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tv   BBC News at One  BBC News  June 13, 2022 1:00pm-1:30pm BST

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the government is to publish plans to scrap parts of the post—brexit trade arrangements for northern ireland. the eu says it would break international law. the prime minister says changes to the rules over checks on goods crossing the irish sea will be easy to implement, but he's faced criticism from several quarters. not a big deal, we can fix it in such a way as to remove those bureaucratic barriers, but without putting up barriers on trade moving north—south in the island of ireland as well. it's also a new low in terms of the relationship between britain and ireland, which is something that many of us have worked so hard to protect and enhance. we'll have reaction from brussels. also this lunchtime... campaigners and migrants wait to hear if asylum seekers will be removed from the uk
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on the goverment�*s first flight to rwanda. farmers are urged to produce more home—grown food, as the government's food strategy is published. but there's criticism as it doesn't include plans to tackle obesity. as hundreds of civilians die in the ukrainian city of kharkiv, amnesty international says there's evidence russia has used cluster bombs. and england are bowled for 539 all out by new zealand on day four of the second test at trent bridge. and coming up on the bbc news channel: manchester city announce the signing of one of the world's most prolific marksmen — erling haaland joins on a five—year contract.
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good afternoon and welcome to the bbc news at one. in the coming hours the government will publish plans that would allow parts of northern ireland's post—brexit trade arrangements to be altered without agreement with the eu. the prime minister says the government's proposed changes to the northern ireland protocol amount to a "trivial set of adjustments" and would be "relatively simple" to implement. but ireland's foreign minister simon coveney says plans to override the protocol would create a new set of uncertainties and be a low point in the uk's approach to brexit. the arrangement, known as the northern ireland protocol, allows for extra checks on some goods moving across the irish sea. it's been a source of discontent for unionists, who see it as an internal border within the uk. our political correspondent jonathan blake reports. borisjohnson boris johnson always borisjohnson always said to briggs it was about taking back control. but when it comes to the northern
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ireland border, progress has been slow. —— brexit. another prime minister is putting forward a plan to override parts of the deal he signed with the eu about how to manage trade across the irish sea. what we can do is fix that. it's not a big deal. we can fix it in such a way as to remove those bureaucratic barriers without putting up barriers on trade moving north to south in the island of ireland as well. that's what we want to do. to the issue is getting — that's what we want to do. to the issue is getting goods _ that's what we want to do. to the issue is getting goods from - that's what we want to do. to the issue is getting goods from great| issue is getting goods from great britain to northern ireland, part of the uk, of course, but with a land border to the republic of ireland thatis border to the republic of ireland that is in the eu. back in 2019 borisjohnson signed a deal to avoid checks on that board which could have threatened peace in northern ireland. but the government now claims its not working and wants to change it using uk laws. the foreign secretary liz truss told her eu counterparts this morning the planned legislation would fix the problems with the northern ireland
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protocol and restore political stability, adding the uk would prefer a negotiated solution. in response, the vice president of the european commission said the eu had offered workable solutions that unilateral action was damaging to mutual trust and a formula for uncertainty. the uk's neighbour agrees. uncertainty. the uk's neighbour aurees. uncertainty. the uk's neighbour a . rees. ., , uncertainty. the uk's neighbour aurees. ., , , uncertainty. the uk's neighbour aurees. , ., , agrees. the uk has been in many ways agrees. the uk has been in many ways a standard-bearer _ agrees. the uk has been in many ways a standard-bearer for _ agrees. the uk has been in many ways a standard-bearer for international- a standard—bearer for international law and the protection of international law for many years. this is damaging that reputation in a very fundamental way but it is also a new low in terms of the relationship between britain and ireland. �* ., , relationship between britain and ireland. �* , , �* ireland. and labour say this isn't the way to _ ireland. and labour say this isn't the way to break _ ireland. and labour say this isn't the way to break the _ ireland. and labour say this isn't the way to break the deadlock i ireland. and labour say this isn't the way to break the deadlock in | the way to break the deadlock in belfast. ., , the way to break the deadlock in belfast. . , ., , , ., belfast. the answer to this is to acce -t belfast. the answer to this is to accept there _ belfast. the answer to this is to accept there are _ belfast. the answer to this is to accept there are some - belfast. the answer to this is to | accept there are some problems belfast. the answer to this is to i accept there are some problems in the way— accept there are some problems in the way the protocol works but they can he _ the way the protocol works but they can be resolved around the negotiating table with statecraft, with guile, with trust. unfortunately we don't have those in the current _ unfortunately we don't have those in the current prime minister. the government _ the current prime minister. tie: government plans include separate lanes for goods staying in northern
