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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 18, 2022 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty. and ben thompson. our headlines today: asylum seekers who cross the channel in small boats are to be electronically tagged under a new home office pilot scheme. supermarkets and utility companies should be helping people struggling with soaring prices — that's according to the government's new cost of living adviser. we'll be speaking to the boss of iceland later on the show. police in brazil say they have identified the remains of the british journalist, dom phillips. rory mcilroy remains in the hunt for a first major in eight years. he's one shot off the lead at the us open in brookline going into the third round.
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good morning, after the peak of the cross part of the world and central england. still hot and humid in the south, we could see thunderstorms in the evening. all of the details coming up on bbc breakfast. it's saturday, the 18th ofjune. our top story: some migrants who cross the channel in small boats are to be electronically tagged, in a 12—month pilot scheme run by the home office. ministers say it will help maintain contact with asylum claimants who reach the uk by what it calls dangerous routes. critics fear it will treat people who have fled war and persecution as criminals. simonjones reports. another busy week for the border force in the channel, more than 1000 migrants brought ashore after being picked up the sea. the government
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says it will seek to remove those who have passed through several safe countries before claiming asylum in the uk. and, as part of a year—long pilot scheme, some of those awaiting deportation will be fitted with electronic tags. officials say there is a greater risk that migrants facing removal will abscond. monitoring the project, the home office says there has been an unprecedented growth in irregular migration. the pilot will test whether electronic monitoring will improve and maintain regular contact with asylum claimants who arrive in the uk via unnecessary and dangerous routes. forthose the uk via unnecessary and dangerous routes. for those facing removal, there may be an increased risk of absconding and less incentive to comply with any conditions of immigration bail. the first to be tagged i said to be the asylum seekers who challenge challenged that removal. it is not clear how many people will be tagged on the pilot project or how kim immigration judges will be to introduce
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electronic monitoring as part of any bail conditions. people who don't comply could be returned to detention or prosecuted. but, the refugee council says it is appalling the government is intent on treating people who have fled war, bloodshed and persecution as criminals. simon jones, bbc news. the home secretary priti patel has described the ruling by the european court of human rights, which grounded the first plane due to take asylum seekers to rwanda, as scandalous. the flight had been due to take off on tuesday night before the court intervened. in an interview with the daily telegraph, ms patel said she believed the decision had been politically motivated. supermarkets, energy companies and the leisure industry are being urged to reduce prices for customers, by the government's new cost—of—living advisor. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, david buttress called on businesses to "come to the party" and help with soaring costs over the next six months. our political correspondent, ione wells, has been speaking to him.
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talk to anyone on and what changes they could make. i definitely have cut down on fuel and eating out. how much electricity i use, but i'm not cutting — how much electricity i use, but i'm not cutting back that much. trying — not cutting back that much. trying to _ not cutting back that much. trying to get my daughter to turn her fan _ trying to get my daughter to turn her fan off— trying to get my daughter to turn her fan off at night and things like that _ that. people are that. — people are changing how that. people are chan--in how much they people are changing how much they buy but can't control how much goods cost. that is something the government's new cost—of—living is our david buttress wants to change. he founded the delivery chainjust eat that will have desk at the heart of government here. he wants to make food, utilities and leisure companies cut their costs to help consumers by the time he leaves the role in the six months. i want to work with the big industries to make sure that we help people to soften the blow, help them
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make their money go further. for the money that is spent on marketing, doing big deals on leisure that british people enjoy, well, let's take some of that money, let's refocus it on what really matters to people which is making prices refocus it on what really matters to people which is making prices more competitive. he hasn't always been a fan of the government, tweeting and his past life that decades of neglect by the conservatives have been a contributing factor to child poverty. how does he feel about advising them now? you have to bear in mind that i had never met any of the team at number ten, a list of all obviously the prime minister, and i think it says everything about this government and the prime minister that actually they are putting somebody like me and place who really cares about a two wants to make a good impact in this area. ~ . , two wants to make a good impact in this area. ~ ., , ., . ., , ., this area. what is not clear is how he will get — this area. what is not clear is how he will get businesses _ this area. what is not clear is how he will get businesses on-board l this area. what is not clear is how. he will get businesses on-board and he will get businesses on—board and whether they will ask for anything from government in return. his ideas have been welcomed by the trade union congress but they argue price cuts won't be enough without wages rising. cuts won't be enough without wages risinu. �* , ., , , cuts won't be enough without wages risinu. �* , ., ,, ., rising. anything that helps hard ressed rising. anything that helps hard pressed families _ rising. anything that helps hard pressed families and _ rising. anything that helps hard pressed families and keeps - rising. anything that helps hard l pressed families and keeps down rising. anything that helps hard - pressed families and keeps down cost will be welcomed but these the
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reality that our cost—of—living crisis is actually a wages crisis. we have had the biggest squeeze on wages in this country for 200 years. real wages are well below where they were below where they were in 2008 in real time so what we need to also employers is what they are going to going to do to do to boost the money and peoples pockets to boost wages and peoples pockets to boost wages and to give britain a pay rise it really has been externally difficult... the package of help, including a discount on energy bills in october and payments of £650 on those on means tested benefits. but the new advisor argues it is time for the private sector to come to the table. ione wells, bbc news. brazilian police have confirmed that the remains of one of the two bodies found in the remote amazon rainforest are those of the british journalist, dom phillips. the second body, believed to be that of indigenous expert bruno pereira, is still being examined. earlier this week, a suspect confessed to burying the bodies. his brother has also been arrested. here's our south america
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correspondent, katy watson. these other two men as their friends and family want to remember them, dom phillips, a passionate journalist writing a book on saving the amazon, his travelling companion, bruno pereira was an indigenous exposure to the community so well and was loved by so many here. the authorities are still trying to establish whether the human remains also include those of bruno pereira. suspect amarildo da costa de oliveira confessed to the crime and lead search teams to the place he buried the two men. a difficult location, two miles inland from the river, and they needed the help of helicopters, sniffer dogs and divers, but police said they still hadn't located the boat belonging to mr pereira, but the
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suspect admitted he had sunk it. authorities are also looking for a third suspect, mr de lima, they say he is currently on the run. the area where the two men disappeared as vast, remote and lawless. on the border with colombia and peru, there are illegalfishermen border with colombia and peru, there are illegal fishermen and border with colombia and peru, there are illegalfishermen and coaches and drug trafficking as well. indeed, bruno's were trying to protect the indigenous communities from illegal activities made him enemies. he had been threatened in the past because of his work. police though say the investigation suggest that the suspects acted alone, not criminal organisation behind them. but, that univaja was rejected by, the association of indigenous communities that had taken part in the search and are calling for more to be done to find their friend bruno and their travel companion, dominic. they believe it was a crime planned in detail. katy watson, bbc news. a major new round of british military training for ukrainian soldiers has been announced by the prime minister. during a surprise visit to kyiv, borisjohnson told president zelensky the aim
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was to train up to 10,0000 soldiers every four months. our europe correspondent, nick beake, has this update. the prime minister was certainly a long way away from some criticism he faced back home for missing a meeting of his own mps. here in kyiv though he was given an extremely warm welcome. he was standing alongside president zelensky who said that the support he had shown, that britain had shown, boris johnson had shown was unparalleled. borisjohnson, of course, the leader who took his country out of the european union, volodymyr zelensky wants his country, ukraine, tojoin, and ukraine has actually got a big boost now with the european commission saying it approves the idea of ukraine starting on the very long path, probably, to full eu membership. of course, boris johnson's visit comes just 2a hours after the leaders of france, germany, italy and romania were here
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on a similar sort of visit, and the ukranian say they are really grateful for this sort of show of strength, the support. the political strength, the support. the political strength it shows in the face of vladimir putin's aggression. but, if you talk to them privately they really stressed that what they really stressed that what they really want at this time in about an hour of need, as they describe it, our heavy weapons coming from the west. they want them to come here much quicker because they remain in thatis much quicker because they remain in that is really brutal battle with russia. a new service has been launched to help deaf people contact the emergency services. for the first time, users will be able to video call 999 and communicate with operators using british sign language. helena wilkinson reports. briony and her husband andy are both deaf. last summer he collapsed, unable to call 999, briony drove him to a&e. at the time, i absolutely panicked, ijust at the time, i absolutely panicked, i just didn't know what to do.
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at the time, i absolutely panicked, ijust didn't know what to do. and i think if i had 909 available, i think if i had 909 available, i think i could have been able to have gotten advice very quickly. i wouldn't have had the stress, i wouldn't have had the stress, i would have been able to stay calm, i would have been able to stay calm, i would have known that help was coming to where we were but obviously it wasn't available back then. and that drive — that drive, when i was trying to drive and watching him struggling to breathe next to me, and obviously i couldn't communicate with him, we got inside, he was struggling to breathe too much. so now i know that this 999 service is available, and i am so glad to know that other deaf people don't need to go through this experience. for the first time, 999 sign language will allow people to directly call through to a video calling service, allowing them to communicate in their first language, psl through an interpreter. this is how the new service works. the caller connects to the 999 psl app
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on the mobile or online, they press the red button to make the call, that connects them to a psl interpreter who contacts a 999 operator. the conversation is then relayed. —— bsl. the deaf community says it is a breakthrough. the app will be an absolute life changer. it has been years and years coming. deaf people have not been able to access emergency services, you can take but it means you have to type, hello, this is the problem, you know, you can imagine doing that. it is now 75% slower. you can imagine trying to have an emergency situation conversation and it is just not acceptable when using english. if it is life—and—death you need to be able to click and use your first language directly, and thatis your first language directly, and that is what this does so i am so pleased to see this here now.
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the deaf community says this is one more step forward towards equality. helen wikinson, bbc news. air passengers have complained of luggage delays of two hours at heathrow airport following a technical problem. these photos were posted on social media showing hundreds of bags and cases piled up at terminal 2 yesterday. the airport has apologised, saying the malfunction has now been fixed, and staff were working to reunite passengers with their belongings. you look at those photos, people look so forward to going on holiday and you look at those photos, it is so frightening. kuleba and i don't know what is welcome if you're heading somewhere and you don't have your luggage, or if you're coming back... at least if you have had your holiday it is fine. how do you deny all those people those bags.
