Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 17, 2022 8:00pm-8:46pm BST

8:00 pm
you are watching bbc news. the headlines at eight p:m.. boris johnson returns to visit but i made we will work together with you and with our partners to rebuild your wonderful country for the benefit of ukrainians and i might say for the benefit of the whole of the global economy. gatwick airport reduces membranous flights in the summer due to lack of staff. investigation launched after messenger with mobility impairments died in an airport and gatwick said
8:01 pm
flights stuff are not responsible. long—running dispute about parking former soldier convicted of murder. signed recent united states —— can julian assange should be sent to united states? priti patel says he can but he has the right to appeal. how day of the year so far. and kate bush's bracket number one. —— hottest day of the year so far. kate bush back at number one in the chart up bush back at number one in the chart up a0 years. prime minister borisjohnson has
8:02 pm
travelled to kyiv, to have talks with ukrainian president volodymyr zelensky. during the visit, the pm offered a uk—led military training programme which he said could "change the equation of the war". downing street says the operation would have the potential to train up to 10,000 soldiers every 120 days. both leaders have been speaking about the talks in kyiv. let's have a listen to what they said. translation: we do not have any doubt that - ukraine's going to prevail, so we are preparing for postwar reconstruction after our victory. i thank you for this. i thank you for your help in terms of reconstruction of kyiv that the united kingdom has undertaken. i thank you for the fact that these negotiations are, as usual, very frank and substantial. and, taking this opportunity, i'd like also to draw your attention to the fact that we have had a historic moment today as ukraine has received a positive assessment
8:03 pm
from the european commission in terms of our membership prospect. volodymyr, we're here once again to underline that we are with you to give you the strategic endurance that you will need, and we are going to continue to help intensify the sanctions on putin's regime. we're going to do everything we can to continue to strengthen the diplomatic coalition of support around the world for ukraine, and i completely understand and sympathise with the need for continued financial support for ukraine. we will continue, as we have from the beginning, to provide the military equipment that you need, and now, of course, the training that may be necessary to go with that new equipment. boris to go with that new equipment. johnson there in t.
8:04 pm
——borisjohnson there in kyiv. to go with that new equipment. mrjohnson�*s trip comes after visits to ukraine by european leaders including french president emmanuel macron and german chancellor 0laf scholz. 0ur europe correspondent, nick beake, watched the pm arrive in kyiv this afternoon. well, the prime minister was on this very spotjust a well, the prime minister was on this very spot just a few well, the prime minister was on this very spotjust a few moments ago. you can see the burnt out russian tanks and vehicles that have been brought back from the front line and now i really thought of the tourist detection will take them testament to the battle the's raging. the primes to's as it was completely unannounced. we got word that he was here, came down to this place in the heart of kyiv, half of the capital, the minister walked into the complex of that magnificent building saint michael's cathedral and made his way outside and walked along the couples here alongside president zelensky and they then walked over to where a large crowd had gathered. we tried to get a few words with both president zelensky and the prime minister, really tight security and
8:05 pm
we were told that they were not here to talk to us, they were here to talk to the ukrainian people and certainly the that the uk is with ukraine. we know that the prime minister may have been facing some problems at home when it comes to his leadership but here there is certainly a feeling in the sense that he is amongst friends and president zelensky has said just as much. now yesterday we had the leaders of france germany and president zelensky has said just as much. now yesterday we had the leaders of france germany and italy here. today the british prime minister, this is a show of defiance and i think they want to be sending and i think they want to be sending a message to president putin. the west as it is with ukraine and clearly it is... americans and british are sending longer range missiles and the form is if you listen to ukrainian commanders and eastern donbas region they say they're not arriving soon enough and they're not arriving soon enough and they are losing hundreds of men every day on the front line in this brutal war but for today this visit, the second trip to chief five boris johnson, it is sending a message that united kingdom is with ukraine definitely second to kyiv.