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ireland and those going on into the republic. ministers insist the mousse would not break international law but the eu disagrees and has warned of retaliation. —— insists the moves. jonathan blake, bbc news. as we've heard, the current system has led to a row in stormont, with the democratic unionist party refusing to allow the formation of a new devolved government until their concerns are addressed. 0ur ireland correspondent chris page reports. the northern ireland protocol means there are checks on some goods arriving here from the rest of the uk. that has led to extra costs, processes and paperwork for businesses who get supplies from across the irish sea. but the protocol also gives companies in northern ireland an advantage. they can sell goods directly into both the british and eu markets without tariffs. .., ., . the british and eu markets without tariffs. _, ., . ., , the british and eu markets without tariffs. ., . ., , ., tariffs. the economic reality for manufacturers _ tariffs. the economic reality for manufacturers here, _ tariffs. the economic reality for manufacturers here, for - tariffs. the economic reality for manufacturers here, for food i manufacturers here, for food processors and many other parts of the economy, is the protocol works incredibly well and the protocol
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needs reform, but it doesn't need a wrecking ball. and what is being proposed potentially today is just that. proposed potentially today is 'ust that. �* proposed potentially today is 'ust that. , , ., , proposed potentially today is 'ust that. �* , , ., , ., that. and representatives of the meat industry — that. and representatives of the meat industry say _ that. and representatives of the meat industry say removing - that. and representatives of the meat industry say removing the | meat industry say removing the protocol would put at risk their ability to export. irate protocol would put at risk their ability to export.— protocol would put at risk their ability to export. we would see the rotocol is ability to export. we would see the protocol is something _ ability to export. we would see the protocol is something to _ ability to export. we would see the protocol is something to build - ability to export. we would see the protocol is something to build on. | protocol is something to build on. we would — protocol is something to build on. we would be concerned about anything that damages trade. the risk here is trade _ that damages trade. the risk here is irade into_ that damages trade. the risk here is trade into europe.— trade into europe. business perspectives _ trade into europe. business perspectives do _ trade into europe. business perspectives do of - trade into europe. business perspectives do of course . trade into europe. business. perspectives do of course play trade into europe. business- perspectives do of course play into the political debate but there is another aspect that is perhaps more symbolic. unionist politicians tend to believe the union is threatened by anything that separates northern ireland from england, scotland and wales, and they view checks carried out at the likes of belfast port as an economic barrier with great britain. the democratic unionist party is preventing the devolved assembly at stormont from meeting over its opposition to the protocol. there is no sign the dup will soften
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its position when the legislation is published. its position when the legislation is ublished. ~ ., , ., published. what we see today will not necessarily _ published. what we see today will not necessarily be _ published. what we see today will not necessarily be what _ published. what we see today will not necessarily be what comes - not necessarily be what comes through the process in the house of commons and the house of lords. we will make our assessment of this legislation as it goes through but i think when it comes to good faith, actually the people who need to demonstrate good faith are the government. but demonstrate good faith are the government-— demonstrate good faith are the government. but the nationalist -a government. but the nationalist party which _ government. but the nationalist party which won _ government. but the nationalist party which won the _ government. but the nationalist party which won the most - government. but the nationalist party which won the most seats | government. but the nationalist l party which won the most seats at the recent stormont election says the recent stormont election says the government is being reckless. the protocol is working. there are sections _ the protocol is working. there are sections of — the protocol is working. there are sections of it where its application needs— sections of it where its application needs to — sections of it where its application needs to be finessed. there are issues _ needs to be finessed. there are issues around paperwork burden and checks— issues around paperwork burden and checks and _ issues around paperwork burden and checks and so on, by the way, all consequences of brexit but the europeans have been very clear there will he _ europeans have been very clear there will he and _ europeans have been very clear there will be and there has been flexibility, and that's where all these — flexibility, and that's where all these matters need to get resolved. once again, northern ireland is at the sharp end of the fallout from brexit and the future of devolution is at stake. chris page, bbc news, belfast. we can talk now to our brussels
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correspondentjessica parker. how strong a reaction can we expect from the eu today? the idea of this legislation has been trailed for weeks. the idea the uk government could override parts of the northern ireland protocol has been around even longer. i don't think brussels will be bowled over with surprise today and some diplomats here suspect this is a uk negotiating tactic tied up with tory party politics. but they will look at the legislation. we expect an initial response later today and probably a more detailed one later in the week. if the eu decides to retaliate, what might it look like? it seems they could relaunch some legal action because last year and if things escalate over the course of the coming months, potentially down the line you could see the idea of trade tariffs on uk goods but we are a long way from that because the legislation could take many months to get through parliament, likewise eu legal action could take time as