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i mean, do people still put their names in baggage and stuff? it gets printed. if the bar tag is still there. the mind boggles! still there. the mind bou ales! , stillthere. the mind boules! , ., the mind boggles! just coming to 6:15am. let's _ the mind boggles! just coming to 6:15am. let's talk _ the mind boggles! just coming to 6:15am. let's talk about - the mind boggles! just coming to 6:15am. let's talk about this. - 37 years after it was first released, kate bush's song, running up that hill, has reached the top spot in the uk singles chart. # running up that hill joe salisbury 1980s, doesn't it? it comes after the song featured in the netflix hit tv series stranger things, introducing kate bush's music to a whole new generation of fans. the song had previously made it to number three in the uk charts in 1985. just a great song. brilliant song. rules around mask—wearing in some hospitals and gp surgeries in england have been relaxed after guidance from nhs bosses to return to pre—pandemic policies. however, with the final decision left up to individual organisations,
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measures can vary significantly across the country. damian o'neill has been looking at the issue in one region in the north—east of england. morning. how are you? at the james cook hospital — morning. how are you? at the james cook hospital in _ morning. how are you? at the james cook hospital in middlesbrough, - morning. how are you? at the james cook hospital in middlesbrough, the| cook hospital in middlesbrough, the wearing of masks is no longer compulsory. it is the same across all of the nhs trust. in compulsory. it is the same across all of the nhs trust.— all of the nhs trust. in line with chances all of the nhs trust. in line with changes in _ all of the nhs trust. in line with changes in national— all of the nhs trust. in line with changes in national policy - all of the nhs trust. in line with l changes in national policy and the incidence and covid in the area, we are now at a point where thankfully we can step away from mask wearing across the whole organisation. we are focusing on mask wearing in the highest risk areas still and we do want the public to support us with that. , . , that. the picture elsewhere in the reuion is that. the picture elsewhere in the region is mixed. _ that. the picture elsewhere in the region is mixed. others _ that. the picture elsewhere in the region is mixed. others insist - that. the picture elsewhere in the region is mixed. others insist on | region is mixed. others insist on masks but maltese has dropped them. the director assembled —— sympathetic. i the director assembled -- sympathetic.— the director assembled -- s m athetic. ~ , sympathetic. i think it is never coin: sympathetic. i think it is never auoin to sympathetic. i think it is never going to feel— sympathetic. i think it is never going to feel like _ sympathetic. i think it is never going to feel like the - sympathetic. i think it is never
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going to feel like the right - sympathetic. i think it is never. going to feel like the right time. during the summer months when we know respiratory viruses tend to spread less than they do in winter, there has to be a point where a decision is made. i imagine those hospitals will monitor it incredibly carefully in terms of impact is having on whether it is resulting in spread within the hospital, in which case — my case i am sure they will reverse a decision. but i do understand why they have made that decision at this stage.— decision at this stage. health authors in — decision at this stage. health authors in cumbria _ decision at this stage. health authors in cumbria say - decision at this stage. health authors in cumbria say they l decision at this stage. health l authors in cumbria say they are optimistic about the covid figures and they know getting an accurate picture isn't easy. it is and they know getting an accurate picture isn't easy.— picture isn't easy. it is so much less than _ picture isn't easy. it is so much less than it _ picture isn't easy. it is so much less than it was _ picture isn't easy. it is so much less than it was in _ picture isn't easy. it is so much less than it was in the - picture isn't easy. it is so much less than it was in the past, - picture isn't easy. it is so much | less than it was in the past, but picture isn't easy. it is so much - less than it was in the past, but we have some access to modelling that we do ourselves. we think the modelled rate is probably at around about 150 cases per 100,000 population per week at the moment, which is lower than it has been for a year. here's sarah with a look at the weekend weather. did you manage to get out yesterday?
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did you manage to get out yesterday? did you manage to get out yesterday? did you feel that lovely sunshine? lovelies for some way too hot for some people. it was, wasn't it. certainly the peak of the heatwave yesterday. good morning to you. yesterday we had really intense heat across southern part of england and wales, further north it was quite sort of day. let's take a �*s maximum temperatures because we saw highs of 30 celsius. santon downham was the hot spot in suffolk. towards belfast, 18 degrees. what a contrast in temperature over the past few days. holding onto that heat and humidity at the moment particularly down towards the south—east. this is the picture for one of our early weather watch is up and about in london where overnight temperatures are still sitting at 20 or 21 degrees. it is more difficult for the average daytime high for this time of year. if you are a of the heat and humidity, you will be pleased to know things are turning cooler and fresher for most of us today. some rain in the forecast as well as the
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cooler air pushes print from the north. we have this weather front which is introducing cooler, fresher error but there will be gone through the central slice of wales and england and that will bring outbreaks of rain. this line of cloud this morning, rain developing across parts of wales, the midlands, east anglia. some could be heavy, but the on rumble of thunder. to the north of that rain band, the cooler, fresher conditions. windy weather in the far north—west. gusts of about 50 miles an hour with the odd shower around. temperatures around 13 to 19 degrees for most of us. look at the south—east corner where we still have the heat, 27 or 28 degrees. into the evening hours, that is when, if we concentrate on this rain, it will be heavy, particularly for east anglia and the south—east so you are likely to hear the odd rumble of thunder through the first part of the night. later in the night, the next batch of
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thunderstorms roles in across the channel, perhaps the isle of wight seeing some of those thunderstorms for the early hours of sunday morning. tomorrow morning it is cooler and fresher, more comfortable sleeping right across the board. the fresh air with us from the word go. some heavy showers and thunderstorms in the far south. through the english channel towards hampshire, kent and sussex we could see some heavy and thundery showers for a time on sunday. they look like they ease a little later in the day for most of us, potentially continuing for the far south—west. largely drier, less breezy than it is today and temperatures between 13 to 20 degrees. cool where we have the breeze coming off the north sea into summer evening. looking ahead to next week for you, and it will not be as hot as the week we have just seen. a lot of dry weather around, some cloud and rain in the far north—west of the uk but temperatures generally in the high
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teens or low 20s. a different feel of the weather into next week. it feels a bit more like a return to something more normal. thank you. and why wouldn't you make the most of the fine weather? have fun, guys. off you go. it is beautiful. definitely one to take the — it is beautiful. definitely one to take the kids out. all the weather we have had lately,
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the horrible — all the weather we have had lately, the horrible rain— all the weather we have had lately, the horrible rain and _ all the weather we have had lately, the horrible rain and all— all the weather we have had lately, the horrible rain and all that, - all the weather we have had lately, the horrible rain and all that, the l the horrible rain and all that, the showers. — the horrible rain and all that, the showers, really— the horrible rain and all that, the showers, really enjoying - the horrible rain and all that, the showers, really enjoying it. - you know those little fountain spells that come out? do you go into them? no, iam them? no, i am always really nervous! i go all the way around. yes! but if you just do it, you will really enjoy it, but it is the first bit ) really enjoy it, but it is the first bit) is quite embarrassing if it is not turned on and you run quickly over it. you have to see if you're splashing. have to casually walk and hope it happens! hap justpens! happens! just do it. always go around. and we'd love to see your pictures of the beautiful weather. maybe you hated it. maybe you were hiding in the shade and waiting for it all to be over. maybe you loved it. let us know what you've been up to.
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it was only hot in certain parts of the country. you can email us at bbcbreakfast@bbc.co.uk and we'll show some of your photos a little later in the program. those videos were great. everyone was having a great time. let's take a look at today's papers. the cost—of—living crisis continues to dominate the front pages. the times leads on comments by treasury minister simon clarke, saying employers must be very careful about giving staff big pay rises because they could fuel a 1970s—style inflationary spiral. the telegraph leads on remarks from the same minister, saying he warned against "giving in" to strikers' pay demands amid fears it would fuel inflation. that's ahead of those planned rail strikes next week. the sun has a poignant message from dame deborahjames who has terminal bowel cancer. she says: and the mirror claims that sir paul mccartney has dropped the song back in the ussr from his set list in protest at vladimir putin's invasion of ukraine.
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speaking of sir paul, he turns 80 today, and we'll be bringing you a story from inside his childhood home later in the programme. it isa it is a nice story. yeah, a really good story. sports, golf, i am yeah, a really good story. sports, golf, iam happy. we will look yeah, a really good story. sports, golf, i am happy. we will look at it and talk about it in a minute. hello! enjoying your papers? hello! en'o in: our --aers? . enjoying your papers? paul mccartney. _ enjoying your papers? paul mccartney. 80! _ enjoying your papers? paul mccartney, 80! you - enjoying your papers? paul mccartney, 80! you have l enjoying your papers? paul mccartney, 80! you have done sidecar, motorbike, haven't you? yes, on the track. what do you think about this? norton, an iconic brand, 124 years, it is the raw you hear and you think, brilliant —— roar. it is planning its first electric bite. can you imagine a norton electric? you have to get a bit of cardboard. like we used to do with bikes. what
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like we used to do with bikes. what did ou like we used to do with bikes. what did you use to _ like we used to do with bikes. what did you use to do? _ like we used to do with bikes. what did you use to do? put _ like we used to do with bikes. what did you use to do? put cardboard i did you use to do? put cardboard in the spokes- — did you use to do? put cardboard in the spokes- so _ did you use to do? put cardboard in the spokes. so it _ did you use to do? put cardboard in the spokes. so it makes _ did you use to do? put cardboard in the spokes. so it makes the - the spokes. so it makes the noise. just like that. the spokes. so it makes the noise. just like that-— the spokes. so it makes the noise. just like that. you never done that? never even — just like that. you never done that? never even heard _ just like that. you never done that? never even heard of— just like that. you never done that? never even heard of it. _ just like that. you never done that? never even heard of it. and - just like that. you never done that? never even heard of it. and you - never even heard of it. and you thought you were broom—brooming? ihla thought you were broom—brooming? i157 big go back to quiet motorbike. thought you were broom-brooming? no big go back to quiet motorbike. we - big go back to quiet motorbike. we should get you to do the noise. they might employ you to do it. you never know. more than 550 jobs will be created, it is going to save, the hope is... this is the business department tackling the 4x4 delivery truck as well. save 27 million tons of c02, truck as well. save 27 million tons of co2, lifetime emissions... that is the important thing. of c02, lifetime emissions... that is the important thing. should we now talk _ that is the important thing. should we now talk about _ that is the important thing. should we now talk about the _ that is the important thing. should we now talk about the golf? - that is the important thing. should we now talk about the golf? yes, l that is the important thing. should | we now talk about the golf? yes, it is interesting. _ we now talk about the golf? yes, it is interesting. looking _ we now talk about the golf? yes, it is interesting. looking at _ we now talk about the golf? yes, it is interesting. looking at the - is interesting. looking at the leaderboard. it is full of the players who have stood up against and decided not tojoin
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players who have stood up against and decided not to join the breakaway saudi tour. the likes of phil mickelson than sergio garcia. they missed the cut. 50 phil mickelson than sergio garcia. they missed the cut.— they missed the cut. so has an effect of the — they missed the cut. so has an effect of the game? _ they missed the cut. so has an effect of the game? has - they missed the cut. so has an effect of the game? has been. they missed the cut. so has an| effect of the game? has been a they missed the cut. so has an - effect of the game? has been a lot of controversy and they have had to face some tough questions in the press that they are not really used to. rory mcilroy is going strong, isn't he? tired at the top. —— it's tight at the top of the us open golf leader board. the americana joel dahmen and colin morakawa lead the way, but rory mcilroy and darlington's callum tarren are still very much in touch. mcilroy�*s desperate for a major win after eight years without one, but he got stuck in the thick brookline rough three holes in. he did recover to stay in touch at 3—under par, two shots off the lead. tarren, meanwhile, is the world number 445, but he's still right up there with a shout. at one stage, he held the outright lead before falling back. he's one 1 under behind mcilroy.
