple of years ago he said that would end. but what we have got this morning in the times newspaper is according to an unnamed source, prince charles made private comments about the government? rwanda asylum plan, and criticised it, describing it as "appalling". according to this source, prince charles expressed opposition to the plan on a number of occasions, and this source is quoted in the paper is saying prince charles said he was
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"more than disappointed" in the policy, he says the government because �*s whole approach is appalling and was not impressed with the government's approach of travel. and also particularly disappointed because later this month he will represent the queen, he has to go to the commonwealth heads of government summit, that takes place in the capital of rwanda, and there is reportedly frustration that this is all happening at around the same time. clarence house in response, not commenting on what were described as supposed anonymous private conversations with the prince of wales, but they restate that he remains politically neutral, and matters of policy are decisions for the government. brazilian police have found possible human remains in their search for uk journalist dom phillips and bruno pereira, an expert on indigenous peoples. the pair disappeared six days ago while travelling through the amazon rainforest.
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police say experts will analyse the material that's been found, as well as blood traces that were discovered on a fishing boat. katy watson reports. from up here you get an idea of the vastness of the amazon. and with that, the challenges faced by the search teams in finding the two men. on friday, though, there was a significant devastating breakthrough. material found significant devastating breakthrough. materialfound in the river that could be human remains. not far from the area that dom phillips and bruno pereira were last seen. it will now be sent to the city of manaus for forensic analysis. authorities are also examining traces of blood on a boat longing to a suspect, a local fisherman. dom phillips and bruno pereira are experts in their field. one an experienced journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travel companion, a renowned expert on indigenous affairs, a man who knows these community well but
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also has his enemies, and had been threatened in the past for his work in trying to denounce illegal mining and fishing. and it was on this river that they were threatened again in the days leading up to their disappearance. we again in the days leading up to their disappearance.— their disappearance. we urge brazilian authorities - their disappearance. we urge brazilian authorities to - their disappearance. we urge i brazilian authorities to redouble their efforts to find dom phillips and bruno pereira. with time of the essence in view of the real risks to their life and security. it is therefore crucial that the authorities at the federal and local levels react robustly and expeditiously, including by fully deploying available means and necessary specialised resources to effectively search over the remote area in question. the effectively search over the remote area in question.— area in question. the news of the missin: area in question. the news of the missing pair— area in question. the news of the missing pair has _ area in question. the news of the missing pair has gained _ area in question. the news of the | missing pair has gained worldwide attention. celebrities and football players have called for the government to step up and find mr phillips and mr perera. that is a call that has been echoed by dom phillips's sister in london. she called for an in—depth and open investigation into what has happened. katy watson, bbc news.
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the prime minister has urged ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british citizens sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. aiden aslin and shaun pinner were captured while with the ukrainian army and tried as mercenaries by a russian proxy court in the so—called donetsk people's republic in eastern ukraine. joe inwood is in kyiv this morning — so what will the next steps be? we have been talking to the two british men's mps we will be talking to one today as well, they have been urging intervention, but what now? prime minister borisjohnson has urged his ministers to do everything they can, but in truth it is difficult to know what that really could be. foreign secretary les truss spoke to her counterpart here, both of them downstairs and said it was a brief of the conventions. but in terms of black leaders that can be pulled, you don't know what they
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can grasp for, there are no formal relations between the united kingdom and the donetsk people's republic, they don't recognise it or the court, there is not much they can do legally automatically. between ukraine and the donetsk people �*s republic there is a state of war, so there are no diplomatic levers they can pull. and in terms of sanctions they have been stepped up continuously throughout this, the uk has led the way, so it is difficult to know what more they could do their short of what they are doing already as a result of this war. it comes down out of two options possibly. one is speculation, but it has been talk of prisoner exchanges throughout this process, there was another prisoner exchange just recently between ukraine and the russians, so that is an option, and there has been some suggestion that there has been some suggestion that the severe nature of the sentence was to make them more valuable as prisoners in an exchange. all of course there is an appeal. —— or of course. but that would reduce their sentence to life improvement, so
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things are certainly looked bleak for the two men.— things are certainly looked bleak for the two men. certainly do, thank ou joe. a man has been arrested on suspicion of murder after a boy was stabbed at a house in manchester. the 15—year—old died in hospital after being attacked alongside his mother, who remains in a stable condition. detectives say the 44—year—old man in custody was arrested in kent, and is believed to be known to the victims. a father and son have been killed in a crash during the isle of man tt. roger stockton and his son bradley, both from crewe, died during the final lap of the second sidecar race. in a statement, organisers said it was "with a deep sense of sorrow" that they could confirm both racers had been killed. five riders have now died at this year's event. proposals for a new salt and sugar tax are expected to be formally rejected when the government publishes its food strategy next week. the policy paper, due to be announced on monday, is in response to an independent review led by the founder of the leon restaurant
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chain henry dimbleby. labour said the government's plan is nothing more than "vague intentions". the singerjustin bieber has revealed he is suffering from facial paralysis after cancelling shows on his world tour earlier this week. in an instagram video the pop star said he had ramsay hunt syndrome, which is caused when a virus, like shingles, affects the facial nerve near a person's ears. he said he doesn't know how long it will take to recover. as you can probably see from my face, i have this syndrome called... ramsay hunt syndrome. and it is from this virus that attacks the nerve in my ear, in my facial nerves, and has caused my face
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to have paralysis. as you can see, this eye is not blinking. i can't smile on this side of my face. this nostril will not move. so there's full paralysis on this side of my face. so for those who are frustrated by my cancellations of the next shows, i'm just physically, obviously not capable of doing them. and on the back of that, lots of people would be interested in what ramsay hunt syndrome is and how viruses can affect people like justin bieber. we will talk to chris and linda at 8:10 a.m., they are biologists and we will find out more from them then.— from them then. let's find out how the weather _ from them then. let's find out how the weather is _ from them then. let's find out how the weather is for _ from them then. let's find out how the weather is for your _ from them then. let's find out how the weather is for your weekend. l from them then. let's find out how. the weather is for your weekend. ben is the man in charge today, good morning. is the man in charge today, good morninu. ., ~ ,, ., .,
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morning. thank you, good morning to ou both morning. thank you, good morning to you both and — morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to _ morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to you _ morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to you at _ morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to you at home. - morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to you at home. it - morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to you at home. it is - morning. thank you, good morning to you both and to you at home. it is a i you both and to you at home. it is a premixed weekend of weather for some, we are starting on a beautiful note, it is the sunrise in portsmouth a short time ago from one of our weather watchers. some sunny spells today yes, but some showers too. and with some brisk winds towards the north of the uk. showers will be quite blustery in nature, we have this swell of cloud on the satellite picture, that is an area of low pressure and the closer you are to that the greater the chance you will see some wet and blustery weather. just over the last few hours we have seen some outbreaks of rain pushing in from the western side of scotland, some showers for northern ireland, it is quite windy at the moment as well whereas further south across england and wales is quite breezy, some showers in northern england but most places are starting the day drive. we will see a few showers popping across england and wales but they should be light in nature and well scattered. as for northern ireland and scotland they will be more showers, some will be heavy, some possibly thundery and it will remain quite windy, wind
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gusts of maybe 40—50 mph in the exposed spots towards the north—west. bridges 13—14 in north—west. bridges 13—14 in north—west scotland, 17 for northern ireland, isaiah 22 across the eastern side of england. however across southern parts of the uk you may notice if you are a hayfever sufferer, very high pollen levels, lower further north where we have more cloud and where we have showers. through this evening and tonight we will continue to see some showers, many will fade, the winds were slowly turned to ease overnight as well, temperatures generally between 9— 12 degrees. the second half of the weekend it is another sunshine and showers day but they should not be as many showers as there are today. the showers should be lighter in nature, the most frequent the further north you are across the uk. those showers will be across the uk. those showers will be across parts of scotland, northern ireland and the far north of england. not as windy as it is today, temperatures struggling in glasgow, 19 in cardiff, 21 in
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london. but let's take a quick look at the weather for the week ahead. it looks like things are set to change a little. we will see frontal systems trying to push in from the north—west, but high—pressure always quite close to the south of the uk. there is a bit of uncertainty about this, but it looks like as the area of high—pressure tends to drift eastwards later in the week, we will begin to pull some warmer air up across many parts of the uk. so look at the outlook for the coming week. if you are looking for some warmth, this may come as good news. because it looks like some southern parts could see temperatures up into the high 20s celsius by the end of the week. it will be cooler further north and west, some rain at times but actually a decent amount of dry weather on the way. that's how things are looking, back to you. some people don't like it. we are all different. we all like different
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things. but i like sunshine. see you later on. let's take a look at today's papers. and the times reports on claims prince charles is opposed to the government's policy to send asylum seekers to rwanda from the uk. the paper says a spokesperson for the prince insisted he remains politically neutral. now, the guardian says a leaked version of the government's food strategy white paper contains "virtually no fresh measures to tackle the soaring "cost of food, childhood hunger, obesity or the climate emergency." the government says the paper will set out measures to promote healthier diets. the daily express reports on a steep rise in so—called staycation bookings. the paper says there has been a surge in people making plans for uk holidays as a result of queues and cancellations at airports. and the sun reports on claims that prince charles and the duchess of cornwall are set to host a live episode of strictly come dancing from the buckingham palace ballroom
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later this year. they may even take to the dance floor. that would be a very dramatic setting. ijust have a fantastic picture. ijust love it. the most powerful, strongest creature in the world? strongest? an elephant? you mean in proportion to its size? yes, yes. it would be an ant or a cockroach or something. it would be an ant or a cockroach or something-— it would be an ant or a cockroach or somethina. ., ., �* ~ ., ., , something. you don't know what this is until ou something. you don't know what this is until you take _ something. you don't know what this is until you take a _ something. you don't know what this is until you take a really _ something. you don't know what this is until you take a really close - is until you take a really close look. so... this is a piece of broccoli. here are two ants lifting the broccoli to take it away to their nest, and it was caught on camera by photographer in indonesia. i thought it was fabulous. you cannot have randomly chanced upon that. he must have set up the
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challenge for the ants. does it matter? the fact is the ants are picking up the beautiful piece of broccoli and it is a beautiful picture. i love profiles of sports personalities. bobby george is a larger—than—life personality. 77 la rger—than—life personality. 77 years larger—than—life personality. 77 years old now, and amazing years dancing. he built his home, a 17 bedroom mansion with his own hands and he lives there now, and at 77, he is just about to start painting the whole thing himself, aged 77, because he doesn't want anybody else working on the house he built. it will be done to his standards, won't it. time now for this week's edition of the film review, with mark kermode and jane hill.
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hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. i'm jane hill. and to take us through this week's cinema releases is mark kermode. hi, mark. what have you been watching? quite the mixed bag. we havejurassic world dominion. the dinosaurs are back. we have swan song, starring german legend udo kier, and all my friends hate me. is it a comedy? is it a horror movie? dinosaurs are back. that's it. end of the review. there we go. thank you very much. thank you for watching. so, this picks up four years after fallen kingdom. man and dinosaurs must coexist because the dinosaurs are now out in the world. also co—existing are the stars of the originaljurassic park movies and the stars of the jurassic world movies. see what they've done?
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brought them all together, kind of big variety stage. the plot this time revolves around a sinister biotech company who are scheming to take over the world's food supplies through genetic engineering. our heroes must unite to save themselves and the world. here's a clip. we gotta go. going to have to break a window to get inside that thing. hope nobody's afraid of heights. growling don't move. now, did that look at all familiar to you? i mean, you know... it did a bit! ok, fine. so here's the thing. i mean, this basically plays like a greatest hits collection. i mean, ifa band comes onto a festival stage, you've got to play the hits, ok.
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so this the conclusion of the second trilogy and the end of the story. play the hits, do the bit when everybody looks up and is astonished. do the bit whenjeff goldblum, whose character, incidentally, makes no sense whatsoever but manages to make every single line a voyage of discovery somehow. because he's employed by the company. as far as i can tell, he's employed simply to tell them that everything is a really, really bad idea, but get him to do that thing he does. you said when you were watching the clip, "i love sam neill." but we all love sam neill! and he has a kind of indiana jones—style hat. the problem with this is for a while, it can't decide which movie it wants to be. i mean, fora bit, it's a kind ofjames bond movie chasing around in very scenic backstreets. then for a while it thinks it wants to be mission impossible. and there's a bit when chris pratt attempts to drive a motorbike into the back of an aeroplane. and then there's a bit which looks like it's come from austin powers with all these kind of strange sets that look very, very �*70s and a little bit shonky. and it's fine, but its two hours long. it's — none of it makes any sense. do you remember the awe,
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the sense of "i've never seen this before" that you got when you saw the first? oh, yes, yes. everyone went to see it and it was the thing to see. and it was terrifying. yes, it was. it was. i mean, the velociraptor stuff was absolutely terrifying. with this, ok, the special effects are good. of course they're good. it's a great big, expensive special effects movie. i mean, some of them are a little bit chunky, but generally great, you know, big dinosaurs. and the cast, these are big actors like this laura dern, sam neill, jeff goldblum, great. like all those people, there they are doing some stuff. and itjust kind of goes on and then it goes on and then it goes on. and then after 2.5 hours or so, it stops and you go, "yeah," you know, "i liked all those hits." i kind of wanted something more. it did feel very incoherent. it did feel like, "let's just get everyone on stage and just do some stuff." and i, funnily enough, i spoke to a colleague quite shortly afterwards, "i said, tell me the plot." and they went, "um, bio locusts, wasn't it? "jeff something?
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what was it?" so it's not going to linger long in the mind after you've seen it. it will, however, be huge, because it's jurassic world. yeah, but if you're saying it's fine, that's not... anyway greatest hits, as you say. swan song — very different choice. so, you know, must have cost less than the catering budget for one morning of jurassic world dominion. so, this is german screen legend udo kier. he's pat. he's a former hairdresser now in a retirement home, is visited by somebody from a funeral home who says rita, who was his star client who he fell out with, has asked for him to do her burial. it was left in her will. and initially, he says, and it's my favourite line, "bury her with bad hair," which is a wonderfully quotable line. then he decides that he will do it. and he walks across the town, which is sandusky in ohio, which i've never been to. and as he goes to all the old haunts, he rediscovers his old self. he picks up a hat in a store, which was a salon that he used to have. and now very much changed.
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he gets given a lime green suit that somehow reinvigorates him. the thing it reminded me of is there's a harry dean stanton movie called lucky. which is very melancholic, but really rather charming. and if you're an udo kierfan, which i am, a lot of the movies that he's been in, like, you know, flesh for frankenstein, they're at the more extreme end of the spectrum. and i thought it was really lovely seeing him do something that was so poignant, so touching, so... i mean, you've seen it. did you...? i was about to use the word touching, actually. were you moved by it? we really enjoyed it. we both said, "oh, that's sad." you know, it is melancholic. we can't get away from that. but the actual story, i really liked, i really like someone looking back on their life and looking back on how much society has changed in the 70 something years they've been alive. and also, i think the whole thing about the location, sandusky, ohio, everywhere looks a little bit barren, a little bit desolate.
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a little bit... yes. but as he rediscovers his life, it all kind of — the surroundings come to life as well. so it's like his presence is breathing life back into the community. and it's, i mean, it's funny in places. there are some really, really lovely moments. i thought his performance was great. i really liked it and i was very, very charmed. i didn't expect to be at all. i'm glad that you watched it. it's a tiny little film, but it'd be nice if people would give it some attention. and eagle—eyed people will spot that linda evans is in it as well, i have to mention that. yeah. playing a key role. yes. i shall say no more. but she's in it. so, onto a british offering, all my friends hate me, which is an uncomfortable and often kind of cringe—inducing, although deliberately so. horror? comedy? is it horror? is it comedy? it's written by tom stourton and tom palmer, who were a comedy duo called totally toms. tom stourton is pete. he's just returned from abroad, round about 30. he gets invited by his old university mates to a party for him. birthday party in a posh country house.
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these are posh people. on the way there, it's clear that he's awkward. he's out of place. he doesn't really fit in. he has an encounter with one of the locals, which looks like it's going to go a bit straw dogs. here's a clip. what do you need to know? lost? — yes. thought as much. yeah _ the old sat nav let you down, ey? surprise, surprise. long journey? yeah. um...sort of late - for my own party, actually. yeah, it's my birthday. yeah, you need to loop back round through the red gate. bear left till you hit the lamb pub, then straight shot through dawn. and it's on your left. big iron—fronted thing. i'll remember. - thank you very much. might come join you later. yeah, well, _ i'll let the others know. cheers again. thanks. - laters. and, indeed, he may actually come and join them. so, as you can see from that, the whole thing is he's a fish out of water,
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he doesn't know... he's awkward. he's difficult. ha—ha, but very, very... he gets there where all his friends, as the title tells us, appear to hate him. or do they? is he being paranoid? are they all conspiring against him? and who's this bloke that they met in a pub who they've said, "oh, he's a great bloke, he's a great guy," who turns up, and seems to pete, our central character, to be actually an agent of malice, somehow conspiring against him. and the whole thing walks on this knife edge between, is this funny or is this disturbing? or is it funny and disturbing at the same time? now, quite often when you do that, one will undercut the other or one will stop the other one from working. i thought the best thing about all my friends hate me is that it does manage to be genuinely awkward for quite a long part of its running time. it got... is that quite clever? it is clever. no, that's a very difficult balancing act. i mean, i'm sure you as well — i've seen enough horror comedies which are neither horrifying norfunny. and this isn't a horrorfilm, but
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there are elements of horror in it. it's not a flat—out comedy, although there are many, many laughs in it. but it's that thing about it...the awkwardness, the sense of paranoia. now, jane, i don't know about you. anyone who understands the paranoid experience of being around people and thinking, "what? what have i done? "what has everyone got against me? "do they know the thing that i'm trying...?" that kind of hidden secret thing? and you can see all of that even in the trailer, actually. you feel quite stressed. yes, absolutely. and i think it gets that right. now, it's not perfect. you know, some bits of it work better than others. but i thought it was, as a balancing act, i thought it was very well done because that's a hard balance to maintain. yeah, intriguing. certainly intriguing. best out this week is still... well, let's embrace it. top gun maverick is really, really great. and against all expectations, because, i mean, i didn't particularly like the first top gun. i think it's better than the first one. jane, whisper it. it is — it is better than the first one. and also, you know, would it immediately,
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if you thought "one of my favourite films will be top gun maverick?" because it's such good fun. no, i had no idea i was going to have such a good time. i can't even explain why i enjoyed it. but it's great to look at. it's fantastic to look at. the flying scenes. i don't even think i'm particularly interested in flying, but they're just extraordinary. it's absolutely fascinating to watch. and also, it works. i mean, the emotional beats get you. and i'm sitting there, i'm crying when i'm watching it thinking, "i'm really cross that it's making me cry, "but it's working really, really well." and tom cruise is really good in it. yes. and, yeah, it's beautifully made. and for those of us of our generation, just those strains of that wonderful, wonderful music. yeah, but it starts off with kenny loggins. it starts with kenny loggins doing them. that was it. as soon as you hear the kenny loggins, you go, "ok, that's it. fine, i'm back in again." you know, "i've got my hair has gone dark again. "i'm a lot thinner than i used to be." ijust i thought it was
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absolutely rip—roaringly good. let's put that on the poster — surprisingly good. quick thoughts about dvds. the duke is out on dvd. this is the stranger—than—fiction true story about the theft of a painting, great performances by jim broadbent and helen mirren. i mention this because it's directed by roger michell, whose last picture was elizabeth, a portrait in parts, which was in cinemas obviously for thejubilee and is now available on prime video. i thought the duke was very likable and very watchable and elizabeth is a very interesting documentary. and roger michell, a great man that we lost too soon. a great loss and a very, very talented and versatile filmmaker. and i actually think those two films demonstrate that perfectly. mark, thank you so much. and that is it for this week. enjoy your cinemagoing wherever you choose to go and see. see you next time. bye—bye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty
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and charlie stayt. good morning. primary school teachers are warning that covid lockdowns left young children so addicted to their smartphones that many are now sleeping with them under their pillows. concerns that children are spending more time in front of screens than ever before were raised by ofcom during the pandemic. teachers believe it has led to a rise in anxiety among some pupils. yetunde yusuf has more. children didn't want to be separated from their_ children didn't want to be separated from their mobile phones at night. sometimes we have had children in year 5_ sometimes we have had children in year 5 and — sometimes we have had children in year 5 and six who have slept with their_ year 5 and six who have slept with their mobile phones under their pillows — their mobile phones under their pillows. they would wake up in the morning _ pillows. they would wake up in the morning and feel stressed out because — morning and feel stressed out because they have 62 notifications. these _ because they have 62 notifications. these are _ because they have 62 notifications. these are some of the many issues being reported to primary school head teachers who have seen a rise in online safeguarding incidents since the first covid lockdown. sophie is the head teacher of the mill academy in crawley. she said
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she had to intervene after mobile phones being used at home were affecting learning in school. it is kind of really — affecting learning in school. it 3 kind of really irregular occurrence. we are having to have these conversations. we are also having to have conversations with families earlier and earlier around use of devices, where children are using devices, where children are using devices younger and younger. we have seen the children exhibiting signs of almost device addiction, they really want to be with their devices all the time, and certainly at home parents have described experiencing difficulty separating them from their devices. a level of anxiety as well that we have seen increase in some children. if i well that we have seen increase in some children.— some children. if i have told you that i some children. if i have told you that i can't _ some children. if i have told you that i can't get _ some children. if i have told you that l can't get it _ some children. if i have told you that i can't get it back... - some children. if i have told you that l can't get it back... at - some children. if i have told you that l can't get it back... at the | that i can't get it back... at the academy _ that i can't get it back... at the academy of _ that i can't get it back... at the academy of custom _ that i can't get it back... at the academy of custom schools - that i can't get it back... at the academy of custom schools in l academy of custom schools in rochester teaching online has become a priority. they say incidents happening five times more than before the pandemic. sometimes the content they — before the pandemic. sometimes the content they are _ before the pandemic. sometimes the content they are doing _ before the pandemic. sometimes the content they are doing online - before the pandemic. sometimes the content they are doing online can - before the pandemic. sometimes the content they are doing online can be| content they are doing online can be a little distressing to them. it might be a particular character appearing that would give them nightmares, it might be talking to someone online that they don't know.
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what should we do? well done. parents— what should we do? well done. parents and carers allowing their children the freedom to explore online, while keeping them safe, can be a tricky balance. mr; online, while keeping them safe, can be a tricky balance.— be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten. and — be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, and she _ be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, and she sees _ be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, and she sees some - be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, and she sees some of - be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, and she sees some of her . is ten, and she sees some of her friends, oh, my friend has tiktok, my friend has youtube, my friend has a facebook account, and it's really hard to turn around and say you are not actually old enough of that. b, not actually old enough of that. a recent report by ofcom found that after lockdown children spend more time than ever in front of screens, and at that make up the restrictions left the space in children's lives that they filled with social media, gaming and content. the nspcc say what children are coming across online is having a big impact on their mental health. we online is having a big impact on their mental health.— online is having a big impact on their mental health. we know that a hu . e their mental health. we know that a huge number _ their mental health. we know that a huge number of _ their mental health. we know that a huge number of children _ their mental health. we know that a huge number of children have - their mental health. we know that a huge number of children have been | huge number of children have been bullied online, we know a huge number of children are finding concerning more nasty content, often that they are not even searching for, but they are stumbling across.