8:06 pm
borisjohnson may have received a warm welcome in ukraine, but back here, some have been more critical of the trip, including members of his own party — as our political correspondent ione wells told me. just this morning some of his mps were saying publicly and certainly seem to be expecting that he was going to be at this conference of northern tory mps in doncaster, as you say, quite a crucial time. it may not have been particularly comfortable for the prime minister, that meeting. certainly head of next week's by—election in wakefield which a number of conservatives have a bit nervous about. it is a seat that labour want to take back from the conservatives after the conservative mp resigned in disgrace after being convicted of sexual assault charges. another source of uncomfortable thing about the conference of the prime minister is this particular group of northern tory mps have been making a number of demands on the government at the moment, particularly around lowering taxes. they've also been calling for certain regions in the north of england to have the power to change taxes themselves so i think there
8:07 pm
could have been some pretty big questions for the prime minister at this conference today but, as you say, his plans of now suddenly changed. i think number ten would argue that this trip to ukraine had to take priority given the ongoing situation there and certainly even the chair at that northern research group of mps jake berry has said that this was not a snub that he didn't turn up today but there are some critics wondering whether he was perhaps trying to evade some of his responsibilities, as you say, back home as part of this last—minute trip to ukraine. my mac we can talk about in the developing story this evening. ludgate's resignation letter was published yesterday but he has now written a letter of clarification to the chairman of the public administration committee. what did he tell us in that that we didn't know already? essentially this is the primes are's former adviser on ethics and as we know this week and issued a resignation letter which he now says today has been somewhat
8:08 pm
misinterpreted. in that resignation letter he said he was close to resigning signing of the partygate was said that he was also asked to advise the prime minister and a matter that he believed would breach international law and can be partial to that. now, the prime minister in response argue that this particular question was a matter of national interest, that he wanted ludgate's advice on and we understand that this was basically in relation to looking at extending certain tariffs on chinese steel which while the prime minister argued would be compliant with domestic law wouldn't comply with world trade organization rules. today, lord geidt somewhat gave hit back at the resignation of some of the portrayals of his resignation yesterday and said his focus on steel tariffs was a distraction the real thing he was frustrated by was essentially being asked to be privy to and comment on asked to be privy to and comment on a matter that would deliberately break international law. he sort of went further than that as well today
8:09 pm
saying that he believed this government had sort of expressed its openness to breaking international law and that is not something that he wanted to be associated with. we'll find out how the stories reported on the front of tomorrow's papers, the saturday papers. i will be joined papers, the saturday papers. i will bejoined by media editor of the sunday times and a writer and broadcaster who usually has a busy weekend who used to be a sports journalist and still loves his cricket. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers, with rosamund urwin, who's the media editor at the sunday times, and the writer and broadcaster, mihir bose. there's worrying news for thousands of people who've booked holidays this summer, after gatwick airport said it would limit the number of flights in the peak summer period, because of a shortage of staff, especially among ground handlers. britain's second—busiest airport said the revised plans were meant to create a more reliable service,
8:10 pm
and it insisted that the vast majority of flights over the summer here's our business correspondent theo leggett. gatwick has imposed a cap on the number of flights that can operate from the airport but it's the airlines that will have to decide which services are going to operate and which are going to be cancelled and which are going to be cancelled and the biggest operator here is easyjet so it will bear the brunt of those consolations and what they're planning to do is they'll take the next few days to decide where the axe is going to fall but they are going to focus on the busiest routes, so the roots where there are six or seven services a day. they can cut one and then rebook passengers onto an alternative service and that will happen automatically so people won't have to do anything, you'll simply get a message from the airline telling them the new time of their flight and easyjet is pretty confident it can rebook the vast majority of passengers in this way. the airline that had fewer services here won't be able to do that necessarily system passengers will be inconvenience but what gatwick is thinking, the gamble it's making is that a certain amount of inconvenience now can potentially prevent absolute chaos and last—minute cancellation during the big mac busiest period of the summer. a passenger with restricted mobility has died at gatwick airport after leaving a plane. gatwick said staff were helping two
8:11 pm
other passengers with restricted mobility to disembark at the time. the man decided to leave the easyjet plane himself rather than wait for staff to return, and fell on an escalator. easyjet have issued a statement. it says... "cabin crew provided medical assistance to a passenger in the airport terminal while waiting for paramedics to arrive. unfortunately the passenger sadly later passed away. our thoughts are with their family and friends at this difficult time." i'm joined now by aviation accessibility consultant, chris wood. we can talk about the question of accessibility at airports. chris, thanks very much forjoining us from buckinghamshire this evening. your experience of this is in part driven by the fact that you have two children who both have mobility issues. presumably, you did a lot of travelling with them as they grew up. how would you assess how the treatment of people with disabilities has changed, if at all, in the last couple of decades? weill.