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you want to go up against the best to bring the best out of yourself and to see colin and john and scotty and sam up there and whoever else, thatis and sam up there and whoever else, that is the major championship golf is all about, that is what championship — the competition is all about. championship — the competition is allabout. i championship — the competition is all about. i don't want to be easy. i have two to 64 is a true 65. that is competition. that is at the heart of this game and i am excited to be in that mix going into the weekend. now, england's cricketers broke their own world record for the highest score in one—day international cricket after reaching 498/4 against the netherlands. david malan, phil salt and jos buttler all smashed centuries as england won by 232 runs. andy swiss reports. blue skies, but for england, it was $0011 was soon raining sixes. is what began a game of cricket ended up more a spot ball competition. their
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opponents, the netherlands, reduced to rummaging in the undergrowth of a blend of obliging bowling and quite staggering hitting sore records smashed to all corners. centre is what ivan milat and phil sold with a 162 from jos buttler things to truly dizzying heights. a case of new balls, please, as time and again buttler blazed them out of the ground. they needed a special net to find that one. and it was before liam livingstone got going, thrashing 32 runs in one over. the travelling fans were loving it. they did two sixes of the last two balls to be the first team to reach 500 they just fell short. they 'ust fell short. commentator: the they just fell short. commentator: the crowd booed _ they just fell short. commentator: the crowd booed because _ they just fell short. commentator: the crowd booed because it - they just fell short. commentator: the crowd booed because it is - they just fell short. commentator: the crowd booed because it is only l the crowd booed because it is only four. , ., , .,' four. they rounded things off in s le. four. they rounded things off in style. 498. _ four. they rounded things off in style. 498. a — four. they rounded things off in style. 498, a walloping - four. they rounded things off in| style. 498, a walloping one-day style. 498, a walloping one—day record, and the england fans, quite exhilarating entertainment. andy swiss, bbc news. now to tennis, and katy boulter�*s impressive run at the birmingham classic has now come to an end.
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she was beaten in the quarterfinals by the former world number one simona halep. boulter started really well, though, against the former wimbledon champion in a tight first set, but halep's class eventually told as she won the match in straight sets. and ryan peniston's fantastic run at queens came to an end as well. he was beaten in the quarterfinals in three sets by filip krajinovic. but still really signs from him with the start of wimbledon just nine days away. he will be a wildcard again. one football line to bring you — liverpool have agreed to sell striker sadio mane to german champions bayern munich. the deal for the 30—year—old could be worth up to £35 million. mane arrived at anfield from southampton in 2016. he scored 90 premier league goals for the club and helped them win the title in 2020 and the champions league the season before. there he is with the fa cup. lewis hamilton has described his current mercedes car as a disaster, adding, "nothing we seem to do seems to work," after another dismal showing in practice ahead of the canadian grand prix. hamilton has won this race
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seven times previously, but he ended the day 13th quickest, with team—mate george russell in seventh. hamilton said that mercedes just have to "tough it out" and work hard on building a better carfor next year. championship leader max verstappen was fastest in his red bull. nothing we do seems to work. we are trying different setups, much different setups. just to see if one way works, one way doesn't. can't wait to hear whether or not it was for him, but for me, it was a disaster. it is like the car is getting worse. it is getting more and more unhappy the more we do to it. i don't know, we will keep working on it and it is what it is. i think this is a car of the year. he is us accepting it for what it is. you can't do much about it. it is frustrating. the other week he
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was talking about the bouncing. and the damage can be causing into drivers as well. it doesn't seem like after last year, after the championship last year to assume you are not going to see hamilton in a race for the title. this was the year he was going to bounce back. this was the year he was going to bounce back-— this was the year he was going to bounce back. this makes sports so infuriating. — bounce back. this makes sports so infuriating, but _ bounce back. this makes sports so infuriating, but also _ bounce back. this makes sports so infuriating, but also such _ bounce back. this makes sports so infuriating, but also such a - infuriating, but also such a challenge because if you have got a car that is not working, you have to sit it out for the rest of the year. it is so fascinating, the engineering. you have the sport aside and the engineering side, which i love. i know whether bonnet on that is it. there is four wheels, i think? the other big story this weekend, a full look ahead to the showbiz final today at the end of rugby union boss was premiership season. saracens face leicester tigers at twickenham this afternoon. for the tigers, it's the end of nine barren years, which saw them fall to rock bottom. but this season they have been transformed, finishing top
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of the table, while for saracens, it marks the end of a brilliant first season, back in the top division, after they were relegated for breaching salary cap rules. we will have a full preview for you at 7:30. these two teams, over the last two years _ these two teams, over the last two years have — these two teams, over the last two years have won more titles than any other— years have won more titles than any other rugby union side each premiership. | other rugby union side each premiership-— other rugby union side each --remiershi. ., , , , ., ~ other rugby union side each ”remiershi. ., , , , ., ~' ., premiership. i have been speaking to two legends — premiership. i have been speaking to two legends as _ premiership. i have been speaking to two legends as they _ premiership. i have been speaking to two legends as they do _ premiership. i have been speaking to two legends as they do battle - premiership. i have been speaking to two legends as they do battle again. | two legends as they do battle again. it is going to be a great match. thank you. if you are planning some sort of activity today, maybe a bike ride, a run, bit of inspiration up next. i always need a boost if you're planning some exercise. setting us off the challenge of running and cycling across the united states. of course! passing through every step along the way. how far? 10,700 miles in 88 days. my
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maths is great. your maths is great. iam i am currently doing my half marathon for the day. he has already done a few hundred miles crossing america from east to west, but with a little over ten weeks for this challenge, ben smith still has more than 10,000 miles to go. two states down, another 48 to go! you have no time to spare. no. ben smith is running and cycling through every single state of america. yes, over the next six hyphenated days my way is sort of north to south. he will cover a distance the equivalent of you to antarctica. it is roughly around 135 miles on average every day which will take about 14—16 hours each day to complete. com plete. most of
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complete. most of my days will start around 3:30am. americans will take roughly between five and six hours to do, after that i will get straight on the bike and a cycle to my next location. it is a huge thing, tell me about your preparation, how do you prepare for something like this? do you know what? it has probably been the hardest thing i have ever done. and that is really saying something. six years ago, bamarang 401 and that is really saying something. six years ago, bamarang401moura bonds in 401 days. raising money for victims of bullying. this time around he is hoping to raise £100,000 to build a phone app that helps people find mental health services near them. i myself had gone through some difficult times growing up as a child, for my sexuality. that what drives me. firsthand, i know what it feels like to be at a lower slope. i wasn't aware of the support and help
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others out there, more so because i didn't have the energy to look for it. ithink didn't have the energy to look for it. i think that is the kind of what we want — we want to make these things easy for people to find. after each marathon, ben will be straight on his bike, carrying everything he needs and bags on the front and back to head off to the next us state. running and cycling through cities, up and down mountains, some areas so remote he will be miles and miles from anywhere. because of the time of year we're going because we needed to go when there's plenty of light it means that we will hit some parts of the us that are quite dangerous at certain points, such as, you know hurricane season in the south, the wildfires up in the north—west. 86 days, more than 10,000 miles, you have left no wiggle room really, can you really do that? yeah, of course i can. i have had the right people around me. we have had three and a half years to plan
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and prepare for something like this. even bears, even alligators, even snakes on a road, i will give it everything i have got. here, i've got confidence in myself. what do you do if you see a bear? i have got to be big like this! laughs. what a challenge he has set oneself. that was ben smith speaking to the bbc. it is now 6:35am. earlier this week we were able to tell you that martin hibbert has successfully reached the summit of kilimanjaro after being injured in the manchester arena attack. it goes without saying, it was growing, his scaled martin in a specially modified will chat with a group of his closest friends, medical staff and local guides and porters. the story.
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gentle string music. i wanted something that people look for, " he is doing what? !" it is hard enough for somebody with links to do it. and for me as a guy doing it in a wheelchair... it is a risk. i am putting my life on the line at doing it. one, two...