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how can you be better equipped as a school to deal with this?— school to deal with this? there needs to be — school to deal with this? there needs to be a _ school to deal with this? there needs to be a more _ school to deal with this? there needs to be a more strategic i school to deal with this? there i needs to be a more strategic view from governmental level. if the support is not out there for children's mental health, my concern is when they move beyond primary level, the real reality, as you speak to secondary colleagues, children becoming school reviews ares. ., , , ares. the government says it is trainina ares. the government says it is training senior _ ares. the government says it is training senior mental - ares. the government says it is training senior mental health i ares. the government says it is - training senior mental health leads in state schools by 2025, and that it's in state schools by 2025, and that its safety bill will tough sanctions on internet platforms if they fail to protect children from harm or inappropriate content. meanwhile schools say they are having to come up with ever more creative and dynamic solutions. yetunde yusuf, bbc news. we'll be speaking to the senior online safety policy officer at the nspccjust after 8:00 this morning. good morning mike, what have you got
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for us today? cricket would be boring if it was consistent team is performing well all the time, wouldn't it? is performing well all the time, wouldn't it?— performing well all the time, wouldn't it? is there bad news cominu ? wouldn't it? is there bad news coming? england _ wouldn't it? is there bad news coming? england dramaticallyj wouldn't it? is there bad news- coming? england dramatically turned the test around, _ coming? england dramatically turned the test around, they _ coming? england dramatically turned the test around, they could _ coming? england dramatically turned the test around, they could have - the test around, they could have wrapped up the series if they win the second test against new zealand, but the building yesterday wasn't quite as sharp. we are up against it now. it keeps us on our toes. a huge day ahead for england as they look to wrestle back control of the second test against new zealand. following england's heroics at lord's last weekend, where they won only their second test in their last 17 matches, it was back to reality yesterday as new zealand battled their way into a commanding position, finishing the day on 381/4. our correspondentjoe wilson reports on the thrills and the spills of day one at trent bridge. the second test for ben stokes' england. the captain invited new zealand to bash. and this happened, often. new zealand were missing their then an top—ranked batter kane
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williamson, who has covid. but they hit fours frequently, frequently, not quite working out as england had planned. ben stokes brought on ben stokes to bowl. two wickets before lunch, but follow the plot, what is that coming? another four. lunch, but follow the plot, what is that coming? anotherfour. a beauty. devon conway in full flow in fact. and then a twist in england's direction as stokes came back to dismiss henry nicholls and james anderson got rid of conway for 46. anderson got rid of conway for 46. and then with daryl mitchell batting, joe root dropped this opportunity, and the captain stayed cool opportunity, and the captain stayed cool. mitchell continued his strong form from the first test, such power and precision with this shot. it appeared to land directly in the spectator�*s drink, and yet england's matthew potts made the official signal the ball having collided with the beer. cider actually! this handshake meant that mitchell and tom blundell were compiling a
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significant partnership. both past 50 as new zealand of their total past 300. after several drops here was chance that the slip field has just left. new zealand were excellent, but england help them. joe wilson, bbc news. to golf, and bryson dechambeau has become the latest major winner to turn his back on golf�*s pga tour, and join the new saudi—funded breakaway series. the american won the 2020 us open, and is in the prime of his career, unlike some of the others who've joined the breakaway series. confirmation of dechambeau's involvement came the day after the pga tour said it was suspending any members who joined the rival circuit. his first appearance will be in the second event of the £200 million series. how about this, andy murray has enjoyed his biggest win since undergoing hip surgery in 2019. he beat world number five stefanos tsitsipas to reach the semifinals of the stuttgart open. murray hasn't beaten a player
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in the top five since 2016, but his impressive start to the grass court season continued with a straight—sets win over tsitsipas. he'll face australian nick kyrgios in the last four later today. he plays well on all of the services, but this surface for me works really nicely with my game, and i am able to use my strengths well on this court, and yeah, i don't want to say i was the smarter player, but i felt like my game on this surface matches up better. amazing to see. lewis hamilton was left a bit sore after his mercedes struggled with bouncing on the straights in friday practice at the azerbaijan grand prix. ferrari's charles leclerc was fastest after second practice. despite topping the standings, leclerc was far from happy with his car, and was heard questioning the team about a sudden loss of power. sergio perez finished fastest in first practice, while hamilton struggled back in 12th. we tried something experimental on
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my car, and it didn't feel that great to be honest. but at least we tried it, and got data on it and now we will go through it and hopefully for tomorrow we will probably revert back to what we changed. next to football, where england's latest nations league game will take place in front ofjust 3,000 schoolchildren later. they take on the side that beat them on penalties in the final of euro 2020, italy. the game is being played in wolverhampton, they are spreading the game around, but molineaux will be mostly empty this evening as part of the punishment imposed on the football association for crowd trouble at that euro final at wembley lastjuly. gareth southgate's side need a win, having drawn with germany and lost to hungary so far in the nations league. elsewhere, scotland play the republic of ireland and wales take on belgium just three days after losing to the netherlands. and captain gareth bale has spoken out about the lack of consideration for player welfare. it's their fourth game in 11 days with their world cup qualification win against ukraine sandwiched between three nations league games. and bale believes the fixture pile—up
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is putting too much of a strain on all involved. something has to change, its people at the top of the game i think have to do something, but unfortunately money comes into it, they want to make more money and it's a business at the end of the day. but the player welfare, at the end of the day. but the playerwelfare, i at the end of the day. but the player welfare, i think money needs to be overlooked and you need to look after the players, because without the players there is no product. now we are paying tribute this morning to a true football legend. billy bingham, the most successful manager of northern ireland's football team, has died at the age of 90. bingham played in the 1958 world cup before leading northern ireland as manager to the world cup in 1982, where they got a stunning win over spain. patrick gearey looks back at his life. ajune a june evening nearly ajune evening nearly a0 years ago. wellcome post spain against billy bingham's unfancied northern ireland. what happened next is enshrined in history. bud
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ireland. what happened next is enshrined in history. and northern ireland enshrined in history. and northern ireland have _ enshrined in history. and northern ireland have done _ enshrined in history. and northern ireland have done it! _ enshrined in history. and northern ireland have done it! they - enshrined in history. and northern ireland have done it! they have . enshrined in history. and northern. ireland have done it! they have won the group! billy bingham embraces the group! billy bingham embraces the goalscorer gerry armstrong. everything was in their favour. the home _ everything was in their favour. the home ground, the spanish press, the world _ home ground, the spanish press, the world press— home ground, the spanish press, the world press wanting spain to get through. — world press wanting spain to get through, fever wanting them to get through _ through, fever wanting them to get throu~h. . through, fever wanting them to get throuth. ., , ., ., . , ., , through. that performance epitomised binuham, through. that performance epitomised bingham. the — through. that performance epitomised bingham, the wholehearted _ bingham, the wholehearted single—minded attitude that made him successful as a player and manager. the coach who coaxed his team to the world cup and taught them not to settle for that. he made this seem natural. ~ ~ �* �* ., natural. commentator: and northern ireland have qualified _ natural. commentator: and northern ireland have qualified for— natural. commentator: and northern ireland have qualified for the _ natural. commentator: and northern ireland have qualified for the world - ireland have qualified for the world cup finals for the second successive time! , ., ~ . ., cup finals for the second successive time! , .,~ time! they went to mexico in 1986 as representatives _ time! they went to mexico in 1986 as representatives of _ time! they went to mexico in 1986 as representatives of a _ time! they went to mexico in 1986 as representatives of a divided - time! they went to mexico in 1986 as representatives of a divided state. i representatives of a divided state. back then, northern ireland meant chaos and killing. it back then, northern ireland meant chaos and killing.— chaos and killing. it has been nearl a chaos and killing. it has been nearly a civil _ chaos and killing. it has been nearly a civil war— chaos and killing. it has been nearly a civil war in _ chaos and killing. it has been nearly a civil war in northern | nearly a civil war in northern ireland now. and yet my team is a complete mixture of both tribes. her
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room together, get on together, play for each other, fight for each other, isn't it remarkable? bingham also won a red _ other, isn't it remarkable? bingham also won a red two _ other, isn't it remarkable? bingham also won a red two british _ also won a red two british championships in northern ireland, in a time and place often haunted by cold despair, he brought the warmth of valencia. the master technician who oversaw a golden era for the men in green. you will like the next story because i know you do a lot of stories about how people keep fit in old age. it is a big passion of mine, it is very important. is a big passion of mine, it is very important-— is a big passion of mine, it is very imortant. ., ., , ., i. important. you are very fit and you are not that _ important. you are very fit and you are not that old. _ important. you are very fit and you are not that old. laughs _ important. you are very fit and you are not that old. laughs. - this is about a charity that holds fitness classes for people over 50 who says it's been saved after receiving £100,000 from a mystery donor. staff at age active in sheffield described the gesture as a "miracle", but they have no idea why the stranger chose to support them.
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our reporter tom ingall went for a workout with the group. you want moves? they've got moves. each week age active welcomes hundreds of people from keep fit to zomba, they are single—handedly keeping the cod liver oil market afloat. and now they can afford to upgrade the half—time biscuits. i’d upgrade the half—time biscuits. i�*c don't know anybody from york, we didn't know what it was, we opened this letter and said "we want your bank account details! oh, we don't think so. we bank account details! 0h, we don't think so. ~ �* , think so. we didn't believe it, we thou~ht it think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was — think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was a _ think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was a hoax. _ think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was a hoax. must i think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was a hoax. must be i think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was a hoax. must be a | thought it was a hoax. must be a scam. so thought it was a hoax. must be a scam- so i _ thought it was a hoax. must be a scam. so i looked _ thought it was a hoax. must be a scam. so i looked into _ thought it was a hoax. must be a scam. so i looked into it, - thought it was a hoax. must be a scam. so i looked into it, rang i thought it was a hoax. must be a l scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors. — scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors, and _ scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors, and they _ scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors, and they said _ scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors, and they said it - scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors, and they said it was i solicitors, and they said it was absolutely not a hoax, it was surreal _ absolutely not a hoax, it was surreal a _ absolutely not a hoax, it was surreal. �* , , ,, ., , ., surreal. a businessman they had never met _ surreal. a businessman they had never met who _ surreal. a businessman they had never met who had _ surreal. a businessman they had never met who had never - surreal. a businessman they had never met who had never been i surreal. a businessman they had| never met who had never been to surreal. a businessman they had i never met who had never been to a class left them around £100,000 in his will. i class left them around £100,000 in his will. ., , class left them around £100,000 in his will. ~' , ., ,, ., his will. i think he must have known somebody who _ his will. i think he must have known somebody who had _ his will. i think he must have known somebody who had come _ his will. i think he must have known somebody who had come here i his will. i think he must have known somebody who had come here and i his will. i think he must have known i somebody who had come here and said to him, what it meant to them, to
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come here, make friends and be involved in a group. the come here, make friends and be involved in a group.— come here, make friends and be involved in a group. the gift means the club can — involved in a group. the gift means the club can keep _ involved in a group. the gift means the club can keep welcoming i the club can keep welcoming allcomers. well, nearly all of them. i don't think they are supposed to go that way! bi]! i don't think they are supposed to go that way!— go that way! all of these girls, the are go that way! all of these girls, they are so — go that way! all of these girls, they are so pleasant _ go that way! all of these girls, they are so pleasant and i go that way! all of these girls, | they are so pleasant and happy. go that way! all of these girls, i they are so pleasant and happy. it is important, every class that we do, because we couldn't, we need to move. _ do, because we couldn't, we need to move. older— do, because we couldn't, we need to move, older people, to keep healthy. after we _ move, older people, to keep healthy. after we will go and have a cup of coffee _ after we will go and have a cup of coffee and — after we will go and have a cup of coffee and a — after we will go and have a cup of coffee and a chat. _ after we will go and have a cup of coffee and a chat. so _ after we will go and have a cup of coffee and a chat.— coffee and a chat. so it is all about the — coffee and a chat. so it is all about the copy _ coffee and a chat. so it is all about the copy in _ coffee and a chat. so it is all about the copy in the - coffee and a chat. so it is all| about the copy in the biscuits afterwards?— about the copy in the biscuits| afterwards?_ it afterwards? that's it, yeah. it kee -s afterwards? that's it, yeah. it keeps everybody _ afterwards? that's it, yeah. it keeps everybody active i afterwards? that's it, yeah. it keeps everybody active and i afterwards? that's it, yeah. it| keeps everybody active and we afterwards? that's it, yeah. it- keeps everybody active and we all meet each other, really good. £100,000 saves age active for the future. just can't everyone's dignity. tom ingall, bbc news, sheffield. nothing awkward about that. great story. £100,000just nothing awkward about that. great story. £100,000 just like that. nothing awkward about that. great story. £100,000just like that. ben is glimmering up over here. i saw
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him joining is glimmering up over here. i saw himjoining in. we saw is glimmering up over here. i saw him joining in. we saw you. a little bit of a limber up. it is a bit early for me for a workout. good morning. not bad if you want to work out outside, maybe go for a run because it is a decent start. that is how it looks to the west of london at the moment, some sunshine overhead. however, there are some blustery showers in the mix. not a great start in the northern half of the uk where you are close to this world of cloud. it is an area of low pressure and you can see where it has been raining over the last few hours, some pretty soggy conditions across parts of western scotland, showers for northern ireland, in an north of england as well. some miss dennis here and there that should clear quite quickly. for england and wales, decent amount of sunshine, one or two mainly light showers. northern ireland will see some showers, and for scotland, showers continuing through the day, some heavy and thundery. here it will be
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winding as well. generally when you cross the northern half of the uk, just touching 50 miles an hour, unusualfor just touching 50 miles an hour, unusual for this just touching 50 miles an hour, unusualfor this time of just touching 50 miles an hour, unusual for this time of year. it is across southern areas where we have a very high pollen levels again today. further north where we have more cloud and showers, pollen levels will be lower. this evening and tonight we will keep some showers going. most of them will fade. winds will slowly ease as well and stay quite breezy. clear spells out there, temperatures typically between nine and 12 degrees. tomorrow is another sunshine and showers day but there will not be as many showers as there will be today. more frequent the further north and west you are, further south, not many showers and some decent spells of sunshine. not as windy yesterday and temperatures, maybe 17 for
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aberdeen, 21 the in london. temperatures could well become a point through the week ahead. low pressure to the north—west still bringing some frontal systems at times across western part of the uk, some outbreaks of rain but high pressure likely to dominate things down towards the south. as the high slips east, it looks like through the second half of next week we can tap into some really quite warm air from the south. all that due to for parts of of wales and southern half of england, we could see temperatures into the mid—to high 20s celsius, a burst of summer warmth potentially. there will be a bit of rain at times in a bit cooler, we will still see values well up into the 20s. it does look like there is something warmer on the way. that is how the weather is looking. back to you. thank you. see you later. we will be
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back with the headlines. it's time now for click. hey, welcome, welcome. i hope you are well. it is often said we do not appreciate our health until we lose it and if someone suffers a life—changing injury, it may be necessary for them to retrain their brain to learn how to use their body again, maybe in a different way than before. there's a new idea called neuroanimation, which is like gaming for brain repair. it is an immersive, emotional and, we are told, enjoyable style of therapy that can have a real impact. what's it say? baby babbles quack, quack, quack. ruby was 2a years old
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when she lost her leg — a simple trip to the supermarket resulting in a life—changing injury. i was going shopping to buy the stuff for the baby, you know, weaning process, buying him veggies and avocados and what have you. but, yeah, i was in the car park and i was run down by a car. at the time of the accident, ruby'd been carrying 5—month—old son leon, instinctively throwing him to safety. but the crash left her, a nurse on maternity leave at the time, facing a series of operations and intensive rehabilitation. the first three weeks in hospital, it'sjust a blur. i don't remember waking up, i don't remember who told me that i'd had my leg amputated. in my head ijust thought, "i'lljust learn how to walk again, "i'll get a fake leg, a prosthetic leg,
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"and then that would be that." i didn't realise how hard it was actually going to be. now at a live—in rehab centre called steps, she's receiving a variety of conventional treatments, as well as a new video game inspired therapy called mindpod. dolphin squeaks wow. this room's amazing. yeah, it is. the painting is beautiful as well, isn't it? it is, it's lovely. yeah. dolphin squeaks mindpod is a form of what's known as neuroanimation. it gamifies treatment by using motion sensors and cameras to track the patient�*s movements as they direct this dolphin. i'm just learning how to balance my body. along with traditional methods like physiotherapy and hydrotherapy, it aims to help improve the physical and cognitive functions of people who've experienced a serious injury. did you ever imagine, at the start of your recovery, that you'd be using games? no, i had no idea, especially
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when i first came to steps, i never imagined intense rehab to be games. were you a gamer before? no, no. i wasn't into gaming before the accident. how much do you feel that you're just instinctively moving and not thinking about it? yeah, because you're so into the game. and being in that room, with the lighting and colours, it takes you away, so it's helping, yeah, balance and co—ordination, stability, core stability. it reflects on, like, say, if i was in the kitchen, reaching for things up in the cupboards, down below. and ruby's commitment, combined with the access to the technology, has accelerated her progress. wow, that was great! how do you feel at the end of a session? tired. laughs
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tired — you don't realise how much you've actually worked out on my arms, my balance — evenjust standing. yeah. and you didn't really think about the fact that you were... crosstalk no, you're just into the game. already, some studies have shown that mindpod can be twice as effective as traditional rehab treatments... 0h! don't know how i hit that one! ..and there are more studies under way. whether it's for chronic post—stroke symptoms, parkinson's, ms or ptsd, the team behind this neuroanimation hope that they will soon understand the full range of illnesses it can treat. this type of experience is really a digital therapeutic approach, and digital therapeutic means really that you can prescribe, as a doctor, software as a pill. so, there is this intricate mapping between your movements and the dolphin's movements that you have to learn and perfect and become more skilled at. so this creates a feedback
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loop of learning and enables exploration, very much in the way a child learns to move their arms about, you know, early in their infancy. my goal is — my long—term goal that i want to achieve — is to be able to pick the baby up, my baby up from the floor. and, hopefully, ruby's access to digital therapeutics will play its part in making that a reality sooner rather than later. oh, my gosh! what a story — and how incredible is ruby? i know, she was an absolute joy and so grateful for all the positives, really a lesson for all of us. and good news, she is recovering well — she managed to go home for a weekend and in about a month or two, she's going to have the cage off her leg. oh, how fantastic! did you try the mindpod yourself? i did, i had a go off—camera and it's actually
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a lot harder than it looks. chuckles it takes a lot of concentration, which makes you stop thinking about how your body is moving, which is part of the idea. yeah, how brilliant is that? we're learning so much more about how technology can be used in rehabilitation, and omar mehtab has been looking into a new form of light therapy, which, it's hoped in the future, could be used in rehabilitation, but for the moment, is being used to hone the performance of athletes. response time — that is the key metric, isn't it? how fast you can react with some games being won by split—second decisions. but it's easier to train other areas of your game, like run more to increase your speed. # oh, yeah... strength — lift weights. but how do you increase your reaction speeds, apart from just playing more? well, there's this. this is okkul — a system that retrains sports players
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by using unique light levels, where the speed of visual processing is slower than at normal light levels. each stage offers a varying degree of difficulty, signified with a different colour — from blue, to green, to red and, finally, near black. i'll be honest — at first glance, i was quite sceptical of this. it's just changing lights, after all. but after checking it out sunderland's own luke o'nien — oof — and he clearly performed better when the lights were turned back on... i've been in here pretty much every day of every hour of every second. i think when i first came in here, evenjust with the lights on at a0mph, the balls were just bouncing off my shins and, you know, slowly, i've adjusted, my body is moving quicker and i'm dealing with faster speeds in this. it is a big part of the modern game, isn't it, how we can implement all the technology and data we have at the highest
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level of football to make marginal gains. and if that's on the analytics side or the data side or biometrics, whatever it may be, i think technology's here to stay and it is the future of the game. the good thing about this is it's very similar to the game, if not pretty much identical, in terms of the ball coming at you at speed, you've got to be able to deal with that and then execute. and football is not the only sport it is useful for. up to now, we've done cricket, baseball, table tennis, boxing and soccer. ball sports are ideal because it's hand—eye coordination. every time we get somebody in, that's the first thought — "oh, well, "you're just changing the light levels, "or this, that and the other. "you're just going to switch the light off." it is the complete opposite to that. there is a whole biological process here we're working on. but how does it actually work? it is to do with the colour and how the colours interact with the eye and the photoreceptors in the eye. but it is also to do with the level of darkness. if you lower the light levels, your visual system slows down. so, in sport, what you are predicting what is going to happen 200 milliseconds into the future.
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at low light levels, you have to predict what's happening 250 milliseconds into the future because the speed of processing is slowed down. so, if you're interacting with the ball under those conditions, you have to speed up your responses to interact with it successfully. so when you go into the light, it seems like you have more time to respond. now, in order to see how effective the system is, first, i'm going to have to set a benchmark. my touch is as heavy as me! laughs should take my time — i'm getting flustered. pass, pass, pass! yeah! sorry, sorry! sorry, jack! phew! ok, time to see if okkulo makes a difference. 0h! that was legit! ohh! it's a bit tougher. i don't know what it is — i am backing away.
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it's the light — it's messing with me a bit. and now, we've turned the lights back on. so, let's see if there's a difference. i'm taking it in my stride, my breathing has calmed down, i'm waiting for it to come to me, i'm assessing the speed, i got better as it went along. ok, so there's a bit of difference — not as much as the pros felt, but still noticeable. now, after going through the system, the effects are supposed to last around two weeks. but also, its said to help people with a degree of cognitive issues such as adhd or brain trauma, but okkulo are still researching this area. when we're working with the athletes, we're getting to see all of these effects outside of sport. we're seeing really intense focus. we're linking up with two universities to make sure that we fully understand what is going on there, but there is a real pattern of significant importance
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in and around what we're doing with these light levels. so, maybe it is not about advanced robots or fancy tech. it's something as simple as light that can unlock the next level in players. maybe i'll carry on playing for a bit after they turn off the lights at the five—a—side! that's the most i've moved in six months. that's a fascinating one, isn't it, and interesting to see how it develops. that's omar and that's it for the shortcut of click. if you fancy more from us, you can have it. it's on iplayer, waiting for you right now. we'll be back next week but, for now, thank for watching.
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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: prince charles is reported to have called the government's scheme to fly asylum seekers to rwanda "appalling". the first deportation flight to the east african country has been given the go—ahead to leave on tuesday. brazilian police searching for british journalist dom philips and another man in the remote amazon rainforest have found possible human remains. as you can see, this eye is not blinking. i can't smile on this side of my face. singerjustin beiber opens up to his fans about the facial paralysis that's forced him to cancel a series of shows. good morning. england's cricketers have a fight on their hands at trent bridge today, after a dominant start to the second test by new zealand, who are building a big first innings. good morning, for many of us the
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weekend promises some warm sunshine but the further north you are across the uk, they will be some pretty hefty showers around, and it will be windy. i will have all the details here on breakfast. good morning, it's saturday 11june. prince charles is said to have privately criticised the government's plan to send asylum seekers from the uk to rwanda, reportedly calling the measures "appalling". the claim is being made after the high court ruled that the first flight under the new policy can depart on tuesday, despite a legal challenge by campaigners. mark easton reports. is it lawful to give people seeking asylum in the uk a one—way ticket to rwanda? telling them to pursue refugee status thousands of miles south in east africa? the first migrants are due to make thatjourney next tuesday, with campaigners today failing in their legal bid to stop the removals. the high court in london heard from home office lawyers that six asylum seekers who had been
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due to be deported have had their removal directions cancelled, but the judge was not persuaded to halt the flight carrying 31 others, dismissing arguments that the policy is unlawful. the government welcomed thejudgement — campaigners said the fight goes on. no, it's absolutely not a landmark day, and doesn't — it is important to note this isn't the substantive hearing, so this isn't in any way a vindication of the home secretary's policy — that is still to be tested in the courts in the next few weeks. the lawyer representing those trying to stop next week's flight, raza husain, pointed out that the home office has repeatedly claimed that their rwanda policy has been given the green light by the unhcr, the un agency responsible for the refugee convention. that's misleading and incorrect, he told the judge. the united nations has used rwanda for several years... priti patel has consistently claimed her deal with rwanda is lawful, under the refugee convention. this agreement is comparable with all our domestic and international legal obligations. but in court, a barrister
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for the un told thejudge: notjust once, but on numerous occasions, it was claimed. after the deal was signed in kigali in april, the un had two meetings with priti patel and told her the arrangement broke international law. the government's legal team, however, interprets the convention differently, noting that more than 10,000 asylum seekers have risked their lives crossing the channel in small boats already this year, and arguing there is a significant public interest in a policy that will deter people from making those journeys, and undermine the activities of criminal people smugglers. around 100 asylum seekers are now in immigration detention, threatened with deportation to rwanda. in brook house near gatwick, some have been on hunger strike. one syrian spoke to the bbc. a translator has voiced his words.
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translation: i came to the uk because it's the only place i i have connections to. my brother, my uncle and my aunt live here. if i end up in rwanda, my future and the future of my two kids will be destroyed. the home office had always expected a legal challenge and welcoming the high court decision last night, the home secretary insisted she will not be deterred. however, campaigners have been given permission to appeal against thejudgement. the matter to be decided at a hearing on monday, just hours before the flight to kigali is due to take off. mark easton, bbc news, at the high court. our correspondent helena wilkinson has more on this. this is interesting, because there have been no denials of these comments, but almost a reassertion that the prince is not interfering in political policy? that that the prince is not interfering in political policy?— in political policy? that is absolutely _ in political policy? that is
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absolutely right. - members of the royal family are supposed to stay out of politics. we know from the past that prince charles has spoken very publicly on matters of public policy. a couple of years ago he said that would end. but what we have seen reported this morning in the times newspaper is according to an unnamed source, prince charles made private comments about the government's rwanda asylum plan, and criticised it, describing it as "appalling". according to this unnamed source, prince charles expressed opposition to the plan on a number of occasions, and this source is quoted in the paper saying prince charles was "more than disappointed" in the policy, he says the government's whole approach is appalling and was not impressed with the government's
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direction of travel. and also reportedly particularly disappointed because later this month he will represent the queen, he has to go to the commonwealth heads of government summit, that takes place in the capital of rwanda, and there is reportedly frustration that this is all happening at around the same time. clarence house in response, not commenting on what were described as supposed anonymous private conversations with the prince of wales, but they restate that he remains politically neutral, and matters of policy are decisions for the government. brazilian police have found possible human remains in their search for uk journalist dom phillips and bruno pereira, an expert on indigenous peoples. the pair disappeared six days ago while travelling through the amazon rainforest. police say experts will analyse the material that's been found, as well as blood traces that were discovered on a fishing boat. katy watson reports. from up here you get an idea of the vastness of the amazon. and with that, the challenges faced by the search teams in finding the two men. on friday, though, there was a significant yet devastating
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breakthrough. materialfound in the river that could be human remains. not far from the area that dom phillips and bruno pereira were last seen. it will now be sent to the city of manaus forforensic analysis. authorities are also examining traces of blood on a boat longing to a suspect, a local fisherman. dom phillips and bruno pereira are experts in their field. one an experienced journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travel companion, a renowned expert on indigenous affairs, a man who knows these communities well, but also has his enemies, and had been threatened in the past for his work in trying to denounce illegal mining and fishing. and it was on this river they were threatened again in the days leading up to their disappearance. we urge brazilian authorities to redouble their efforts to find phillips and pereira. with time of the essence in view of the real risks to their life and security. it is therefore crucial
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that the authorities at the federal and local levels react robustly and expeditiously, including by fully deploying available means and necessary specialised resources to effectively search over the remote area in question. the news of the missing pair has gained worldwide attention. celebrities and footballers including pele have called for the government to step up and find mr phillips and mr pereira. that is a call that has been echoed by mr phillips' sister in london. she called for an in—depth and open investigation into what has happened. tom phillips had previously worked with greenpeace. we're joined now by louisa casson from greenpeace. what information do you have this morning? it what information do you have this mornin: ? , . , , morning? it is incredibly distressing _ morning? it is incredibly
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distressing to _ morning? it is incredibly distressing to have i morning? it is incredibly distressing to have the l morning? it is incredibly i distressing to have the reports about these potential findings, distressing to have the reports about these potentialfindings, but they are still subject to analysis. it is incredibly worrying and upsetting for the families and other organisations who have worked alongside dom and bruno or anyone who shares a commitment to the amazon and protection of its peoples. amazon and protection of its --eoles. ~ . amazon and protection of its ..eoles, . ., amazon and protection of its --eoles. ~ . , amazon and protection of its n-eoles.. ., ,., peoples. what can you tell us about the nature of— peoples. what can you tell us about the nature of what _ peoples. what can you tell us about the nature of what you _ peoples. what can you tell us about the nature of what you understand i the nature of what you understand they were doing there? so the nature of what you understand they were doing there?— the nature of what you understand they were doing there? so we know they were doing there? so we know the air they were doing there? so we know the pair were _ they were doing there? so we know the pair were working _ they were doing there? so we know the pair were working alongside i the pair were working alongside indigenous communities in this incredibly remote part of the amazon rainforest, they are both experts and have a long history of really shining that global spotlight on what is happening in the amazon, what is happening in the amazon, what is happening to the indigenous people who are living there, we understand dom was researching a book into forest conservation and learning from the communities that have lived there, and their way of life in the forest. and bruno, again, has that real expertise of the area. so incredibly concerning, it is also worth pointing out that
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dom particularly in recent years had really also started to do very in—depth investigation into this context of growing violence we are seeing in the amazon as a result of the policies of the current brazilian government under bolsonaro, we have seen a really starc and worrying increase in the number of invasions of indigenous lands, murders of indigenous peoples, and so that context is really impossible to ignore, particularly if it is something that dom and bruno themselves cared strongly about and reported extensively on. the strongly about and reported extensivel on. , ., ., , extensively on. the investigation is under way. — extensively on. the investigation is under way, albeit _ extensively on. the investigation is under way, albeit it _ extensively on. the investigation is under way, albeit it is _ extensively on. the investigation is under way, albeit it is being - under way, albeit it is being criticised in terms of how quickly the brazilian authorities have moved. the nature of the work that anyone is doing, maybe some of the people who have worked with you in the past, who are looking into issues around the environment, asgreen please do, in places like that, necessarily —— as greenpeace
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do, necessarily comes with some risk, doesn't it?— risk, doesn't it? protecting the environment _ risk, doesn't it? protecting the environment should _ risk, doesn't it? protecting the environment should not - risk, doesn't it? protecting the environment should not come l risk, doesn't it? protecting the i environment should not come with those risks, standing with indigenous peoples, these rights should be guaranteed. but brazil is now one of the most dangerous places in the world should be an environmental defender, and that is why this incredibly worrying news is really the tip of the iceberg of the current policies being pursued by bolsonaro and the brazilian government, and making it really dangerous work and stepping up that risk because we can see that systematically this isn'tjust risk because we can see that systematically this isn't just a case of a delay of a few days, putting in place a proper search operation, it has been three years of policies that could have been put in place —— that have been put in place that have increased violence, turned a blind eye to logging and other activities, turned a blind eye to logging and otheractivities, but turned a blind eye to logging and other activities, but really perpetuated this economy of destruction and disregard for human rights and human safety. thank
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destruction and disregard for human rights and human safety.— rights and human safety. thank you ve much rights and human safety. thank you very much for— rights and human safety. thank you very much for your _ rights and human safety. thank you very much for your time _ rights and human safety. thank you very much for your time this - very much for your time this morning, luisa is head of forest and food at greenpeace. tom phillips, we understand this investigation is understand this investigation is under way to find out what happens to him, but real concern after that finding most recently. it is 7:13am. the prime minister has urged ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british citizens sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. aiden aslin and shaun pinner were captured while with the ukrainian army and tried as mercenaries by a russian proxy court in the so—called donetsk people's republic in eastern ukraine. joe inwood is in kyiv this morning. what will the next steps be from ukraine? good to see you this morning. when the prime minister is urging his ministers to do everything they can, what can they do?—
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what can they do? honestly very little. foreign secretary liz truss spoke to her counterpart here, both of them said it was a breach of the conventions. there are no formal relations between the united kingdom and the donetsk people's republic, they don't recognise it or the court, there is not much they can do legally automatically. there are a few options for these men. there is an appeal, that they have one month to make, that would see their sentence taken from a death sentence to life imprisonment, still an incredibly harsh punishment. but then we have probably the final option, this is where you get into speculation, the idea of prisoner exchanges. they have been prisoner exchanges, there have been prisoner exchanges, there have been prisoner exchanges, there have been calls a prisoner exchanges, and there was some thought that by giving these men a death sentence, what the russians
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are actually doing is upping their value, as unpleasant as that sounds to say, in a form of a prisoner exchange. but that is speculation, there are no guarantees, so until we have any confirmation, the future of these men is looking increasingly dangerous. a boy was stabbed in manchester. he was attacked alongside his mother who remains in a stable condition. detectives say the aa—year—old man in custody was arrested in kent and is believed to be known to the victims. a father and son had been killed in a crash. they both died during the final lap of the second sidecar race. organisers said it was with a deep sense of sorrow that they could both races had been killed.
