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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 11, 2022 2:00pm-2:31pm BST

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this is bbc news with the latest headlines. prince charles is reported to have described the government's rwanda asylum scheme as �*appalling'. his office say he remains politically neutral. a number of the views that have been made about ruan destined to be on the basis of a lack of information about what this programme and what the migrant experience has been like. the migrant experience has been like. police in brazil searching for a missing britishjournalist say they've found possible human remains in a river. the family of shaun pinner — seen here on the right — release a statement calling on all parties for his safe release. he was sentenced to death for fighting russian forces in ukraine.
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the maximum interest rate on student loans in england is being cut by almost 5%. ministers hope it will provide �*peace of mind' for graduates. a father and son have been killed in a crash at the isle of man tt. five riders have died in this year's event and singerjustin bieber reveals the reason he cancelled his performances this week — he's experiencing facial paralysis. good afternoon. royal officials have said that prince charles "remains politically neutral", following a report that he has
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strongly criticised plans to send some asylum seekers to rwanda. an unnamed source told the times newspaper that prince charles has described the policy as "appalling" and said he was "more than disappointed" by it. the first flight carrying asylum seekers to rwanda is due to leave on tuesday. simonjones reports. their destination, dover. more than 10,000 migrants have reached the uk in small boats so far this year. the government says it is determined to stop people risking their lives crossing the channel and to tackle the people smugglers who are dangerously overloading the boats. its big idea, to send some asylum seekers to rwanda to act as a deterrent. the first flight is scheduled for tuesday. but now prince charles has reportedly described the policy as appalling. according to the times, in private conversations he said he was unimpressed with the government's direction of travel, and said he feared it could overshadow a
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commonwealth heads of state meeting in rwanda in ten days. this is one of the hotels preparing for uk arrivals. the british government insists rwanda is a safe country. clarence house wouldn't comment on supposedly anonymous private conversations except to restate that the prince of wales remains politically neutral and matters of policy for government. but it has proved controversial. the archbishop of canterbury said it would not stand the judgment of god, and the un said it would be illegal. but the mp for dover told me that despite the criticism, the government is doing the right thing. what you make of the comments apparently made by prince charles he is entitled to his view, as is anyone else, but a number of comments made on rwanda seem to be on the basis of a lack of information about what this programme and the experience has been like in rwanda. to the home secretary herself travelled to rwanda in april to announce the plan.
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campaigners failed in an initial legal bid to ground the first flight yesterday, but they will seek a full judicial review next month. we very much welcome what prince charles seems to have said. this policy is wrong. we believe it is unlawful and morally indefensible. the government describes its partnership with rwanda as world leading. people sent there will be given support. but the opposition has been loud and is now reportedly coming from some unexpected quarters. simon jones, bbc news. let's speak to matt dathan who is home affairs editor at the times. and who broke the story in the times newspaper this morning. so you quoting prince charles as having said this government policy is appalling. are you are your source 100% sure the prince of wales actually said this?— 100% sure the prince of wales actually said this? yes, absolutely. and he has —
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actually said this? yes, absolutely. and he has expressed _ actually said this? yes, absolutely. and he has expressed his - actually said this? yes, absolutely. and he has expressed his belief - actually said this? yes, absolutely. i and he has expressed his belief more than once, on more than one occasion as well. and clarence house, when we put the story to them, pointedly did not deny that he held these private beliefs, butjust insisted that he has not and is not trying to influence government policy, is that as a matter for the government and not for him and he remains politically neutral.- not for him and he remains politically neutral. you say in your sto that politically neutral. you say in your story that prince _ politically neutral. you say in your story that prince charles - politically neutral. you say in your story that prince charles has - story that prince charles has actually said that a number of times or have been had to have said that a number of times?— or have been had to have said that a number of times? yes, that is right. in more than — number of times? yes, that is right. in more than one _ number of times? yes, that is right. in more than one occasion _ number of times? yes, that is right. in more than one occasion he - number of times? yes, that is right. in more than one occasion he has i in more than one occasion he has expressed his view. 0n in more than one occasion he has expressed his view. on one occasion he was expressing his opposition to government's general reforms to the asylum system. the bill is bringing about a whole load of changes and comes into force later this month. and on a second occasion, he used the word appalling to describe the government's controversial policy to send some migrants to rwanda. you can tell it to —