8:12 pm
in the last couple of decades? well, ou are in the last couple of decades? well, you are right. _ in the last couple of decades? well, you are right. if— in the last couple of decades? well, you are right, if at _ in the last couple of decades? well, you are right, if at all, _ in the last couple of decades? well, you are right, if at all, and - in the last couple of decades? well, you are right, if at all, and it - you are right, if at all, and it hasn't. not at all. if i can use a kate bush quote, running up that hill, we are crawling up it i'm afraid and it has been like that for afraid and it has been like that for a long time is a sense at the moment moment is going backwards and i went know our whole community's thoughts are with a family so it is not, going backwards at the moment. llntiii going backwards at the moment. until the inuuest going backwards at the moment. until the inquest itself _ going backwards at the moment. until the inquest itself we will not know what may be the factors that led to it and clearly to illustrate some of the points and we had just a couple of weeks ago where a passenger was left on an aircraft and was really effectively felt like she had abandoned because they, the crew were helping someone else, all the team who were supposed to come and help her. how typical is that? mean, i have to sink my one experience is limited with an elderly parent who is now then end in that case gatwick�*s help was brilliant and she
8:13 pm
had serious mobility issues. i had a really good experience but it sounds like a lot of people with disabilities do not get that experience.— disabilities do not get that experience. disabilities do not get that exerience. ., , ., �* ., disabilities do not get that exerience. ., , ., �* . , experience. no, they don't and it is fractured around _ experience. no, they don't and it is fractured around the _ experience. no, they don't and it is fractured around the world. - experience. no, they don't and it is fractured around the world. even i experience. no, they don't and it is fractured around the world. even in j fractured around the world. even in the uk the policy is not always recognised and i think this will carry on. we do know i need to look at the solutions. we can keep talking about the problems we need to find solutions and some of that is an operations at the airport and were came about to discuss with you is the solution that i've come up with, which is pretty much, i think, the first industry led solution. so if you have an industry led solution which is the are for all solution, thatis which is the are for all solution, that is led by the biggest design of carbon dust, and a certification company, again, one of the biggest in the world, sws certification —— one of the big designers of cabin in the world. we have every solution
8:14 pm
and also partner with sunrise medical who will be looking at that wheelchair and if we look at how thatis wheelchair and if we look at how that is done, passengers using wheelchairs, which is in theory and practice not to crack in the most vulnerable passengers because they are theory cannot sit on a passenger seat. mice in a passenger seat. mice and i dose he couldn't sit in the passenger seat because they have no choice. it is put up or shut up afraid and don't even go about going to the toilet, that is so close to the question. we put a measured up to get there. fix, the question. we put a measured up to get there-— to get there. a lot of people saying the don't to get there. a lot of people saying they don't eat _ to get there. a lot of people saying they don't eat or— to get there. a lot of people saying they don't eat or drink _ to get there. a lot of people saying they don't eat or drink for - to get there. a lot of people saying they don't eat or drink for several l they don't eat or drink for several hours before a flight because they know it is going to be impossible for them to relieve themselves and they are going to end up basically in a horrible position of signing themselves because there is no other way for them to be able to do that, certainly not with any dignity in a crowded cabin. very last brief point because we're having some technical problems on this, do you think there
8:15 pm
are enough incentives for airlines and airport designers to make these changes? in other words, and airport designers to make these changes? in otherwords, is and airport designers to make these changes? in other words, is it a big enough part of their business for them to feel compelled to do something, absent any pressure from outside to do it? we something, absent any pressure from outside to do it?— outside to do it? we are certainly caettin outside to do it? we are certainly getting messages _ outside to do it? we are certainly getting messages now _ outside to do it? we are certainly getting messages now that - outside to do it? we are certainly getting messages now that they l getting messages now that they didn't understand that there's two things here. —— do understand. i can give you figures of land shall airlines were paying out in excess of 20— airlines were paying out in excess of 20- £30 airlines were paying out in excess of 20— £30 million a yearfor airlines were paying out in excess of 20— £30 million a year forjust payments of repairing, refurbishing and replacing wheelchairs and have got to remember that this is a global industry so around the world there are several trillion dollars to be spent on industry but it is so far stopping people flying, because people will not fly.— people will not fly. chris, i would love to talk _ people will not fly. chris, i would love to talk more. _ people will not fly. chris, i would love to talk more. we _ people will not fly. chris, i would love to talk more. we are - people will not fly. chris, i would love to talk more. we are going. people will not fly. chris, i would l love to talk more. we are going to have to leave it there. you have given us some food for thought there and also suggestions of companies that are trying to do something
8:16 pm
about that. thank you so so much the headlines on bbc news... so much borisjohnson has boris johnson has been borisjohnson has been back to meet president zelensky for another visit. gatwick airport cancelled flights because it likes to have to deal with them. from the soldier found guilty of murdering his neighbours in a dispute about parking. it's the hottest day of the year for england and wales —
8:17 pm
with a temperature of 32.7 degrees celsius being recorded at santon downham, in suffolk. a level 3 heat—health alert has been in place for london, the east of england and the south east. it's the third day in a row to break this year's weather records. but the heatwave is due to end over the weekend, as our correspondent celestina olulode reports. cooling down on the river cam in cambridge. who needs to a busy airport when temperatures in many parts of the uk to are higher in many popular holiday destinations? who needs to queue at a busy airport when temperatures in many parts of the uk to are higher than in many popular holiday destinations? visitors sought shade at one of the country's hottest spots, cambridge university botanic garden. we're pretty well equipped at home because we have a little paddling pool for this guy, and lots of fans, so it felt like it was quite like this last year, so we were equipped for hot weather. terrible — the hay fever has been