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five riders have now died at this year's event. proposals for a new salt and sugar tax are expected to be formally rejected when the government publishes its food strategy next week. the policy paper, due to be announced on monday, is in response to an independent review led by the founder of the leon restaurant chain henry dimbleby. labour said the government's plan is nothing more than "vague intentions". the singerjustin bieber has revealed that he is suffering from facial paralysis after cancelling shows on his world tour earlier this week. in an instagram video, the pop star said he had ramsay hunt syndrome, which is caused when a virus, like shingles, affects the facial nerve near a person's ears. he said he doesn't know how long it will take to recover. as you can see, this eye is not blinking. i can't smile on this side of my face. this nostril will not move. so there's full paralysis on this side of my face. so for those who are frustrated by my cancellations
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of the next shows, um, i'm just physically, obviously not capable of doing them. i will be using this time to rest and relax and get back to 100% so that i can do what i was born to do. but in the meantime... this ain't it. justin bieber there. let's have a look a little bit of weather for you. if you are waking up in london, maybe you have weather like this. this is a camera looking out over westminster. there are times injune of this time of year when early mornings are absolutely beautiful. hazy sunshine. it feels like... it feels lovely. it is looking great this morning. is it going to be like that for everyone? that doesn't like the uk. it looks
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quite murky. it is the uk, but this isjust quite murky. it is the uk, but this is just to demonstrate a little bit of contrast, because yes, in london, certainly on my way in this morning, a beautiful start of the day. at the western start of scotland, cloud and rain. that is the scene from one of our weather watchers living in a beautiful part of the world, with some wet and blustery weather, blustery showers to come through today. some sunny spells as well. best of the sunshine, largely clear skies in the south of the uk. further north is where we have the outbreaks of rain. this is the radar picture. evidence of that soggy start for many, western and central parts, a few showers in the far north of england, but the further south, yes, a beautiful start to the day. miss dennis around that would tend to lift, long spells of
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sunshine —— mistiness. scotland seeing the lion's share of the wet weather. heavy downpours, the older flash of lightning and rumble of thunder. quite windy with gusts up to a0 or 50 miles an hour, unusually windy for this time of year. temperatures 13 degrees for some areas. low 20s across parts of south—east england. very high pollen levels across southern parts of the uk. it is the price you pay for the best of the sunshine, lower levels further north with outbreaks of rain. tonight, the showers will fade and the winds will ease. temperatures between ten and 12 degrees. tomorrow is another sunshine and showers day, but not as many showers as today. a better chance of waking up with a little bit of sunshine in scotland, some showers here and some for northern ireland. not many the further south
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you put across england and wales. it will not be as windy yesterday either. top temperatures of 17 or 18 in eastern scotland, 21 across the south—east of england. those temperatures are set to climb through the week ahead. frontal systems will always graze into the north and west of the uk, a little bit of rain at times, not an awful lot, but higher pressure further south and east. there is a bit of uncertainty, if this area of high—pressure drifts further east, it will allow us to tap into some really rather warm air for the end of the week. a real taste of summer as we had towards the end of the coming week. temperatures in the southern areas like to get into the high 20s. there will be some rain at times. it is how it is looking. back to you. next week marks a0 years since the end of the falklands war, a conflict that came at a high cost for some of its survivors
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who went on to develop symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. flashbacks, insomnia and heavy drinking were some of the long—term issues they faced, as our special correspondent allan little reports. couldn't see my kids because i was i was a bit of a loose cannon, really. everything was taken away. it was hard. ., ., ~ everything was taken away. it was hard. ., ., . ., hard. come on. when paul came home from the falklands, _ hard. come on. when paul came home from the falklands, his _ hard. come on. when paul came home from the falklands, his life _ hard. come on. when paul came home from the falklands, his life apart. i from the falklands, his life apart. for years, from the falklands, his life apart. foryears, he from the falklands, his life apart. for years, he drank, from the falklands, his life apart. foryears, he drank, he from the falklands, his life apart. for years, he drank, he couldn't sleep, he was violent. when he realised others were also struggling, he founded the organisation.— struggling, he founded the organisation. struggling, he founded the oruanisation. ., , , ., organisation. that is when i started to mend myself. _ organisation. that is when i started to mend myself. it— organisation. that is when i started to mend myself. it was _ organisation. that is when i started to mend myself. it was massive i organisation. that is when i started to mend myself. it was massive for me, ifound something to mend myself. it was massive for me, i found something to channel my mind into. iwould me, i found something to channel my mind into. i would sit into the
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corner and listen. i had the guys up here who are all like minded, we are trying to build something positive. the conversations we have in our little room, amazing. this the conversations we have in our little room, amazing.— little room, amazing. this is the erskine veterans _ little room, amazing. this is the erskine veterans village - little room, amazing. this is the erskine veterans village near i erskine veterans village near glasgow. it is home to hundreds of former servicemen and women. for them, a0 years is the blink of an eye and they commemorate the experience still. after the falklands, a long, slow evolution began in the way we think about war trauma. but back then, the stigma it carried caused many to suffer in silence shame. i carried caused many to suffer in silence shame.— carried caused many to suffer in silence shame. i think it goes back to a long-standing _ silence shame. i think it goes back to a long-standing view— silence shame. i think it goes back to a long-standing view that i silence shame. i think it goes back to a long-standing view that if i silence shame. i think it goes back to a long-standing view that if you | to a long—standing view that if you stay ill, it is really a question of character, there is something wrong with you, and it is a weakness, a character flaw. with you, and it is a weakness, a characterflaw. that with you, and it is a weakness, a character flaw. that was a very
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common view in the 20th century and you still see echoes of that in the 80s and 905. it you still see echoes of that in the 805 and 905. it is very unusual to find that now, and i would actually say rather the opposite. the military have had ma55ive change5. military have had ma55ive changes. we know that a considerable number of people actually do come forward now with mental health problems. the military have made major strides there. i am military have made major strides there. iam not military have made major strides there. i am not saying it is perfect but it is much better than it was. david cruick5hank5 wa5 but it is much better than it was. david cruick5hank5 was a beneficiary of that change. he has written a book about his ptsd. it was just 17 when he came home from the falklands. by his mid 305 he was also drinking heavily. it took al5o drinking heavily. it took nearly 20 years for him to seek help. i nearly 20 years for him to seek hel. ., ., , nearly 20 years for him to seek hel. ,, help. i knew there was something auoin on, help. i knew there was something going on. i _ help. i knew there was something going on, i didn't _ help. i knew there was something going on, i didn't know— help. i knew there was something going on, i didn't know what i help. i knew there was something going on, i didn't know what it i help. i knew there was something | going on, i didn't know what it was called, i didn't know how to explain it, i didn't want to tell anybody about it. i wanted to mask it. you knew something was wrong i didn't want to admit it. when the doctor said, i think you might have some
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sort of panic disorder or anxiety. i remember that day because i burst out crying. it was like a complete release. oh, my god, ido out crying. it was like a complete release. oh, my god, i do not have to pretend anymore. and there is help. i to pretend anymore. and there is hel. ,., . to pretend anymore. and there is hel. . ., ., to pretend anymore. and there is hel. ., , help. i get so much out of this. it cheers me _ help. i get so much out of this. it cheers me up- — help. i get so much out of this. it cheers me up. the _ help. i get so much out of this. it cheers me up. the vast _ help. i get so much out of this. it cheers me up. the vast majorityl help. i get so much out of this. it. cheers me up. the vast majority of cheers me up. the vast ma'ority of combat veterans i cheers me up. the vast ma'ority of combat veterans do i cheers me up. the vast ma'ority of combat veterans do not i cheers me up. the vast majority of combat veterans do not develop i cheers me up. the vast majority of i combat veterans do not develop ptsd and many of those who do get better in time. at the falklands generation is the last for whom the commission went initially at least unrecognised and untreated. they paid a high price for that. for paul bron well, recovery began with the discovery that he was not alone and in the company of old comrades. allan little, bbc news. it is interesting because it is interesting becau5eju5t yesterday we had the falklands veterans with us here and they were very much talking about exactly that, how over the years, immediately afterwards but even now, a lot came back and the films are
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made because of the anniversary, it is really in interesting and important subject. hundreds of thousands of people will flock to arenas and festival sites all over the country this weekend, kick5tarting a huge summer of music for the uk. for many, it will be the first time they've been to a gig since 2019, because of the pandemic. to ta ke to take you through some of the occasions... in manchester, parklife festival is back up and running. ed sheeran will perform to nearly 250,000 fans over four days at the etihad stadium, and both the killers and alicia keys are set to headline other venues in the city. very bu5y. very, very busy. harry style5 fans have descended on gla5gow from all over the world to see the singer kick off his world tour. his uk and european live shows were postponed in 2020 and 2021. billie eili5h will be playing one of six shows at the o2 in london.
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then we have the download festival, which welcomed 10,000 guests as one of several pilot events last year, is back to full capacity and already under way. now, kathryn stanczyszyn is at donington park for us this morning soaking up the atmosphere. iam not i am not sure if she is on one of those tense, but i do think it is tho5e tense, but i do think it is so lovely seeing all those ten5e out there in the sun 5hining lovely seeing all those ten5e out there in the sun shining and no wellington boots needed. —— tents. where are you? ida. wellington boots needed. -- tents. where are you?— wellington boots needed. -- tents. where are you? no, i am not in one of those tents. _ where are you? no, i am not in one of those tents. but _ where are you? no, i am not in one of those tents. but isn't _ of those tents. but isn't it fantastic? big skies and big stages in a sea of tents like that as people gathered together again to do what they love, singing and dancing wildly in a field with thousands of other people. i am here at donington park at leicestershire, the home of download, 85,000 people are here this weekend to see kiss last night, we have tomorrow as well and it is
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just an amazing atmosphere. it is so good to be back. as you said, lots of other events are going on up and down the country as well. for many of them, it has been the first time that they can put on a normal show in three years. a little bit different here at download because they are part of the government pilot last year in 2021 to try and see if it ends like this could be staged during the covid pandemic, just 10,000 people, staged during the covid pandemic, just10,000 people, it staged during the covid pandemic, just 10,000 people, it went very well, but i think you will find most punters will say part of the joy of a music festival is the scale of it, those tens of thousands of people, lots and lots of fun, and talking about that, people, as you can see, have been emerging from their tents this morning, some of it bleary eyed which i think is there enough in the circumstances. let us talk with some of the people who are here. ollie is one of the stewards that is working at download. have you ever done this before? it at download. have you ever done this before? , , , ., before? it is my first time. i have really enjoyed —
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before? it is my first time. i have really enjoyed it, _ before? it is my first time. i have really enjoyed it, it _ before? it is my first time. i have really enjoyed it, it is _ before? it is my first time. i have really enjoyed it, it is fun. - before? it is my first time. i have really enjoyed it, it is fun. are i really en'oyed it, it is fun. are ou into really enjoyed it, it is fun. are you into the — really enjoyed it, it is fun. are you into the music— really enjoyed it, it is fun. fife: you into the music it has, really enjoyed it, it is fun. .�*5;2 you into the music it has, heavy metal? , , ., , metal? yes, definitely. iwas listenin: metal? yes, definitely. iwas listening to _ metal? yes, definitely. iwas listening to all _ metal? yes, definitely. iwas listening to all the _ metal? yes, definitely. iwas listening to all the rock- metal? yes, definitely. iwas| listening to all the rock bands yesterday. listening to all the rock bands yesterday-— listening to all the rock bands esterda . ~ ., , ., ., yesterday. what is your “ob? you have a utue * yesterday. what is your “ob? you have a little dog i yesterday. what is your “ob? you have a little dog squad i yesterday. what is yourjob? you have a little dog squad thing. i yesterday. what is yourjob? you have a little dog squad thing. we are art have a little dog squad thing. we are part of the dog squad. i am working — are part of the dog squad. i am working at— are part of the dog squad. i am working at the campsite looking after _ working at the campsite looking after people, making sure everyone is happy— after people, making sure everyone is happy and there is no fights or anything — is happy and there is no fights or anything like that.— anything like that. everyone is ha a n l anything like that. everyone is happy. aren't— anything like that. everyone is happy, aren't they? _ anything like that. everyone is happy, aren't they? yes, i anything like that. everyone is happy, aren't they? yes, it. anything like that. everyone is| happy, aren't they? yes, it has anything like that. everyone is - happy, aren't they? yes, it has been lovel . happy, aren't they? yes, it has been lovely- we — happy, aren't they? yes, it has been lovely- we are _ happy, aren't they? yes, it has been lovely. we are right _ happy, aren't they? yes, it has been lovely. we are right next _ happy, aren't they? yes, it has been lovely. we are right next to - lovely. we are right next to east midlands airport, _ lovely. we are right next to east midlands airport, which - lovely. we are right next to east midlands airport, which is - lovely. we are right next to east midlands airport, which is what | midlands airport, which is what you can hear going on overhead. here is one of the punters, is very fresh and chatty this morning. he has his i am maiden teacher. he and chatty this morning. he has his i am maiden teacher.— i am maiden teacher. he forgot to mention, i am maiden teacher. he forgot to mention. you _ i am maiden teacher. he forgot to mention, you said _ i am maiden teacher. he forgot to mention, you said is... _ i am maiden teacher. he forgot to mention, you said is... -- - i am maiden teacher. he forgot to mention, you said is... -- iron . mention, you said is... —— iron maiden — mention, you said is... —— iron maiden this_ mention, you said is... —— iron maiden. this is— mention, you said is... —— iron maiden. this is the _ mention, you said is... —— iron maiden. this is the fourth- mention, you said is... —— iron maiden. this is the fourth dayl mention, you said is... —— iron. maiden. this is the fourth day of the festival_ maiden. this is the fourth day of the festival and _ maiden. this is the fourth day of the festival and it _ maiden. this is the fourth day of the festival and it is _ maiden. this is the fourth day of the festival and it is absolutely i the festival and it is absolutely awesome _ the festival and it is absolutely awesome a— the festival and it is absolutely awesome. a big _ the festival and it is absolutely awesome. a big weight- the festival and it is absolutely awesome. a big weight has. the festival and it is absolutely . awesome. a big weight has been lifted _ awesome. a big weight has been lifted off— awesome. a big weight has been lifted off the _ awesome. a big weight has been lifted off the world. _ awesome. a big weight has been lifted off the world. everybody. awesome. a big weight has been lifted off the world. everybody is| lifted off the world. everybody is so happy, — lifted off the world. everybody is
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so happy, it _ lifted off the world. everybody is so happy, it is— lifted off the world. everybody is so happy, it is a _ lifted off the world. everybody is so happy, it is a family- lifted off the world. everybody is so happy, it is a family place. i lifted off the world. everybody is i so happy, it is a family place. last night, _ so happy, it is a family place. last night, i_ so happy, it is a family place. last night, i had — so happy, it is a family place. last night, i had a _ so happy, it is a family place. last night, i had a ten—year—old and i night, i had a ten—year—old and lifted _ night, i had a ten—year—old and lifted him — night, i had a ten—year—old and lifted him on _ night, i had a ten—year—old and lifted him on my— night, i had a ten—year—old and lifted him on my shoulders. - lifted him on my shoulders. everybody _ lifted him on my shoulders. everybody was _ lifted him on my shoulders. everybody wasjust... - lifted him on my shoulders. everybody was just... it - lifted him on my shoulders. i everybody wasjust... it has lifted him on my shoulders. - everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant — everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant we _ everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant. we had _ everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant. we had a _ everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant. we had a hard _ everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant. we had a hard couple i everybody wasjust... it has been brilliant. we had a hard couple of�* brilliant. we had a hard couple of years _ brilliant. we had a hard couple of ears. ., . brilliant. we had a hard couple of ears, ., ., ., brilliant. we had a hard couple of ears. ., ., ., ., years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? — years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i _ years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i am — years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i am 70 _ years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i am 70 next _ years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i am 70 next year- years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i am 70 next year and l years. you are a download veteran, aren't you? i am 70 next year and i | aren't you? i am 70 next year and i have been _ aren't you? i am 70 next year and i have been coming _ aren't you? i am 70 next year and i have been coming many, _ aren't you? i am 70 next year and i have been coming many, many- aren't you? i am 70 next year and i i have been coming many, many years. this is— have been coming many, many years. this is probably— have been coming many, many years. this is probably the _ have been coming many, many years. this is probably the best— have been coming many, many years. this is probably the best year- have been coming many, many years. this is probably the best year ever- this is probably the best year ever because _ this is probably the best year ever because it — this is probably the best year ever because it really— this is probably the best year ever because it really does _ this is probably the best year ever because it really does seem - this is probably the best year ever because it really does seem as - because it really does seem as though— because it really does seem as though something really - because it really does seem as l though something really exciting because it really does seem as - though something really exciting has happened _ though something really exciting has happened it— though something really exciting has happened. it is— though something really exciting has ha ened. , ., , ., ., ., happened. it is a bit emotional, isn't it? the _ happened. it is a bit emotional, isn't it? the people, _ happened. it is a bit emotional, isn't it? the people, it- happened. it is a bit emotional, isn't it? the people, it is- happened. it is a bit emotional, | isn't it? the people, it is always friendly and _ isn't it? the people, it is always friendly and eight _ isn't it? the people, it is always friendly and eight a _ isn't it? the people, it is always friendly and eight a is _ isn't it? the people, it is always friendly and eight a is a - isn't it? the people, it is always. friendly and eight a is a fantastic, probably— friendly and eight a is a fantastic, probably the _ friendly and eight a is a fantastic, probably the best _ friendly and eight a is a fantastic, probably the best music- friendly and eight a is a fantastic, probably the best music festival i friendly and eight a is a fantastic, i probably the best music festival in the world — probably the best music festival in the world ls— probably the best music festival in the world. , ., ., , ., ., the world. is covid i worry at all for ou? the world. is covid i worry at all for you? it _ the world. is covid i worry at all for you? it doesn't _ the world. is covid i worry at all for you? it doesn't seem - the world. is covid i worry at all for you? it doesn't seem to - the world. is covid i worry at all| for you? it doesn't seem to exist now. i for you? it doesn't seem to exist new i think _ for you? it doesn't seem to exist now. i think it _ for you? it doesn't seem to exist now. ithink it is, _ for you? it doesn't seem to exist now. ithink it is, because- now. i think it is, because obviously— now. i think it is, because obviously my— now. i think it is, because obviously my age, - now. i think it is, because obviously my age, and - now. i think it is, because obviously my age, and i. now. i think it is, because . obviously my age, and i had now. i think it is, because - obviously my age, and i had a bad experience — obviously my age, and i had a bad experience during _ obviously my age, and i had a bad experience during covid, - obviously my age, and i had a bad experience during covid, but - obviously my age, and i had a bad experience during covid, but it- obviously my age, and i had a bad experience during covid, but it is| experience during covid, but it is so nice _ experience during covid, but it is so nice to — experience during covid, but it is so nice toiust_ experience during covid, but it is so nice tojust be _ experience during covid, but it is so nice tojust be back— experience during covid, but it is so nice tojust be back and - experience during covid, but it is so nice tojust be back and really�* so nice tojust be back and really begin— so nice tojust be back and really begin into — so nice tojust be back and really begin into it— so nice tojust be back and really begin into it and _ so nice tojust be back and really begin into it and i— so nice tojust be back and really begin into it and i can't- so nice tojust be back and really begin into it and i can't wait! - so nice tojust be back and reallyl begin into it and i can't wait! hour begin into it and i can't wait! how many steps _
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begin into it and i can't wait! how many steps did — begin into it and i can't wait! how many steps did you _ begin into it and i can't wait! many steps did you do begin into it and i can't wait!- many steps did you do yesterday? begin into it and i can't wait! how i many steps did you do yesterday? it is not easy being at a festival! i did 30,000 _ is not easy being at a festival! i did 30,000 steps! _ is not easy being at a festival! i did 30,000 steps! —— - is not easy being at a festival! i did 30,000 steps! -- 37,000!| is not easy being at a festival! i i did 30,000 steps! -- 37,000! [i is not easy being at a festival! i - did 30,000 steps! -- 37,000! [i i5 did 30,000 steps! -- 37,000! it is basically 16 _ did 30,000 steps! -- 37,000! it is basically 16 miles _ did 30,000 steps! -- 37,000! basically 16 miles he walked here yesterday. at festivals up and down the country where the forecast is looking good, some scattered showers, hence the wellingtons, but they are pristine at the moment, lots of sunshine as well. good news. i willjinx it now.— i willjinx it now. what a lovely atmosphere — i willjinx it now. what a lovely atmosphere down _ i willjinx it now. what a lovely atmosphere down there, - i willjinx it now. what a lovely atmosphere down there, and l i willjinx it now. what a lovely - atmosphere down there, and would see the blue skies and good weather. we will be back with you later on. thank you very much. she wears that had very well. interesting what he was saying about covid. we interesting what he was saying about covid. ~ , . ~ interesting what he was saying about covid. ~ , ., ,, ., ., covid. we will be talking to our reuular covid. we will be talking to our regular experts, _ covid. we will be talking to our regular experts, chris - covid. we will be talking to our regular experts, chris and - covid. we will be talking to our. regular experts, chris and linda, just after eight o'clock. we will also be talking about what is going on in terms ofjustin bieber, which
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we saw, with the virus that caused the paralysis in his face, and so chris is a biologist so we will get more questions to him about what that means —— virologist. if you have any questions about health, you can e—mail us. you can tweet us about today's stories as well. on that theme of areas we are looking at in terms of the cost of living crisis, it is pinching a lot of budget at the moment, which comes down to the food you buy, whether you can still buy good quality food, and diet has a direct relationship with health. another thing chris and linda will be looking at today. we will be back shortly.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. almost one in six people in england, wales and northern ireland used food banks or food charities in march. one in five skipped meals or cutting portion sizes to cope with the cost of living. it's created a perfect storm for food banks, with increasing demand and falling donations. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has been to meet one woman struggling to keep her community afloat. imight let go i might let go in a minute! without mel hudson. _ i might let go in a minute! without mel hudson, hundreds _ i might let go in a minute! without mel hudson, hundreds of - i might let go in a minute! without mel hudson, hundreds of people i i might let go in a minute! without. mel hudson, hundreds of people each week would struggle to eat. she set “p week would struggle to eat. she set up this food bank at the start of the pandemic. but despite covid easing, her efforts are still desperately needed.- easing, her efforts are still desperately needed. have a lovely da ! desperately needed. have a lovely day! wh0's — desperately needed. have a lovely day! who's next? _ desperately needed. have a lovely day! who's next? people - desperately needed. have a lovely day! who's next? people need - desperately needed. have a lovely day! who's next? people need us| desperately needed. have a lovely - day! who's next? people need us more than ever because the cost of living is spiralling at the moment, and costing jobs i go out every day.