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well. in the meantime, could you see negotiations resume? the eu has suggested it has some further compromises to offer. it is unlikely to go far enough for the uk, however, in terms of it current demands so today expect a lot of noise and accusations that the uk is potentially breaching international law and in the face of that the eu will not want to look weak in its response. will not want to look weak in its response-— response. jessica parker in brussels. _ response. jessica parker in brussels, thank _ response. jessica parker in brussels, thank you. - campaigners are making another attempt today to block the government's plan to send some asylum seekers who arrive in the uk to rwanda. the first deportation flight is due to take off tomorrow, after a high court challenge to stop it failed. the government says the plan will deter arrivals and stop smuggling gangs. our correspondent sean dilley reports. it isa it is a hotel like many others. inside, one of the room made up ready to receive unwilling guests, refugees forcibly removed from the uk. on friday the high court
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rejected a bid by four asylum seekers, backed by charities and the pcs union that would seek an injunction stopping the first flight leaving the uk tomorrow. thejudge, mrjustice swift, ruled the rwanda policy needs to be fully examined next month but there was no legally compelling reason to stop tomorrow's first flight. today the court of appeal is being asked whether it will overturn that decision. separately another charity, asylum aid, is asking the court to stop the flight leaving for now because it says refugees were not given enough notice of their removal. the government meanwhile insists that its deal, that would see rwanda hosting and processing appeals, would discourage dangerous channel crossings. but charities, opposition politicians, two archbishops and these protesters believe the government policy is wrong. the prince of wales has reportedly described it as appalling. meanwhile, a number of those due to take off tomorrow has fallen from 37
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to 11 with individual challenges succeeding on modern slavery and human rights grounds. home office sources have told the bbc it is possible further challenges could see tomorrow's flight grounded whatever happens in court today. sean dilley, bbc news. dominic casciani is at the high court. only a few hours left and arguments continue. , , ., continue. indeed. the numbers are bein: continue. indeed. the numbers are being whittled _ continue. indeed. the numbers are being whittled down _ continue. indeed. the numbers are being whittled down all _ continue. indeed. the numbers are being whittled down all the - continue. indeed. the numbers are being whittled down all the time, l continue. indeed. the numbers arej being whittled down all the time, it appears. we started with 150, maybe as many as that removal directions being served. by the time we hit court on friday it was 37 for top by the end of friday it was 31. this morning we were told it was 11. now we believe it is ten and if the charities have their way the only people on the flight will be the pilot and cabin crew. to get that stage they either have to win every individual case brought by every asylum seeker, effectively last—minute appeals to have their cases considered in the uk. or the
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court of appeal here has to say, hang on, let's put on the brakes before a final larger hearing in july. the government says that is not necessary, there is no compelling reason to stop this flight because why the questions about rwanda's additions, that's for next month. let's wait for that hearing but in the meantime like the flight to take off. a lot is riding on the hearing today. even if this one goes against campaigners they could be back here again later this afternoon with another case and also tomorrow morning. this will go on until the flight finally leaves the ground, if at all, tomorrow evening. dominic casciani at the high court, thank you. the latest official figures show that the uk economy shrank for the second month in a row in april. the office for national statistics says gdp was down 0.3%, compared with a fall of 0.1% in march. our economics correspondent andy verity is here. how many sectors of the economy have shrunk? the short answer is, every sector, the whole economy. we should stress
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these are monthly figures and they wobble around and are not as reliable as the three month ago. even then, when you look at the picture, it is not good. looking for example at services, four fifths of the economy, you can see activity bear has shrunk by 0.3%. a large part of that was because the government was spending less money on test and trace because it was wound down. looking at other sectors, production, manufacturing and oil and sectors, production, manufacturing and oiland gas, sectors, production, manufacturing and oil and gas, that was down 0.6%. part of the reason there is what we have been talking about for weeks, supply disruption. in the car industry they have struggled to get parts. and supply difficulties also in the oil and gas industry partly because of the war in ukraine. other sectors like construction, that is also down by 0.4%. every sector of the economy is down,
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these weapons are banned by more than a hundred countries but not by russia. our correspondent wyre davies reports. from the very start of this war, the city of kharkiv bore the brunt of russian shelling.