8:18 pm
the worst it's ever been. yeah, he's been - sniffing all day long. we thought we'd just come out and get a spot in the shade. i it looks lovely outside, and then you come out and find out it's 32 degrees, which is pretty oppressive, but it's very pleasant in the botanical gardens. further south, londoners sizzled in the sunshine. a level three heat health alert has been issued here, also covering the south—east and the east of england. it means high temperatures could impact health services. water sports kept some people in derbyshire cool. temperatures here weren't quite as high as down south, but still high enough across much of the north of england to prompt a level one heat health alert. but it's not all ice lollies and lidos. there's been rain in scotland and northern ireland, keeping temperatures down. time to splash in the paddling pool at battersea dogs and cats home to stop this rescue dog overheating. hard to believe it's still only mid—june. with months more of the summer to come, the question is — how many spells of weather
8:19 pm
like this are ahead? nobody has mentioned hosepipe bans yet but i guess it is only a question of time. the hot weather comes as there has been a heatwave in europe. we are actually getting the after—effects of what many in continental europe expense yesterday. and warnings that heatwaves will be more intense and hit earlier than usual thanks to climate change. we can speak now to sharon george, senior lecturer on environment and green technology at keele university. thank you so much for being with us? is the fault of the link with what we are experiencing at the moment and in what way will not manifest itself? . ., , ., and in what way will not manifest itself? . . , ., ., , ., itself? heat waves are an unusual thin. we itself? heat waves are an unusual thing- we see _ itself? heat waves are an unusual thing. we see heatwaves - itself? heat waves are an unusual thing. we see heatwaves as - itself? heat waves are an unusual thing. we see heatwaves as part. itself? heat waves are an unusual. thing. we see heatwaves as part of a natural weather patterns but what we're seeing what we are going to expect to see as climate change really kicks in rvs heatwaves happening more and more frequently —— heatwaves are not an unusual thing, rvs heatwaves. we have got these targets linked to climate
8:20 pm
change gases so we want to talk about keeping temperatures between certain levels keeping it under, are targets of under 1.5 or under 2 degrees and that is significant. it doesn't sound like a lot of temperatures but those slight increases really increase the likelihood of these having these heatwaves though, for instance, you know, 1.5 degrees rise, 14% of the population will likely experience a heat wave every five years. that rises to 40% of the population if the increase goes to tea degrees, so it is all about likelihood and frequency and intensity of these events we are likely to see as climate change kicks in and we see more chaos, more records being broken more often, as we head it these extreme.— broken more often, as we head it these extreme. . , , ., these extreme. managing this is what we're auoin these extreme. managing this is what we're going to — these extreme. managing this is what we're going to have _ these extreme. managing this is what we're going to have to _ these extreme. managing this is what we're going to have to do. _ these extreme. managing this is what we're going to have to do. we - these extreme. managing this is what we're going to have to do. we talk- we're going to have to do. we talk about mitigating the effects but we're also going to have to manage
8:21 pm
living with them because this is with us now, another two things. when i supposes the impact on sources of food and water, drinking water, and the other thing of the impact on the human body because presumably there comes a point at which the temperatures are just too much for the body to cope with? that is it. we much for the body to cope with? that is it- we think— much for the body to cope with? trust is it. we think about heatwaves and we mention basking in the sun and ice lollies and thus is nice that if he have an underlying health condition these sorts of temperatures can really put stress on the body. yoga enzymes that operate in the body and we are designed to work at around 37 celsius and when these temperatures are hitting in some parts of the country 30 degrees for long periods, this can put real stress on the body, coupled with things like air quality, so there's a real clear link between poor air quality and heatwaves as well, and pollution, so
8:22 pm
people with maybe respiratory problems who really have those exacerbated by particulates. senior lecturer on environmental- lecturer on environmental technology. interesting to say that because we have had a national audit office report saying the current is going to miss its target on the miss its target of air pollution reduction by 2030. thank you very much and i should apologise for the sound on her lying there and also chris's earlier. i don't know if high temperatures can affect the sound quality but we certainly seem to be experiencing something untoward here this evening and we will try to get it sorted out as evening goes on an apology see if you have been struggling with it at home. a former soldier has been found guilty of murdering his neighbours — after a long—running
8:23 pm
dispute about parking. collin reeves, who's 35 and a veteran of the war in afghanistan, stabbed jennifer and stephen chapple in their home in norton fitzwarren in somerset, while their children slept upstairs. from bristol crown court, andrew plant reports. you're under arrest at the minute. collin reeves, arrested outside his home in somerset. he had just killed his next—door neighbours. stephen and jennifer chapple's children had been asleep upstairs at the time. the couple had been hounded by reeves, waiting for them before arguing about parking in the road outside their homes. in november, reeves snuck through their patio doors before stabbing them both and then calling the police. collin reeves's wife was upstairs at their home at the time of the attack. she says she heard screaming and then realised something was wrong when she came downstairs and saw her husband's ceremonial
8:24 pm
dagger was missing from the wall. did you killjennifer and stephen? no comment. outside court, police read a statement on behalf of the chapple family. "no verdict will bring back our beautifuljennifer and stephen. "we will now focus on stephen and jennifer's beautiful boys, "helping them to live the life that jennifer and stephen "would have wanted for them." the former soldier tried to argue he had lost control. neighbours described the family as a young couple who are full of dreams. colin reeve will be sentenced next week. andrew plant, bbc news. wikileaks founderjulian assange's extradition to the us has been approved by uk home secretary priti patel. mr assange has 1a days to appeal the decision. he's wanted by the american authorities over documents leaked in 2010 and 2011, which the us says broke the law
8:25 pm