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sometimes we need to accept we need a little bit of help. it sometimes we need to accept we need a little bit of help.— a little bit of help. it really is difficult. a little bit of help. it really is difficult- i— a little bit of help. it really is difficult. i know _ a little bit of help. it really is difficult. i know it _ a little bit of help. it really is difficult. i know it is. - a little bit of help. it really is difficult. i know it is. i- a little bit of help. it really is difficult. i know it is. i have. a little bit of help. it really is - difficult. i know it is. i have been independent _ difficult. i know it is. i have been independent all _ difficult. i know it is. i have been independent all my _ difficult. i know it is. i have been independent all my life, - difficult. i know it is. i have been independent all my life, had - difficult. i know it is. i have been i independent all my life, had money independent all my life, had money in my— independent all my life, had money in my pocket... independent all my life, had money in my pocket- - -_ in my pocket... keefe worked in construction, _ in my pocket... keefe worked in construction, only _ in my pocket... keefe worked in construction, only up _ in my pocket... keefe worked in construction, only up to - in my pocket... keefe worked in i construction, only up to £40,000 before covid. he had a stroke during the pandemic, causing him to use up his savings. he is now homeless. it his savings. he is now homeless. ii is his savings. he is now homeless. iii isjust brilliant. without them i is just brilliant. without them i don't know where i would be. i would be inside, if i was to say the truth, i would be inside, if i was to say the truth, iwould be be inside, if i was to say the truth, i would be inside. what you mean? i would _ truth, i would be inside. what you mean? i would have _ truth, i would be inside. what you mean? i would have to _ truth, i would be inside. what you mean? i would have to turn - truth, i would be inside. what you mean? i would have to turn to i truth, i would be inside. what you i mean? i would have to turn to crime to net mean? i would have to turn to crime to get food- — mean? i would have to turn to crime to get food- we _ mean? i would have to turn to crime to get food. we have _ mean? i would have to turn to crime to get food. we have run _ mean? i would have to turn to crime to get food. we have run out - mean? i would have to turn to crime to get food. we have run out of- to get food. we have run out of corned beef. — to get food. we have run out of corned beef, ham, _ to get food. we have run out of corned beef, ham, etc. - to get food. we have run out of corned beef, ham, etc. we i to get food. we have run out of| corned beef, ham, etc. we have to get food. we have run out of- corned beef, ham, etc. we have run out of— corned beef, ham, etc. we have run out of hotdogs, meatballs, literally run out _ out of hotdogs, meatballs, literally run out of _ out of hotdogs, meatballs, literally run out of everything stop keeping it going _ run out of everything stop keeping it going however is getting harder, as we _ it going however is getting harder, as we discovered as we followed mel over several days.— over several days. morrisons, sensory and _ over several days. morrisons, sensory and asda. _ over several days. morrisons, sensory and asda. see - over several days. morrisons, sensory and asda. see if- over several days. morrisons, sensory and asda. see if we l over several days. morrisons, i sensory and asda. see if we can get some fruit and veg. donations are
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fallings and the food bank's resources don't stretch as far as they used to. it resources don't stretch as far as they used to-— they used to. it will come to a oint they used to. it will come to a point where — they used to. it will come to a point where we _ they used to. it will come to a point where we will _ they used to. it will come to a point where we will only - they used to. it will come to a point where we will only have | they used to. it will come to a i point where we will only have beans and pastor. nobody wants to eat that seven days a week, but if they can haveit seven days a week, but if they can have it two days a week, it is better than nothing.- have it two days a week, it is better than nothing. each week mel coaches green _ better than nothing. each week mel coaches green nights. _ better than nothing. each week mel coaches green nights. the - better than nothing. each week meli coaches green nights. the compassion of the food bank replaced with conviction on the football field. iii conviction on the football field. if they don't listen it is press ups or lapse. they don't ever want to do that so they listen. it is really good fun and nice to see the boys enjoy themselves.— good fun and nice to see the boys enjoy themselves. slade green has hiuh levels enjoy themselves. slade green has high levels of _ enjoy themselves. slade green has high levels of deprivation, - enjoy themselves. slade green has| high levels of deprivation, domestic violence and mental health condition. listening to the area's problems daily does of course take its toll. ., �* , , ., ., its toll. i don't sleep well at all because you — its toll. i don't sleep well at all because you think— its toll. i don't sleep well at all because you think about - its toll. i don't sleep well at all because you think about those | its toll. i don't sleep well at all i because you think about those people and how you will help them the next day or do this to get them help, and it does make it really hard. abs,
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it does make it really hard. a single mother of four, her youngest just eight, mel's dynamism is driven by a desire to see both her own and others do well. i by a desire to see both her own and others do well.— others do well. i live in this area and i don't _ others do well. i live in this area and i don't want _ others do well. i live in this area and i don't want to _ others do well. i live in this area and i don't want to see - others do well. i live in this area and i don't want to see that i others do well. i live in this area and i don't want to see that -- l others do well. i live in this area and i don't want to see that -- i | and i don't want to see that —— i want to see the area get better. it is notjust about coming to get food, or playing a game of football, it is about how we can move them onto something else. this it is about how we can move them onto something else.— it is about how we can move them onto something else. this corner of south-east — onto something else. this corner of south-east london _ onto something else. this corner of south-east london has _ onto something else. this corner of south-east london has often - onto something else. this corner of south-east london has often felt i south—east london has often felt overlooked. it needs its own community, it needs mel hudson to see it through its current challenges. michael buchanan, bbc news. it is 7:35am. let's talk to mike about the sport. i know you are going to talk about cricket, but you are very excited about andy murray's achievements? we are very excited about andy murray's achievements?— are very excited about andy murray's achievements? we will come to that, andy murray. — achievements? we will come to that, andy murray. this _ achievements? we will come to that, andy murray, this extraordinary - andy murray, this extraordinary comeback, a man with a metal hip has an amazing result in a run—up to wimbledon. that the thing. fin an amazing result in a run-up to wimbledon. that the thing. on grass so far, his form _
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wimbledon. that the thing. on grass so far, his form has _ wimbledon. that the thing. on grass so far, his form has been _ wimbledon. that the thing. on grass so far, his form has been absolutely| so far, his form has been absolutely amazing _ so far, his form has been absolutely amazing. we don't want to get hopes up amazing. we don't want to get hopes up too _ amazing. we don't want to get hopes up too much — amazing. we don't want to get hopes up too much because it could all come _ up too much because it could all come crashing down at wimbledon, but let's~~~ _ come crashing down at wimbledon, but let's~~~ l _ come crashing down at wimbledon, but let's. .. . , . , let's... i am “umping the gun, let's talk about— let's... i amjumping the gun, let's talk about cricket. _ let's... i amjumping the gun, let's talk about cricket. he _ let's... i amjumping the gun, let's talk about cricket. he beat - let's... i amjumping the gun, let's talk about cricket. he beat a - let's... i amjumping the gun, let'sj talk about cricket. he beat a player in the top five. _ talk about cricket. he beat a player in the top five. but _ talk about cricket. he beat a player in the top five. but the _ talk about cricket. he beat a player in the top five. but the other - talk about cricket. he beat a player in the top five. but the other big i in the top five. but the other big story this morning is the cricket. england were may be doing some catching practice over dinner last night. the margins are so fine in cricket after days i. england's bowlers struggled to make their early advantage count on the opening day of the second test against new zealand at trent bridge. the tourists made a solid start and were 84 without loss, when ben stokes made the breakthrough to see off will young. jimmy anderson took the wicket of tom lathan and also dismissed devon conway and england looked to be on top — but new zealand piled on the runs in the final session — daryl mitchell and tom blundell both passed their half centuries, as they closed on 318/4.
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play will resume in nottingham at 11am, and england are staying positive. i thought there was some really good bowling in period out there today, we took an aggressive option all the time, trying to bowl the opposition out as often as we could. i thought the guys were really courageous in the guys were really courageous in the links they tried to bowl after lunch in particular, and i thought there was some really good work out there was some really good work out there today. another big name hasjoined the controversial breakaway golf tour — bryson dechambeau has become the latest major winner to turn his back on golf�*s pga tour and join the new saudi—funded super rich series. the american won the 2020 us open and is in the prime of his career, unlike many of the others who've joined the breakaway series. confirmation of dechambeau's involvement came the day after the pga tour said it was suspending any members who joined the rival circuit. his first appearance will be in the second event of the £200 million series. now why was charlie and the rest of us so excited?
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andy murray has enjoyed his biggest win since undergoing hip surgery in 2019. he beat world numberfive stefanos tsitsipas to reach the semifinals of the stuttgart open. murray hasn't beaten a player in the top 5 since 2016, but his impressive start to the grass court season continued with a straight—sets win over tsitsipas. he'll face australian nick kyrgios in the last four later today. it was a good day for britain's men overall, with dan evans through to the semifinals of the men's singles at the nottingham open after beating marc—andrea huesler. no such fortune for harriet dart, as her strong run came to an end after she lost to american alison riske in the quarterfinal. lewis hamilton was left a bit sore after his mercedes struggled with bouncing on the
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straights in practice at the azerbaijan grand prix. ferrari's charles leclerc was fastest after second practice. despite topping the standings, leclerc was far from happy with his car, and was heard questioning the team about a sudden loss of power. sergio perez finished fastest in first practice, while hamilton struggled back in 12th. on to football, where england's latest nations league game will take place in front ofjust 3,000 schoolchildren later. they take on the side that beat them on penalties in the final of euro 2020, italy. the game is being played in wolverhampton, but molineaux will be mostly empty this evening as part of the punishment imposed on the football association for crowd trouble at that euro final at wembley lastjuly. gareth southgate's side need a win, having drawn with germany and lost to hungary so far in the nations league. but despite the run of results, the england boss says he will still pick a strong side. all the players are physically in good condition, the recovery between these two games is a little bit different to the previous two, so i think on the scheduling, this is how it should be. two days between the
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games isn't really ideal across a four game spam. but yeah, we have got no concerns about any of the players in that situation. elsewhere, wales take on belgium just three days after losing to the netherlands, and captain gareth bale has spoken out about a lack of consideration for player welfare. it's theirfourth game in 10 days, with their world cup qualifying win against ukraine sandwiched between three nations league games. and bale believes the fixture pile—up is putting too much of a strain on all involved. bale has warned there would be consequences if the congested football calendar continues. and scotland travel to the republic of ireland, who are without a win in the nations league. but manager steve clarke say�*s they won't underestimate the challenge they could face. any team going to dublin to play a game can expect a tough match. obviously the last two games have gone against them but only been one goal previous to that, a really good
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8—game run where they went unbeaten. before that the run was portugal and belgium so we expect a tough game. two huge matches today in rugby union's english premiership. the competition has reached the playoff semifinal stage, with reigning champions harlequins taking on saracens in the first match. following that, leicester tigers take on northampton at welford road. it's been eight years since either of these clubs last tasted premiership glory — the winners of both matches will face each other in the final at twickenham a week on saturday. now what lengths would you go to if you had the chance to enter the love island villa? well? well, i wouldn't. you wouldn't rive well? well, iwouldn't. you wouldn't rive u- well? well, iwouldn't. you wouldn't give up your— well? well, i wouldn't. you wouldn't give up youriob. _ well? well, i wouldn't. you wouldn't give up yourjob, would _ well? well, i wouldn't. you wouldn't give up yourjob, would you. - well? well, i wouldn't. you wouldn't give up yourjob, would you. not i give up your 'ob, would you. not -alannin give up your 'ob, would you. not planning on — give up yourjob, would you. not planning on it, mike, thanks for asking — planning on it, mike, thanks for asking do— planning on it, mike, thanks for askinu. , . . planning on it, mike, thanks for askinu. , ., , , asking. do they have a surprise entrance? _ asking. do they have a surprise entrance? they _ asking. do they have a surprise
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entrance? they do. _ rugby league starjacques o'neill has been allowed to leave castleford tigers so that he can join the dating game show later this weekend. the super league club confirmed last night that it had agreed to release o'neill, from his contract so that he can pursue another opportunity. he's only 23 and they do have first option, to sign him back next year should he wish to return to rugby league. so he is taking a break, but they may take him back. now let's talk about seagrass. seagrass is a plant that lives in shallow, sheltered areas along our coastline, and it's vital to protecting the planet against climate change. it's able to store carbon faster than tropical rainforests. but in the uk, it's been drastically reduced since the 19305. now, the ocean conservation trust has launched an experimental nursery as part of a plan to restore seagrass meadows
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around our coasts. scott bingham reports. seagrass meadows are one of the most valuable and bio diverse habitats on the planet. they are home to many see live species, including commercial important fish. they are also up to 35 times more efficient at absorbing carbon than rainforests. so they are environmentally important to. but there is a murkier side to this story— more than 90% of seagrass beds have disappeared since the 19305, and they are still in rapid decline. this project aims to reverse that. 50 decline. this pro'ect aims to reverse that.— decline. this pro'ect aims to reverse that. . , reverse that. so rewarding. there is the drive of — reverse that. so rewarding. there is the drive of going _ reverse that. so rewarding. there is the drive of going down _ reverse that. so rewarding. there is the drive of going down and - reverse that. so rewarding. there is the drive of going down and seeing| the drive of going down and seeing what is underwater, but than the actual process of trying to improve it and contribute to the worldwide ambition of reducing our carbon, is just unexplainable really. emilia;r ambition of reducing our carbon, is just unexplainable really.— just unexplainable really. emily is art of a just unexplainable really. emily is part of a team — just unexplainable really. emily is
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part of a team literally _ just unexplainable really. emily is part of a team literally working i just unexplainable really. emily is part of a team literally working at i part of a team literally working at grassroots level at this nursery in south devon. the largest of its kind in the uk, the work done here will help protect 700 hectares, that is around 1000 football pictures of underwater seagrass meadows, around our coasts. iii underwater seagrass meadows, around our coasts. , , ., . underwater seagrass meadows, around ourcoasts. , , ., . , underwater seagrass meadows, around ourcoasts. . , ., our coasts. if this pro'ect is to net to a our coasts. if this pro'ect is to get to a stage t our coasts. if this pro'ect is to get to a stage where i our coasts. if this project is to get to a stage where we - our coasts. if this project is to get to a stage where we can l our coasts. if this project is to i get to a stage where we can plant tens of thousands of hectares, we need to scale this up, so we need to understand how to firstly do it on a horticultural scale, but then do it on agricultural scale stop initial efforts to sow seeds on the seabed saw just 6% of efforts to sow seeds on the seabed sawjust 6% of those plants grow. the nursery is already helping horticultural experts unlock the secrets of growing seagrass more successfully. secrets of growing seagrass more successfully-— successfully. this is a first attempt — successfully. this is a first attempt at _ successfully. this is a first attempt at trying - successfully. this is a first attempt at trying to - successfully. this is a first attempt at trying to growl successfully. this is a first i attempt at trying to grow sub successfully. this is a first - attempt at trying to grow sub title seagrass at a horticultural scale. and what it provides is the opportunity to make observations and [earnings not many people know how these seagrass grow. the
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learnings not many people know how these seagrass grow.— these seagrass grow. the blue meadows project _ these seagrass grow. the blue meadows project is _ these seagrass grow. the blue meadows project is aiming i these seagrass grow. the blue meadows project is aiming to l these seagrass grow. the blue i meadows project is aiming to protect 10% of the uk's seagrass levels over the next ten years. scott bingham, bbc news. there is some good news out there if you are a sun worshipper later in the week. if you like warm weather, i have good news for you at the end of this forecast. it is not too bad. today we had some sunshine. this is the scene from a weather watcher. sunny spells is out of the weather story today. mastery showers is the other half. those are most prevalent the further north you are. it is like a swiss roll on the weather chart. an area of low pressure, some showers or longer spells of rain across parts of scotland so far. to the west we have seen heavy and persistent rain this morning. some showers on northern ireland but not showing up on the radar. showers in
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the far north of england. further south, missed is clearing. we will see one or two showers today. —— mist. northern ireland seeing plenty of showers, and heavy unfunded reform scotland and it will be particularly windy generally across the northern half of the uk, wind gusts of 40 and 50 miles an hour. top temperatures will reach 13 or 14 degrees. 22 23 in the of england. the price you pay for the weather is very high pollen levels. lower levels further north. this evening we will see some showers that will feed in across western parts of scotland. the wind stays quite brisk. not as windy through the day. tomorrow is another sunshine and showers today, but not as many as
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today. the greatest chance of showers the further north you are, scotland there will be some, northern ireland, northern england, not as many showers further south, spells of sunshine. libraries breezy, not as windy as it has been today. averages are 17 for aberdeen, liverpool, 21. the top temperature in london. at the start, temperatures are set to climb through the coming week. there will be frontal systems pushing to the north—west of the uk bringing some rain, perhaps not an awful lot of rain, perhaps not an awful lot of rain, but high pressure down towards the south. as the higher slips further east, there is some certainty that my uncertainty about the detail but it looks like we will tap into some really warm air that would bring a taste of summer for some. averages across southern areas up some. averages across southern areas up into the mid—to high 205. always at the are further north and west and some rain at times. warm—up for some of us on the way. back to you.
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we will be back with a headline eight o'clock. —— we will be back with the headlines at eight o'clock. it's time now for this week's newswatch with samira ahmed. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. did bbc news overdo the platinumjubilee celebrations last weekend and forget its normal journalistic values? oh, quite the booing in the crowd, and you can hear it... and did the bbc alter the sound level of booing when repeating shots of boris and carriejohnson at last weekend's thanksgiving service? a decade ago, the bbc was widely criticised for dumbing down its treatment of the queen's diamond jubilee with its rain—drenched royal flotilla along the thames. and a year ago, it received a record 100,000 complaints about the extent of air time devoted to the duke of edinburgh's death. those experiences, coupled with the recent troubled history of the royal family,
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meant there was an intense focus on how the platinum jubilee was covered on the bbc. and the corporation certainly pulled out all the stops from the start of the weekend to the end. cheering she was the star of the show and it was her grand finale. the queen began the celebrations on the balcony here and this is where they ended after a weekend of pomp, partying, and pageantry. for many, last weekend showed the bbc at its finest, with punka from felixstowe writing:
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there were, of course, grumbles. some of them from enthusiasts for the monarchy who objected to occasional references to protests against the celebrations. and interviews with representatives of the republican movement. there are actually twice as many people now that want to abolish the monarchy as who are celebrating the jubilee. obviously you wouldn't know that if you had been watching bbc�*s coverage over the last few days. deb taylor was watching that and e—mails: but for others, this was a political event. and with many of the weekend's ceremonies broadcast on the news channel, as well as bbc one, the corporation's largely celebratory approach represented a failure ofjournalistic impartiality.
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for dave rees in birmingham: one specific moment over the long weekend attracted a lot of attention from the audience and it came as guests arrived at st paul's cathedral on friday morning for the queen's thanksgiving service. the prime minister just arriving with his wife. quite a bit of booing in the crowd there. and you can hear it, there is really quite of lot of booing, actually. wow. — a substantial amount. didn't see that coming. that's quite a moment. we definitely haven't heard that for any other vip guests,
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have we, that's fair to say. that was broadcast live. but as jane hill continued to talk to her guests, the footage of mr and mrsjohnson was replayed a few minutes later on the news channel. this time, it sounded like this. hopefully, that isn't the big story that's going to come out today. hopefully, it's a family gathering together to recognise the contribution and the service of their boss. she's the boss of the firm, as well as being the kind of matriarch figure of the royal family. and, certainly, i mean, i hope that queen this weekend, in the midst of the celebration, she's also going to get to meet her one—year—old granddaughter or great—granddaughter lillibet for the first time. she turns one tomorrow. some viewers detected less booing on that repeat showing of those pictures, and when they were broadcast again later in the weekend. vicki middleton from northampton shire was one of them.
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well, to respond to all those issues, i'm doing here in the studios by richard burgess, interim senior controller of bbc news content. and down the line from somerset by one of the viewers who contacted us about last weekend'sjubilee coverage, paul benwell. let's talk first, richard, about the booing. so, overwhelmingly, the viewers' complaints that we got at newswatch was that when the video was repeated of the prime minister's arrival, the booing seemed to be harder to hear. why the difference? well, the first shot that you saw was ofjane hill commentating live on thejohnsons arriving. and you can hear her reaction instantly, that she can hear quite a lot of booing — "a considerable amount," i think she says. the second shot that you saw was from a different camera, we have a number of different cameras filming events like this and they used what we call a clean feed.
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so, essentially, audio without the commentary on, so withoutjane hill's commentary on in a different position and so just the volume levels were different. but there was no editing of it, no attempt to censor anything. and i think if you watched our coverage in the days following this incident, you'll have seen that we regularly covered this story, we even played the clip to grant shapps, the cabinet minister, on sophie raworth's sunday morning programme. ok, thank you. let's talk to paul. paul, why did you contact newswatch about the coverage of the platinum jubilee? well, i felt that the bbc coverage really conveyed the impression to viewers that 100% of the public are in favour of the monarchy and we're all going to be out celebrating 70 years of having the same unelected head of state. now, nothing could be further from the truth, really, because in a recent new yougov poll, only 62%
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of the population thought that the monarchy should continue into the future, and a majority of 60—odd percent is a majority, but as borisjohnson found out earlier this week, it's by no means a resounding majority. the same poll found something like 22% of the population were firmly in favour of having an elected head of state. so, these are big numbers, you know. _ we're not talking about a fringe of people. i felt that during the hours and hours of coverage of the jubilee events, the bbc could have made a bit more of an effort to include some contrary points of view just to balance things up a bit. even allowing for the fact that the bbc might say, well, we're covering that platinum jubilee and it was important to kind
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of cover in the right amount, you have a concern about the tone as well, don't you? well, yes. i mean, i think at times the tone was rather too deferential. all public figures deserve respect, but i think the level of respect shown was a bit excessive. and on the other hand, at other times it was a bit gushing. i think that as licence payers we have the right to expect that bbc'sjournalists will act in a slightly detached way when they're reporting on these matters and be a bit more objective. thank you. richard, can you address his points? especially the idea that you expect bbcjournalists to have a bit of detachment. they didn't, did they? i don't think that's fair. i think it was a major moment of national significance. i don't think you can argue about that. it was a significant story, our head of state being on the throne for longer than any other monarch,
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this was a moment to reflect on that, to reflect on the reign, to consider the future, yes, to represent the celebrations that were going on. but also i think to represent what paul was saying, which is that not everybody feels the same way about the monarchy, and we did reflect that within our coverage as well. it's interesting that there were some viewers complaining about whether it was appropriate to have republican points of view during the coverage. i think it's appropriate to reflect that point of view. but i think it's also incumbent upon us to show that there was an awful lot of joy around over that weekend and i don't it's right that we should be po—faced about it. of course we need to reflect that, but at the same time, not get carried away. so i think tony's right. personally, i thought we did get the tone right. you don't think it was a bit gushing at times? i don't think so. i think we used the opportunity to put the monarchy into context, we considered issues around it, we considered the future, we considered what will happen
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after the queen is gone. she's extremely popular, but what about the next generation? so, no, i think we reflected the celebration, but we also looked at the wider context. paul, as you know, a lot of this coverage was simultaneously broadcast on the news channel, as well as bbc one. do you have a view about that? well, i think that one channel's worth of coverage is enough. you know, i'm not denying that this is a major event and did warrant a significant amount of coverage. but i do feel that it was pretty much one—way traffic. i mean, there was very little representation of any other point of view. and there was other news happening as well, wasn't there? indeed, yeah. richard, the trooping of the colour, the thanksgiving service, and the pageant all went out in full
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on the news channel, as well as on bbc one. where were people supposed to go for news? well, i don't think it would've been a good use of licence fee payer money to try and recreate event coverage, and that was the events of the weekend that was going on on bbc one. i don't think we did entirely simulcast, certainly not around the pageant, we did break out for other news as well. look, i think it's a major event, we come back to that. and i think people would expect that the bbc news channel is covering a major event in the uk as it happens. thank you, richard burgess, and thank you, paul benwell. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear on the bbc news on tv, radio, online, and social media, e—mail newswatch. or you can find us on twitter. you can call us. and do have a look at our website for previous interviews. that's all from us.
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we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. prince charles is reported to have called the government's scheme to fly asylum seekers to rwanda "appalling". the first deportation flight to the east african country has been given the go—ahead to leave on tuesday. brazilian police searching
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for british journalist dom philips and another man in the remote amazon rainforest have found possible human remains. as you can see, this eye is not blinking, i can't smile on this side of my face. singerjustin beiber opens up to his fans about the facial paralysis that's forced him to cancel a series of shows. england's cricketers have a fight on their hands at trent bridge today after a dominant start to the second test by new zealand, who are building a big first innings. good morning. for many of us the weekend promises some warm sunshine, but the further north you are across the uk there will be some pretty hefty showers around and it will be windy. i'll have all the weather details here on breakfast. it's saturday the 11th ofjune. our main story.
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prince charles is said to have privately criticised the government's plan to send asylum seekers from the uk to rwanda, reportedly calling the measures "appalling". the claim is being made after the high court ruled that the first flight under the new policy can depart on tuesday, despite a legal challenge by campaigners. mark easton reports. is it lawful to give people seeking asylum in the uk a one—way ticket to rwanda? telling them to pursue refugee status thousands of miles south in east africa? the first migrants are due to make that journey next tuesday, with campaigners today failing in their legal bid to stop the removals. the high court in london heard from home office lawyers that six asylum seekers who had been due to be deported have had their removal directions cancelled, but the judge was not persuaded to halt the flight carrying 31 others, dismissing arguments that the policy is unlawful. the government welcomed thejudgment — campaigners said the fight goes on.
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no, it's absolutely not a landmark day, and doesn't — it is important to note this isn't the substantive hearing, so this isn't in any way a vindication of the home secretary's policy — that is still to be tested in the courts in the next few weeks. the lawyer representing those trying to stop next week's flight, raza husain, pointed out that the home office has repeatedly claimed that their rwanda policy has been given the green light by the unhcr, the un agency responsible for the refugee convention. that's misleading and incorrect, he told the judge. the united nations has used rwanda for several years... priti patel has consistently claimed her deal with rwanda is lawful, under the refugee convention. this agreement is comparable with all our domestic and international legal obligations. but in court, a barrister for the un told thejudge... notjust once, but on numerous occasions, it was claimed. after the deal was signed in kigali
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in april, the un had two meetings with priti patel and told her the arrangement broke international law. the government's legal team, however, interprets the convention differently, noting that more than 10,000 asylum seekers have risked their lives crossing the channel in small boats already this year, and arguing there is a significant public interest in a policy that will deter people from making those journeys, and undermine the activities of criminal people smugglers. around 100 asylum seekers are now in immigration detention, threatened with deportation to rwanda. in brook house near gatwick, some have been on hunger strike. one syrian spoke to the bbc. a translator has voiced his words. translation: i came to the uk because it's the only place - i have connections to. my brother, my uncle and my aunt live here. if i end up in rwanda, my future and the future of my two kids will be destroyed. the home office had always expected a legal challenge and welcoming the high court decision last night, the home secretary insisted
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she will not be deterred. however, campaigners have been given permission to appeal against thejudgment. the matter to be decided at a hearing on monday, just hours before the flight to kigali is due to take off. mark easton, bbc news, at the high court. our correspondent helena wilkinson has more the prince's comments his comments haven't been denied but we know that the prince usually and the royal family usually stays out of politics. the royal family usually stays out of olitics. , ., �* , of politics. yes, that's right. the ro al of politics. yes, that's right. the royal family _ of politics. yes, that's right. the royal family are _ of politics. yes, that's right. the royal family are expected - of politics. yes, that's right. the royal family are expected to i of politics. yes, that's right. the| royal family are expected to stay out of politics and stay impartial and neutral. we know in the past prince charles has spoken on public policy matters but in the last few years he said that that would end. but in the times, they are reporting that prince charles made some private comments criticising the government's rwanda asylum plan,
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describing it as appalling. this is according to an unnamed source quoted in the times this morning. that source has said prince charles was more than disappointed with the policy, he thinks the government approach is appalling and he was not impressed with the government to's direction of travel. it's also reported that prince charles is frustrated because later on this month he will be representing the queen, he will be going to the commonwealth heads of government summit, that is taking place in rwanda. clarence house isn't denying the story but not commenting it says on what are described as supposed anonymous private conversations with the prince of wales and clarence house also saying that he remains politically neutral and also matters of policy they say are decisions the government. of policy they say are decisions the government-— brazilian police have found possible human remains in their search for uk journalist dom phillips and bruno pereira, an expert on indigenous peoples.
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the pair disappeared six days ago while travelling through the amazon rainforest. police say experts will analyse the material that's been found, as well as blood traces that were discovered on a fishing boat. katy watson reports. from up here you get an idea of the vastness of the amazon. and with that, the challenges faced by the search teams in finding the two men. on friday, though, there was a significant yet devastating breakthrough. materialfound in the river that could be human remains, not far from the area that dom phillips and bruno pereira were last seen. it will now be sent to the city of manaus for forensic analysis. authorities are also examining traces of blood on a boat longing to a suspect, a local fisherman. dom phillips and bruno pereira are experts in their field. one an experienced journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travel companion, a renowned expert on indigenous affairs, a man who knows these communities
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well, but also has his enemies, and had been threatened in the past for his work in trying to denounce illegal mining and fishing. and it was on this river they were threatened again in the days leading up to their disappearance. we urge brazilian authorities to redouble their efforts to find phillips and pereira. with time of the essence in view of the real risks to their life and security. it is therefore crucial that the authorities at the federal and local levels react robustly and expeditiously, including by fully deploying available means and necessary specialised resources to effectively search over the remote area in question. the news of the missing pair has gained worldwide attention. celebrities and footballers including pele have called for the government to step up and find mr phillips and mr pereira. that is a call that has been echoed by mr phillips' sister in london. she called for an in—depth and open investigation into what has happened. katy watson, bbc news.