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send some migrants to rwanda. you can tell it to your— send some migrants to rwanda. you can tell it to your sources but it like it is somebody quite close to prince charles?— like it is somebody quite close to prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source _ prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source is _ prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source is or _ prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source is or give _ prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source is or give a - prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source is or give a clue - prince charles? yes, i can't divulge who the source is or give a clue as| who the source is or give a clue as we must protect our resources but i can reassure viewers that this story was worked upon by several days and we also spoke to clarence house at length about it to make sure that they were not going to, you know, that they did not deny what we were reporting. i've made you think prince charles will be embarrassed by this or even quite happy to see it in print? well, that is a very interesting on the topic that we have been discussing in the lead up to publishing the story. and its aftermath. i'm no royal expert, come from home affairs perspective and had been reporting about this policy for several weeks since it was announced, i mean, ithink what for several weeks since it was announced, i mean, i think what will be the most uncomfortable for clarence house is the fact that he
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is due to travel to rwanda later this month to represent the queen at the commonwealth heads of government meeting and i think it will be an awkward, it is awkward i think that this is coming, his private views are being published in our newspaper and are now known to be public. i think that was really part of the reason why he has expressed his dissatisfaction about policy to people in private because of his very public role later this month. white maggie has been, in the past, as we all know, accused of meddling in politics foot of the 2015 he had to defend writing letters to government ministers, the so—called black spider memos. but at the same time, he is in a slightly different position as heir to the throne and he has made it clear that when he becomes king, he will be rather more careful about what he says or is heard to say. and i think that is why he will find the fact that
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private views are being made public that the uncomfortable. but i think there is a difference here. he was not, there is no suggestion that he was trying to influence government policy in the same way that perhaps he was in the past with his black spider memos writing to tony blair and other ministers on all kinds of topics from herbal medicine to badger curls or even equipment for soldiers in iraq. so this is, i think, yes, it might be embarrassing thatis think, yes, it might be embarrassing that is private views have been made public but ever since his interview, she mentioned, when he turns 70 and 2018, he has made it very clear that once he succeeds the queen and the throne that he will leave his public interventions behind him. it to talk to ou. interventions behind him. it to talk to yom thank— interventions behind him. it to talk to you. thank you _ interventions behind him. it to talk to you. thank you for _ interventions behind him. it to talk to you. thank you for your - interventions behind him. it to talk to you. thank you for your time. i thank you for your time. police in brazil searching for a missing britishjournalist and his travelling companion say they've found what may be human remains, in a river close
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to where the men were last seen. dom phillips and bruno pereira went missing in the amazon rainforest last weekend. 0ur south america correspondent, katy watson has sent this report. dom phillips and bruno pereira are experts in theirfield, one an established journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travel companion, a renowned expert on indigenous affairs, a man who knows these communities well. but also has his enemies, and had been threatened in the past for his work in trying to denounce illegal mining and fishing. it was on this river they were threatened again in the days leading up to their disappearance. on friday, there was a significant yet devastating breakthrough. materialfound in the river that could be remains. not far from the area that dom phillips and bruno pereira were last seen. it will now be sent to the city nearby for forensic analysis. currently authorities are also examining traces of blood on a boat
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belonging to a suspect, a local fisherman. translation: since last sunday . we had information that eu citizens, one british, dom phillips, and brazilian, bruno pereira, disappeared in the valley. from that moment on, our military forces have started a search to find those people. we ask god that they may be found alive. the news of the missing pair has gained worldwide attention. celebrities and footballers including pele have called for the government to step up to find the men. we urge brazilian authorities to redouble their efforts to find phillips and pereira. as time increases, so increases the risk to their security. it is crucial that officials reacted robustly including deploying local resources to search the area in question.