and endangered lives. assange's brother and father, gabriel and john shipton, held a press conference today to respond to the home secretary's decision. let's hear what they said. democracy dies in the darkness and today is a dark day for democracy. the uk government today has decided thatjournalists and publishers can be extradited from their country for publishing evidence of war crimes, torture and corruption. julian assange will appeal this decision to the high court in the uk. he has 1a days to appeal the decision, but what this decision means is that basicjournalism that people do every day, sourcing information, publishing information, is now illegal in the uk. your australian friends find it extraordinary that the country that gave the world freedom of the press and trying to its constitution
8:26 pm
enshrined in its constitution and the first amendment, today, brought that freedom to an end. it's over. for a publisher to be extradited to the united states, charged under the espionage act, oppresses all publishers, alljournalists everywhere. so we found it a bit shameful that the united kingdom has conspired in this process to bring an end to freedom of the press with the department ofjustice of the united states. it's regretful. the estimated number of people with covid in the uk hasjumped by more than 40% in a week. the latest official survey suggests around 1.4 million people, or 2% of the population, were infected in the week ending the eleventh ofjune —
8:27 pm
up from 990,000 the previous week. cases have risen in all four nations of the uk. our medical editor, fergus walsh, has more about these latest figures. the office for national statistics survey the most reliable indicator of codeless suggest the following figures. increases being driven by two even more contagious sub—levels of common cold balpha—macro for and later mac a5. of common cold balpha-macro for and later mac its-— later mac a5. even in those who had a revious later mac a5. even in those who had a previous infection _ later mac a5. even in those who had a previous infection of _ later mac a5. even in those who had a previous infection of a _ later mac a5. even in those who had a previous infection of a week- later mac a5. even in those who had a previous infection of a week when | a previous infection of a week when it is possible you can get reinfected and in particular we have this variance circulating now which are quite — this variance circulating now which are quite different from the previous— are quite different from the previous covariance and are now able to evade _ previous covariance and are now able to evade our— previous covariance and are now able to evade our past immunity. just
8:28 pm
back_ to evade our past immunity. just back from — to evade our past immunity. just back from the previous covid—19 variants — back from the previous covid-19 variants. . . . . back from the previous covid-19 variants. . .. , back from the previous covid-19 variants. , ., , variants. vaccines may not be able to stop you — variants. vaccines may not be able to stop you getting _ variants. vaccines may not be able to stop you getting infected - variants. vaccines may not be able to stop you getting infected but. to stop you getting infected but visually give strong protected dollar protection against zero covid. more than nine in ten of those aged 12 and over have had more than two doses. globally, two thirds of the world's population have had at least one dose but that dropped to just one in six people on low—income countries. in the uk, they're still a few hundred covid—19 related deaths per week, but that is way below the level we saw in january last year. the official covid death time in the uk has risen to almost 180,000, globally, it stands at more than 6 million, but studies suggest global deaths could be around three times that number due to patchy reporting. the deaths don't capture _ due to patchy reporting. the deaths don't capture the _ due to patchy reporting. the deaths don't capture the full— due to patchy reporting. the deaths don't capture the full extent - due to patchy reporting. the deaths don't capture the full extent of - due to patchy reporting. the deaths don't capture the full extent of it, i don't capture the full extent of it, the learning loss, the depression,
8:29 pm
the learning loss, the depression, the defect. — the learning loss, the depression, the defect, deficits will be paying off forever and economic damage has been absolutely horrific. how off forever and economic damage has been absolutely horrific.— been absolutely horrific. how does covid-19 compare _ been absolutely horrific. how does covid-19 compare with _ been absolutely horrific. how does covid-19 compare with other- covid—19 compare with other pandemics? swine flu killed about half a million people globally but spanish flu just after the first world war was far more deadly with at least 50 million deaths. the black death, bubonic plague in the 14th century killed up to 200 million people, half of europe's population. lesson from history as a future pandemic could be far more deadly in covid—19, so the world needs to be better prepared. no time for the weather. hello, again. it was the hottest day of the year so far. and that is earlier in the day reached above 30. clear blue skies even across much of england and wales as well. i like that everywhere, low cloud, mist and fog rolled in towards the coast of
8:30 pm
southern wales and south—west england as the murk folding temperatures came down. quite good gloomy afternoon for a few of you. after such a warm day, where it was warm, the sandwiches were very slow to fall and still up at midnight, 2a degrees in london, 22 in norwich, pressure conditions across the north west. now for it is a dry night was a week with a fun loving the odd spot of rain and a few shows an office of scotland. into saturday that week with a fun still on the charts, not bringing much rain initially but gets reactivated, outbreaks of rain turning heavier perhaps with some thunder spilling across parts of wales, the midlands and batteries in england. still hot towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc news. towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc news. i'm towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc news. i'm shaun towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc news. i'm shaun ley. towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the towards the south—east of olympus limber slice fashion whether many. welcome back, you are watching bbc news. i'm shaun ley. the headlines, borisjohnson has been in kyiv, a surprise visit, the second he's made
8:31 pm
since the russian invasion four months ago. gatwick airport is to reduce the number of flights during the peak summer period because it hasn't got enough staff to deal with them. an investigation has been launched at the airport after a passenger with restricted mobility died on an escalator, the airport said it was unconnected with staff shortages. julian assange is going to be extradited to the united states after the home secretary approved the request. he has 1a days to appeal. it's been the hottest day of the year in london, the southeast, in many places heat warnings were issued. # if only i could i'd make make a deal with god # and i'd get him to swap our places #. and stranger things have happened, thanks to a television programme kate bush is back at number one in the charts after a gap of 44 years.