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the prime minister has urged ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british citizens sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. aiden aslin and shaun pinner were captured while with the ukrainian army and tried as mercenaries by a russian proxy court in the so—called donetsk people's republic in eastern ukraine. joe inwood is in kyiv this morning — what will the next steps be from ukraine? you will have had those comments from the prime minister, it's one of those words people use, that ministers should do everything in their power. i'm wondering in practical terms, what could that mean in terms of what happens next? very little, i think. mean in terms of what happens next? very little, ithink. we mean in terms of what happens next? very little, i think. we had a statement from liz truss and the ukrainian foreign minister denouncing this, saying it's a breach of the geneva conventions but
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in reality the levers they can pull to influence donetsk are very limited. there are no formal relations between the british government and the self—declared republic. the ukrainians are at war with them so there's not a channel. the british government have already put heavy sanctions on russians and therefore their proxy as well. they've been calling for more and they can't do it unilaterally so it's difficult to think they will get anything more there. we are then left with the legal option for the three men, there is a moroccan with them as well, and that is an appeal. they have 30 days to launch that but that would see their sentence reduced from death by firing squad to a life sentence, is still very, very harsh. then we come to the final possible option for the three men and that is some sort of prisoner swap. that has been discussed repeatedly, the idea that will be some exchange between the two sides, that russians captured by the ukrainians will be sent back to
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the ukrainians will be sent back to the kremlin and these men could come backin the kremlin and these men could come back in return but of course there is no indication that that is going to happen and it depends on goodwill from russia so it's really hard to see what the path could be for these men. . ~' see what the path could be for these men. . ~ , ., the singerjustin bieber has revealed he is suffering from facial paralysis after cancelling shows on his world tour earlier this week. in an instagram video, the pop star said he had ramsay hunt syndrome, which is caused when a virus, like shingles, affects the facial nerve near a person's ears. he said he doesn't know how long it will take to recover. as you can see, this eye is not blinking. i can't smile on this side of my face. this nostril will not move. so there's full paralysis on this side of my face. so for those who are frustrated by my cancellations of the next shows, i'm just physically, obviously not capable of doing them.
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i'll be using this time to just rest and relax and get back to 100% so that i can do what i was born to do. but in the meantime, this ain't it. primary school teachers are warning that covid lockdowns left young children so addicted to their smartphones that many are now sleeping with them under their pillows. concerns that children are spending more time in front of screens "than ever before" were raised by ofcom during the pandemic. teachers believe it has led to a rise in anxiety among some pupils. yetunde yusuf has more. children didn't want to be separated from their mobile phones at night. sometimes we have had children in year five and six who have slept with their mobile phones under their pillows. they would wake up in the morning and feel stressed out because they have 62 notifications. these are just some of the many issues being reported to primary
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school head teachers who have seen a rise in online safeguarding incidents since the first covid lockdown. sophie gosden is the head teacher of the mill academy in crawley. she says she had to intervene after mobile phones being used at home were affecting learning in school. it's kind of really a regular occurrence, we are having to have these conversations. we are also having to have conversations with families earlier and earlier around use of devices, where children are using devices younger and younger. we have seen the children exhibiting signs of almost device addiction — they really want to be with their devices all the time, and certainly at home parents have described experiencing difficulty separating them from their devices. a level of anxiety as well that we have seen increase in some children. if i have told you that i can't get it back... at the academy of cuxton schools in rochester, teaching online safety has become a priority. they say incidents are happening five times more than before the pandemic.
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sometimes the content they are viewing online can be a little bit distressing for them. it might be a particular character appearing that would give them nightmares, it might be talking to someone online that they don't know. what should we do? block, well done. for parents and carers, allowing their children the freedom to explore online, while keeping them safe, can be a tricky balance. my oldest child is ten, and she sees some of her friends, "oh, my friend's got tiktok, my friend's got youtube, "my friend's got a facebook account," and it's really hard to turn around and say, "you are not actually old enough for that." a recent report by ofcom found that after lockdown, children spent more time than ever in front of screens, and that the restrictions left a space in children's lives that they filled with social media, gaming and content. the nspcc say what children are coming across online is having a big impact on their mental health.
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we know that a huge number of children are being bullied online, we know a huge number of children are finding concerning or nasty content, often that they are not even searching for, but they are stumbling across. how can you be better equipped as a school to deal with this? there needs to be a more strategic view from governmental level. if the support's not out there for children's mental health, my concern is when they move beyond primary level, the real reality, as you speak to secondary colleagues, children becoming school refusers. the government says it is training senior mental health leads in state schools by 2025, and that its new online safety bill will tough sanctions on internet platforms if they fail to protect children from harm or inappropriate content. meanwhile, schools say they are having to come up with ever more creative and dynamic solutions. yetunde yusuf, bbc news, crawley. we're joined now by hannah ruschen
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the senior online safety policy officer at the nspcc. good morning. thank you forjoining us. in many ways, it's not surprising that more children are spending more time on their smart devices during lockdown but the impact of that, this is what the concern is. impact of that, this is what the concern is— impact of that, this is what the concern is. definitely. we know there are _ concern is. definitely. we know there are positive _ concern is. definitely. we know there are positive and - concern is. definitely. we know| there are positive and negatives concern is. definitely. we know- there are positive and negatives for children who are using devices like smartphones, laptops and online gaming. so, we know it was really important for children to be able to communicate with friends and family in the pandemic, and also things like online schooling and learning. but what the figures from ofcom show is that a third of children in the last 12 months have seen harmful content online and that's really concerning because we know that being exposed to harmful content and videos can be really upsetting and distressing for children and young
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people and that's why we want to see really strong legislation in place through the online safety bill that is currently being debated by mp5 in parliament. we think that can be strengthened to make sure children have the protections they need so that children and families are not left to pick up the pieces from industry in action. the left to pick up the pieces from industry in action.— left to pick up the pieces from industry in action. the dcms says all children _ industry in action. the dcms says all children should _ industry in action. the dcms says all children should be _ industry in action. the dcms says all children should be able - industry in action. the dcms says all children should be able to i industry in action. the dcms says. all children should be able to enjoy the online world safely, both at home and at school. our new safety bill will put tough sanctions on internet platforms which failed to protect children from harmful or inappropriate content. how much faith can be put in the idea of internet platform is actually playing their part in this? i ask this because on this programme and no doubt you are well aware we have discussed the dangers of social media platform is not doing enough to protect against trolling. exactly. we know that's why we want to see some changes made to the online safety bill. it's really important that these companies are
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held to account for the preventable harm they are exposing children to online, whether that be pro anorexia content, harassment and bullying, age inappropriate content, we need to see that legislation being well bleeding to make sure children are protected from these distressing harms —— that legislation is world leading. one way it can be improved is that we want to see all platforms a child might have access to taking responsibility and being enforced to take action to prevent children being exposed to that harmful content. currently in the legislation we know that sides like telegrams or onlyfans claim they don't have a significant number of child users and therefore don't have to take action and that's really concerning. this is a real opportunity for government to make sure that we have legislation that acts on the preventable harm, hold companies to account and make sure that children and families are not left to fend for themselves when it
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comes to responding to the harm that children are being exposed to on sides like facebook or instagram. fist sides like facebook or instagram. at the moment, parents and children are left to fend for themselves effectively so what's the advice for parents who are concerned or want to protect their children from viewing harmful content? it’s protect their children from viewing harmful content?— harmful content? it's obviously really concerning _ harmful content? it's obviously really concerning the _ harmful content? it's obviously really concerning the parents i harmful content? it's obviously i really concerning the parents and carers to hear and speak to their children about what kind of content they might be exposed to. so, it's really necessary that we can have conversations with our children about what activity they are taking part in online, who they might be speaking to and if they see something that might upset them, making sure they know they can come to you to talk about what they might be seeing online. we know this content can have a detrimental impact on mental health and if any young person is feeling upset by some of the content they might see online or struggling to deal with the online activity, they can contact childline on the phone or online, where we had some really helpful resources for children to
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think through some of the things they might be experiencing in the online world.— they might be experiencing in the online world. thank you very much for talkin: online world. thank you very much for talking to _ online world. thank you very much for talking to us. _ lots of people are doing lots of things this weekend, lots of festivals and events happening, how is it looking? we are getting into that summer period and later in the coming week, there could be some really summery weather on the way. this weekend is more mixed but it is a beat. for many. that is the scene from a weather watcher in warwickshire. gorgeous sunshine. the other side of the coin, blustery showers and some unusually windy weather today across the north of the uk where you are closest to this swirl of cloud. that's an area of low pressure. not only is it bringing brisk winds but some outbreaks of rain, it's been quite a 50997 outbreaks of rain, it's been quite a soggy start across western scotland, we've got some showers are starting to creep in across northern ireland.
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one or two showers across wales and the south—west but generally the further south and east, not as many showers today. much of england and wales will hold onto spells of sunshine. if you passing showers, many places will remain dry and for scotland showers or even longer spells of rain and potentially the odd flash of lightning and rumble of thunder. while southern parts will be breezy, northern parts will be windy. gusts of 40—50 mph in north—west scotland where temperatures will only get up to 13 or 14. temperatures will only get up to 13 or14. furthersouth temperatures will only get up to 13 or 14. further south and east, highs of 23 but the price you pay for the best of the dry weather is very high pollen levels across particularly southern parts, the midlands. some of the showers further north will continue tonight, they will tend to ease, the winds will ease a little as well, staying quite breezy. tomorrow is another sunshine and showers stay but they shouldn't be
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as many showers as there are today. they should tend to be lighter in nature. the lion's share of the showers across northern parts, so most of the showers in scotland. some for northern ireland and northern england, not as many further south. still breezy, northern england, not as many furthersouth. still breezy, not northern england, not as many further south. still breezy, not as windy yesterday and top temperatures just 14 for glasgow but a high of 21 impulsive eastern and south—eastern england. those temperatures are set to climb next week. low pressure to the north—west is likely to bring rain at times but not all the time across north—western parts. higher pressure further south and east. while this is a few days off and there is a bit of uncertainty, if that area of high pressure moves further east, we will start to tap into some really quite warm air later next week. a bit cooler further north and west
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where there is the potential for some rain at times but not all the time. forsome, there some rain at times but not all the time. for some, there could be something much warmer on the way through the coming week. i'm so excited now about the end of the week. i i'm so excited now about the end of the week. ., , ., �* , ., the week. i hope i don't let you down! not _ the week. i hope i don't let you down! not this _ the week. i hope i don't let you down! not this time! _ the week. i hope i don't let you down! not this time! thank i the week. i hope i don't let you | down! not this time! thank you. british servicemen who took part in nuclear tests in the 19505 and 19605 could be one step closer to being honoured for the first time. it follows a long campaign, which was boosted this week by a meeting between veterans and the prime minister. earlier this year we heard one former serviceman's experiences of taking part in the tests. archive: from this day britain - will rank beside america and russia as a major nuclear power. i suppose if i'm honest, it was an adventure. as a 19—year—old, john folkes volunteered to go to the south pacific. he was raf ground crew
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servicing planes. but when he arrived, his role in this nuclear testing programme changed. he'd be in the air, monitoring radiation. on one sortie, ordered to fly right over the blast site. that fireball coming up, black, crimson, a mixture of all these vortexes of cloud. i questioned why we ever were sent there. but they did theirjob, collecting radiation readings before coming into land. we were looking at the aircraft, it had taken the paint off. it was the heat from the explosion. what i find shameful and i feel betrayed is we were given no medical back—up. had those medical checks been carried out, on us and the veterans, i think it would've saved a lot of lives. that was john folkes speaking
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to our reporter sarah smith. we're joined now by nuclear test veteran edmund mcgrath and the chief executive of the british nuclear test veterans association, ceri mcdade. you update very this morning. if i can start with you, ed, this is your story, you were there in that place and time. explain to us what it was you were required to do.— you were required to do. briefly i was a national _ you were required to do. briefly i was a national serviceman - you were required to do. briefly i was a national serviceman so i you were required to do. briefly i i was a national serviceman so called up was a national serviceman so called up for the two—year period. raf bomber command and then put out to australia for task force antelope which was the testing of three atomic bombs. —— task force antler. we were based just north of adelaide doing fairly mundane things, to be honest. i was a runaround guy
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running from here to there and half the time forgetting where i was going but then we were taken up by plane on three separate occasions to the desert to witness the explosion of these huge atomic bombs. many, many times more powerful than those dropped on hiroshima. with the benefit of hindsight, there was no reason for us to go. no reason whatsoever for us to go there. other than to be witnesses to the explosion. than to be witnesses to the expl°5i°"-_ than to be witnesses to the exlosion. ~ ,, explosion. when you say witness, in what way did — explosion. when you say witness, in what way did you — explosion. when you say witness, in what way did you witness _ explosion. when you say witness, in what way did you witness it? - explosion. when you say witness, in what way did you witness it? well, | what way did you witness it? well, we were wearing _ what way did you witness it? well, we were wearing our _ what way did you witness it? well, we were wearing our shorts - what way did you witness it? 7m we were wearing our shorts and shirts and we were, i don't know the exact distance from the epicentre of the bomb but it was too close for comfort, let's put it that way. what comfort, let's put it that way. what did ou comfort, let's put it that way. what did you see? _ comfort, let's put it that way. what did you see? we — comfort, let's put it that way. what did you see? we were _ comfort, let's put it that way. what did you see? we were told - comfort, let's put it that way. what did you see? we were told to - comfort, let's put it that way. what| did you see? we were told to shield oure es did you see? we were told to shield our eyes with _ did you see? we were told to shield our eyes with our _ did you see? we were told to shield our eyes with our hands _ did you see? we were told to shield our eyes with our hands and - did you see? we were told to shield our eyes with our hands and you - our eyes with our hands and you could see the bone structure of your hands at the time of the explosion, need explosion. we looked around and we could see that there were other
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people there with protective clothing on. white jackets, not jackets, jumpsuits and hats, the full helmet business. aged 20 you don't think too much about these things, it was an adventure. a flight from adelaide to the maralinga desert, flight back again number one and then of course did it again for number two and number three. the point is that there was absolutely no reason for us to be there other than for us to be guinea pigs. there other than for us to be guinea “is. ., there other than for us to be guinea “is, ., ., , ~' there other than for us to be guinea “is, ., there other than for us to be guinea pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked — pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to _ pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to do _ pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to do and _ pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to do and you _ pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to do and you just - pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to do and you just did l pigs. can i ask you, that's what you were asked to do and you just did it but at what point did you start to think differently about what you are required to do? when did you start to think this is something that was fundamentally wrong and stopped to ask questions about what it had done to you? to
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ask questions about what it had done to ou? ., , ., , �* ~' to you? to be honest, i didn't think about it seriously _ to you? to be honest, i didn't think about it seriously for _ to you? to be honest, i didn't think about it seriously for a _ to you? to be honest, i didn't think about it seriously for a long - to you? to be honest, i didn't think about it seriously for a long time. l about it seriously for a long time. i had a good, exciting life, getting on with family and friends and lots of things to do. i didn't even think, my wife asked me this the other day, did you think about it when we had our children? and i didn't. but slowly and surely when the campaign started to gain momentum in the 1980s, it struck home to me that my goodness, this was fundamentally wrong. we were pushed up there for no reason whatsoever. i wrote a couple of articles about it and i got some reaction that encouraged me to keep going and i became a member of the organisation. veterans in the bntva, numbers are decreasing. i'm 8a. when
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ceri approached me to come on as a trustee i agreed. unable to have a conversation and move around well and be fairly active —— i am able. in the category of veterans i wasn't a bad choice. i in the category of veterans i wasn't a bad choice-— a bad choice. i don't doubt there are people _ a bad choice. i don't doubt there are people listening _ a bad choice. i don't doubt there are people listening to _ a bad choice. i don't doubt there are people listening to that - a bad choice. i don't doubt there are people listening to that first | are people listening to that first hand account that are staggered that that happened. you've had a meeting with the prime minister. a meeting has taken place. can you give us some sense, ceri, what it is the veterans and families are seeking now. ~ ., , ~' veterans and families are seeking now. . . , ~ ., ., ., y now. we are seeking a full apology from the government _ now. we are seeking a full apology from the government for _ now. we are seeking a full apology from the government for these - now. we are seeking a full apology i from the government for these tests happening _ from the government for these tests happening and as ed explained, of
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being _ happening and as ed explained, of being witnesses, participating, being _ being witnesses, participating, being volunteered in these tests. it has caused — being volunteered in these tests. it has caused harrowing incidences in families, _ has caused harrowing incidences in families, the effects over the years. — families, the effects over the years, the moral injury that's been caused _ years, the moral injury that's been caused 50. — years, the moral injury that's been caused. 50, that is the act of commissioning, the act of omission of inadequate clothing and the act of inadequate clothing and the act of betrayal of the government by putting _ of betrayal of the government by putting the men in front of these life weapons. over the years you can look at official— over the years you can look at official letters and see the same paragraph used again and again saying — paragraph used again and again saying that the health and safety standards were fine, etc. it is very important — standards were fine, etc. it is very important that the prime minister says there was something wrong. that is the _ says there was something wrong. that is the start— says there was something wrong. that is the start to address it. we have a community of people who need help, and their— a community of people who need help, and theirfamilies, a community of people who need help, and their families, wives and widows, _
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and their families, wives and widows, physicaland mental widows, physical and mental problems. widows, physicaland mental problems. did widows, physical and mental problems-— widows, physical and mental roblems. , problems. did you take part in this meetin: ? problems. did you take part in this meeting? no. _ problems. did you take part in this meeting? no. i— problems. did you take part in this meeting? no, iwasn't. _ problems. did you take part in this meeting? no, iwasn't. you - problems. did you take part in this meeting? no, i wasn't. you have l meeting? no, iwasn't. you have interacted _ meeting? no, iwasn't. you have interacted briefly _ meeting? no, iwasn't. you have interacted briefly with _ meeting? no, iwasn't. you have interacted briefly with boris - interacted briefly with boris johnson. h interacted briefly with boris johnson. . , interacted briefly with boris johnson. , . ., johnson. i was pencilled in for the meetin: , johnson. i was pencilled in for the meeting, pencilled _ johnson. i was pencilled in for the meeting, pencilled out _ johnson. i was pencilled in for the meeting, pencilled out because . johnson. i was pencilled in for the l meeting, pencilled out because we wanted our founder to go meeting, pencilled out because we wanted ourfounder to go in my place but he has a serious critical illness. they didn't get me back in again. i was on the sidelines. what again. i was on the sidelines. what have ou again. i was on the sidelines. what have you heard _ again. i was on the sidelines. what have you heard from _ again. i was on the sidelines. what have you heard from the _ again. i was on the sidelines. what have you heard from the meeting? those who attended were able to give accounts of what happens. from what i understand, there was that silence, that shock that this happened. was the reaction from those in that meeting satisfactory to you? i those in that meeting satisfactory to ou? ~' ,., those in that meeting satisfactory to ou? ~ �* , to you? i think so. i've been in constant _ to you? i think so. i've been in constant contact _ to you? i think so. i've been in constant contact with - to you? i think so. i've been in constant contact with the - to you? i think so. i've been in| constant contact with the office to you? i think so. i've been in - constant contact with the office for veterans _ constant contact with the office for veterans affairs over the past
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couple — veterans affairs over the past couple of _ veterans affairs over the past couple of weeks. i'm hearing from them _ couple of weeks. i'm hearing from them almost daily. we have a meeting lined up _ them almost daily. we have a meeting lined up about our community, about our objectives as a charity. we represents nuclear test veterans and their families for the long term. and how— their families for the long term. and how they can help us, basically. we have _ and how they can help us, basically. we have the — and how they can help us, basically. we have the statement from the office of borisjohnson. this is about you, basically, and your contemporaries. it says, these veterans epitomised the true meaning of service and a selfless commitment —— selfless commitment. i know i speak for the nation when i expressed my immense gratitude to those involved in our nuclear testing programme he had made significant contributions to our national security. significant contributions to our nationalsecurity. it significant contributions to our national security. it is only right they are recognised for their service. i will ask ministers to explore how their dedication can be
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marked. carry a moment ago said an apology was needed. when you hear that, is that what you want to hear? is that what you are expecting from your governments? taste is that what you are expecting from your governments?— is that what you are expecting from your governments? we are expecting to break through _ your governments? we are expecting to break through the _ your governments? we are expecting to break through the barrier- your governments? we are expecting to break through the barrier that - your governments? we are expecting to break through the barrier that we i to break through the barrier that we have experienced over the bass part —— best part of 20 years when the civil service are those representing the ministry of defence have said thank you for your service, end of story. there is a strong feeling, medals have been awarded to commonwealth countries. new zealand were in the same place doing the same thing as us. in the realm, fiji and others. we are the only country that hasn't. the metal isn't the most paramount importance but it is significant. what is? at the acknowledgement and the welfare of the veterans and the contribution,
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the veterans and the contribution, the broader contributions. there are not many of them left. the the broader contributions. there are not many of them left.— not many of them left. the average are of not many of them left. the average age of veterans _ not many of them left. the average age of veterans is _ not many of them left. the average age of veterans is 85. _ not many of them left. the average age of veterans is 85. if _ not many of them left. the average age of veterans is 85. if we - not many of them left. the average age of veterans is 85. if we were i age of veterans is 85. if we were talking _ age of veterans is 85. if we were talking 20 — age of veterans is 85. if we were talking 20 years ago it to be very different. — talking 20 years ago it to be very different, but we have seen the levet— different, but we have seen the level of— different, but we have seen the level of suicide has highly increased in the government study that we _ increased in the government study that we have seen compared to the control— that we have seen compared to the control group amongst nuclear test veterans _ control group amongst nuclear test veterans. the subcommittee turned down _ veterans. the subcommittee turned down the _ veterans. the subcommittee turned down the applications for a medal saying _ down the applications for a medal saying there wasn't enough risk and rigour— saying there wasn't enough risk and rigour demonstrated. we know that risk was _ rigour demonstrated. we know that risk was accepted by the ministry of defence _ risk was accepted by the ministry of defence in — risk was accepted by the ministry of defence in 2013, but nothing was done _ defence in 2013, but nothing was done i_ defence in 2013, but nothing was done. i was told that the veterans were _ done. i was told that the veterans were in— done. i was told that the veterans were in a — done. i was told that the veterans were in a noveland done. i was told that the veterans were in a novel and challenging surroundings but there was no rigour~ — surroundings but there was no riuour. , . surroundings but there was no riuour. ,. , rigour. the statement says they will ex - lore rigour. the statement says they will explore how — rigour. the statement says they will explore how their _ rigour. the statement says they will explore how their dedication - rigour. the statement says they will explore how their dedication can - rigour. the statement says they will explore how their dedication can be | explore how their dedication can be marked. ~
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explore how their dedication can be marked- this _ explore how their dedication can be marked.- this is _ explore how their dedication can be marked.- this is the - explore how their dedication can be i marked.- this is the question. marked. when? this is the question. a lecture will — marked. when? this is the question. a lecture will be _ marked. when? this is the question. a lecture will be delivered _ marked. when? this is the question. a lecture will be delivered to - marked. when? this is the question. a lecture will be delivered to the - a lecture will be delivered to the prime minister on monday, drafted with kerry and myself and patrons. it will re—the points made during the meeting and it concludes with the fact that we need him... the last time we got any kind of breakthrough on this was when david cameron was prime minister and he overrode the bank of bureaucracy that was there to get the roots, to get a reaction. it that was there to get the roots, to get a reaction-— get a reaction. if you were able to address boris _ get a reaction. if you were able to address boris johnson _ get a reaction. if you were able to address boris johnson directly, i get a reaction. if you were able to l address boris johnson directly, and address borisjohnson directly, and i know you want to do, what is it you would say? he i know you want to do, what is it you would say?— i know you want to do, what is it you would say? he is a very big fan of winston — you would say? he is a very big fan of winston churchill _ you would say? he is a very big fan of winston churchill and _ you would say? he is a very big fan of winston churchill and i - you would say? he is a very big fan of winston churchill and i would i of winston churchill and i would remind him that attlee and churchill started this bandwagon going. they wanted to be amongst the
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superpowers. ourfriends wanted to be amongst the superpowers. our friends across the channel that we liberated were on the cusp of getting a nuclear weapon. that was our top priority to get in that gang. these tests where the end product of all of that activity and i would remind him that this was a cold war, but it was a war, this rigour business, it is toffee, to be honest. there was rigour. the bomb was many many times more powerful than the one dropped in hiroshima, you are there with the shirt on and you're told to cover your eyes with your hands, it is not good enough prime minister. come on our side, good enough prime minister. come on ourside, because good enough prime minister. come on our side, because we are outnumbered. we are an importer is charity, we are outnumbered and we have been forgotten. i’m