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that is a call that has been echoed by mr phillips” sister in london. she called for an in—depth and open investigation into what has happened. katy watson, bbc news. campaign groups have accused the government of failing to deliver on its promise of a new food strategy for england. a leak of of its plans suggests there will be no new tax on salt and sugar in processed foods. 0ur political reporter tony bonsignore has more details. the environmental impact of intensive farming methods, and the role of low—cost processed foods in contributing to obesity have all become hot political topics in recent years. in 2018, the government commissioned a major review into the whole food chain, from field to fork. the subsequent report recommended a tax on sugar and salt, reducing meat and dairy
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consumption and expanding free school meals. but a leaked copy of the government's long—awaited response suggests many of those recommendations won't be accepted. the white paper instead talks more generally about initiatives to boost health sustainability and accessibility of diets, and on food prices, the government simply says it will engage closely with the food industry to understand price impacts. one of the few new practical suggestions as to increase the use of responsibly sourced wild venison. all this will come as a disappointment to campaigners who have called for tougher measures to reduce meat and dairy consumption, and to tackle obesity. it wasn't all bad. we are pleased to see a framework in there which will help the transition to nature friendly farming, but we do need government intervention in diet. we need to change the way that we eat. we need the government to be proposing changes to public procurement policy, to support more sustainable
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dietary patterns in schools and hospitals. we need them to introduce the salt and sugar tax, to change the way the products are manufactured and how they are sold, and we need an overarching ambition that we get to the sustainable diet within this decade, because the clock is ticking and time is running out. the government is expected to say its plans will create a food system aimed at maintaining and increasing production levels. there will be much for mps to digest when they get the final next week. a father and son have been killed in a crash during the isle of man tt. roger stockton and his son bradley, both from crewe, died during the final lap of the second sidecar race. in a statement, organisers said it was "with a deep sense of sorrow" that they could confirm both racers had been killed. alex wotton reports. voyager, he was 56, and is 21—year—old son were racing together for the first time at this year's tt
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and recorded in eighth place finish but the news came in yesterday that they both tragically died in a crash. it happened at the bottom of the hill, an area known as a leap, a mile into the 37 mile course. 0rganisers confirmed the father and son from crewe had passed away with their deepest sorrow and passed on condolences to family, loved one and friends. now, family member has since paid tribute to them both on social media saying heart broken does not even begin to describe how the family are feeling right now to lose not one but to loved ones at the same time, they said it was the absolute passion to be racing and it was their dream to be racing together at the tt and that eighth place earlier this week was a very proud moment for them. these latest deaths bring the total number of people have died during this tt event to five. people have died during
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this tt event to five. the family of shaun pinner — one of the britons sentenced to death for fighting russian forces in ukraine have released a statement. shaun pinner is on the right of this image. the statement says: "as a ukrainian resident for over 4 years and contracted serving marine in the 36th brigade, of which he is very proud, shaun should be accorded all the rights of a prisoner of war according to the geneva convention and including full independent legal representation. and went on to call on all parties to ensure the safe release or exchange of shaun. the president of the european commission ursula von der leyen is visiting kyiv today for talks on ukraine's proposal tojoin the european union — and alongside president zelensky — she gave an update on how those talks are progressing. the discussions today will enable us to finalise our assessment by the
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end of next week. the path is known. it is a merit—based path forward. it is a path where i must say, i highly appreciate the enormous efforts and the determination of ukraine in this process. the people of ukraine have proven incredible strength and motivation and stamina so i am deeply convinced that we will together, you will overcome this horrible atrocious war. we will and you will rebuild this beautiful country and modernise ukraine and i just want to say we stand by your side. we stand by your side. the singerjustin bieber has revealed he is suffering from facial paralysis after cancelling shows on his world tour earlier this week. in an instagram video the pop star said he had ramsay hunt syndrome, which is caused when a virus, like shingles, affects the facial nerve near a person's ears.
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he said he doesn't know how long it will take to recover. as you can probably see from my face, i have this syndrome called. ramsay hunt syndrome. and it is from this virus that attacks the nerve in my ear, in my facial nerves, and has caused my face to have paralysis. as you can see, this eye is not blinking. i can't smile on this side of my face. this nostril will not move. so there's full paralysis on this side of my face. so for those who are frustrated by my cancellations of the next shows, i'm just physically, obviously not capable of doing them. and i hope you guys understand, and i'll be using this time to just rest and relax and get back to 100% so that i can do what i was born to do. but in the meantime, this ain't it. the headlines on bbc news... prince charles is reported to have described the government's rwanda
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asylum scheme as �*appalling'. his office say he remains politically neutral. police in brazil searching for a missing britishjournalist say they've found possible human remains in a river. borisjohnson urges ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british men sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. almost one in six people in england, wales and northern ireland used foodbanks or food charities in march, with one in five skipping meals or cutting portion sizes to cope with the cost of living. it's created a perfect storm for foodbanks — with increasing demand and falling donations. 0ur social affairs correspondent michael buchanan has been to meet one woman struggling to keep her community afloat. without mel hudson, hundreds of people each week would struggle to eat. she set up the slade green food bank at the start of the pandemic.