8:32 pm
there's more evidence today of the sharp rise in the cost of living, with the price of petrol and diesel breaking new records, and the rate of inflation heading to levels not seen for decades. ministers have urged people to be "sensible" in their demands for higher wages, but a major new survey for the bbc indicates the concerns that people have about their household finances. the firm savanta spoke to more than 4,000 people. of those, more than 80% said they were worried about their finances. 66% said their mental health had been affected. 56% said they were cutting back on food. and 70% said they were taking appliances off standby — and switching off completely. here's our economics editor, faisal islam. your tinned food and cereal, things like that... at this durham trust community centre, manager lindsay is shocked by what she is seeing in terms of who needs help with food supplies and with massive debts. this is the front line of the cost of living crisis. people who have never thought
8:33 pm
they would come to the for support before our contacting us and saying, i really need your help. are used to previously donate food on a regular basis and i need help and i feel embarrassed to say that but i do. as prices rise, fewer people can afford to donate but demand is up 30%. i think we are getting to the point where people can't afford the basic necessities in life and people are telling us they can't afford prescriptions at the moment and access to other medication, even if they go to the hospital, getting on the bus to go to appointments because they have to weigh up the books and they don't know... they will stay at home and not go to a hospital appointment because they can't for the bus fare? the energy price surges affecting everyone. people are saying, the energy provider has taken a sum of money out of my bank and its wiped me out and we have to tell people to cancel the direct debit. set up a standing order to pay the payment but cancelled the direct debit and pay payment that is affordable to put at this surge in the cost of living
8:34 pm
is hitting deep and wide. affecting working households that never would have considered themselves anything other than comfortable before now. it could also be impacting upon the great british public�*s expectations of what and how much a crisis, and right now the critical question economically is how much workers expect wages to bridge this gap. our survey shines a light on that link, suggesting that over eight in ten british people think wages should go up with prices and over half said they were planning to ask for a pay rise with 35% saying they would ask for their pay to go up at least as much as prices, currently 9% and rising. hundreds of pounds of help towards bills is on its way to every household, says the treasury, but wages should not be expected to match inflation. there is not an automaticity, if you like, between inflation and pay setting and we need to be
8:35 pm
very careful to avoid fuelling an inflationary spiral in a way which actually is to everyone's detriment if we allow it to run away from us and that is what the governments of the '705 failed to address and what we need to prevent it occurring in the 20205. back in peterlee, janine is from a working family but says those in old mining communities like this feel abandoned again. myself and my partner work full time. i thought i'd never have to worry about food but that is my main worry every day right now. just for a sunday roast, we are looking at about £15 every sunday which is £60 a month. i do know my family alone and other people's families are starting to grow their own vegetables. people are resilient through hardship but with petrol prices at new records and international gas prices now surging again, there are limits. faisal islam, bbc news, in county durham.