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charity, we are outnumbered and we have been forgotten.— charity, we are outnumbered and we have been forgotten. i'm so glad you came into saiss _ have been forgotten. i'm so glad you came into saiss this _ have been forgotten. i'm so glad you came into saiss this morning. - have been forgotten. i'm so glad you came into saiss this morning. it i have been forgotten. i'm so glad you came into saiss this morning. it is i came into saiss this morning. it is compelling what you're telling us. good to see you. you are welcome. nice to be with you. residents living on some stretches of the uk coast are being told to prepare now for when rising sea levels forces them out of their homes. it comes as the environment agency warns there is no coming back for [and taken away by erosion. our reporter paul murphy has been to skipsea, in east yorkshire — one of europe's fastest eroding coastlines. the road to nowhere. there are lots of them on the east coast and the rate at which [and the being gobbled up rate at which [and the being gobbled up is only increasing. so the environment agency is starting a typical conversation, suggesting that some community should be moved inland because they can no longer be defended. . . ., ., , inland because they can no longer be defended. . . . ., , .,
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defended. climate change means that some of our communities _ defended. climate change means that some of our communities cannot i defended. climate change means that some of our communities cannot stay| some of our communities cannot stay where they are. now that is because while we can come back safely and build back better after most river flooding, there is no coming back for land that coastal erosion has simply taken away.— for land that coastal erosion has simply taken away. here in skipsea, there are 20 — simply taken away. here in skipsea, there are 20 or— simply taken away. here in skipsea, there are 20 or so _ simply taken away. here in skipsea, there are 20 or so residents - simply taken away. here in skipsea, there are 20 or so residents still i there are 20 or so residents still living on the edge. carol tells me that plans have been made to move them inland when the sea gets too close, but she is reluctant to leave. 1 close, but she is reluctant to leave. ., �* ., ., ., ., leave. i don't want to move. i love it here. leave. i don't want to move. i love it here- i— leave. i don't want to move. i love it here- i love _ leave. i don't want to move. i love it here. i love this _ leave. i don't want to move. i love it here. i love this spot. _ leave. i don't want to move. i love it here. i love this spot. it - leave. i don't want to move. i love it here. i love this spot. it is i leave. i don't want to move. i love it here. i love this spot. it is a i it here. i love this spot. it is a millionaire? phew. but high risk. but very high risk, yeah. it is but very high risk, yeah. it is inevitable — but very high risk, yeah. it is inevitable it _ but very high risk, yeah. it is inevitable it is _ but very high risk, yeah. it is inevitable it is going - but very high risk, yeah. it is inevitable it is going to happen. there are also more than 400 caravans seem to be at risk along the coastline that is a routing by an average of 12 feet every year. all this coastline, we couldn't really defended, could we? i will just have to let some parts of
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england go. just have to let some parts of england go-— just have to let some parts of encland no. ., ., ., england go. how do you feel about that? probably _ england go. how do you feel about that? probably not _ england go. how do you feel about that? probably not in _ england go. how do you feel about that? probably not in my _ england go. how do you feel about that? probably not in my lifetime. | that? probably not in my lifetime. we filmed here back in 2007. there was a public road that many of the homes had substantial back gardens. fast forward to 2022 and you get a clear sense of how 15 years has taken its toll here on europe is my fastest eroding coastline.- taken its toll here on europe is my fastest eroding coastline. when we do, fastest eroding coastline. when we do. eventually _ fastest eroding coastline. when we do, eventually to _ fastest eroding coastline. when we do, eventually to decisions - fastest eroding coastline. when we do, eventually to decisions on i fastest eroding coastline. when we do, eventually to decisions on any| do, eventually to decisions on any relocation of communities, then we have to take full account of the views of the people who actually live there. no one should be forced from their homes against their will. the local council says that up to 50 miles of coastline is under threat in east yorkshire. larger towns are being protected, but many communities will need to retreat, relocates and reinvent themselves
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inland. the families of two british men sentenced to death by russian forces are calling for them to receive urgent legal and medical help. aiden aslin and shaun pinner were captured whilst fighting with the ukraine army in the east of the country. the prime minister has urged ministers to do everything in their power to secure their release. richard fuller is the local mp for shaun pinner�*s family. hejoins us now. very good morning to you about the family and how they are? i met very good morning to you about the family and how they are? i met with sean's mother _ family and how they are? i met with sean's mother and _ family and how they are? i met with sean's mother and stepfather i family and how they are? i met with sean's mother and stepfather on i sean's mother and stepfather on thursday evening and clearly it is a very anxious time. what is so worrying is that for weeks now, the families have been receiving messages from shaun and obviously directed by those who are holding
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him looking for a prisoner of war exchange. on very suddenly a few days ago those holding them change the rules, broke international law and held a show trial. it is an incredibly difficult situation for the family. incredibly difficult situation for the family-— incredibly difficult situation for the family. incredibly difficult situation for thefamil. ., ., , ., the family. what contact if any have the family. what contact if any have the been the family. what contact if any have they been able _ the family. what contact if any have they been able to _ the family. what contact if any have they been able to have _ the family. what contact if any have they been able to have with - the family. what contact if any have they been able to have with sean? l the family. what contact if any have i they been able to have with sean? -- they been able to have with sean? —— shaun? they been able to have with sean? -- shaun? ., , they been able to have with sean? -- shaun? . , , . shaun? there have been restricted outbound calls _ shaun? there have been restricted outbound calls made. _ shaun? there have been restricted outbound calls made. under i shaun? there have been restricted outbound calls made. under a i shaun? there have been restricted i outbound calls made. under a certain amount of duress. and with a request for prisoner of war exchanges. that created some hope that those holding them were going to follow international law, correctly recognise shaun and agent as prisoners of war, they have been members of the ukrainian military for a number of years. what is most concerning to me as i have seen no evidence that shaun 08 and have been
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able to meet with representatives from the international red cross. that is usually the case in nearly all conflict situations. also that a trial has taken place but without any independent legal advice assist them. this is really interesting. there are media concerns about their physical and mental welfare, presumably, which judging from what you just told me he believed the family are not being addressed at all. well, they are not. who knows what sort of duress they have been under, physical, psychological. this is a monstrous flouting of their human rights, complete contravention of all of the rule set up under the geneva convention. they have someone who touts themselves as the human rights ombudsman who has been speaking for weeks about how well they treat prisoners of war and how
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well they follow the rules. what is she doing to ensure that shaun and aidan are given their rights under international law? what is she doing to ensure that the red cross can have access and that they are well infect? ~ . ., . ., , infect? we have heard the comments ofthe infect? we have heard the comments of the prime — infect? we have heard the comments of the prime minister _ infect? we have heard the comments of the prime minister saying - infect? we have heard the comments of the prime minister saying that i of the prime minister saying that everything can be done should be done. we are speaking to our correspondence in ukraine this morning saying that in practical terms, in terms of what leavers are available because of the situation politically, geographically, there are very few avenues that can be gone through. what would you like to see happening? at gone through. what would you like to see happening?— see happening? at that big global level, see happening? at that big global level. you're _ see happening? at that big global level, you're right, _ see happening? at that big global level, you're right, it _ see happening? at that big global level, you're right, it is _ see happening? at that big global level, you're right, it is a - see happening? at that big globall level, you're right, it is a complex situation. i have been in touch with the foreign secretary and i know she has spoken to their counterparts in
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ukraine and, quite rightly, because shaun and ate and were members of the regular ukrainian army it is right that they are being treated as a prisoner of war, and the negotiations go with russia and their proxies. at the heart of this are mothers and families who have been strung along by a bunch of people who gave them hope that their sons would be treated as a prisoner of war and have flouted international law and created this devastating situation. what they need to do now is enable shaun and aidan to have proper legal representation if this charming legal process is going to continue, but also make sure they are safe and healthy by giving them access to the red cross. ., , ., ,
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red cross. people are interested in them now in _ red cross. people are interested in them now in ways _ red cross. people are interested in them now in ways that _ red cross. people are interested in them now in ways that they - red cross. people are interested in them now in ways that they were i them now in ways that they were before. what do you know about shaun, his character, who he is? his mother is shaun, his character, who he is? h 3 mother is a strong shaun, his character, who he is? h 2 mother is a strong personality, a strong woman and determined to ensure that her son is kept well, as is his stepfather. shaun is a father, married to a ukrainian woman. his wife is still in ukraine, still doing extensive humanitarian work. this is a family that is committed to the values and principles that we hold dear and are committed to the humanitarian effort to support those most impacted by the conflicts. i think that is something that the british government should recognise, and is recognising, but ultimately of course it is up to those who are holding shaun and aidan to recognise that they should be following international law. russia cannot wash its hands of this, somehow
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pretend it doesn't have control. the only reason they are being held by those people is because of the involvement of russian military forces. these are russian proxies. russia needs to obey international law. thank you for your time this morning. let's take you to westminster this morning. it looks like the cloud is just thinning out the little bits with some blue sky over the river thames. there is the palace of westminster, of course. ben will tell us a little bit more about if we can enjoy this kind of weather today all over the uk. it isa it is a beautiful star the day in
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london and many places saying that sunshine, but there is more cloud out towards the west. it is still just about right for most in south—west england at the moment, but the story today, yes, sunny spells, but also showers and blustery winds. not reallyjewish hours, but long spells of rain so far this morning across the scottish highlands. this was the scene in glencoe just a highlands. this was the scene in glencoejust a short highlands. this was the scene in glencoe just a short time ago. outbreaks of rain affecting many parts of scotland. there is a bit of rain getting into northern ireland. the odd showerfor rain getting into northern ireland. the odd shower for wales and the south—west of england. dry further south—west of england. dry further south and east, which is where we will have the best of the sunshine. for england and wales not too many showers today. northern ireland sing scattered heavy showers and for scotland, heavy showers and longer spells of rain, maybe the odd flash of lightning. it will be appreciated generally put windy in the north with gusts up to 50 miles an hour in
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exposed parts of north—west scotland, temperature shared just 13 degrees, but further east saying highs of 22 in hull and london. the price you pay for the sunny weather is high pollen levels across many parts of england and where is. further north, those levels will be lower. through this evening and overnight, some showers will continue, most of them will fade. some clear spells to start the day. temperatures between ten and 12 degrees. tomorrow, more of us should see a bright start with parts of scotland saying a better chance of early sunshine. not as many showers tomorrow as we will have today. it will not be quite as windy as today. temperatures in parts of western scotland just 1a or 15, 16 for belfast, 18 or 19 in wales, 22 in the south—east of england. let me
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take you further ahead. if you are a fan of warm weather you might like what i have in the forecast for next week. frontalsystems what i have in the forecast for next week. frontal systems bringing rain to the north—west of the uk at times. furthersouth to the north—west of the uk at times. further south and east, high—pressure taking charge and the potential, we will have to firm up on the details of this, but it looks like we will see much warmer air moving northwards, bringing a real taste of summerfor some in moving northwards, bringing a real taste of summer for some in the southern half of the uk, with potentially 29 degrees in london by the end of the week. not quite as warm in the north. so, next week not looking too bad. for the weekend, and mixed affair. sunny spells for some, downpours for others. what with the average temperature before this month? generally high teens to link 20 is going from north to south across the uk. so, as you can see, these
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temperatures would be above average. statistics showing it has been a pretty cool tune so far. it has been a degree or so below average in most parts of the uk. it looks like that could be about to change throughout the coming week. a charity that holds fitness classes for people over 50 says it's been saved after receiving £100,000 from a mystery donor. staff at age active, in sheffied, described the gesture as a "miracle" — but they have no idea why the stranger chose to support them. our reporter tom ingall went for a work out with the group.
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# it's raining men, hallelujah... you want moves? they've got moves. each week age active welcomes hundreds of people. from keep fit to zomba, they are single—handedly keeping the cod liver oil market afloat. and now they can afford to upgrade the half—time biscuits. this letter arrived, "i don't know anybody from york," we didn't know what it was, we opened this letter and said "we want your bank account details!" oh, i don't think so. we didn't believe it, we thought it was a hoax. must be a scam. so i looked into it, rang the solicitors up, and he said it was absolutely not a hoax, it was for real. a businessman they had never met, who had never been to a class, left them around £100,000 in his will. i think he must have known somebody who had come here and they must have said to him what it meant to them, to come here, make friends and be involved in a group. the gift means the club can keep welcoming all comers. well, nearly all of them. i don't think they are supposed to go that way! all these girls, they are so pleasant and happy. it is important, every class that we do, because we couldn't, we need to move, older people,
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to keep healthy. after we will go and have a cup of coffee and a chat. _ so it is all about the apres keep fit, the coffee and the biscuits afterwards is it? that's it, yeah. it keeps everybody active and we all meet each other, really good. £100,000 saves age active for the future. itjust can't everyone�*s dignity. tom ingall, bbc news. that was tom ingall reporting. it's the end of an era for the residents of ramsay street, as the cameras stopped rolling for the final time on the set of neighbours. cast members past and present reunited to film the final episode of the aussie soap and came together for a special rendition of the theme tune — let's take a look. # neighbours, everybody needs good neighbours. # with a little understanding, you can find the perfect blend # neighbours, should be
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there for one another # that's when good neighbours become good friends #. alan fletcher, who has played dr karl kennedy in neighbours for 28 years, joins us now from melbourne. allen, hello stop well, it is the day after we finish.— allen, hello stop well, it is the day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet _ day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet. it _ day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet. it was _ day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet. it was a _ day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet. it was a tough - day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet. it was a tough day. l day after we finish. yesterday was bittersweet. it was a tough day. itj bittersweet. it was a tough day. it was a sad day, but celebratory as well because we are filming one of the very last scenes and we were surrounded by so many past cast members. it was an enormous amount of fun, but of course ada was the last scene. of fun, but of course ada was the last scene-— last scene. what was it like when ou all last scene. what was it like when you all got _ last scene. what was it like when you all got together? _ last scene. what was it like when you all got together? i _ last scene. what was it like when you all got together? i imagine i last scene. what was it like when i you all got together? i imagine the cast members come and go, but you
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stay in touch because as a viewer you do like to think you're all family really and you all get on. oh, absolutely. very much so. sometimes people can be a way for many years and they come back and it is like just yesterday. peter o'brien, who i hadn't seen for goodness knows how many years, it is just like a high, peat, how are you doing? paul keane, wonderful to see him back. an absolutejoy doing? paul keane, wonderful to see him back. an absolute joy to doing? paul keane, wonderful to see him back. an absolutejoy to have people come back. it is just like your second cousin is coming home after ten years of being overseas. can you just help me with something? in the final episode, i know lots of the character to come back. where they literally in the final episode? how has it all works? i’m
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they literally in the final episode? how has it all works?— they literally in the final episode? how has it all works? i'm not going to cive how has it all works? i'm not going to give away _ how has it all works? i'm not going to give away any — how has it all works? i'm not going to give away any spoilers, - how has it all works? i'm not going to give away any spoilers, but - to give away any spoilers, but through the magic of technology many people who couldn't physically be with us have other ways of returning. i can tell you that almost any person who was available who was approached was magnanimous enough to say yes i would love to be involved. that is the depths of affection that people have for the show, and a recognition of how much the show has done for them, no matter how big they have become as stars. ~ ., ., ~ , stars. well done for keeping it cuiet. stars. well done for keeping it quiet- allen. _ stars. well done for keeping it quiet. allen, tell— stars. well done for keeping it quiet. allen, tell me - stars. well done for keeping it quiet. allen, tell me about. stars. well done for keeping it | quiet. allen, tell me about you. stars. well done for keeping it - quiet. allen, tell me about you. you have been on the show for a very long time, which is great in the career of an actor. what happens to you now? career of an actor. what happens to ou now? ~ . , you now? well, mercifully, neighbours _ you now? well, mercifully, neighbours has _ you now? well, mercifully, neighbours has given - you now? well, mercifully, neighbours has given me . you now? well, mercifully, neighbours has given me a| you now? well, mercifully, i neighbours has given me a lot you now? well, mercifully, - neighbours has given me a lot of connections in the uk is like a second home to me. i'm doing some music gigs in london in earlyjuly, some music festivals, then back
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again in september doing my doctor coral in conversation show right around the country. neighbours will stay alive for me in a big way. i will be back next year doing similar work, as well. i will be connecting with fans, that is the thing i love the most. thank you to everybody who has e—mailed me and sent messages of support, i really appreciate it. has it ever taken _ support, i really appreciate it. has it ever taken you by surprise how popular an australian drama is in the uk? jl popular an australian drama is in the uk? ., ., , ~ the uk? it gave me a huge shock when i went over in — the uk? it gave me a huge shock when i went over in 1999 _ the uk? it gave me a huge shock when i went over in 1999 today _ the uk? it gave me a huge shock when i went over in 1999 today my _ the uk? it gave me a huge shock when i went over in 1999 today my first - i went over in 1999 today my first pantomime and i was mobs! it was fantastic. since then i have enjoyed a wonderful connection with literally thousands and thousands of people in the uk. it gives me so muchjoy because when people in the uk. it gives me so much joy because when you make a tv programme you arejust much joy because when you make a tv programme you are just hoping that people love it, but when they come
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to you face to face and say how much they appreciate the show, that it's a they appreciate the show, that it's 8 joy they appreciate the show, that it's a joy to me. i they appreciate the show, that it's a joy to me— a joy to me. i don't think i had fully appreciated _ a joy to me. i don't think i had fully appreciated how - a joy to me. i don't think i had fully appreciated how the - a joy to me. i don't think i had| fully appreciated how the show a joy to me. i don't think i had - fully appreciated how the show had spread. it has been shown in more than 60 countries around the world. have there been places that you have heard about that have particularly surprised you? i heard about that have particularly surprised you?— heard about that have particularly surprised you? i love the fact that in the netherlands _ surprised you? i love the fact that in the netherlands and _ surprised you? i love the fact that in the netherlands and belgium i surprised you? i love the fact that i in the netherlands and belgium the show is very popular, but my favourite is iceland. half the population of iceland watch neighbours and i was literally mulch when i went there. every time i would get out of the van and go into a petrol station it was on the television! fantastic. istand a petrol station it was on the television! fantastic. i stand is now my favourite overseas destination for neighbours lovers. if you were to pick an episode or a storyline that for you was the most
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memorable, what would it be, what resonated most with your fans from your point of view?— your point of view? probably the isabel, susan, _ your point of view? probably the isabel, susan, coral— your point of view? probably the isabel, susan, coraltriangle. it| isabel, susan, coraltriangle. it was so rich in drama. you have a situation where a woman is pregnant and herfather situation where a woman is pregnant and her father has died so she latches onto carl kennedy and accept him as a partner so she has a father for the daughter. lucy is the daughter then there is a huge blow up. it was a fantastic intricate story. i would like to say, i love comedy on neighbours and episode 7,000 is my favourite! you comedy on neighbours and episode 7,000 is my favourite!— comedy on neighbours and episode 7,000 is my favourite! you must have moved house — 7,000 is my favourite! you must have moved house quite _ 7,000 is my favourite! you must have moved house quite a _ 7,000 is my favourite! you must have moved house quite a few _ 7,000 is my favourite! you must have moved house quite a few times, - 7,000 is my favourite! you must have moved house quite a few times, how. moved house quite a few times, how many times have you had the guy from
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neighbours is my new neighbour? i have only moved once in the entire time i have been on neighbours. i am lad ou time i have been on neighbours. i am glad you had — time i have been on neighbours. i am glad you had a — time i have been on neighbours. lam glad you had a good day yesterday. i'm sure it was very emotional and we wait to see the results. nice to see u. stay with us, headlines coming up.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. prince charles is reported to have called the government's scheme to fly asylum seekers to rwanda "appalling". the first deportation flight to the east african country has been given the go—ahead to leave on tuesday. brazilian police searching for british journalist dom philips, and another man, in the remote amazon rainforest, have found possible human remains.
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as you can see, this eye is not blinking, i can't smile on this side of my face. singerjustin bieber opens up to his fans about the facial paralysis that's forced him to cancel a series of shows. england's cricketers have a fight on their hands at trent bridge today, after a dominant start to the second test by new zealand, who are building a big first innings. i'm live at download in donington park where the main stage is preparing for heavy metal legends iron maiden as they return to live music festivals. good morning. for many of us the weekend promises some warm sunshine, but the further north you are across the uk there will be some pretty hefty showers around and it will be windy. i'll have all the weather details here on breakfast.
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it's saturday the 11th ofjune. our main story. prince charles is said to have privately criticised the government's plan to send asylum seekers from the uk to rwanda, reportedly calling the measures "appalling". the claim is being made after the high court ruled that the first flight under the new policy can depart on tuesday, despite a legal challenge by campaigners. helena wilkinson reports. prince charles pictured here hosting a celebration for the commonwealth, but it was comments he previously reported to have made about the government's deportation policy that have been picked up by the times newspaper. the paper says the prince described the policy of deporting asylum seekers to rwanda as appalling. his spokesman emphasised that the prince remains politically neutral. the first migrants are due to make thatjourney next tuesday with campaigners failing in their
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legal bid to stop the removals. the high court in london heard from home office lawyers at six asylum seekers who had been due to be deported have had their removal directions cancelled. but thejudge had their removal directions cancelled. but the judge was not persuaded to halt the flight carrying 31 others, dismissing arguments that the policy is unlawful. the government welcomed thejudgment, campaigners said the fight goes on. no, it's absolutely not a landmark day, and doesn't — it is important to note this isn't the substantive hearing, so this isn't in any way a vindication of the home secretary's policy — that is still to be tested in the courts in the next few weeks. the lawyer representing those trying to stop next week's flight, raza husain, pointed out that the home office has repeatedly claimed that their rwanda policy has been given the green light by the unhcr, the un agency responsible for the refugee convention. that's misleading and incorrect, he told the judge. priti patel has consistently claimed her deal with rwanda is lawful,
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under the refugee convention. this agreement is comparable with all our domestic and international legal obligations. but in court, a barrister for the un told thejudge... notjust once, but on numerous occasions, it was claimed. after the deal was signed in kigali in april. the un had two meetings with priti patel and told her the arrangement broke international law. the government's legal team, however, interprets the convention differently, noting that more than 10,000 asylum seekers have risked their lives crossing the channel in small boats already this year, and arguing there is a significant public interest in a policy that will deter people from making those journeys, and undermine the activities of criminal people smugglers. around 100 asylum seekers are now
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in immigration detention, threatened with deportation to rwanda. in brook house near gatwick, some have been on hunger strike. one syrian spoke to the bbc. a translator has voiced his words. translation: i came to the uk because it's the only place - i have connections to. my brother, my uncle and my aunt live here. if i end up in rwanda, my future and the future of my two kids will be destroyed. the home office had always expected a legal challenge and welcoming the high court decision last night, the home secretary insisted she will not be deterred. however, campaigners have been given permission to appeal against thejudgment. the matter to be decided at a hearing on monday, just hours before the flight to kigali is due to take off. our correspondent helena wilkinson has more the prince's comments on the deportation policy.
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his comments are seen as quite unusual but not being denied. yes. unusual but not being denied. yes, that's right- — unusual but not being denied. yes, that's right. members _ unusual but not being denied. 16712 that's right. members of the unusual but not being denied. 122 that's right. members of the royal family normally stay out of politics. it's important to stress these were private comments reportedly made by prince charles in the times this morning, according to an unnamed source prince charles on several occasions expressed his opposition to the government to's rwanda asylum plan, describing it as appalling. this unnamed source is quoted in the paper saying prince charles said he was more than disappointed with the policy, he thinks the government approach is appalling and also isn't impressed with the government's direction of travel. it's also reported that prince charles's frustrated because later this month he's going to be representing his mother the at the
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commonwealth heads of government summit. he will represent the queen there, so this is rather unfortunate timing but important to stress is a private comments reported, clarence house won't deny the story, what they will say is they aren't commenting on what were described as supposed anonymous, private conversations with the prince of wales but clarence house restating that he remains politically neutral and matters of policy decisions the government. and matters of policy decisions the government-— brazilian police have found possible human remains in their search for uk journalist dom phillips and bruno pereira, an expert on indigenous peoples. the pair disappeared six days ago while travelling through the amazon rainforest. police say experts will analyse the material that's been found, as well as blood traces that were discovered on a fishing boat. katy watson reports. from up here you get an idea of the vastness of the amazon. and with that, the challenges faced by the search teams in finding the two men.
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on friday, though, there was a significant yet devastating breakthrough. materialfound in the river that could be human remains, not far from the area that dom phillips and bruno pereira were last seen. it will now be sent to the city of manaus for forensic analysis. currently, authorities are also examining traces of blood on a boat longing to a suspect, a local fisherman. belonging to a suspect, a local fisherman. dom phillips and bruno pereira are experts in their field. one an experienced journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travel companion, a renowned expert on indigenous affairs, a man who knows these communities well, but also has his enemies, and had been threatened in the past for his work in trying to denounce illegal mining and fishing. and it was on this river they were threatened again in the days leading up to their disappearance. it's an incredibly distressing situation. there have been reports
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overnight about these findings but that's still subject to analysis. at this time it remains incredibly worrying and upsetting for the families and for organisations who have worked alongside dom and bruno or anyone who shares a commitment to the amazon and protection of its pupils. —— peoples. the news of the missing pair has gained worldwide attention. celebrities and footballers including pele have called for the government to step up and find mr phillips and mr pereira. that is a call that has been echoed by mr phillips' sister in london. she called for an in—depth and open investigation into what has happened. katy watson, bbc news. the prime minister has urged ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british citizens sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. aiden aslin and shaun pinner were captured while with the ukrainian army and tried as mercenaries by a russian proxy court in the so—called donetsk people's republic in eastern ukraine.