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but despite covid easing, her efforts are still desperately needed. have a lovely day. thank you. who's next? people need us more than ever, because the cost of living is spiralling at the moment, and the costs in shops are going up every day. sometimes you have to accept that we need a little bit of help. i tell you what, it's difficult. i know. it really is difficult. i know it is. i've been independent all my life, i've had money in my pocket. - keith buckingham worked in construction, earning up to £40,000 before covid. he had a stroke during the pandemic, forcing him to use up his savings and is now homeless. the girls that run it, mel- and the girls, are just brilliant. without this place i don't know. where i would be, i really don't. i'd be inside, if i was going to say the truth, i'd be inside. _ how do you mean? well, i would have had to turn to crime to get food. - we've run out of tinned meat, corned beef, ham, etc. we've run out of hot dogs, meatballs, we've literally run out of everything. keeping the help going,
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however, is getting harder, as we discovered as we followed mel over several days. morrisons, sainsbury�*s and asda, see if we can get some fruit and veg. i'm not brave enough to phone them, i'lljust text them! donations are falling, and the food bank's own meagre funds don't stretch as far, due to rising prices. we can'tjust shut it. it will come to a point where we only have beans and pasta, and no one wants to eat that seven days a week, but for two days a week it's better than having nothing at all. it's about knowing where all the players are on the pitch. each weekend, mel coaches the slade green knights, the compassion of the food bank replaced by conviction on the football field. don't panic! just turn, take the ball. if they don't listen, it's press ups or laps. they don't ever want to do that, so they listen. it's really good fun and nice to see the boys enjoy themselves. slade green has high levels of deprivation, domestic violence and mental health conditions.
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listening to the area's problems daily does of course take its toll. i don't sleep very well at all, because obviously you think about those people, and you have to think i'm going to help them the next day, or do this the next day to get them help, and it does make it really hard. you can only take one, all right? a single mother of four, the youngestjust eight, mel's dynamism is driven by a desire to see both her own and others do well. i live in this area and i want to see the area get better. it's notjust about coming to get food or coming to play a game of football, it's about how we can move them onto something else. this corner of south east london has often felt overlooked. it needs its own community — it needs mel hudson to see it through its current challenges. michael buchanan, bbc news. the maximum interest rate on student loans in england is being cut by almost 5%, to 7.3% according to the government. the maximum rate had been predicted to rise to 12% in the autumn, according to the institute for fiscal studies.
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while the ifs welcomed the announcement, it said it would "have little of no effect" on most graduates�* repayments. larissa kennedy — president of the national union of students explained the impact of intereset rate cuts. we have course welcome that there is a recognition that the 12% was going to be absolutely eye watering. but to be absolutely eye watering. but to say that 4.3, going upward to 7% is not a change that is going to make an impact isjust is not a change that is going to make an impact is just absolutely not correct. we are in a setting where students and graduates are already struggling at a level we have not seen. we have got more students and graduates than ever needing to access food banks. struggling to make ends meet with event costs, the cost of living rising. this is still astronomical. talking about a 7% interest rate. essentially, if you want to access
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higher education in this country, you have to shackle yourself to an ever moving goalpost that makes it all the more difficult, particularly so for young people who are graduating into a world where camino, house prices and trying to get on the market is absolutely, you know, almost impossible for a generation. and all of these things are stacking up. feels like the odds are stacking up. feels like the odds are stacked against students and graduates. next week marks 40 years since the end of the falklands war — a conflict that came at a high cost for some of its survivors, who went on to develop symptoms of post traumatic stress disorder. flashbacks, insomnia and heavy drinking were some of the long term issues they faced, as our special correspondent allan little reports. couldn't see my kids because i was a bit of a loose cannon, really. i weren't a nice person in them days and everything was taken away, you know, and it was hard. come on...come on.
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when paul bromwell came home from the falklands, his life fell apart. for years, he drank, he couldn't sleep, he was violent. when he realised others were also struggling, he founded valley veterans. whoa. i started helping other people, and that's what i've done ever since, and that's when i started to mend myself as well. i started to get involved with the horses. that was massive for me, because i found something that i could channel my mind into, you know, and the horse would give me so much. i'd sit in the corner and just listen to them munching the hay and that cheers me up. but also, at the same time, i've got the guys up here, we're all like—minded, we're out in the air, and we're trying to build something positive, you know, and the guys and the conversations we've in our little room in there...amazing. bagpipes skirl. this is the erskine veterans village near glasgow.