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often indiscriminate and wildly inaccurate. this at a junction outside a large public hospital. in saltivka, one of kharkiv�*s northern suburbs, there's barely a building undamaged. in these areas, says amnesty international, the routine use of unguided rockets by russian forces in built—up residential suburbs resulted in hundreds of casualties. those who survived the onslaught left. those who now return do so only briefly. translation: it was horrible, horrible. - when the russians were firing, you would get thrown into the air from your chair. it's hard to describe, but that's what it was like. 20 miles from the border,
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kharkiv was a key russian target in the early weeks of the war, and they literally threw everything at this city, including widely banned weapons, indiscriminate by their very nature. the world has made these weapons illegal because they are so devastating and indiscriminate, and mainly affect civilians. there can be no reason, legally or morally, to use cluster munitions in ukraine or anywhere else. this demonstrates the indiscriminate destruction that cluster munitions can bring. a large shell explodes, casting off dozens of smaller bomblets. as they then explode over a certain area, they shower people and buildings with thousands of pieces of shrapnel. in this case, kharkiv�*s children's hospital. some of those struck down by cluster munitions and russian shells are now recovering in city hospitals. there was a hole in my leg the size
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of a fist, says roman, who tells me how he fell to the ground, convinced he was going to die, as several other cluster bombs exploded around him. according to the regional medical director, more than 600 civilians have been killed and 1200 injured in kharkiv alone. the material damage to the city's infrastructure, too, is obvious, all of which, says amnesty, may constitute a war crime. wyre davies, bbc news, kharkiv. the time is 1:17. our top story this lunchtime: the prime minister says changes to the rules over checks on goods crossing the irish sea should be easy to implement. the eu says it could break international law. still to come, england bowled out for 539 by new zealand on day four of the second test at trent bridge. coming up on the bbc news channel:
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liverpool agree a deal with benfica to sign uruguay striker darwin nunez for a deal that could cost up to £81; million. the long—awaited plan to transform england's food system was published this morning, with the government promising to put farmers and food security at the heart of their reforms. the prime minister denied criticism that the plan fails to tackle obesity by leaving out a recommended tax on sugar and salt, saying the best way to lose weight was to "eat less." claire marshall takes a look at what else is included in the paper. courgette city. the prime minister was on a courgette farm near hayle in cornwall for the media this morning for the launch of the government's national food strategy. it's the plan for how our food gets from the fields to our forks. at its heart, the government says, are the farmers. what you've got to make sure that you do is that you look after uk food and farming and recognise that we have an opportunity to eat much more
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of what we grow in this country. in the white paper is a framework for farming the land sustainably, trying to take care of nature and tackle climate change. more locally grown or higher—standard food. there will be a consultation on whether this is where the public sector — hospitals, schools and care homes — should be spending its food budget. there will be a review of the labour shortage, including using more machines and issuing more visas for migrants. this is an organic farm near swindon. these pigs currently provide high quality meat for national supermarkets, but could they soon go into meals for local schools? these pigs have been bred and reared outdoors, and they are given minimal amounts of antibiotics. until now, this style of organic farming has been seen as more niche, but if today's strategy document is to be believed, then they could move more into the mainstream. but there is not enough detail, according to the man who led a major review into our food system.