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it was such a relief to get there. just so proud, so proud. applause. thank you, thank you. good _ thank you, thank you. good job, thank you, thank you. goodjob, goodjob. hello, hello! how are you doing? i'm hello, hello! how are you doing? i'm good, — hello, hello! how are you doing? i'm good, and i've got all of our stuff as well. martin hibbert has set himself and unbelievable challenge — to climb the highest mountain in africa, kilimanjaro in a wheelchair. # in thejungle, the mightyjungle, the lion sleeps tonight. as long as i have got my chair i can do it _
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# awembawe, awembawe. martin will battle his way through desert, ice and snow to reach the summit. if you want to start ripping. it doesn't seem real, does it? all of those — it doesn't seem real, does it? all of those zoom because we have had, all of— of those zoom because we have had, all of the _ of those zoom because we have had, all of the team calls, it's mental. it's all of the team calls, it's mental. it's nearly— all of the team calls, it's mental. it's nearly three years. i got an idea! _ idea! martin is idea! — martin is climbing kilimanjaro idea! martin is climbin- kiliman'aro to martin is climbing kilimanjaro to raise money for the spinal injury association. his team includes members of the charity like ollie, stuart, a trauma nurse who helped to save martin's live. there we go, there we go. and steve, martin's best friend,
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always at his side. and remember that although we are attempting to summit, the most important thing for all of you is for you — important thing for all of you is for you to — important thing for all of you is for you to get home safely. everyone has a _ for you to get home safely. everyone has a reason — for you to get home safely. everyone has a reason to go home, and that reason _ has a reason to go home, and that reason is _ has a reason to go home, and that reason is that there is nothing on the mountain that is more important than getting you home in one piece with all— than getting you home in one piece with all of— than getting you home in one piece with all of your limbs back to your families — families. martin's family means families. — martin's family means everything to him. his wife, gabby, his mum, janice, his daughter, eve. manchester, 2017. the terror attack at and ariana grande concert killed 22 and left hundreds injured. martin and his daughter eve were less than 20 metres away from the explosion. she was sort of fairly entered, you know, at the time she was 14, she would be 20 this year, you know,
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seeing all of her friends learning how to drive, go to university, all of these things and she has been able to do that. whenever i see her with her smile on herface, the typical mentality... i want to show her that it is up to her the life that she lived, and it is up to her to do it, from the people to support her to do it. martin was hit with more than 20 pieces of shrapnel, one that severed his spinal cord leaving him paralysed from the waist down. i have always kind of wondered why we survived, being so close and things, but i think it probably kind of came to me when we saw kilimanjaro off close that it is this moment, this is the reason i survived, you know, to change perception on disability, to actually show if we embrace and celebrate disability, look at what we can do — we can literally climb mountains. so, yes, iamjust ready to smash it now, and this is where
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the journey begins, to smash it now, and this is where thejourney begins, not to smash it now, and this is where the journey begins, not ends. to get up the mountain safely, martin's team has hired a group of expert guides. they practise manoeuvring martin's trike over rough terrain.— manoeuvring martin's trike over rough terrain. fallback, that's it. the team are _ rough terrain. fallback, that's it. the team are doing _ rough terrain. fallback, that's it. the team are doing good, - rough terrain. fallback, that's it. the team are doing good, very i rough terrain. fallback, that's it. - the team are doing good, very good, picking _ the team are doing good, very good, picking it _ the team are doing good, very good, picking it up — the team are doing good, very good, picking it up very quickly, they understand what the need to do. we are going _ understand what the need to do. we are going to swap teams now, seeing how the _ are going to swap teams now, seeing how the next team. it how the next team. it is _ how the next team. it is good to do thisjust so how the next team. it is good to do this just so they get a feel for it. i know it is going to be a lot tougher than this. singing. singing and clapping.
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absolutely amazing, i'm honestly buzzing. ifeel very absolutely amazing, i'm honestly buzzing. i feel very emotional and mallay, literally two years of my life... i'm so ready for it, all of the training, the team around us, my friends, the nurses that saved my life, it's amazing, absolutely amazing. and a bit of a song and dance also i'm very warm now. see you in a bit!— you in a bit! woohoo! one, you in a bit! woohoo! one. two! _ one, two! one, - one, two! - one, two! we're one. two! — one, two! we're going to go through all emotions, article two that has been my life the last five years. the climb starts in dense rainforest. big step. ra i nfo rest. big step. left rainforest. big step. left from there and there as well. 0k. as well. ok. for the as well. ok. forthe big as well. ok. for the big step. 0k. ok. for the big step. ok. almost immediately there are
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hazards to overcome. if anybody needs to stop, just say. one, two, three. down. hang on. one, two, three. down. hang om— one, two, three. down. hang on. one, two, three. down. hanton. , , hang on. does the break come off? the break is — hang on. does the break come off? the break is off. _ the break is off. coming down and one, two, three. there we go. coming down and one, two, three. there we go— there we go. you're right, steve? yes. i'm all yes. - i'm all right. we - i'm all right. we are done! _, ., .,, i'm all right. we are done! good “ob, good 'ob. have we got fl we are done! good “ob, good 'ob. have we got any h we are done! good job, good 'ob. have we got any wd-40? i we are done! good job, good job. have we got any wd-40? the - we are done! good job, good job. - have we got any wd-40? the brakes... have we got any wd—40? the brakes... but scattered _ have we got any wd—40? the brakes... but scattered in there. one. _ but scattered in there. one, two, three. when i came up with this crazy idea and they said, get a team together, i thought, i am crazy enough to do it but who else? i'll do my best mates, the nurses that looked after me at the royal, you know, a lot of these people have seen at my worst.
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singing. sonos! everything that i wanted, you know, they wanted destroy that, so what a perfect reflection to do this with the people that saved my life. there is no better— the people that saved my life. there is no better message. _ the people that saved my life. there is no better message. chanting. i the people that saved my life. there | is no better message. chanting. he
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is no better message. chanting. he is doint is no better message. chanting. he is doing very — is no better message. chanting. he is doing very well _ is no better message. chanting. he is doing very well and _ is no better message. chanting. he is doing very well and he _ is no better message. chanting. he is doing very well and he is _ is no better message. chanting. he is doing very well and he is looking . is doing very well and he is looking forward to smashing it and according to my experience, i am sure he is going to make it to the top with the support of the strong team, great team, and he is smiling and he enjoys it. this experience is absolutely fantastic, and to see what martin is doing _ fantastic, and to see what martin is doing for— fantastic, and to see what martin is doing for people with spinal cord injuries! — doing for people with spinal cord injuries, just showing everyone how you can _ injuries, just showing everyone how you can live — injuries, just showing everyone how you can live a fulfilled life is just — you can live a fulfilled life is just inspirational, though it is great — just inspirational, though it is treat. , ., just inspirational, though it is jreat, ., just inspirational, though it is great-— one i just inspirational, though it is l great-— one of just inspirational, though it is - great-— one of my great. go, martin team! one of my shra-nel great. go, martin team! one of my shrapnel wounds _ great. go, martin team! one of my shrapnel wounds is _ great. go, martin team! one of my shrapnel wounds is rubbing. - great. go, martin team! one of my shrapnel wounds is rubbing. can i great. go, martin team! one of my. shrapnel wounds is rubbing. can you have a look at it? it shrapnel wounds is rubbing. can you have a look at it?— have a look at it? it does look a bit angry- that _ have a look at it? it does look a bit angry. that is _ have a look at it? it does look a bit angry. that is the _ have a look at it? it does look a bit angry. that is the one, - have a look at it? it does look a l bit angry. that is the one, yeah? can you just itch it really gentle?
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oh... oh, yeah!— can you just itch it really gentle? oh... oh, yeah! this is a friendship ou will oh. .. oh, yeah! this is a friendship you will never— oh... oh, yeah! this is a friendship you will never break. _ oh... oh, yeah! this is a friendship you will never break. i _ oh... oh, yeah! this is a friendship you will never break. i am - oh... oh, yeah! this is a friendship you will never break. i am filling i you will never break. i am filling in the gaps for the stuff that martin can't do for himself in effect. i would just put some sunscreen to lubricated. i am making sure his skin is good because if he ends up with pressure damage or moisture damage or sharing damage, like, that could end this whole thing in one go.— like, that could end this whole j thing in one go.- lifelong thing in one go. oh... lifelong friendships _ thing in one go. oh... lifelong friendships are _ thing in one go. oh... lifelong friendships are being - thing in one go. oh... lifelong friendships are being formed l thing in one go. oh... lifelong friendships are being formed across the board, which is fantastic stop adversity brings the sort of people — like this sort of thing out in people and it is something i will treasure and take home with me. do in or pushed down. flush treasure and take home with me. do in or pushed down.—
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the weather changes. it is cold and wet in the team are starting to struggle. thinking a lot about the people who are here. i thinking a lot about the people who are here. ., , ~ are here. i have been thinking... i have been — are here. i have been thinking... i have been thinking _ are here. i have been thinking... i have been thinking a _ are here. i have been thinking... i have been thinking a lot _ are here. i have been thinking... i. have been thinking a lot about what it means to the charity that i work for and how hard everybody has worked to get here. people with spinal cord injury are so underrepresented and so misunderstood so people can get is a generic term that you have a spinal cord injury, the biggest problem you haveis cord injury, the biggest problem you have is you can't walk. that is not true. it is your bowels, your bladder, your skin. and we advocate
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for a fulfilled life for anyone with a spinal cord injury and that is what martin's mountain is all about. to have any ribavirin? tats what martin's mountain is all about. to have any ribavirin?— to have any ribavirin? as the rain continued to _ to have any ribavirin? as the rain continued to fall, _ to have any ribavirin? as the rain continued to fall, there _ to have any ribavirin? as the rain continued to fall, there is - to have any ribavirin? as the rain continued to fall, there is a i to have any ribavirin? as the rain | continued to fall, there is a worry. martin was my best friend is in trouble. —— ibuprofin. he has altitude sickness, headaches, shortness of breath, nausea. he is advised to head back down the mountain. it advised to head back down the mountain-— advised to head back down the mountain. .,, , , ., ., , mountain. it has been my one worry, eah, mountain. it has been my one worry, yeah. gutted- — mountain. it has been my one worry, yeah, gutted. gutted _ mountain. it has been my one worry, yeah, gutted. gutted for _ mountain. it has been my one worry, yeah, gutted. gutted for him. - mountain. it has been my one worry, yeah, gutted. gutted for him. give i yeah, gutted. gutted for him. give me two minutes. look after yourself. he wanted to do this for his wife _ look after yourself. he wanted to do this for his wife who _ look after yourself. he wanted to do this for his wife who passed - look after yourself. he wanted to do this for his wife who passed away i look after yourself. he wanted to do this for his wife who passed away a . this for his wife who passed away a couple of years ago. he will be gutted.
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how is everybody this morning? i think there is a lot of trepidation in camp. that is the best way to put it. you are out of your comfort zone by good 30 metres this point. morning, ladies! i said automatically because i saw that. morning. we can just pull it through. i am going to get under your arms and pull you
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forward. one, two, three... that is better. yep, we are on. is that better? good. the go. i forgot about breakfast- — losing steve has hit the team hard, but they are determined to keep going. mountain! mountain! mountain! it is tirint. oh! mountain! mountain! mountain! it is tiring. 0h! everybody is doing a tiring. oh! everybody is doing a really, really well. this is tough. we are going at a good pace, everybody is sticking together.
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martin is now almost 15,000 feet up. he is heading to the last camp before the summit. each member of the team has their own way of keeping themselves going. i am proud of ou, keeping themselves going. i am proud of you. dad- — keeping themselves going. i am proud of you. dad- we _ keeping themselves going. i am proud of you, dad. we all— keeping themselves going. i am proud of you, dad. we all love _ keeping themselves going. i am proud of you, dad. we all love you. - keeping themselves going. i am proud of you, dad. we all love you. keep i of you, dad. we all love you. keep going. all the hard work will pay off. i love you loads. from zac. he made it for me. that is my motivation. we need to move!