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it's home to hundreds of former servicemen and women. for them, 40 years is the blink of an eye, and they commemorate the experience still. after the falklands, a long, slow evolution began in the way we think about war trauma. but back then, the stigma it carried caused many to suffer in silent shame. i think it goes back to a long—standing view that if you stay ill, then it's really a question of character, there's something wrong with you, and it's a weakness, it's a character flaw. that was a very common view in the mid 20th century and you still see — that was echoes of that in the �*80s and �*90s. it's very unusual to find that now, and i would actually say rather the opposite now — i think the military have had massive changes. we know that a considerable number of people in the military do come forward now with mental health problems. the military have made major strides there. i'm not saying it's perfect,
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but it's much better than it was. david cruickshanks was a beneficiary of that change. he's written a book about his ptsd. he was just 17 when he came home from the falklands. by his mid 30s, he was also drinking heavily. it took nearly 20 years for him to seek help. i knew there was something going on, i didn't know what it was called, i didn't know how to explain it, i didn't want to tell anybody about it, i wanted to mask it. you knew something was wrong but you didn't really want to admit it, and when that doctor said, "i think...| think you might "have some sort of panic disorder or anxiety, "i'm going to refer you," and i rememberthat day because ijust burst out crying. it was like a complete release. "oh, my god, i do not have to pretend any more," you know, and there's help. i get so much out of this, for me. itjust chills me out. the vast majority of combat veterans do not develop ptsd and many of those who do get better in time. but the falklands generation is the last for whom the condition went, initially at least,
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unrecognised and untreated. they paid a high price for that. for paul bromwell, recovery began with the discovery that he was not alone and in the company of old comrades. allan little, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with louise. hello there. today's weather story is all about location. for many, we've seen some glorious blue sky and sunshine first thing. yes, a little bit of fair weather cloud is starting to develop now, but it's fine, dry and warm with it. different story, however, further north and west. here, we've got some low clouds, some murky conditions and some rain which will be quite persistent for the remainder of the afternoon. you can see exactly where i'm talking about across northwest scotland, parts of northern ireland. a few scattered showers into northern england and wales as well. but some of this rain could be quite persistent
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through the remainder of the afternoon. it'll be quite windy with it as well. generally a blustery day, but some sunny spells continuing across england and wales. the wind strengths noticeably stronger further north and west. we could potentially see gusts of winds close to 45—50 miles an hour in a place it's quite unusual for this time of year. so it's a blustery afternoon for some and temperatures a little bit more subdued — 14 or 15 degrees where the rain is sitting. but we might see highs of 23 celsius with the sunshine. but that comes at a price, because at the moment we've got very high pollen levels across england and wales as the grass pollen reaches its peak at this time of year. now, as we go through the evening, we keep those clear skies across england and wales. the rain will tend to peter out, still becoming quite showery, particularly to the north west of the great glen. temperatures will hold up into double figures, so it's going to be a mild start to sunday. and on the whole, it's going to be a beautiful start to sunday. in fact, the second half of the weekend will be less windy. not as wet in those areas where we've got rain. and so all in all, slightly more promising picture. there will be a few scattered
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showers, as you can see, but not as widespread as today. and again, those temperatures will peak into the low twenties with the best of the sunshine coming through. now, it looks as though warmth is going to remain a feature to our weather as we move through the week ahead. high pressure is building. there is the risk of this frontal system toppling across the high, introducing more rain into the far northwest. but generally, with that high pressure building as we go through the week, a southerly airflow takes over. that's going to drag in some very warm air quite widely across the country. so, yes, there is a risk of some rain on tuesday and wednesday in the far north west of scotland. but generally speaking, look at this. we could see a high of 27 degrees in leeds by friday afternoon. hello this is bbc news. the headlines.
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prince charles is reported to have described the government's rwanda asylum scheme as "appalling". he is entitled to his view, as is anyone else. police in brazil searching for a missing britishjournalist say they've found possible human remains in a river. borisjohnson urges ministers to do "everything in their power" to secure the release of two british men sentenced to death for fighting russian forces. the maximum interest rate on student loans in england is being cut by almost 5%. ministers hope it will provide "peace of mind" for graduates. a father and son have been killed in a crash at the isle of man tt. five riders have died in this year's event.

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