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i think it's progress, particularly on the environment. there are some really important policies. it's a list of policies, not a strategy, though, and it needs to be bolder on the environment. and on health, we are waiting. it has been kicked down the line. we are waiting for what the health secretary says on health. some wildlife groups are saying that the government has broken its promise to restore nature and help biodiversity, but after withering criticism of an earlier leaked draft, the national farmers' union is now behind the plans. i think it's really welcome to see government committing to food production and food security. there is a strong commitment in there to maintain our current levels of self—sufficiency and to produce more, effectively, of what we are good at, more of our fruit and vegetables, which have been in decline, so that's a laudable ambition. however, britain is in the grip of an obesity crisis, and many campaigners are asking what happened to the proposed sugar and salt tax. according to the government, these will be addressed in another white paper at a later date. claire marshall, bbc news, wiltshire.
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the labour leader, sir keir starmer, is to be investigated over potential breaches of rules on gifts and earnings. parliament's standards commissioner is investigating whether sir keir broke the house of commons code of conduct. mps must declare within 28 days any interest which might be reasonably considered to influence their actions. sir keir appears to have missed this deadline on several occasions. he says he's confident no rules have been broken. we can talk now to our political correspondent nick eardley. what's being claimed here? it was a simple update on the standards commissioner's website that told us these investigations were going on. she doesn't provide details of what exactly she is looking at. my understanding is, this refers to the late declaration of some payments around a book that circular starmer is writing, and some football tickets he was given as a gift —— sir keir. a spokesman
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for sir keir says he takes his declarations very seriously, has apologised to the commission for these like declarations, and has been asked to provide more information, which he said he will do. sir keir says he is confident there is no issue here. worth bearing in mind that there have been a lot of previous investigations into this. the prime minister has been reprimanded in the past for not declaring his interests in time, but just remember, sir keir starmer is someone that his cabinet colleagues call mr rules. the fact that he appears to have fallen foul of them, evenif appears to have fallen foul of them, even if it is in a fairly minor way, is pretty embarrassing.— even if it is in a fairly minor way, is pretty embarrassing. nick, thank ou. the brexit campaigner arron banks has lost a libel claim he brought against the investigative journalist, carole cadwalladr. mr banks, who founded the pro—brexit campaign group leave.eu, sued ms cadwalladr for defamation over two instances in 2019.
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mr banks claimed he was defamed after comments ms cadwalladr made about his relationship with the russian state. police in brazil say they've found items belonging to the british journalist dom phillips and his travelling companion, the indigenous specialist bruno pereira. they disappeared in the amazon last week. the development comes as the family of mr phillips have said their hopes of finding him alive have faded. our south america correspondent katy watson reports. it was along this stretch of water that dom phillips and bruno pereira disappeared. the vastness of the amazon plain to see. the armed forces are out searching. so, too, are the indigenous communities, many of whom knew bruno personally. he helped train indigenous groups to defend themselves against the increasing threat of illegal fishermen and poachers. dom phillips was writing a book, which was why the two men were travelling together, bruno introducing dom to people he knew.
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the indigenous community has set up camp near where they disappeared. we were asked not to identify anyone because they fear reprisals. translation: a fisherman financed by the narcos will do _ what they probably did to bruno — end their life because they see us as an obstacle. our river guide is felipe. he and his father run a fishing tourism business, and the two men were staying in their small hotel. dom was really interested in the environment and was passionate about the amazon and told us what he was writing, felipe tells me. he interviewed us and asked us about our work. up river, we come across a search team focused on a small area. the indigenous teams alongside, they know the terrain better than anyone. there is a police boat in the distance. beyond that there is another one further into the jungle. we've been told we can't go any further, but clearly there was something they are looking at.