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our europe correspondentjoe inwood is in kyiv this morning — what will the next steps be from ukraine? this is complicated, the prime minister making those comments about seeking to do everything possible. in practical terms, what could happen? in practicalterms, what could hauen? ., , , ,.,,.,_ ., in practicalterms, what could hauen? ., , , ., ., happen? honestly, probably not that much diplomatically. _ happen? honestly, probably not that much diplomatically. liz _ happen? honestly, probably not that much diplomatically. liz truss - happen? honestly, probably not that much diplomatically. liz truss and i much diplomatically. liz truss and dmytro kuleba have condemned this, they said it's a breach of the geneva conventions but in terms of diplomatic levers there aren't really any available. they don't have formal relations with the people's republic or recognise its existence. ukraine is in a state of war with them and there aren't any diplomatic channels there. the uk has a ready put heavy sanctions on russia and the people's republic. they have been at the forefront of pushing for more and i don't think we'll see how the sanctions as a
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consequence because they can't act unilaterally. another option is an appeal, a legal appeal, they got 30 days to do so. that would reduce their sentence from death by firing squad to life imprisonment. still an incredibly harsh sentence for two people who were legitimate soldiers of the ukrainian army. there is the final area, this is speculation but it is serious speculation from serious places that they could be exchanged in some sort of prisoner swap. these exchanges between the two sides have happened but they've happened between prisoners of war and as you've mentioned, the men haven't been tried as prisoners of war but as terrorists, as mercenaries. we don't have a precedent for this and it's very uncertain anything could happen. the two men the future is looking very, very uncertain. two men the future is looking very, very uncertain-— very uncertain. there is sunshine out there for _ very uncertain. there is sunshine out there for many _ very uncertain. there is sunshine out there for many of— very uncertain. there is sunshine out there for many of us - very uncertain. there is sunshine out there for many of us this - out there for many of us this
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morning. good morning. sunshine is part of our weather story this weekend. the beautiful start for many but big shower clouds starting to develop for this weather watcher in the west of wales. for some it's been more than showers so far this morning, some persistent rain in parts of scotland. sunshine and blustery showers for most but evidence of that really wet weather we've had across the highlands and on the radar picture you can see that heavy rain piling in. we've also got outbreaks of showers starting to push across northern ireland. quite a lot of cloud generally in this northern half of the uk. the shower cringing into wales and the south—west. best of the sunshine in central and eastern parts. three today that's where we'll keep the best of the sunshine and the dry weather. some showers in wales, northern and western england, plenty of showers for northern ireland and lots continuing to fall across scotland. potentially some thunder and lightning. quite a windy
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day for many particularly in the northern half of the uk and in north—west scotland gusts of up to 50 mph. but the price you pay for the best of the warmth and sunshine is very high pollen levels across many central and southern parts of england, wales. lower levels further north. three tonight, many of the showers will fade, some continuing to feed into parts of western scotland, northern ireland, north—west england on this westerly breeze which will ease a little as the night goes on. clear spells, temperatures around 10—12. most of us getting off to a sunny start for sunday, a better chance of morning brightness across scotland. some showers around, there shouldn't be as many as we've had today. equally breezy but not as windy as today. as
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we look further ahead, there's temperatures are set to climb, low pressure to the north—west. we could see frontal systems at times bringing rain into the western uk but higher pressure further south and east. as that area of high pressure moves east, looking likely that we will start to tap into some really warm air pushing up from the south. that could live temperatures in some central and southern parts into the mid to high 20s through the latter part of next week. while there will be some rain at times further north and west, even here we should see some warmth. something quite some like on the way but a mixed weekend to get through first. almost one in six people in england, wales and northern ireland used foodbanks orfood charities in march, with one in five skipping meals or cutting portion sizes to cope with the cost of living. or cutting portion sizes to cope it's created a perfect
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storm for foodbanks — with increasing demand and falling donations. our social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has been to meet one woman struggling to keep her community afloat. hundreds of people would struggle to eat without this woman. she set up the food bank at the start of the pandemic but despite covid easing her efforts are still desperately needed. ., , , ., ., needed. people need us more than ever because _ needed. people need us more than ever because the _ needed. people need us more than ever because the cost _ needed. people need us more than ever because the cost of _ needed. people need us more than ever because the cost of living - needed. people need us more than ever because the cost of living is i ever because the cost of living is spiralling and the costs in shops going up every day. spiralling and the costs in shops going up every day-— spiralling and the costs in shops going up every day. sometimes you have to accept _ going up every day. sometimes you have to accept we _ going up every day. sometimes you have to accept we need _ going up every day. sometimes you have to accept we need a _ going up every day. sometimes you have to accept we need a bit - going up every day. sometimes you have to accept we need a bit of - have to accept we need a bit of help _ have to accept we need a bit of help it— have to accept we need a bit of hel. :, , have to accept we need a bit of hel _ ., , , ' . have to accept we need a bit of hel. . , , , . | help. it really is difficult. i know. help. it really is difficult. i knovv- i've _ help. it really is difficult. i know. i've been _ help. it really is difficult. i. know. i've been independent help. it really is difficult. i- know. i've been independent all my life. keith worked _ know. i've been independent all my life. keith worked in _ know. i've been independent all my life. keith worked in construction i life. keith worked in construction earnina life. keith worked in construction earning up _ life. keith worked in construction earning up to _ life. keith worked in construction earning up to £40,000 - life. keith worked in construction earning up to £40,000 before i life. keith worked in construction - earning up to £40,000 before covid. he had a stroke during the pandemic forcing him to use up his savings and is now homeless. thea;r forcing him to use up his savings and is now homeless.— forcing him to use up his savings and is now homeless. they are 'ust
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brilliant. without i and is now homeless. they are 'ust brilliant. without this i and is now homeless. they are 'ust brilliant. without this place i and is now homeless. they are 'ust brilliant. without this place it brilliant. without this place i don't — brilliant. without this place i don't know_ brilliant. without this place i don't know where _ brilliant. without this place i don't know where i- brilliant. without this place i don't know where i would i brilliant. without this place ll don't know where i would be, brilliant. without this place i. don't know where i would be, i really— don't know where i would be, i really don't _ don't know where i would be, i really don't. i'd _ don't know where i would be, i really don't. i'd be _ don't know where i would be, i really don't. i'd be inside, - don't know where i would be, i really don't. i'd be inside, if. don't know where i would be, i really don't. i'd be inside, if i. really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was — really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was going _ really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was going to _ really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was going to say— really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was going to say the - really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was going to say the truth. i really don't. i'd be inside, if i. was going to say the truth. hopi: really don't. i'd be inside, ifi was going to say the truth. how do ou was going to say the truth. how do you mean? — was going to say the truth. how do you mean? i _ was going to say the truth. how do you mean? i would _ was going to say the truth. how do you mean? i would have _ was going to say the truth. how do you mean? i would have had - was going to say the truth. how do you mean? i would have had to - was going to say the truth. how do | you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to — you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to get _ you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to get food _ you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to get food at. _ you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to get food at. we - you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to get food at. we ran - you mean? i would have had to turn to crime to get food at. we ran out| to crime to get food at. we ran out of tinned meat, _ to crime to get food at. we ran out of tinned meat, hot _ to crime to get food at. we ran out of tinned meat, hot dogs, - to crime to get food at. we ran out i of tinned meat, hot dogs, meatballs, we've run out of everything.- we've run out of everything. keeping the help going _ we've run out of everything. keeping the help going is _ we've run out of everything. keeping the help going is getting _ we've run out of everything. keeping the help going is getting harder, - we've run out of everything. keeping the help going is getting harder, as i the help going is getting harder, as we discovered as we followed bell over several days.— over several days. morrisons, sainsburv's — over several days. morrisons, sainsbury's and _ over several days. morrisons, sainsbury's and asda, - over several days. morrisons, sainsbury's and asda, see - over several days. morrisons, sainsbury's and asda, see if. over several days. morrisons, i sainsbury's and asda, see if we over several days. morrisons, - sainsbury's and asda, see if we can get some free time veg. i'm not brave enough to find them! donations are fallin: brave enough to find them! donations are falling and — brave enough to find them! donations are falling and the _ brave enough to find them! donations are falling and the meagre _ brave enough to find them! donations are falling and the meagre funds - brave enough to find them! donations are falling and the meagre funds of. are falling and the meagre funds of the food bank don't stretch as far due to rising prices. we the food bank don't stretch as far due to rising prices.— the food bank don't stretch as far due to rising prices. we can't 'ust shut it. it will�* due to rising prices. we can't 'ust shut it. it will come i due to rising prices. we can't 'ust shut it. it will come to i due to rising prices. we can't 'ust shut it. it will come to a i due to rising prices. we can'tjust shut it. it will come to a point - shut it. it will come to a point where we only have beans and pasta, no one wants to eat that seven days a week but for two days a week it's better than having nothing at all. it's about knowing where all the players — it's about knowing where all the players are... it's about knowing where all the players are- - -— it's about knowing where all the players are... each weekend she coaches a _
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players are... each weekend she coaches a football _ players are... each weekend she coaches a football team, - players are... each weekend she i coaches a football team, conviction on the football field.— on the football field. don't panic. just turn, on the football field. don't panic. just turn. take — on the football field. don't panic. just turn, take the _ on the football field. don't panic. just turn, take the bull. - on the football field. don't panic. just turn, take the bull. if- on the football field. don't panic. just turn, take the bull. if they i just turn, take the bull. if they don't listen its press ups or labs. they don't want to do that so they listen. it's really good fun and nice to see the boys enjoy themselves. nice to see the boys en'oy themselvesi nice to see the boys en'oy themselves. ,, ., , ., , themselves. slade green has high levels of deprivation, _ themselves. slade green has high levels of deprivation, domestic i levels of deprivation, domestic violence and mental health conditions. listening to the problem is daily does of course take its toll. i is daily does of course take its toll. ., �* , , , ., ., toll. i don't sleep very well at all because obviously _ toll. i don't sleep very well at all because obviously you _ toll. i don't sleep very well at all because obviously you think i toll. i don't sleep very well at all. because obviously you think about those people and you have to think i'm going to help them the next day and it does make it really hard. aha, and it does make it really hard. a single mother of four, the youngest just eight, mel's dynamism is driven by a desire to see both her own and others do well. i by a desire to see both her own and others do well.— others do well. i live in this area and i want _ others do well. i live in this area and i want to — others do well. i live in this area and i want to see _ others do well. i live in this area and i want to see the _ others do well. i live in this area and i want to see the area i others do well. i live in this area and i want to see the area get i and i want to see the area get better. it's notjust about coming to get food or play a game of football, it's about how we can move them onto something else. this corner of south _ them onto something else. this corner of south east _ them onto something else. this corner of south east london has often felt overlooked. it needs its
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own community, it needs mel hudson to see it through its current challenges. michael buchanan, bbc news. we can speak now to dr chris smith and professor linda bauld — who answered our questions on covid throughout the pandemic. now they're turning to other matters of public health. we were just listening to that report on the cost of living and perhaps you can pick up on this, this is something we've spoken about a lot, it's the impact this is having on physical health, mental health and emotional health and stress. how are people going to deal with this? this stress. how are people going to deal with this? , , ., , , ., , with this? this is really serious, the situation _ with this? this is really serious, the situation is _ with this? this is really serious, the situation is just _ with this? this is really serious, the situation isjust as - with this? this is really serious, the situation isjust as serious l the situation is just as serious pandemic, as a pandemic for many people around the country. if you look at the ons data, you can see that three in four of us are worried
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about the cost of living, people are buying less food and more than half of us are spending less on energy. people are really concerned and what i know from my own research actually over many years is that not having enough money, not having enough food, not being able to heat your home properly has direct health implications and they range from the immediate, so someone who has arthritis or ulcers in a cold home, someone who has asthma living in a damp house they can't heat, or not having enough money to use transport to get prescriptions, etc. those are the immediate effects and then there are the longer term effects. for example, mums who don't have an adequate diet, that has an effect on their kids, we know that can carry through life and then people experiencing stress and worry and over time that has direct physical effects on the body. it effects our heartrate, puts us at greater risk of heart attacks or stroke. we really have to try and support
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people but we need a big effort to try and get through this cost of living crisis because i think it's a health inequalities issue and that's a big challenge notjust for the uk but for many countries around the world. ,, ., but for many countries around the world. ,. but for many countries around the world. y., , , .,, ., world. so, your expertise as a virologist. _ world. so, your expertise as a virologist, how _ world. so, your expertise as a virologist, how does - world. so, your expertise as a virologist, how does that i world. so, your expertise as a virologist, how does that fit i world. so, your expertise as a virologist, how does that fit in with poverty, the link between them? well, this is a public health problem _ well, this is a public health problem and it is a fact and we've known _ problem and it is a fact and we've known for— problem and it is a fact and we've known for many years and in many countries — known for many years and in many countries that health outcomes in the country are directly proportional to how much money is in a person's— proportional to how much money is in a person's pocket. that is proportional to how much education and what _ proportional to how much education and what they do as a job, in other words _ and what they do as a job, in other words their— and what they do as a job, in other words their social class. the people who are _ words their social class. the people who are hardest hit when there's less money in the pocket of the people — less money in the pocket of the people who have released money to start with _ people who have released money to start with. the reason for this is all of— start with. the reason for this is all of the — start with. the reason for this is all of the things linda said. there is a series— all of the things linda said. there is a series of domino effects. one of the _ is a series of domino effects. one of the other— is a series of domino effects. one of the other issues that linda didn't— of the other issues that linda didn't mention is that it's a vicious _ didn't mention is that it's a vicious cycle because when a person
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is in a _ vicious cycle because when a person is in a situation where they are already— is in a situation where they are already debating 90% of their cognitive energy worrying about whether— cognitive energy worrying about whether to pay their bills or where the next _ whether to pay their bills or where the next ten years coming from, there's— the next ten years coming from, there's much less freedom of thought to devote _ there's much less freedom of thought to devote to how do i improve my situation, — to devote to how do i improve my situation, how do i break the cycle? that's_ situation, how do i break the cycle? that's the _ situation, how do i break the cycle? that's the other thing we have to remember, it becomes a self—fulfilling prophecy and that's why people need help. self-fulfilling prophecy and that's why people need help.— self-fulfilling prophecy and that's why people need help. linda, pick up on the story — why people need help. linda, pick up on the story we've _ why people need help. linda, pick up on the story we've been _ why people need help. linda, pick up on the story we've been talking i on the story we've been talking about this week, you'll be well aware of it, the review in the smoking age. it's the age at which you can buy cigarettes in england and the debate around that and it sparks a lot of interest in where we are with smoking and people's health. �* , :, are with smoking and people's health. �*, ., . ., , health. there's a connection between the previous — health. there's a connection between the previous we _ health. there's a connection between the previous we just _ health. there's a connection between the previous we just discussed - health. there's a connection between the previous we just discussed and i the previous we just discussed and smoking which is one of the biggest causes of health inequalities because people are far more likely to smoke often because of stress and family circumstances or they start early in childhood in a community where people are more likely to
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smoke. it contributes to poverty because cigarettes are so expensive. this is a report released this week led byjaved khan who has was this is a report released this week led by javed khan who has was asked to come up with an ambitious set of plans. a lot of people say to me that smoking is hugely reduced and it is but we still have 7 million smokers in the uk. what he is setting out as a number of recommendations which we hope the government will take seriously and one of them is the idea of prevention. at the moment you can't buy cigarettes if you're under 18 and he is saying what we should do is raise the age of sail by a year every year as they are already doing in new zealand to contribute to prevention and i think that would have a big impact. his other recommendations around vaping, around helping pregnant women quit smoking, thinking about smoke—free environments, all these things together i think could make a big impact. we're almost with smoking, if you pick up public health issue
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we might succeed within my lifetime, this is the one so i really hope we will see this report listened to and we'll see some action on the back of it. ~ ., we'll see some action on the back of it. . ., ., we'll see some action on the back of it. : ., ., , ., we'll see some action on the back of it. what are your thoughts in terms of observing? _ it. what are your thoughts in terms of observing? i'm _ it. what are your thoughts in terms of observing? i'm thinking - it. what are your thoughts in terms of observing? i'm thinking about i of observing? i'm thinking about what new zealand did in raising the age, it has this ambition that if you're born after a certain year you won't be able to buy cigarettes, you won't be able to buy cigarettes, you won't have access to it and there is also the argument about e—cigarettes or vaping as to what role they should play. or vaping as to what role they should play-— or vaping as to what role they should -la . . .,, ., ., should play. that was one of the recommendations _ should play. that was one of the recommendations in _ should play. that was one of the recommendations in javed i should play. that was one of the | recommendations in javed khan's report, _ recommendations in javed khan's report, his — recommendations injaved khan's report, his third action point was to promote — report, his third action point was to promote vaping. i'm slightly cautious— to promote vaping. i'm slightly cautious about vaping. i spoke to a researcher— cautious about vaping. i spoke to a researcher in america this week is looking _ researcher in america this week is looking at— researcher in america this week is looking at the onward health consequences of vaping and it's not benigh _ consequences of vaping and it's not benign. yes, it may contain fewer chemicals — benign. yes, it may contain fewer chemicals and may help you to reduce smoking, _ chemicals and may help you to reduce smoking, she's got evidence it's causing — smoking, she's got evidence it's causing inflammation in other parts of the _ causing inflammation in other parts of the body including the brain so
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we wait _ of the body including the brain so we wait to— of the body including the brain so we wait to see what the consequences might— we wait to see what the consequences might be _ we wait to see what the consequences might be. the message is, the best thing _ might be. the message is, the best thing you _ might be. the message is, the best thing you can do for your health ever— thing you can do for your health ever is— thing you can do for your health ever is either not to smoke in the first place — ever is either not to smoke in the first place or to stop. smoking is linked _ first place or to stop. smoking is linked to— first place or to stop. smoking is linked to every disease that we study— linked to every disease that we study in — linked to every disease that we study in medicine. most people if you say— study in medicine. most people if you say smoking will think of lung cancer— you say smoking will think of lung cancer and — you say smoking will think of lung cancer and yes that is one dramatic consequence of smoking and it's a common— consequence of smoking and it's a common outcome. but it's not the most _ common outcome. but it's not the most common. smoking is far worse for your— most common. smoking is far worse for your heart and blood vessels and a stronger— for your heart and blood vessels and a stronger risk factor for having a heart _ a stronger risk factor for having a heart attack and stroke than for lung _ heart attack and stroke than for lung cancer, actually. as one person put it— lung cancer, actually. as one person put it to _ lung cancer, actually. as one person put it to me. — lung cancer, actually. as one person put it to me, most people don't live lon- put it to me, most people don't live long enough to get lung cancer if they smoke, they are more likely to die of— they smoke, they are more likely to die of heart— they smoke, they are more likely to die of heart disease and stroke which — die of heart disease and stroke which is — die of heart disease and stroke which is already a leading cause of death _ which is already a leading cause of death if_ which is already a leading cause of death. if we can keep driving down the rates _ death. if we can keep driving down the rates of— death. if we can keep driving down the rates of smoking we will reduce significantly the risk of people having — significantly the risk of people having heart attacks and strokes and that will _ having heart attacks and strokes and that will translate into a huge health — that will translate into a huge health benefit. we are making strides— health benefit. we are making strides in— health benefit. we are making strides in the right direction. the
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number— strides in the right direction. the number of— strides in the right direction. the number of people who now smoke is somewhere — number of people who now smoke is somewhere around 15%. in about 2011 it was _ somewhere around 15%. in about 2011 it was about _ somewhere around 15%. in about 2011 it was about 20% and it used to be about— it was about 20% and it used to be about half— it was about 20% and it used to be about half the population. this is a huge _ about half the population. this is a huge achievement. the government want to— huge achievement. the government want to get to a zero smoking state but that's— want to get to a zero smoking state but that's why this report has come out and _ but that's why this report has come out and make these recommendations because _ out and make these recommendations because it's _ out and make these recommendations because it's always hardest to get the iast— because it's always hardest to get the last few games as we get towards the last few games as we get towards the residual last numbers of people who smoke and stopping more people joining _ who smoke and stopping more people joining the _ who smoke and stopping more people joining the habit is a good way to start _ joining the habit is a good way to start -- — joining the habit is a good way to start -- the _ joining the habit is a good way to start. —— the last few gains. joining the habit is a good way to start. -- the last few gains. we've been reporting _ start. -- the last few gains. we've been reporting that _ start. -- the last few gains. we've been reporting that justin - start. -- the last few gains. we've been reporting that justin bieber l been reporting thatjustin bieber has had to cancel some gigs because he's been struck by quite a rare virus called ramsay hunt syndrome. we are all learning about this this morning. let's see whatjustin bieber has been saying about the symptoms. as you can see, this eye is not blinking.
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i can't smile on this side of my face. this nostril will not move. so there's full paralysis on this side of my face. so for those who are frustrated by my cancellations of the next shows, i'm just physically, obviously not capable of doing them. i should say he's canadian not from the us. tell us about this luke hunt syndrome is caused by a that 90% of us will have had a brush with and thatis us will have had a brush with and that is chickenpox virus. this us will have had a brush with and that is chickenpox virus.- that is chickenpox virus. this is a member of _ that is chickenpox virus. this is a member of the _ that is chickenpox virus. this is a member of the hairpiece - that is chickenpox virus. this is a member of the hairpiece family i that is chickenpox virus. this is a i member of the hairpiece family which means— member of the hairpiece family which means once _ member of the hairpiece family which means once it's in your body it's in your— means once it's in your body it's in your body— means once it's in your body it's in your body for — means once it's in your body it's in your body for life —— a member of the herpes— your body for life —— a member of the herpes family. most people will
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be familiar with shingles where the virus infects one patch of skin and if this— virus infects one patch of skin and if this happens in your ear and around— if this happens in your ear and around yourear if this happens in your ear and around your ear you get a manifestation called ramsay hunt syndrome. what you can do is put pressure — syndrome. what you can do is put pressure on — syndrome. what you can do is put pressure on the facial nerve which is the _ pressure on the facial nerve which is the nerve — pressure on the facial nerve which is the nerve that supplies the muscles _ is the nerve that supplies the muscles of your face and enables you to move _ muscles of your face and enables you to move your eyes, nose, mouth and speak— to move your eyes, nose, mouth and speak and _ to move your eyes, nose, mouth and speak and so— to move your eyes, nose, mouth and speak and so on and that's why justin _ speak and so on and that's why justin bieber is swearing a bit because — justin bieber is swearing a bit because if you damage that nerve or cause _ because if you damage that nerve or cause inflammation around it, which is what _ cause inflammation around it, which is what happens when you get this manifestation of chickenpox in your ear, manifestation of chickenpox in your ear. then _ manifestation of chickenpox in your ear. then it— manifestation of chickenpox in your ear, then it causes the nerve to stop— ear, then it causes the nerve to stop working. in some cases temporarily, in some people it can have _ temporarily, in some people it can have long—term consequences. younger people _ have long—term consequences. younger people tend _ have long—term consequences. younger people tend to do better than older people _ people tend to do better than older people and if it's less severe onset you don't— people and if it's less severe onset you don't have complete paralysis which _ you don't have complete paralysis which is _ you don't have complete paralysis which is a — you don't have complete paralysis which is a good prognostic feature. you're _ which is a good prognostic feature. you're more — which is a good prognostic feature. you're more likely to get things back _ you're more likely to get things back it — you're more likely to get things back. it settles down with time, there _ back. it settles down with time, there are — back. it settles down with time, there are antivirus drugs we can give _ there are antivirus drugs we can give people and you can give people
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steroids _ give people and you can give people steroids as— give people and you can give people steroids as well to help the immune system _ steroids as well to help the immune system damped down the response and that tends— system damped down the response and that tends to be associated with better— that tends to be associated with better outcomes.— that tends to be associated with better outcomes. . �* ., , better outcomes. linda, i'm not sure there's anything _ better outcomes. linda, i'm not sure there's anything particularly - better outcomes. linda, i'm not sure there's anything particularly want i there's anything particularly want to pick up on but i'm thinking about public health messaging, it makes a huge difference when we're talking about it now, when a well—known person talks about a medical condition. it person talks about a medical condition-— person talks about a medical condition. , . ., condition. it is and we saw that with jade goody _ condition. it is and we saw that with jade goody and _ condition. it is and we saw that with jade goody and cancer i with jade goody and cancer screening, for example. we've been talking about dame deborahjames and i've certainly spoken to my colleagues working in bowel cancer charity is seeing people coming forward with symptoms, wanting information. i think there is absolutely a place and as chris is saying with ramsay hunt, in the vast majority of cases people fully recover so let's hope that's the case forjustin. i think people coming forward is key and raising awareness. to go back to the original story on the cost of living, if people wanted advice and
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help, and don't know what their personal circumstances are and what they might be entitled to, the money helper website, there's loads of advice on there and people can receive it and it's not health advice but money advice but because health is so connected to money and our livelihoods, that's another good source of information.— source of information. always good to seak source of information. always good to speak to — source of information. always good to speak to you- — source of information. always good to speak to you. we'll _ source of information. always good to speak to you. we'll talk - source of information. always good to speak to you. we'll talk again i to speak to you. we'll talk again soon. thank you. we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, when matt takes over in the saturday kitchen. i hear it is uk gin day or some some gin day. its i hear it is uk gin day or some some ain da . , ., ._ i hear it is uk gin day or some some cinda. , ., ., ., ~ gin day. its world gin day and thank ou for gin day. its world gin day and thank you for giving _ gin day. its world gin day and thank you for giving that _ gin day. its world gin day and thank you for giving that away! _ gin day. its world gin day and thank you for giving that away! good i you for giving that away! good morning. ourspecial you for giving that away! good morning. our special guest today, the only man you need when you have a diy disaster, nick knowles. looking forward to it enormously. you've _ looking forward to it enormously. you've done the shape. lou and i
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like eating. excellent news! tell us about your food heaven like eating. excellent news! tell us about yourfood heaven food hell. aubergine is my food heaven, as a child _ aubergine is my food heaven, as a child it _ aubergine is my food heaven, as a child it was — aubergine is my food heaven, as a child it was my food hell but i love it and _ child it was my food hell but i love it and food — child it was my food hell but i love it and food hell would be any fish with bones in because no matter how .ood with bones in because no matter how good the _ with bones in because no matter how good the restaurant, on the one that will get _ good the restaurant, on the one that will get the _ good the restaurant, on the one that will get the bone.— will get the bone. we'll talk about that later. what do you have for us sally? some deliciously gooey _ what do you have for us sally? some deliciously gooey croquettes, paired with a _ deliciously gooey croquettes, paired with a summer— deliciously gooey croquettes, paired with a summer salad, _ deliciously gooey croquettes, paired with a summer salad, fresh - deliciously gooey croquettes, paired with a summer salad, fresh peas- deliciously gooey croquettes, paired i with a summer salad, fresh peas and onions _ with a summer salad, fresh peas and onions. ., ., , ., with a summer salad, fresh peas and onions. ., ., ., with a summer salad, fresh peas and onions. ., ., , ., ., a onions. theo, what if you got? a trilled onions. theo, what if you got? a grilled and _ onions. theo, what if you got? a grilled and roasted _ onions. theo, what if you got? a grilled and roasted marinated i onions. theo, what if you got? a i grilled and roasted marinated lamb rump, a beautiful sicilian stew with aubergines, tomatoes, courgettes. it is world gene day. what _ aubergines, tomatoes, courgettes. it is world gene day. what do _ aubergines, tomatoes, courgettes. it is world gene day. what do you i aubergines, tomatoes, courgettes. it is world gene day. what do you have | is world gene day. what do you have for us? we —
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is world gene day. what do you have for us? we will _ is world gene day. what do you have for us? we will have _ is world gene day. what do you have for us? we will have incredible i for us? we will have incredible genes— for us? we will have incredible genes from all around the world. and no tonic? _ genes from all around the world. and no tonic? no— genes from all around the world. and no tonic? no tonic. i have cocktails 'ust no tonic? no tonic. i have cocktails just for— no tonic? no tonic. i have cocktails just for you — no tonic? no tonic. i have cocktails just for you-— just for you. will we have them neat? 0h _ just for you. will we have them neat? oh no! _ just for you. will we have them neat? oh no! ollie? _ just for you. will we have them neat? oh no! ollie? in - just for you. will we have them neat? oh no! ollie? in addition just for you. will we have them i neat? oh no! ollie? in addition to bein: neat? oh no! ollie? in addition to being international _ neat? oh no! ollie? in addition to being international gin _ neat? oh no! ollie? in addition to being international gin day, i neat? oh no! ollie? in addition to being international gin day, it i neat? oh no! ollie? in addition to being international gin day, it is i being international gin day, it is national— being international gin day, it is national rose _ being international gin day, it is national rose day. _ being international gin day, it is national rose day. there - being international gin day, it is national rose day. there is- being international gin day, it is national rose day. there is a i being international gin day, it is| national rose day. there is a day for everything _ national rose day. there is a day for everything. see _ national rose day. there is a day for everything-— for everything. see you at ten o'clock! stop giving ollie a hard time, he is still nice to you and you're just so to him! he is, but he is so nice to me he pushes me that way. have a good one, guys.
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the weather could be quite nice this weekend. the weather could be quite nice this weekend. hundreds of thousands of people will flock to arenas and festival sites all over the country this weekend, kick—starting a huge summer of music for the uk. for many, it will be the first time they've been to a gig since 2019 because of the pandemic. in manchester, parklife festival is back up and running. ed sheeran will perform to nearly a quarter of a million fans over four days at the etihad stadium, and both the killers and alicia keys are set to headline other venues in the city. harry styles fans have descended on glasgow from all over the world to see the singer kick off his world tour. his uk and european live shows were postponed in 2020 and 2021. billie eilish will be playing one of six shows at the o2 in london.
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download festival, which welcomed 10,000 guests as one of several pilot events last year, is back to full capacity and already underway. kathryn stanczyszyn is at donington park for us this morning soaking up the atmosphere. a quick weather update. i'm looking at your hairand a quick weather update. i'm looking at your hair and thinking it is quite windy, but i'm saying sunshine. quite windy, but i'm saying sunshine-— quite windy, but i'm saying sunshine. , , , , , quite windy, but i'm saying sunshine. , , i, , , sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but re sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but pretty windy- _ sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but pretty windy- you — sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but pretty windy. you might _ sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but pretty windy. you might be - sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but pretty windy. you might be able i sunshine. yes, it is very sunny, but pretty windy. you might be able to| pretty windy. you might be able to see some of the ticker tape flying around from last night's headliner here at the download stage, which was case. frenetic preparations going on this magnificent stage for the music that will start tonight. iron maiden will be on tonight. 85,000 punters will be here in this huge field. that is what people are back four, the scale of these music festivals. it will be an epic night.