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getting this far up the mountain is a remarkable achievement. martin's mountain! look _ a remarkable achievement. martin's mountain! look at _ a remarkable achievement. martin's mountain! look at what _ a remarkable achievement. martin's mountain! look at what they - a remarkable achievement. martin's mountain! look at what they can i a remarkable achievement. martin's mountain! look at what they can do | mountain! look at what they can do when they have the right help and support. they can climb mount kilimanjaro. support. they can climb mount kilimanjaro-— support. they can climb mount i kilimanjaro._ hopefully it kiliman'aro. chanting. hopefully it 'ust kilimanjaro. chanting. hopefully it 'ust shows kilimanjaro. chanting. hopefully it just shows everybody _ kilimanjaro. chanting. hopefully it just shows everybody that _ kilimanjaro. chanting. hopefully it just shows everybody that with i kilimanjaro. chanting. hopefully it just shows everybody that with the . just shows everybody that with the right help and support, disabled people can literally do anything they want to do. embrace disability and not turn their back on it. there is a long way to go but hopefully doing this has highlighted just how important help and support is. 50. important help and support is. so, congratulations. you have made it to the heart _ congratulations. you have made it to the heart. yay! just the last little challenge, a very short seven kilometre _ challenge, a very short seven kilometre hike to the summit. nice and eas . kilometre hike to the summit. nice and easy- a — kilometre hike to the summit. nice and easy. a final _ kilometre hike to the summit. i»! ca: and easy. a final team meeting. it is decided for safety reasons that the team will split up an attempt to
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get to the top in different groups. everyone has to do is find their place, don't try and keep up with people _ place, don't try and keep up with people otherwise you definitely will not get _ people otherwise you definitely will not get to the top, and if at any point _ not get to the top, and if at any point you — not get to the top, and if at any point you get tapped on the shoulder and told _ point you get tapped on the shoulder and told you need to go down the mountain. — and told you need to go down the mountain, you will be taken down the mountain _ mountain, you will be taken down the mountain if— mountain, you will be taken down the mountain. if you need help tomorrow, if you _ mountain. if you need help tomorrow, if you are _ mountain. if you need help tomorrow, if you are tired, if you are cold, if you are tired, if you are cold, it you _ if you are tired, if you are cold, it you are — if you are tired, if you are cold, if you are finding things hard, ask for help — if you are finding things hard, ask for help. there is lots of stuff we can do— for help. there is lots of stuff we can do to — for help. there is lots of stuff we can do to help you, but only if you tell us _ can do to help you, but only if you tell us so — can do to help you, but only if you tell us. , ., ., i. that is what is more important. just a short while _ that is what is more important. inst a short while later, chris starts to feel unwell. he is told to head back down. martin has now lost two key members of his team.
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assent day, and martin sets off in the dark. he is attempting to get to the dark. he is attempting to get to the top with the expert guides who have supported him all the way up. as he battles the mountain, martin is thinking about his family, his daughter, eve, his wife, abby, and his mum, janice, who died in november last year. he has brought some of her ashes to spread at the top.
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martin has made it to one of the three official summits at the top of kilimanjaro. there is the briefest celebration, some photos, and then a moment martin will never forget. brute moment martin will never forget. we have moment martin will never forget. - have died, we are at the top of kilimanjaro. my mom passed away in november, she was immensely proud. she said she would be with me and when i got the top of kilimanjaro, spread some ashes, by her favourite
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tune. we will do that now. it is the carpenters. this is for you, mum. that is a very special moment, and to play that music as well, which is a very special song, between me and my mum... i am getting emotional. sorry. love you, mum. singing. the team meet up for a
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final farewell. _ singing. the team meet up for a final farewell. it _ singing. the team meet up for a final farewell. it is _ singing. the team meet up for a final farewell. it is a _ singing. the team meet up for a final farewell. it is a joyous i final farewell. it is a joyous celebration, thank you. and they goodbye. singing. i celebration, thank you. and they goodbye. singing.— celebration, thank you. and they goodbye. singing. i said we'll come back as different _ goodbye. singing. i said we'll come back as different people _ goodbye. singing. i said we'll come back as different people and - goodbye. singing. i said we'll come back as different people and i i back as different people and i certainly will do, just the love and them just... yeah... certainly will do, just the love and themjust... yeah... iwill definitely be a different person going home, and i think everyone else will be as well.— going home, and i think everyonej else will be as well._ so, else will be as well. singing. so, thank ou else will be as well. singing. so, thank you from — else will be as well. singing. so, thank you from my _ else will be as well. singing. so, thank you from my heart, - else will be as well. singing. so, thank you from my heart, and i else will be as well. singing. so, thank you from my heart, and to. thank you from my heart, and to everybody, thank you. honestly, it has been amazing, and we have all been a team, and a bit of my heart is going to be left here, i think. yes, thank you to everybody... everybody. thank you. applause. martin. . . everybody. thank you. applause. martin... mountain! _ everybody. thank you. applause. martin... mountain! martin i everybody. thank you. applause. . martin... mountain! martin gospers
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mountain! —— martin's mountain! from a single act of violence in the 22 we lost, hundreds, maybe thousands who still pay a daily cost, that comes choirs, there comes music, there comes campaigns, there comes stories, get there come daily fights and love in all its glory. there comes martin in his wheelchair with just one thing on his there comes martin in his wheelchair withjust one thing on his mind and dream, believe, achieve, he says, and onwards, forwards, climb, and with northern mindedness and crazy as this sounds, we will raise hope and we will raise awareness and we will raise £1 million. those who sign at his lowest�*s at the very gates of hell, those who stitched him back together and said, you are
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mad. will climb as well. from base camp, this is wheelchair versus volcano. yes, it is rough and tough, but he is hurt as a claim for dignity, humanity, for all like me who say believe in us achieving, we climb mountains every day. and over rock, and over rivers and through eight and sheeting rain and through blood and sweat and fears and through sickness and through pain, over boulders, aching shoulders, something bulges. through the snow, something bulges. through the snow, something in us, deep within us, we dig in and on we go. and we made it to the summitand dig in and on we go. and we made it to the summit and united with his mum, a flag for manchester, look what i have done. for those who would divide us, who spread hatred all around, this is love can conquer
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mountains and his never coming down. and it is strong and it came to us, lift us to the top, martin, he has just started and he is never going to stop. from a single act of violence comes a simple act of love. we rise, we rise, we rise, we rise, we rise... we rise above.
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good morning, naga munchetty and ben thomas. electronically tagging migrants who arrived by boat. supermarkets and utility company should be helping with the soaring prices, according to the new cost—of—living advisor for the government. we will speak to the boss of iceland a little later. police and brazil have identified the remains of british journalist dom phillips. good morning, rory michael remains in the taste for our first major nad is one stroke off the lead in the going into round three. with the uk and talks to host next year'seurovision song contest, we look at which cities could be in the running to stage the show. good morning, after the peak of the heatwave on friday things are turning cooler and fresher across the uk. sunil around across parts of
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wales in central england. still hot and humid in the south. thunderstorms in the evening. more details on bbc breakfast. good morning, saturday, june 18. some migrants who crossed the channel and small boats are to be ever chronically tagged and a 12 month pilot scheme run by the home office. ministers say it will help maintain contact with asylum seekers who reached the uk by what it calls dangerous routes. critics fear it will treat people who fled war and persecution as criminals. simon jones reports. another busy week for the border force in the channel, more than 1000 migrants brought ashore after being picked up at sea. the government says it will seek to remove those who have passed through several safe countries before claiming asylum in the uk. and, as part of a year—long pilot scheme, some of those awaiting deportation will be fitted with electronic tags. officials say there's a greater risk that migrants facing removal will abscond.
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launching the project, the home office says, "there has been an unprecedented growth in irregular migration. "the pilot will test whether electronic monitoring "will improve and maintain regular contact with asylum claimants "who arrive in the uk via unnecessary and dangerous routes. "for those facing removal, there may be an increased risk "of absconding and less incentive to comply with any conditions "of immigration bail." the first to be tagged are set to be the asylum seekers who successfully challenged their removal to rwanda this week — the flight to kagali grounded following last—ditch legal challenges. it's not clear how many people will be tagged in the pilot projectm or how keen immigrationjudges will be to introduce electronic monitoring as part of any bail conditions. people who don't comply could be returned to detention or prosecuted. but, the refugee council says it's appalling that the government is intent on treating people who have fled war, bloodshed and persecution as criminals. simon jones, bbc news.
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the home secretary priti patel has described the ruling by the european court of human rights, which grounded the first plane due to take asylum—seekers to rwanda, as scandalous. the flight had been due to take off on tuesday night before the court intervened. in an interview with the daily telegraph, ms patel said she believed the decision had been politically motivated. supermarkets, energy companies and the leisure industry are being urged to reduce prices for customers, by the government's new cost—of—living advisor. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, david buttress called on businesses to "come to the party" and help with soaring costs over the next six months. our political correspondent, ione wells, has been speaking to him. talk to anyone on high streets up and down the uk, and everyone is thinking about the cost of living and what changes they could make. i've definitely cut down on fuel and eating out.
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be careful about how much electricity i use, but i don't think i'm cutting back that much. turning out lights and trying - to get my daughter to turn her fan off at night, and things like that. people are changing how much they buy but can't control how much goods cost. that's something the government's new cost—of—living tzar david buttress wants to change. he founded the delivery chain just eat, but will have desk here at the heart of government here. but he says his aims are not to change government policy, but to make food, utilities and leisure companies cut their costs to help consumers by the time he leaves the role in the six months' time. i want to work with the bigger industries to make sure that we help people to soften the blow of that, to make their money go further. if you think of all the the money that's spent on marketing and doing deals to promote some of the big activities that british people enjoy, well, let's take some of that money, let's refocus it onto what really matters to people which is making prices more competitive. he hasn't always been
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a fan of the government, tweeting in his past life that decades of neglect by the conservatives have been a contributing factor to child poverty. how does he feel about advising them now? you have to bear in mind that i had never met any of the team at number ten, at least of all obviously the prime minister, and i think it says everything about this government, and the prime minister, that actually they've put someone like me in place who really cares about it and wants to make a big impact in this area. what's not clear is how he will get businesses on—board and whether they will ask for anything from government in return. his ideas have been welcomed by the trades union congress, but they argue price cuts won't be enough without wages rising. anything that helps hard—pressed families, that keeps down costs is going to be welcomed, but i'm afraid these comments ignore the reality that our cost—of—living crisis is actually a wages crisis. we've had the biggest squeeze on wages in this country for 200 years. real wages are well below where they were in 2008 in real terms. and so, what we need to see from governments and also
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from employers is what they're going to going to do to do to boost the money in peoples' pockets, to boost wages and to give britain a pay rise it really needs and deserves. it really has been extremely difficult... the government has announced a package of support, including a £400 discount on energy bills in october, and payments of £650 on those on means—tested benefits. but the new advisor argues it's time for the private sector to come to the table. ione wells, bbc news. brazilian police have confirmed that the remains of one of the two bodies found in the remote amazon rainforest are those of the british journalist, dom phillips. the second body, believed to be that of indigenous expert bruno pereira, is still being examined. earlier this week, a suspect confessed to burying the bodies. his brother has also been arrested. here's our south america correspondent, katy watson. the grim news confirmed — dom phillips' family can now, in the words of his wife, ale, say goodbye to him with love.