8:36 pm
ifi if i said to you out on the wily windy moors you are roughly the same age as me. kate bush was just 19 when she achieved her first number one in the uk singles chart in 1978. she's now 63, and this evening it's been confirmed that she's back at number one. the song — running up that hill — was first released in 1985, and it's now a big hit again after featuring in the latest series of the netflix show stranger things. our music correspondent mark savage has more. # if only i could. # i'd make a deal with god... in 1985, running up that hill got to number three in the charts. # running up that hill... 37 years later, it's gone two better, knocking harry styles off the top spot, and it is all thanks to this. the netflix show stranger things, where kate bush's song saves the life of sadie sink�*s character after she succumbs to a dark force. her friends realise that the best
8:37 pm
way to get her out of this state is to play music, and it gives her the strength and the power to be able to overcome that moment, which i think metaphorically is beautiful, it is absolutely beautiful. # you don't want to hurt me... over the last seven days, running up that hill has been streamed 57 million times around the world, as a new generation of fans discovers its charms. when it came out all those years ago it sounded brand—new, no—one else could ever have made it. it will sound like that in ten years time, it sounds like that now. she's totally separate to everybody else, in terms of what she does. there's no—one else like kate bush, so it sounds new now. 44 years into her career, running up that hill has earned kate bush a million in royalties over the last month. she's not the only one to benefit. katie smith is a kate bush tribute act. # out on the wily windy moors... we've seen a rise in ticket sales, which has been really amazing. just to be having a chat with people about kate and her music again has been really,
8:38 pm
really lovely, and i think with this resurgence we're going to see a lot more younger people in the audience. kate bush approved every single use of her song in stranger things, but she couldn't have anticipated what would come next. in a statement on friday, she said... can you remove your headphones, please? mark savage, bbc news. john robb is a journalist right in the thick of punk back in the 70s roughly at the time kate bush first first hit the charts. he writes for a monthly magazine. it's lovely to talk to you this evening. this is great news for any fan of kate bush. why do you think it's so deserved? i think it's great news for any fan of p0p think it's great news for any fan of pop music. it's like a pop victory, something that is artful, brilliant, textual, nuanced, to be a hit more
8:39 pm
than a0 years later, its power and testimony to such a great song and such a great artist as well and it's also very modern kind of story as well, the idea that you can put the tv series, tracks and there are a key part of the series but power of streaming, it's not a marketed thing, it's not normally release record, it'sjust thing, it's not normally release record, it's just a thing, it's not normally release record, it'sjust a great thing, it's not normally release record, it's just a great song that has broken through because of the circumstances of these times. i5 circumstances of these times. is really interesting, because in a sense her first achievement was because she got taken up by a big label at an incredibly tender age it had the power, the marketing power to get her out there, get her herd and get her scene. this time, as you say, it's nothing to do with that, it's a kind of democratisation of music in a way.— music in a way. yeah, with streaming. _ music in a way. yeah, with streaming, it's _ music in a way. yeah, with streaming, it's obviously l music in a way. yeah, with - streaming, it's obviously need disadvantage streaming, artists don't get enough money from it, i thought i'd get that in, with streaming everything is current all
8:40 pm
at the same time so if you are 1a or 15 years old there is no new or old. something released a week ago or a0 or 50 years ago is all current, all at once, so there is an in—built advantage, it's so timeless. when you listen to a track like this you can't guess what period it was released in, what cultural period. it doesn't sound like an old dusty track that sneaked in at number one, it sounds like it could have been released by billie eilish about two weeks ago. it sounds utterly contemporary almost contemporary, and that is part of the genius of bush and even though she is a pop star she always knew her worth and knew how good she was. when she was 19 insisting that wuthering heights, telling him emi the big corporate label how her career should go, what record she should release and what it should sound like has paid off. if you trust a true artist it will
8:41 pm
work out. if you trust a true artist it will work out-— if you trust a true artist it will work out. it's interesting, her career. work out. it's interesting, her career- she — work out. it's interesting, her career. she doesn't _ work out. it's interesting, her career. she doesn't ever- work out. it's interesting, her| career. she doesn't ever seem work out. it's interesting, her- career. she doesn't ever seem to become addicted to fame in the way a lot of people in the music profession do and therefore they end “p profession do and therefore they end up chasing what they had once and they can't capture again, so it almost feels like this has happened but it doesn't really matter to her whether it happened or not because she is still producing the kind of music she wants to produce. the treat music she wants to produce. the great thing _ music she wants to produce. tue: great thing about kate bush is she's almost retired. she appears every ten years, did that run of gigs about ten years ago now, occasionally releases a record her own terms on her own speed and the quote from her about this track, it's one of bemusement, it's like, this wasn't planned, it came out of nowhere and she talks about the tv series like a friend, watch this coming of track is on it. it's utterly normal, so cut off from the hurly—burly of fame culture. it's a true artist. there are true artists
8:42 pm