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they've been here for several hours now. shortly after, it's sealed off. we were told later that this was where bruno and dom's belongings were found. the search teams continue, but these new developments point to a devastating conclusion, and hope's faded of finding the two men alive. katy watson, bbc news, in valo dojavari. an australian newspaper has removed an article and its writer has offered an apology after being accused of outing actress rebel wilson. on friday, wilson said she had found her "disney princess" as she shared a selfie with her partner on instagram. but on saturday, the paper revealed it had known about the relationship before it was public and had given her two days to comment. that report sparked widespread criticism on social media. a judge at the high court has ruled that life support treatment for a 12—year—old boy who'd suffered
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brain damage should stop. archie battersbee's parents had wanted his treatment to continue but doctors at the royal london hospital say he is clinically dead. his family have just given their reaction. i his family have 'ust given their reaction. ., ., , ~ . reaction. i do not believe archie has been given _ reaction. i do not believe archie has been given enough - reaction. i do not believe archie has been given enough time - reaction. i do not believe archie i has been given enough time from reaction. i do not believe archie - has been given enough time from the beginning i have always thought, what is the rush? his heart is still beating. he has gripped my hand. and as his mother, by my instant, i know my son is still there. the as his mother, by my instant, i know my son is still there.— my son is still there. the mother of archie battersbee. _ after an action packed start to the fourth day of the test in nottingham, england were bowled out by new zealand. at lunch, the tories had reached 27—1 in their second innings, with a lead of 41 runs. no wonderjoe root couldn't wait to get out there.
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this is an athlete at his peak, the kind of form where everything you touch flies. unbelievable from joe root. he doesn't captain england any more but through his batting here still leads them. ben foakes followed in his wake, passed 50, england's deficit just above a0. could they build a lead? it is at such moments of confidence when you content to overreach. root out, out of nowhere. he had scored 176, but that only made him want more. with him went england's momentum. now new zealand took off. daryl mitchell somehow grab stuart broad. what had been clear was now modelled. matthew potts was looking to score his first run in test cricket, then he changed his mind and asked ben foakes to change direction, too late. and too little for england as well, considering where they had been. all out, still 1a runs behind. new zealand batting the match beginning to move, too much for tom latham. he has to move, too much for tom latham. he: has knocked him over!
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to move, too much for tom latham. he has knocked him over! jenny _ has knocked him over! jenny randerson's _ has knocked him over! jenny randerson's 650th _ has knocked him over! jenny randerson's 650th test - has knocked him over! jenny i randerson's 650th test wicket. has knocked him over! jenny randerson's 650th test wicket. when you have taken that many, you can feel an opportunity. both he ending with will sense a chance after lunch. patrick geary, bbc news. time for the news. here is susan. —— time for the news. here is susan. —— time for the news. here is susan. —— time for the weather. there is still decent sunshine out there. as this week goes on, more in there. as this week goes on, more in the way of sun to come, and the most surprising thing will be some significant heat. this afternoon, patchy cloud developing across england and wales, more solid cloud to the north—west of the uk, keeping things pretty grey across western scotland this afternoon, a little like radio. elsewhere, drive. temperatures around average for the time of year in the sunshine. low 20s at best. there is a heat wave
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across spain at the moment. today, temperatures above a0 celsius, into the mid a0s. by mid week, that heat heads into central europe, pushing across france by friday. it is heading our way, and 30 celsius is possible across large swathes of england and wales on friday. we will see how we get there in a moment. back to this afternoon, it is pretty much business as usual, our temperatures will slide down the teens scale. by the end of the night, they will sit somewhere between nine and 12 celsius. there could be clearer spells around across england and wales by the end of the night, still thick cloud and rain for the north—west of scotland. and that will linger through tuesday. it always stays slightly cooler here, rather grey and wet. further south, high—pressure will allow us to see more in the way of sunshine are england and wales on tuesday. brighter spells for northern ireland as well, and temperature is already starting to creep up a couple of degrees. we
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could see perhaps 2a celsius in the south—east of england on tuesday afternoon, just 1a. in a way underneath those thicker clouds. wednesday, not going to have too dramatic a difference. it is later in the week that heat will built. not a great day for hay fever sufferers on tuesday. very high levels of pollen across england and wales. in scotland, much lower levels. wednesday, pretty similar. more cloud filling in again across england and wales on wednesday. grey skies to the far north—west, but temperatures creeping all the while, getting further up the 20s scale towards the far south—east. it is the end of the week as we see low pressure trying to come in from the west, picking up that plume of warm airfrom further west, picking up that plume of warm air from further south across the continent, straight across england and wales, and thunderstorms coming south from northern ireland and scotland. 30 or 31 celsius across wales and southern england, a more damp story for scotland and northern
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ireland. then we will see

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