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these are the two men as their friends and family want to remember them — dom phillips, a passionate journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travelling companion, bruno pereira, was an indigenous expert who knew the community so well and was loved by so many here. the authorities are still trying to establish whether the human remains also include those of bruno pereira. suspect amarildo da costa de oliveira confessed to the crime and lead the search teams to the place he buried the two men. a difficult location, two miles inland from the river, and they needed the help of helicopters, sniffer dogs and divers, but police said they still hadn't located the boat belonging to mr pereira, the suspect admitted he had sunk. authorities are also looking for a third suspect, jefferson de silva lima, they say he is currently on the run. the area where the two men
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disappeared as vast, remote and lawless. on the border with colombia and peru, there are illegal fishermen and coaches and drug trafficking, too. indeed, bruno's work trying to protect the indigenous communities from illegal activities made him enemies. he had been threatened in the past because of his work. police though say the investigation suggests that the suspects acted alone, not with a criminal organisation behind them. but, that was rejected by univaja, the association of indigenous communities which had taken part in the search and are calling for more to be done to find their friend bruno and his travel companion, dom. they believe it was a crime planned in detail. katy watson, bbc news. a major new round of british military training for ukrainian soldiers has been announced by the prime minister. during a surprise visit to kyiv, borisjohnson told president zelensky the aim was to train up to 10,000 soldiers every four months. we're joined now by our europe correspondent, nick beake, who's in kyiv. nick, how significant
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is this announcement? we think training would take place elsewhere, potentially in ukraine so there's always a bit of a lad between the training taking place, these expertise being given, we are told on medical help, dealing with explosives, that sort of thing, cybersecurity, always a bit of a lad between training taking place and it coming into operation on the battlefield, but it is the latest really, you know, instalment of british support for ukraine at a time in the country says it desperately needs heavy weapons in its brutal fight against russia. we know the fighting on the frontline end of the donbas, the eastern region is really, really tough. borisjohnson here in the care of yesterday, surprise visit, nobody
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was really expecting it, we managed to see him walk along the streets of kyiv, with president volodymyr zelensky. the two men walked side—by—side. president zelensky told borisjohnson that has supported an unparalleled. boris johnson said that the british people were with the ukrainian people and would give them support for as long as it takes. also, the same time, ukraine is trying to become a member of the european union so boris johnson, the person who took his country out of the eu, volodymyr zelensky wants to join the eu because he thinks in the long—term thatis because he thinks in the long—term that is a ukraine will safest, within this european union community. thank you, nick beake. we can speak now to our political correspondent, damian grammaticas, who's in our london newsroom. damian, a warm reception for borisjohnson in ukraine, but the visit meant he had to pull out of a conference with conservative mps here in the uk. he was the top billing at a conference that was happening in doncaster yesterday, organised by
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northern tory mps, representing northern constituencies. there was some disappointment that he didn't turn up there. jake berry, who had organised that, chairs the group, he said that clearly people were disappointed. henry morrison who heads the powerhouse shop partnerships that it was a missed opportunity. there were some reports that said that — there was speculation that the prime minister was reluctant to appear in front of the mps after the competence boat, but ben wallace took 220 yesterday to say it was clearly rubbish. he said these sorts of are organised and high secrecy because of the day she said russian missile attacks are still happening in ukraine, russian spying that goes on. it means they have to be secret, and important things sometimes have to be discussed face—to—face, and the prime minister wanted to go to ukraine before the nato leaders meet
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in a few days. all of those reasons, he said, were important ones when mr johnson — she said as a northern mp mr wallace, johnson — she said as a northern mp mrwallace, he johnson — she said as a northern mp mr wallace, he was proud that the kyiv. of course, but military aid that nick was talking much, that is really the issue that they wanted to discuss. thank you very much. air passengers have complained of luggage delays of two hours at heathrow airport following a technical problem. these photos were posted on social media showing hundreds of bags and cases piled up at terminal 2 yesterday. the airport has apologised, saying the malfunction has now been fixed, and staff were working to reunite passengers with their belongings. those pictures look like one of those really complicated jigsaws that you have to do, where it all looks the same. imagine being the person in charge of that. good luck! here's sarah with a look
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at this morning's weather. it has been glorious in the last couple of days if you enjoy that kind of heat. it wasn't for all of the country. it kind of heat. it wasn't for all of the country-— the country. it wasn't, good morning- — the country. it wasn't, good morning. yes, _ the country. it wasn't, good morning. yes, we _ the country. it wasn't, good morning. yes, we have i the country. it wasn't, good| morning. yes, we have seen the country. it wasn't, good i morning. yes, we have seen those temperatures building through the course of the weekend at the south, so yesterday was the peak of that heatwave across parts of england and wales. it has been different across the country. we haven't seen as very high—temperature is everywhere. high—temperatu re is everywhere. these high—temperature is everywhere. these were maximums. belfast was 18 degrees, the hottest spot was in its offer, reachingjust degrees, the hottest spot was in its offer, reaching just shy of 33 degrees. it has been very hard across parts of southern england in particular but not as hot as further south. the heatwave really intense across france in particular where yesterday it was 42 degrees in the southern france, even paris today could hit 40 degrees. really high temperatures further south. still pretty warm and muggy out in the far south—east of england, london in
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particular. this picture was taken a few hours ago as the sun was rising. temperatures in london sitting around 20 degrees, so it has been a so—called tropical night with the temperatures overnight staying at 20. you'll be pleased to hear if you don't like the heat and humidity for sleeping that things are turning cooler and fresher foremost today. some rain in the forecast but we're just holding on to that hot, humid air in the far south—east of england through the rest of today. also, a cold front moving on, introducing cooler, fresh air from the cold front moving on, introducing cooler, fresh airfrom the north, and quite a lot of cloud and epics of rain. here's the front, the franklin delano cloud stretching through the midlands and south wales, south—west england. rain developing on this front at times today and some could be heavy. the odd rumble of thunder. to the north, clearer, fresher, sunny, blustery showers coming in across the north—west where it will be windy. in the sunshine in the south—east, 27-28 in the sunshine in the south—east, 27—28 likely, not as hot as
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yesterday but still humid. also, temperatures generally in the mid—to high teens. into the evening, the band of rain will start to pack pipe as it moves to the south—east, expect thunderstorms rattling through east anglia, down towards kent, sussex through the first half of denied. the storms is for a time and after midnight we will see the next area of gundary rain living in across the channel isles, parts of the south—west coast. expect boundary downpours as the heat and humidity clear away overnight. look at the overnight temperatures — cooler and fresher than it has been recently in the south. temperatures in the north have been similar over recent months. just bad getting into single figures. tomorrow, the cooler air is across the uk. the threat of heavy showers and thunderstorms across parts of southern england. most other places dry. less breezy tomorrow compared to today. temperatures certainly won't be as warm as they happen in the south. highs ofaround warm as they happen in the south. highs of around 13—20 on a sunday.
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keeping the threat of showers towards the south, but it should be mostly dry elsewhere across the country. for the first time, deaf people who use british sign language will be able to contact 999 through a specialised video service. the new system connects users to the police, ambulance, fire and coast guard via a remote interpreter. campaigners have called it a breakthrough that will save lives. helena wilkinson reports. briony and her husband andy are both deaf. last summer, he collapsed. unable to call 999, briony drove him to a&e. at that time, i absolutely panicked, i just didn't know what to do. and i think if i'd had 909 be available back then, i would have been able to have gotten advice very quickly. i wouldn't have had the stress, i would have been able to stay calm,
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i would have known that help was coming to where we were, but obviously, it wasn't available back then. and that drive — the drive, when i was trying to drive and watching him struggling to breathe next to me, and obviously, i couldn't communicate with him, we got inside, he was struggling to breathe too much. so i know now that this 999 service is available, and it's just such a relief, i am so glad to know that other deaf people don't need to go through this experience. for the first time, 999 sign language will allow people to directly call through to an emergency video calling service, allowing them to communicate in theirfirst language, bsl, through an interpreter. this is how the new service works. the caller connects to the 999 bsl app on their mobile or online, they press the red button to make the call, that connects them to a bsl interpreter who contacts a 999 operator. the conversation is then relayed.