in pop, kate bush is definitely one of them. i in pop, kate bush is definitely one of them. ~' ., , in pop, kate bush is definitely one of them. ~ ., , ., ., of them. i know she reached out to ou after of them. i know she reached out to you after you _ of them. i know she reached out to you after you did — of them. i know she reached out to you after you did a _ of them. i know she reached out to you after you did a review - of them. i know she reached out to you after you did a review of - of them. i know she reached out to you after you did a review of one i of them. i know she reached out to you after you did a review of one of her songs. you after you did a review of one of hersongs. i'd you after you did a review of one of her songs. i'd love to talk to you about that but we are out of time but hopefully she will be reaching out to you again after this interview. thank you so much, john rob from the louder than war website. eurovision could be set to return to the uk next year — after organisers confirmed that they are in talks with the bbc about hosting the 2023 song contest. ukraine won this year's competition, and would normally host the following year — but they've been ruled out as hosts because of the ongoing war with russia and have condemned the decision. because the uk's sam ryder came second this year, the european broadcasting union are now hoping the uk can stage it instead. joining me now is dr pauljordan, a eurovision expert and media commentator on the eurovision song contest. good to see you this evening. this is effectively whether ukraine likes
8:43 pm
it or not probably what is going to happen. it it or not probably what is going to ha en. . . it or not probably what is going to ha en, , ., �* , it or not probably what is going to hauen. ,., h ., it or not probably what is going to hauen. ,. �*, ., . happen. it is and it's not about, ou happen. it is and it's not about, you know. _ happen. it is and it's not about, you know, politics, _ happen. it is and it's not about, you know, politics, it's - happen. it is and it's not about, you know, politics, it's not - happen. it is and it's not about, | you know, politics, it's not about the kind of emotional element. eurovision is a mammoth event and the planning for eurovision starts the planning for eurovision starts the next day, literally the next day after the country wins. i used to work on eurovision as part of the comms team and literally that sunday is when the planning begins and you can't put on an event when you don't know if the city is going to be safe. it's really unfortunate. it's really sad for ukraine as well. they should host it, they've hosted it very well in 2005 and 2017 but the reality is theyjust can't, next year. the uk have been offered the chance. let's hope they take the chance. let's hope they take the chance. the uk has stepped in before, the bbc have done before. we've hosted it eight times, won five. let's hope it's a night time and maybe scotland will host it again. i and maybe scotland will host it aaain. ., ., ., and maybe scotland will host it aain, ., ., ., r, again. i want to ask you where in the uk but _ again. i want to ask you where in the uk but before _ again. i want to ask you where in the uk but before we get onto i again. i want to ask you where in i the uk but before we get onto that, are there ways of making this feel like it's a ukrainian led programme
8:44 pm
evenif like it's a ukrainian led programme even if it's not physically coming from ukraine?— even if it's not physically coming from ukraine? absolutely full stop there are many — from ukraine? absolutely full stop there are many ways _ from ukraine? absolutely full stop there are many ways they - from ukraine? absolutely full stop there are many ways they can - from ukraine? absolutely full stop there are many ways they can do l there are many ways they can do that. they can have ukrainian interval acts. they can have ukrainian presenters. the statement was quite interesting from the eurovision organisers. they said they would be a ukrainian flavour to they would be a ukrainian flavour to the contest next year regardless of where the contest is held, so that is a fair compromise. these things are not without precedent. the uk has stepped in before with other countries when they didn't want to host it. it's the first time since 1980 that the previous year's winner hasn't hosted it but... that 1980 that the previous year's winner hasn't hosted it but. . ._ hasn't hosted it but... that was israel, hasn't hosted it but... that was israel. they _ hasn't hosted it but... that was israel, they couldn't post - hasn't hosted it but... that was israel, they couldn't post it - israel, they couldn't post it because of the conflict going on at the time so the netherlands stepped in on that occasion.— in on that occasion. indeed, it was in on that occasion. indeed, it was in the hague. _ in on that occasion. indeed, it was in the hague, and _ in on that occasion. indeed, it was in the hague, and in _ in on that occasion. indeed, it was in the hague, and in 1974 - in on that occasion. indeed, it was in the hague, and in 1974 it - in on that occasion. indeed, it was in the hague, and in 1974 it was i in on that occasion. indeed, it was| in the hague, and in 1974 it was in in the hague, and in 197a it was in brighton and that was when i buy famously won even though the year before luxembourg won so the uk has stepped in before and it will be a fitting tribute if it's in the uk with a nod to the ukraine as well. i can imagine the director—general of the bbc tim davie breaking out in a
8:45 pm
cold sweat because there is always a nervousness amongst broadcasters. much as they love it it costs a lot of money to stage.— much as they love it it costs a lot of money to stage. television eggs exensive of money to stage. television eggs expensive and _ of money to stage. television eggs expensive and strictly _ of money to stage. television eggs expensive and strictly is _ of money to stage. television eggs expensive and strictly is £1 - of money to stage. television eggs expensive and strictly is £1 million | expensive and strictly is £1 million an episode, so give or take a couple of grand, so eurovision gets huge audiences and it's very important, it's a very important part of our cultural history and i don't think we should dismiss it or write it off is too expensive. it's a really important thing. the bbc last staged in 1998 in birmingham, they did a greatjob. they transcended the eurovision format if you like, they really did a greatjob, and this is an opportunity for broadcasters to step up and share best practice and i think it's a great opportunity. aha, i think it's a great opportunity. a quick last thought. great success, cop being held in glasgow despite the pandemic. do you think, you are in glasgow, could your city do it again? i in glasgow, could your city do it auain? ~ in glasgow, could your city do it auain?
8:46 pm
great city. it's got the - great city. it's got the infrastructure. it's not got that

20 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on