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i have been over in the campsite talking to some of the people that are here, and they are quite emotional. one infection download person was telling me how great it was to be back. download did take place last year, but it was a reduced version, it was one of the government's pilots on how to hold these kind of events. getting it back up to capacity is a brilliant and welcome thing for so many people. i'mjoined by and welcome thing for so many people. i'm joined by the managing director of festival republic, melvin. how much preparation has gone into bringing this back to its huge scale? monstrous preparation, really. three weeks ago this was just a piece of grass and the amount of effort that goes in for every little bit of detail, all of the stages, the lights. the crews are
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working, the barriers, the funfair, the bars. it is significant work. you have this reduced scale festival last year. what did you learn from that? , , ., , last year. what did you learn from that? ,, ., , ., last year. what did you learn from that? ,, . , ., ., that? essentially, that was all about last _ that? essentially, that was all about last year, _ that? essentially, that was all about last year, really. - that? essentially, that was all about last year, really. we i that? essentially, that was all| about last year, really. we did learn that we could have a safe fester. it was the only pilot festival of a camping nature anywhere in the world last year and that allowed us and other places to open up and have festivals from july to 19th. it didn't help the main download festival which was before then. we learned that we could do it safely, within the covid time. covid largely has gone now, so the covid preparation is still pretty minimal. it still there. but this is back to a regular here now.—
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a regular here now. with the logistics. — a regular here now. with the logistics. we _ a regular here now. with the logistics, we are _ a regular here now. with the logistics, we are hearing i a regular here now. with the i logistics, we are hearing about staffing crisis across the country, and the cost of things going up. it has been incredibly difficult. as i said, this was just a field. there is nothing here that didn't have to be delivered. everything that has to be delivered. everything that has to be delivered. everything that has to be delivered has faced massive cost increases because of the fuel increases, the staff shortages are off the scale. i have never known anything like this. the fuel is the significant issue. it is one thing changing at the petrol pump, but it is hitting every aspect of everything that we do. is hitting every aspect of eve hint that we do. :, ,, everything that we do. nonetheless, ou're everything that we do. nonetheless, you're making _ everything that we do. nonetheless, you're making it— everything that we do. nonetheless, you're making it work. _ everything that we do. nonetheless, you're making it work. you - everything that we do. nonetheless, you're making it work. you have i you're making it work. you have reading and leeds coming up, as well. there is this real sense of emotion from people to be back at some this scale. it emotion from people to be back at some this scale.— some this scale. it brings a community _ some this scale. it brings a community together, i some this scale. it brings a community together, a i some this scale. it brings a - community together, a community some this scale. it brings a _ community together, a community that is grouped around a music genre or an age grouping, orjust a festival bad. there is a need for it at all
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times, but especially when times are tough and times are incredibly tough now. will tough and times are incredibly tough now. ~ , ., , ., tough and times are incredibly tough now. ~ , ., ., ., now. will you be down the front for iron maiden — now. will you be down the front for iron maiden later? _ now. will you be down the front for iron maiden later? not _ now. will you be down the front for iron maiden later? not at - now. will you be down the front for iron maiden later? not at the i now. will you be down the front for iron maiden later? not at the fun, | iron maiden later? not at the fun, ma be at iron maiden later? not at the fun, maybe at the _ iron maiden later? not at the fun, maybe at the back _ iron maiden later? not at the fun, maybe at the back enjoying - iron maiden later? not at the fun, maybe at the back enjoying them. j maybe at the back enjoying them. those days are well gone!- those days are well gone! melvin benn, those days are well gone! melvin benn. thank _ those days are well gone! melvin benn, thank you. _ those days are well gone! melvin benn, thank you. you _ those days are well gone! melvin benn, thank you. you mention i those days are well gone! melvin l benn, thank you. you mention the weather at the beginning. i thought i would bring back my hats. the hat is a bit more glastonbury than rock, so i'm not sure it is right for download. i think you wear that hat very well. it gets you into the festival mood. it is deserted behind her there, yet you know the place is heaving, the campsite will be busy later on.
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did ink my cricketers not listen to the weather yesterday morning. did they make the right call on the toss? ben stokes put new zealand into bat, thinking the pitch would turn. new zealand in the end really enjoyed batting on the dry surface. its a huge day ahead for england as they look to wrestle back control of the second test against new zealand. following england's heroics at lord's last weekend, where they won only their second test in their last 17 matches, it was back to reality yesterday as new zealand batted their way into a commanding position, finishing the day on 318 for 1l our correspondentjoe wilson reports on the thrills and spills of day one at trent bridge. the second test for ben stokes' england. the captain invited new zealand to bat. and this happened, often.
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new zealand were missing kane williamson — their captain and top—ranked batter has covid. but they hit fours frequently, fluently, not quite working out as england had planned. ben stokes brought on ben stokes to bowl. will young gone for a7. two wickets before lunch, but follow the plot, what is that coming? another four. a beauty — devon conway in full flow, in fact. and then a twist in england's direction as stokes came back to dismiss henry nicholls, and james anderson got rid of conway for 46. and then with daryl mitchell batting, joe root dropped this opportunity, and the captain stayed cool. mitchell continued his strong form from the first test — such power and precision with this shot, it appeared to land directly in the spectator�*s drink, and yeah, england's matthew potts made the official signal for "the ball has collided with the beer." cider actually!
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this handshake meant that mitchell and tom blundell were compiling a significant partnership. both past 50 as new zealand of their total past 300. after several drops here was chance that the slip fielders just left. new zealand were excellent, but england helped them. joe wilson, bbc news. we saw the sign for the cricket ball has gone in your pint. andy murray has enjoyed his biggest win since undergoing hip surgery in 2019. he beat world numberfive stefanos tsitsipas to reach the semifinals of the stuttgart open. murray hasn't beaten a player in the top five since 2016, but his impressive start to the grass court season continued with a straight sets win over tsitsipas. he will face australian nick kyrios in the last four later today.
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stefanos plays well on all of the surfaces, but this surface for me works really nicely with my game, and i am able to use my strengths well on this court. and yeah, i don't want to say i was the smarter player, but i felt like my game on this surface matches up better. it was a good day for britain's men with dan evans through to the semifinals of the men's singles at the nottingham open after beating marc—andrea huesler. no such fortune for harriet dart, though, as her strong run came to an end after she lost to american alison riske in the quarterfinal. the lure of huge amounts of saudi arabian money has tempted another of golf�*s big hitters to join the breakaway tour that is shaking the sport to its core. the american bryson de chambeau is the latest to sign up. he won the 2020 us open and is in the prime of his career, unlike many of the others who've joined the breakaway series. confirmation of de chambeau's involvement came the day after the pga tour said it was suspending any members who joined the rival circuit. his first appearance
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will be in the second event of the £200 million series. the bouncing problem with lewis hamilton's mercedes car continues and he was left "a bit sore" after his car struggled with bouncing once again on the straights in practice at the azerbaijan grand prix. ferrari's charles leclerc was fastest after second practice. despite topping the standings, leclerc was far from happy with his car and was heard questioning the team about a sudden loss of power. sergio perez finished fastest in first practice, while hamilton struggled back in 12th. we tried something experimental on my car, and it didn't feel that great to be honest. but at least we tried it, and got data on it and now we will go through it and hopefully for tomorrow we will probably revert back to what we changed. to football, where england's latest nations league game will take place in front ofjust 3,000 schoolchildren later. they take on the side that beat them on penalties in the final of euro 2020, italy.
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the game is being played in wolverhampton, but molineaux will be mostly empty this evening, as part of the punishment imposed on the football association for crowd trouble at that final at wembley last july. gareth southgate's side need a win having drawn with germany and lost to hungary so far in the nations league. elsewhere, scotland are hoping for back—to—back wins when they take on the republic of ireland in dublin. wales face belgium just three days after losing to the netherlands. captain gareth bale has spoken out at a lack of consideration, for players. he's called on football's governing bodies to prioritise player welfare above money. tonight's game is their fourth in ten days, before travelling to rotterdam to play the netherlands on tuesday. bale believes the fixture pile—up is putting too much of a strain on all involved. two huge matches today in rugby union's english premiership. the competition has reached the playoff semifinal stage, with reigning champions harlequins taking on saracens in the first match. following that, leicester tigers take on northampton at welford road. it's been eight years since either of these clubs last
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tasted premiership glory. the winners of both matches will face each other in the final at twickenham a week on saturday. now what lengths would you go to if you had the chance to enter the love island villa? would you give up yourjob? well, rugby league star jacques o'neill has been allowed to leave castleford tigers and so that he can join the dating game show later this weekend. the super league club confirmed last night that it had agreed to release o'neill from his contract so that he can pursue another opportunity. he's only 23 and they do have first option to sign him back next year should he wish to return to rugby league. i hope it takes a rugby league ball in there and teaches them some skills. quite a change for him as opposed to his normal training ritual, a rainy day wherever. i don't watch it. it
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would be nice. it's always good to do something different. he can come back to rugby league. he has the option. he has the option. next week marks li0 years since the end of the falklands war — a conflict that saw almost 1,000 uk and argentinian soldiers killed in action. for many of those who survived, the ravages of war live on. post—traumatic stress disorder symptoms such as insomnia and heavy drinking are just some of the long term issues they've dealt with, as our special correspondent allan little reports. couldn't see my kids because i was a bit of a loose cannon, really. i weren't a nice person in them days and everything was taken away, you know, and it was hard. come on...come on. when paul bromwell came home from the falklands, his life fell apart. for years, he drank, he couldn't sleep, he was violent.
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when he realised others were also struggling, he founded valley veterans. whoa. i started helping other people, and that's what i've done ever since, and that's when i started to mend myself, as well. i started to get involved with the horses. that was massive for me, 'cause i found something that i could channel my mind into, you know, and the horse would give me so much. i'd sit in the corner and just listen to them munching the hay and that cheers me up. but also, at the same time, i've got the guys up here, we're all like—minded, we're out in the air, and we're trying to build something positive, you know, and the guys and the conversations we've in our little room in there...amazing. bagpipes skirl. this is the erskine veterans village near glasgow. it's home to hundreds of former servicemen and women. for them, li0 years is the blink of an eye, and they commemorate the experience still.
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after the falklands, a long, slow evolution began in the way we think about war trauma. but back then, the stigma it carried caused many to suffer in silent shame. i think it goes back to a long—standing view that if you stay ill, then it's really a question of character, there's something wrong with you, and it's a weakness, it's a character flaw. that was a very common view in the mid 20th century and you still see — that was echoes of that in the '80s and '90s. it's very unusual to find that now, and i would actually say rather the opposite now — i think the military have had massive changes. we know that a considerable number of people in the military do come forward now with mental health problems. military have made major strides there. i'm not saying it's perfect, but it's much better than it was. david cruickshanks was a beneficiary of that change. he's written a book about his ptsd. he was just 17 when he came
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home from the falklands. by his mid 30s, he was also drinking heavily. it took nearly 20 years for him to seek help. i knew there was something going on, i didn't know what it was called, i didn't know how to explain it, i didn't want to tell anybody about it, i wanted to mask it. you knew something was wrong but you didn't really want to admit it, and when that doctor said, "i think...| think you might have some sort of panic disorder or anxiety, i'm going to refer you," and i remember that day because ijust burst out crying. it was like a complete release. "oh, my god, i do not have to pretend any more," you know, and there's help. i get so much out of this, for me. itjust cheers me up. the vast majority of combat veterans do not develop ptsd and many of those who do get better in time. but the falklands generation is the last for whom the condition went, initially at least, unrecognised and untreated. they paid a high price for that.
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for paul bromwell, recovery began with the discovery that he was not alone and in the company of old comrades. allan little, bbc news. of course, it is a story we will keep you up—to—date on as that anniversary is commemorated. maybe if you plan to be outdoors today he will hope it is going to be like this. this is central london looking up this. this is central london looking up at the houses of parliament. it looks like a nice day. it is the day when you could go out on a dinky or a little boat. pick your boat behind you, ben. the blue one for me. it has the rope around the side. i will put in an orderfor you! the further north you are today, it is
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unusually windy in northern parts today. the showers are quite blustery in nature. as if to prove the point, look at this weather watcher picture that was sent to us from glencoe earlier. we have seen outbreaks of rain in many parts of scotland, particularly the northwest. some rain drifting across northern ireland, as well. it is windy as well with gusts up to 50 miles an hour. though strong winds will continue. further south, hour. though strong winds will continue. furthersouth, it is hour. though strong winds will continue. further south, it is drier and brighter. we will see few showers today drifting across parts of england and wales but plenty more for northern ireland and scotland. some of the showers will be heavy and thundery. when cast in the north—west is up to 50 mph. mixed fortunes today. that is reflected in the temperatures. 11i fortunes today. that is reflected in the temperatures. m for stornoway, 22 for hull and london. we have the
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best of the weather is where we also have very high levels of grass pollen today. lower levels for of the cloud and showers. the showers will continue for a time into the evening. overnight tonight we will keep some showers in the north. many of the showers will fade. the winds will ease a little but it will be breezy into sunday morning. temperatures between ten and 12 degrees. into tomorrow, quite a lot of sunshine. a brighter start and we had today. still some showers in northern areas, not as many as today. not too many showers in the south. not as windy as it has been today. temperatures in glasgow only up today. temperatures in glasgow only up to m degrees. further south 21 or 22. talking of the temperatures, let me show you what happens into next week. there will be frontal systems to the north—west, so rain at times in northern and western
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parts, but not all the time. further south, high—pressure taking charge and suggestions that the high pressure will wobble further eastwards, opening the door to really warm air set to push up from the south. so, the outlooks for the four capitals of the uk show temperatures in london by friday potentially up to around 29 degrees, so a burst of summer warmth look set to be on the way. further north and west, some rain at times, a bit cooler, but temperatures still up to the 20s. the weekend looks decidedly mixed, with some sunshine, as well. whatever the weather throws at you, i hope you have a good weekend. world cup winners, tv stars and olympic champions will once again take to the pitch tomorrow for soccer aid, the world's biggest celebrity football match. this year, the money raised will go to help the millions of children affected by the war in ukraine.
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we're joined now by presenter mark wright and comedian russell howard, who will both be putting on their boots for the game at the london stadium. good morning to you both. good morninu. good morning to you both. good morning- we _ good morning to you both. good morning. we are _ good morning to you both. good morning. we are feeling - good morning to you both. good morning. we are feeling ok. i good morning to you both. good morning. we are feeling ok. wej good morning to you both. good i morning. we are feeling ok. we will train in about _ morning. we are feeling ok. we will train in about an _ morning. we are feeling ok. we will train in about an hour, _ morning. we are feeling ok. we will train in about an hour, after- train in about an hour, after breakfast. i train in about an hour, after breakfast-— train in about an hour, after breakfast. . , , ., breakfast. i have 'ust been given a i e i breakfast. i have 'ust been given a -e- talk. breakfast. i have 'ust been given a pep talk. anyone— breakfast. i have just been given a pep talk. anyone who _ breakfast. i have just been given a pep talk. anyone who looks - breakfast. i have just been given a pep talk. anyone who looks lonelyj pep talk. anyone who looks lonely and lost. what _ pep talk. anyone who looks lonely and lost. what was _ pep talk. anyone who looks lonely and lost. what was in _ pep talk. anyone who looks lonely and lost. what was in the - pep talk. anyone who looks lonely and lost. what was in the pep i pep talk. anyone who looks lonely l and lost. what was in the pep talk? mark you have experience of professional football. mas mark you have experience of professional football.- professional football. was it crawley? — professional football. was it crawley? yeah, _ professional football. was it crawley? yeah, yeah. - professional football. was it crawley? yeah, yeah. i- professional football. was it | crawley? yeah, yeah. i tried professional football. was it i crawley? yeah, yeah. i tried to professional football. was it - crawley? yeah, yeah. i tried to have a go last year, as well. well, you say expert. a go last year, as well. well, you say “pert-— a go last year, as well. well, you sa exert. , _, ., say expert. his tip yesterday was to ick our say expert. his tip yesterday was to pick your spots _ say expert. his tip yesterday was to pick your spots and _ say expert. his tip yesterday was to pick your spots and go _ say expert. his tip yesterday was to pick your spots and go with - say expert. his tip yesterday was to pick your spots and go with it. - say expert. his tip yesterday was to pick your spots and go with it. like | pick your spots and go with it. like obi-wan _ pick your spots and go with it. like obi—wan kenobi ends door words, find
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a corner_ obi—wan kenobi ends door words, find a corner and _ obi—wan kenobi ends door words, find a corner and just hit the corner, then_ a corner and just hit the corner, then he — a corner and just hit the corner, then he would just wander off. we then he would 'ust wander off. we did a then he would just wander off. - did a penalty shoot—out yesterday to see who gets the home dressing room at london stadium. that happened yesterday, so i wasjust at london stadium. that happened yesterday, so i was just making sure our boys scored. my yesterday, so i was 'ust making sure our boys scored.— our boys scored. my pep talk didn't work! russell, _ our boys scored. my pep talk didn't work! russell, good _ our boys scored. my pep talk didn't work! russell, good morning. - our boys scored. my pep talk didn't work! russell, good morning. arel our boys scored. my pep talk didn't i work! russell, good morning. are you any good at football? i’m work! russell, good morning. are you any good at football?— any good at football? i'm all right. as far as comedians _ any good at football? i'm all right. as far as comedians go, _ any good at football? i'm all right. as far as comedians go, and - any good at football? i'm all right. as far as comedians go, and 0k. l any good at football? i'm all right. - as far as comedians go, and 0k. when you find _ as far as comedians go, and 0k. when you find yourself playing against joe cole. — you find yourself playing against joe cole, teddy sheringham, mark noble, _ joe cole, teddy sheringham, mark noble, you realise not so much. it is like _ noble, you realise not so much. it is like in _ noble, you realise not so much. it is like injurassic park when noble, you realise not so much. it is like in jurassic park when the kids_ is like in jurassic park when the kids are — is like in jurassic park when the kids are running a long and the dinosaurs— kids are running a long and the dinosaurs run by, that is with the professionals. they have this softness, _ professionals. they have this softness, then you are there like a ten mart — softness, then you are there like a ten mart he— softness, then you are there like a ten man. ., ., ._ ten man. he said to me today, i thou~ht ten man. he said to me today, i thought i _ ten man. he said to me today, i thought i was — ten man. he said to me today, i thought i was quite _ ten man. he said to me today, i thought i was quite decent, - ten man. he said to me today, i thought i was quite decent, but| ten man. he said to me today, i. thought i was quite decent, but it was so fast i didn't know what was going on. the professionals don't take it lightly, they try and
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everything they do. russell, used the phrase _ everything they do. russell, used the phrase amongst _ everything they do. russell, used the phrase amongst comedians i l everything they do. russell, used i the phrase amongst comedians i am not that bad. give us a top to bottom, who is best and worst of the comedians who are playing? me bottom, who is best and worst of the comedians who are playing?- comedians who are playing? me and lee mack. comedians who are playing? me and lee mack- i — comedians who are playing? me and lee mack. i don't _ comedians who are playing? me and lee mack. i don't want _ comedians who are playing? me and lee mack. i don't want to _ comedians who are playing? me and lee mack. i don't want to be - lee mack. i don't want to be arrogant. _ lee mack. i don't want to be arrogant, lee is 55! i'm allowed to say that _ arrogant, lee is 55! i'm allowed to say that i— arrogant, lee is 55! i'm allowed to say that. i was just arrogant, lee is 55! i'm allowed to say that. i wasjust having arrogant, lee is 55! i'm allowed to say that. i was just having a arrogant, lee is 55! i'm allowed to say that. i wasjust having a look to see _ say that. i wasjust having a look to see if— say that. i wasjust having a look to see if he — say that. i wasjust having a look to see if he was around, but there getting _ to see if he was around, but there getting into the bath. he is very old. getting into the bath. he is very otd~ as— getting into the bath. he is very otd~ as far— getting into the bath. he is very old. as far as me and lee go, they are chopping — old. as far as me and lee go, they are chopping up as food as we speak. and he _ are chopping up as food as we speak. and he scored last year and i have never— and he scored last year and i have never scored.— never scored. have you done any trainin: never scored. have you done any training for— never scored. have you done any training for this, _ never scored. have you done any training for this, russell? - never scored. have you done any training for this, russell? i- training forthis, russell? i haven't, no. i havejust come training forthis, russell? i haven't, no. i have just come off a european — haven't, no. i have just come off a european tour, sol haven't, no. i have just come off a european tour, so i haven't been
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training — european tour, so i haven't been training at— european tour, so i haven't been training at all. my first day was yesterday. it was a real eye—opener. mark— yesterday. it was a real eye—opener. mark has _ yesterday. it was a real eye—opener. mark has been training for the last three _ mark has been training for the last three months. i mark has been training for the last three months.— three months. i always try to keep it u -. three months. i always try to keep it u. i'm three months. i always try to keep it up- i'm ready — three months. i always try to keep it up. i'm ready as— three months. i always try to keep it up. i'm ready as i _ three months. i always try to keep it up. i'm ready as i can _ three months. i always try to keep it up. i'm ready as i can be. - three months. i always try to keep it up. i'm ready as i can be. let's. it up. i'm ready as i can be. let's talk about— it up. i'm ready as i can be. let's talk about the _ it up. i'm ready as i can be. let's talk about the important - it up. i'm ready as i can be. let's talk about the important stuff, . it up. i'm ready as i can be. let's talk about the important stuff, as well. we spoke to david james and mo farah yesterday, they couldn't make more clear that this is about raising money, it's about giving something back. this is why you guys are involved. something back. this is why you guys are involved-— are involved. 100%. we were 'ust sa in: are involved. 100%. we were 'ust saying before. i are involved. 10096. we were 'ust saying before, when i are involved. 10096. we were 'ust saying before, when you i are involved. 10096. we were 'ust saying before, when you say h are involved. 10096. we werejust saying before, when you say first| saying before, when you say first hand, russell has done something like going to see with the money goes before, i had done the same in south africa, you see it first hand, you see the lives it changes. i went to a township where it was not safe for kids to play at all. a very dangerous place. unicef have created this area with the kids to go every day so they could play. i could see the faces of the kids as they went running through the gates. to be
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able to play safe was everything to us we were young, i played out every day when i was young. the fact that unicef have got this together is quite extraordinary. the unicef have got this together is quite extraordinary. the money goes towards getting _ quite extraordinary. the money goes towards getting rid _ quite extraordinary. the money goes towards getting rid of— quite extraordinary. the money goes towards getting rid of malnutrition, i towards getting rid of malnutrition, it gets _ towards getting rid of malnutrition, it gets vaccines. we are fortunate that we _ it gets vaccines. we are fortunate that we get to play the game of footbatt — that we get to play the game of football. they raised i think 13 million — football. they raised i think 13 million last year. there was a conrpany_ million last year. there was a company called the power of nutrition, they will double all the money— nutrition, they will double all the money that you guys donate. which is lovel , so money that you guys donate. which is lovely. so if — money that you guys donate. which is lovely. so if you _ money that you guys donate. which is lovely, so if you put _ money that you guys donate. which is lovely, so if you put them _ money that you guys donate. which is lovely, so if you put them ten - lovely, so if you put them ten points, you will know that will be doubled, everything up to £4 million. it is a beautiful thing. the fact we could be part of it means the world.— the fact we could be part of it means the world. one of the things that ou means the world. one of the things that you highlighted, _ means the world. one of the things that you highlighted, russell, - means the world. one of the things that you highlighted, russell, is . means the world. one of the things that you highlighted, russell, is a i that you highlighted, russell, is a bit of good news. you do that thing we do try to pick stories that are funny, may be, orserious, butare good news. it has been a challenging time in lots of ways for lots of people. some things don't change, do they?
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people. some things don't change, do the ? , , ~ , they? yes, but i think there is alwa s they? yes, but i think there is always hope. _ they? yes, but i think there is always hope, always - they? yes, but i think there is always hope, always uplifting| always hope, always uplifting stories — always hope, always uplifting stories. like marco steyn, when you see the _ stories. like marco steyn, when you see the compassion and dedication of people _ see the compassion and dedication of people who are doing their utmost to .ive people who are doing their utmost to give kids— people who are doing their utmost to give kids a _ people who are doing their utmost to give kids a playground, summerto play. _ give kids a playground, summerto play. you _ give kids a playground, summerto play, you realise that there is a lot of— play, you realise that there is a lot of hope _ play, you realise that there is a lot of hope and joy and magic in the universe, _ lot of hope and joy and magic in the universe, but that doesn't sell papers, — universe, but that doesn't sell papers, so _ universe, but that doesn't sell papers, so you sometimes have to dig a little _ papers, so you sometimes have to dig a little deeper to see that humanity is pretty— a little deeper to see that humanity is pretty spectacular. we want to help each — is pretty spectacular. we want to help each other. not to get too deep, — help each other. not to get too deep, but — help each other. not to get too deep, but sometimes it is the mechanism through which the new schools. _ mechanism through which the new schools, rage cells, and something n1agical— schools, rage cells, and something magical doesn't. it is schools, rage cells, and something magical doesn't.— magical doesn't. it is a good point well made- _ magical doesn't. it is a good point well made. is _ magical doesn't. it is a good point well made. is there _ magical doesn't. it is a good point well made. is there a _ magical doesn't. it is a good point well made. is there a ball- magical doesn't. it is a good point well made. is there a ball there, i well made. is there a ball there, are you going to have a kickabout now? , ., ., . ., now? there is not a ball. we are both in our— now? there is not a ball. we are both in our flip-flops, _ now? there is not a ball. we are both in our flip-flops, so - now? there is not a ball. we are both in our flip-flops, so not - now? there is not a ball. we are both in our flip-flops, so not the both in ourflip—flops, so not the right gear!
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both in our flip-flops, so not the right gear!— right gear! the plan is we are havin: right gear! the plan is we are having an _ right gear! the plan is we are having an massage _ right gear! the plan is we are having an massage this - right gear! the plan is we are - having an massage this morning, then it is the _ having an massage this morning, then it is the last _ having an massage this morning, then it is the last training session today, — it is the last training session today, so— it is the last training session today, so all to play for. the massage _ today, so all to play for. the massage bed _ today, so all to play for. the massage bed is _ today, so all to play for. the: massage bed is always today, so all to play for. tte: massage bed is always where today, so all to play for. tt9: massage bed is always where you find the celebrities, queueing for massage. the celebrities, queueing for massage-— the celebrities, queueing for massare. :, , , :, massage. lovely to see this morning. thank ou massage. lovely to see this morning. thank you very _ massage. lovely to see this morning. thank you very much. _ thank you very much. soccer aid is on itv this sunday from 6.30pm. that's all for today. breakfast will be back tomorrow morning from six. enjoy the rest of your day, bye—bye.
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this is bbc news — these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. prince charles is reported to have described the government's rwanda asylum scheme as "appalling." his office say he remains politically neutral. police in brazil searching for a missing britishjournalist say they've found possible human remains in a river. borisjohnson urges ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british men sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. the government is expected to reject proposals to introduce a new salt and sugar tax on process food sold in england. a father and son have been killed in a crash at the isle of man tt. five riders have died in this year's event. as you can see, this eye is not blinking, i can't smile on this side of my face. and singerjustin bieber reveals the reason he cancelled his
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performances this week — he's experiencing facial paralysis.

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