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your location, please. the deaf community says it is a breakthrough. what is your emergency? the app will be an absolute life changer. it has been years and years coming. deaf people have not been able to access emergency services, for years directly. they can do it through text rely, but it means you have to type, hello, this is the problem, you know, you can imagine doing that — it is 75% slower. you can imagine trying to have an emergency situation conversation and it is just not acceptable when using written english. if it is life—and—death, you need to be able to click and use your first language directly, and that is what this does so i am so pleased to see this here now. the deaf community says this is one more step forward towards equality. helena wikinson, bbc news. we are joined now by ben fletcher, who is deaf,
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and his partner lauren harris. good morning to you both. also here in the studio is british sign language interpreter, darren townsend—handscomb. he will be interpreting for ben, and you also will see in the box on your screen russell andrews interpreting for those of you at home. welcome, all. then, iwill start for those of you at home. welcome, all. then, i will start with you. this is not to you. this is a breakthrough, it is being described. in your experience, how does this change your life and how does it make you feel?— change your life and how does it make ou feel? ~ , , ,, make you feel? absolutely... i think it is ttoin make you feel? absolutely... i think it is going to — make you feel? absolutely... i think it is going to make _ make you feel? absolutely... i think it is going to make a _ make you feel? absolutely... i think it is going to make a huge _ it is going to make a huge difference to deaf people. particularly for accessing medical care and emergencies. i think it is really important that is in place. do you feel more safe now? is someone living in the community who hasn't had access to something like before? i
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hasn't had access to something like before? . ., , ., before? i certainly feel more safe. in my experience, _ before? i certainly feel more safe. in my experience, there _ before? i certainly feel more safe. in my experience, there has i before? i certainly feel more safe. in my experience, there has been | in my experience, there has been many barriers to medical care. and, for example, when lauren was pregnant with our child, there were lots of barriers to me having access and we decided to have a home birth, so that the midwife could provide more personal care and build up a relationship with us. and so what happened that night was that lauren started to have contractions, we filled up the birthing pool ready to 9°! filled up the birthing pool ready to go, and then i could see the midwife arrive... but i could see from the midwife's face that something was wrong, and i was really concerned. so i couldn't ask lauren obviously to explain because she is in the middle of contractions. and then i saw the flashing blue lights outside of the window and i could see an ambulance arrived and i was really, really worried. i was wondering whether my unborn child without risk or lauren at risk, and so i was
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asking the midwife to try and explain and i didn't have time so i ended up getting in the ambulance still not knowing what is going on. i had no idea why we were not having a home birth. no—one explained it to me. so i understand the midwife is trained to focus on the woman in childbirth, but in that situation, i literally had no idea what was happening or how much of an emergency it was, and ifelt happening or how much of an emergency it was, and i felt utterly lost when we got a hospital. it wasn't until later, luckily i have a good friend who is a qualified interpreter, was able to come to the hospital at short notice, and at that point, i was able to ask the midwife and they explained to me what had happened and said, no, the babyis what had happened and said, no, the baby is fine. it was a little concerned it was such a relief to know, and it wasjust concerned it was such a relief to know, and it was just about the waters, it is a relatively minor concern, but that is one example of the barriers and the impact it had on me. that is such an astonishing example
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of why this is so necessary, isn't it? give us a little sense of how it might work practice, what it might look like, and how available these interpreters will be when you ring 999. it interpreters will be when you ring 999. , ., ., .,, , interpreters will be when you ring 999. , . ., .,, , , . 999. it is available 24 seven, 365 da s a 999. it is available 24 seven, 365 days a year _ 999. it is available 24 seven, 365 days a year and — 999. it is available 24 seven, 365 days a year and it _ 999. it is available 24 seven, 365 days a year and it is _ 999. it is available 24 seven, 365 days a year and it is fantastic i days a year and it is fantastic because _ days a year and it is fantastic because for ambulance, police, fire and coastguard you can talk to emergency operators and get help quickly _ emergency operators and get help quickly. however, the challenge we have or _ quickly. however, the challenge we have or the — quickly. however, the challenge we have or the deaf community has, when they arrive! _ have or the deaf community has, when they arrive, you put the phone down and you _ they arrive, you put the phone down and you cannot sign, and that is the issue _ and you cannot sign, and that is the issue we _ and you cannot sign, and that is the issue we have. we have a very patchy care throughout the hospital, the antenatal— care throughout the hospital, the antenatal treatment, they wouldn't - ive antenatal treatment, they wouldn't give us _ antenatal treatment, they wouldn't give us an— antenatal treatment, they wouldn't give us an interpreter because i was the patient — give us an interpreter because i was the patient and i can sign, so they said you _ the patient and i can sign, so they said you can— the patient and i can sign, so they said you can sign for him, so that involved — said you can sign for him, so that involved me _ said you can sign for him, so that involved me with my big belly covered — involved me with my big belly covered in gel signing for ben, and we were _ covered in gel signing for ben, and we were able to have our friend come and help— we were able to have our friend come and help us— we were able to have our friend come and help us during the birth, but
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otherwise. — and help us during the birth, but otherwise, ben was there to advocate for me _ otherwise, ben was there to advocate for me if— otherwise, ben was there to advocate for me if i_ otherwise, ben was there to advocate for me if i had to have a cesarean or whatever! _ for me if i had to have a cesarean orwhatever, he for me if i had to have a cesarean or whatever, he was my partner but he wasn't _ or whatever, he was my partner but he wasn't treated as an equal partner~ _ he wasn't treated as an equal partner. the nhs is supposed to be applying _ partner. the nhs is supposed to be applying that standard about the staff had never heard of it. this was two — staff had never heard of it. this was two years after it was supposed to have _ was two years after it was supposed to have been enforced. it is diminishing. _ to have been enforced. it is diminishing. for _ to have been enforced. it : diminishing. for people in the deaf community. it is almost as if they are second—class citizens. is that how you feel? are second-class citizens. is that how you feel?— are second-class citizens. is that how you feel? you are absolutely ritht, how you feel? you are absolutely right. that _ how you feel? you are absolutely right. that is _ how you feel? you are absolutely right, that is exactly _ how you feel? you are absolutely right, that is exactly how- how you feel? you are absolutely right, that is exactly how i i how you feel? you are absolutely right, that is exactly how i felt. i right, that is exactly how i felt. and i think with the nhs, they are trying to offload responsibility for providing access, asking family, asking lauren to interpret. trying to get an agency to provide an interpreter but agencies nothing about etsi language. the nhs needs to accept responsibility for providing appropriate quality interpreters for all situations required. interpreters for all situations re . uired. ., , interpreters for all situations retuired. ., , ., , required. there have been so many cases of children _ required. there have been so many cases of children having _ required. there have been so many cases of children having to - required. there have been so many cases of children having to intrepid | cases of children having to intrepid for their deaf parents, giving
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terminal cancer diagnoses. it for their deaf parents, giving terminal cancer diagnoses. if ben wants to go _ terminal cancer diagnoses. if ben wants to go to — terminal cancer diagnoses. if ben wants to go to the _ terminal cancer diagnoses. if ben wants to go to the gp, _ terminal cancer diagnoses. if ben wants to go to the gp, it - terminal cancer diagnoses. if ben wants to go to the gp, it is easier for him _ wants to go to the gp, it is easier for him to— wants to go to the gp, it is easier for him to go with me than to wait for an— for him to go with me than to wait for an interpreter that might not be available _ for an interpreter that might not be available. we need more interpreters to be trained. it is expensive to train _ to be trained. it is expensive to train there _ to be trained. it is expensive to train. there are quite a few barriers _ train. there are quite a few barriers still to overcome. this is a fantastic— barriers still to overcome. this is a fantastic development, we are so happy— a fantastic development, we are so happy to— a fantastic development, we are so happy to see that if someone has a heart _ happy to see that if someone has a heart attack, their deaf partner can phone _ heart attack, their deaf partner can phone or— heart attack, their deaf partner can phone or if— heart attack, their deaf partner can phone or if i — heart attack, their deaf partner can phone or if i deaf person witnesses, they can _ phone or if i deaf person witnesses, they can also call and be empowered to do that _ they can also call and be empowered to do that i— they can also call and be empowered to do that. ~ ., they can also call and be empowered to do that. ~' ., ., , to do that. i think there are many deaf parents _ to do that. i think there are many deaf parents who _ to do that. i think there are many deaf parents who have _ to do that. i think there are many deaf parents who have told i to do that. i think there are many deaf parents who have told me i to do that. i think there are many. deaf parents who have told me the situations where children have been asked to interpret for them, and give them really bad news. how inappropriate is that? i would not let that happen to my three—year—old child. let that happen to my three-year-old child. , , , ., , child. then, this is 'ust a first state, child. then, this is 'ust a first stage. a h child. then, this is 'ust a first stage. a first _ child. then, this is 'ust a first stage, a first step i child. then, this isjust a first stage, a first step in - child. then, this isjust a first l stage, a first step in something that it strikes me that should have been done a very long time ago already. it is an important fourth
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stage, but what needs to happen next? = stage, but what needs to happen next? , , ., ., ., next? - the first stage. you are absolutely _ next? - the first stage. you are absolutely right. _ next? - the first stage. you are absolutely right. what - next? - the first stage. you are absolutely right. what needs i next? - the first stage. you are absolutely right. what needs to happen is they need to have procedures in place so that when someone like myself arrived at the hospital, access is provided at that point in a timely fashion. flan hospital, access is provided at that point in a timely fashion.— point in a timely fashion. can we tet some point in a timely fashion. can we get some practical details? i point in a timely fashion. can we get some practical details? tell| point in a timely fashion. can we i get some practical details? tell me what you know. how many interpreters are available how available are they? is it 24 hours? it must be. do you know about the training they receive? i can only imagine how harrowing it is to receive, beyond the end of a call with someone who is in physical, emotional distress. gently with life—threatening concerns. how much training do they have? this is different. you saw that you are seeing someone and that adds a whole other layer to being able to offer that care and advice. it is right. in terms of the training _ it is right. in terms of the training the interpreters received, they have — training the interpreters received, they have actually gone to the emergency operators to see what kind of call— emergency operators to see what kind of call they— emergency operators to see what kind of call they handle to get an experience of what the process is,
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they have — experience of what the process is, they have received additional training — they have received additional training in the handling of the trauma — training in the handling of the trauma actually of seeing whatever they might see. i know it learnt —— launched _ they might see. i know it learnt —— launched yesterday so there were a few calls _ launched yesterday so there were a few calls already and it is going to be, few calls already and it is going to be! i_ few calls already and it is going to be, i guess, a learning process because — be, i guess, a learning process because deaf people have never had access _ because deaf people have never had access to _ because deaf people have never had access to that. they have two find a hearing _ access to that. they have two find a hearing person to call on their behalt — hearing person to call on their behalf. but what we do need is more peopie _ behalf. but what we do need is more peopie to _ behalf. but what we do need is more people to learn bsl 's that will start— people to learn bsl 's that will start from primary school ideally, you do _ start from primary school ideally, you do have deaf studies degree but you do have deaf studies degree but you have _ you do have deaf studies degree but you have to— you do have deaf studies degree but you have to learn bsl from scratch very quickly. we have only got 1700 interpreters in the country, about 50 deaf _ interpreters in the country, about 50 deaf people to one interpreter. depending on where you live, you might— depending on where you live, you might have better access. we have been _ might have better access. we have been very— might have better access. we have been very lucky that we have... darren— been very lucky that we have... darren was— been very lucky that we have... darren was the intrepid at the hospital— darren was the intrepid at the hospital and he came up and worked unpaid! _ hospital and he came up and worked unpaid! 30 _ hospital and he came up and worked unpaid, 30 hours, slept on the floor to make _ unpaid, 30 hours, slept on the floor to make sure — unpaid, 30 hours, slept on the floor to make sure ben had access during
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the birth— to make sure ben had access during the birth and make sure i could focus _ the birth and make sure i could focus on — the birth and make sure i could focus on eating birth. not everybody has an— focus on eating birth. not everybody has an interpreter they can call in that situation. find has an interpreter they can call in that situation.— that situation. and the baby is fine? he is— that situation. and the baby is fine? he is fine, _ that situation. and the baby is fine? he is fine, he _ that situation. and the baby is | fine? he is fine, he is outside. that situation. and the baby is i fine? he is fine, he is outside. he is very well-behaved. _ fine? he is fine, he is outside. he is very well-behaved. learning i is very well—behaved. learning silent — is very well—behaved. learning silent |t— is very well-behaved. learning silent. ., , , is very well-behaved. learning silent. , ., , is very well-behaved. learning silent. ., , silent. it has been really good talkin! silent. it has been really good talking to _ silent. it has been really good talking to you _ silent. it has been really good talking to you both. _ silent. it has been really good talking to you both. ben i silent. it has been really good talking to you both. ben and . silent. it has been really good i talking to you both. ben and lauren, thank you so much for sharing your story and your experiences. darren, thank you somewhat for the work. you are a hero as well! russell andrews who you have seen in the box, he is in ourstudio, thank who you have seen in the box, he is in our studio, thank you very much as well. good morning. long covid is becoming a growing and under—addressed problem among children — that's the warning from scientists as new figures suggest nearly1 in 20 primary school pupils in england are living with the illness. around 26,000 children have been ill with long covid for at least a year according to the office for national statistics. our reporterjamie coulson has been to meet 11—year—old freya who has been suffering with debilitating symptoms since last october.
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this was freya before she caught coded last october, energetic, sporty and full of life. and this is her now, living with a long list of the militating symptoms which frequently leave her exalted and often in pain —— debilitating. i get often in pain -- debilitating. i get backache. — often in pain -- debilitating. i get backache, headache, _ often in pain —— debilitating. i get backache, headache, rashes, sometimes i get to notice,, tired all the time — note —— tinitus. really active, jumping around constantly. we see her does very tired. _ constantly. we see her does very tired, having to have a rest even after _ tired, having to have a rest even after going — tired, having to have a rest even after going to school for a few hours — after going to school for a few hours. ., . ., after going to school for a few hours. ., _, .,, . hours. long cove it has impacted every aspect _ hours. long cove it has impacted every aspect of _ hours. long cove it has impacted every aspect of freya _ hours. long cove it has impacted every aspect of freya bozovic i hours. long cove it has impactedj every aspect of freya bozovic life and she has missed large period of
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school. she only manages 3/2 days a week and she struggles to take part in normal activities. it is week and she struggles to take part in normal activities.— in normal activities. it is very difficult and _ in normal activities. it is very difficult and frustrating i in normal activities. it is very difficult and frustrating that. in normal activities. it is very difficult and frustrating that i | difficult and frustrating that i can't do the things that i wanted to do and that i did do before, like all my dancing and football, theatre shows. we all my dancing and football, theatre shows. ~ ., all my dancing and football, theatre shows. ., shows. we were in a boombox cycle. he has also — shows. we were in a boombox cycle. he has also been _ shows. we were in a boombox cycle. he has also been diagnosed with i he has also been diagnosed with chronic— he has also been diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome as well as lon- chronic fatigue syndrome as well as long cove _ chronic fatigue syndrome as well as long cove it. so she was going to school _ long cove it. so she was going to school for— long cove it. so she was going to school for a _ long cove it. so she was going to school for a day and then end up being _ school for a day and then end up being two— school for a day and then end up being two days in bed, three days in bed, being two days in bed, three days in bed. not— being two days in bed, three days in bed, not well enough to walk across the landing — bed, not well enough to walk across the landing because she was doing too much — the landing because she was doing too much. how are you feeling? i am a bit tired. — too much. how are you feeling? i am a bit tired. but _ too much. how are you feeling? i am a bit tired, but | — too much. how are you feeling? i am a bit tired, but i am _ too much. how are you feeling? i am a bit tired, but i am ok, _ too much. how are you feeling? i —n a bit tired, but i am 0k, thank you. a bit tired, but i am ok, thank you. she is seeing a fatigue specialist at her recovery has been slow and frustrating. it at her recovery has been slow and frustrating-— frustrating. it is 'ust hard. it is soul destroying i
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frustrating. it isjust hard. it is soul destroying a _ frustrating. it isjust hard. it is soul destroying a devastating l frustrating. it isjust hard. it is. soul destroying a devastating and frustrating. it isjust hard. it is- soul destroying a devastating and i 'ust soul destroying a devastating and i just hope _ soul destroying a devastating and i just hope for more good days and bad days _ just hope for more good days and bad days |_ just hope for more good days and bad da s. ~ ._ . just hope for more good days and bad da s. ~ , , ., , days. i think maybe nine months i will tet a days. i think maybe nine months i will get a bit _ days. i think maybe nine months i will get a bit better. _ days. i think maybe nine months i will get a bit better. after nine i will get a bit better. after nine months of having it. but... i don't know. let's talk to one of our regular gps. good morning. what are you seeing in terms of children and long covid? well, we are seeing a huge range of effects, both from covid and also from pandemic restrictions, of course, so not only new cases of children with long covid, but lots of cases with mental health problems, physical health problems. there are certainly a number of children in at the uk affected by long covid, and there is plenty of
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work to be done, that is reflected in my gp surgery. bind work to be done, that is reflected in my gp surgery-— in my gp surgery. and it is very difficult, isn't _ in my gp surgery. and it is very difficult, isn't it, _ in my gp surgery. and it is very difficult, isn't it, to _ in my gp surgery. and it is very difficult, isn't it, to define i in my gp surgery. and it is very difficult, isn't it, to define what long covid is. you can have covid, and at various points, you almost think, is this related? it is something we just think, is this related? it is something wejust don't think, is this related? it is something we just don't know about. absolutely. brand—new illness, of course, making it very difficult. if you look at what defines long covid by the official guidelines, there is a huge range of quite nebulous symptoms, very non—specific symptoms like fatigue, brain fog, aches and pains, and a lot of those factors may be overlapping with other illnesses in children, so we heard the mention of chronic fatigue syndrome, and they will be an overlap with that, they will be in overlap with that, they will be in overlap with that, they will be in overlap with post viral symptoms, there will also be an overlap with mental health problems following the restrictions in the pandemic, so it
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is very difficult to underpay, even as a doctor, healthcare professional and even as the patient yourself — is this long covid or is it not? we don't have any diagnostic tests. 50 what, if don't have any diagnostic tests. so what, if you are a parent or child concerned about this, what should you be looking out for and what should you be confident to flag to your gp, for example? well, there is a very good nhs website, actually, all about covid, covid recovery, it is called your covid recovery, it is called your covid recovery, it has all the list of symptoms there, whether it be breathing problems or aches and pains. if you think your child is suffering because, as we saw there, children should be healthy and vibrant and going to school every day. absolutely speak to your gp, say to them "do you think this could be long covid? this is the situation. " it may not be that, it
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could be something else, and it is really important. we can see that this stunting children's lives, and this stunting children's lives, and this isn't nice for them, they are very distressed and it is curbing their lives, so absolutely speak to a gp and find out what help is there. there isn't very much help at there. there isn't very much help at the moment available because we just don't know how to help these kids. an estimated 1.4 million people or one and 45 has covid, this is rising, up from one and 65 the week before. this is the latest data. why do you think these cases are rising? are you seeing a significant rise in people reporting to you? i have certainly noticed, anecdotally, in the last week or two, both in a clinic and personally. people seem to be coming
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down with covid again, this is due to one of the sub variants. we all know about omicron but there are different types of omicron, and this looks like what we call ba4 and ba5. we are seeing other parts of the world, in south africa they have already had this many ways, if you like, and it has slightly gone up, slightly gone down, and this is what a virus will do, it will mutate, it will escape some people's immune system which doesn't recognise it, and we will have some cases and then it will go down again. what is good as we haven't seen a rise in hospital admissions matching the rise in the case numbers. did hospital admissions matching the rise in the case numbers.- rise in the case numbers. did you talk to you. _ rise in the case numbers. did you talk to you, one _ rise in the case numbers. did you talk to you, one of— rise in the case numbers. did you talk to you, one of our— rise in the case numbers. did you talk to you, one of our regular i rise in the case numbers. did you l talk to you, one of our regular gps. thank you. sport time. good morning. i'm starting to believe and rory mcilroy. — i'm starting to believe and rory mcilroy, iowa whispered quietly. wouldn't — mcilroy, iowa whispered quietly.
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wouldn't it be great for him to win his first _ wouldn't it be great for him to win his first major and 80 is? i don't want _ his first major and 80 is? i don't want to— his first major and 80 is? i don't want toiinx _ his first major and 80 is? i don't want tojinx it but he has recovered from _ want tojinx it but he has recovered from getting into trouble, he is informed, _ from getting into trouble, he is informed, won the canadian covid open. _ informed, won the canadian covid open, starting to believe. i don't _ open, starting to believe. i don't think he has ever stopped believing. he i don't think he has ever stopped believinu. . , i don't think he has ever stopped believinu. ., , ., ., ., , i don't think he has ever stopped believin.. ., ., ., believing. he has a great open and then it goes _ believing. he has a great open and then it goes downhill. _ then it goes downhill. i love _ then it goes downhill. i love rory. he is such a great ambassadorfor the i love rory. he is such a great ambassador for the support. he is, it is really tired at the top of the leaderboard. the americans, joel dahmen, and colin morakawa lead the way, but rory mcilroy and darlington�*s callum tarren are still in touch. mcilroy is desperate for a major win, after eight years without one, but he got stuck in the thick brookline rough, three holes in. he did recover, to stay in touch at three under par, one shot off the lead. tarren meanwhile, is the world number 445, but he's still right up there, with a shout. at one stage he held the outright lead before falling back, he's on one under, three behind mclroy.
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imean, i i mean, i think i i mean, ithink i have i mean, i think i have to guard to the minds — i mean, i think i have to guard to the minds this weekend that i am going _ the minds this weekend that i am going to — the minds this weekend that i am going to try and win back the first agaih _ going to try and win back the first agaih i_ going to try and win back the first again. i mean, i going to try and win back the first again. i mean, lam playing as good again. i mean, iam playing as good a golf— again. i mean, lam playing as good a golf as _ again. i mean, lam playing as good a golf as i _ again. i mean, lam playing as good a golf as i have been playing and a [on- a golf as i have been playing and a tong time — a golf as i have been playing and a long time so i have a lot of experience. yes, i have won major championships and other big events, but i don't _ championships and other big events, but i don't think... just because i have _ but i don't think... just because i have done — but i don't think... just because i have done that doesn't mean that i will hit _ have done that doesn't mean that i will hit better shots. i am in a good — will hit better shots. i am in a good place, i'm really happy with where _ good place, i'm really happy with where my— good place, i'm really happy with where my game is at and i think that is the _ where my game is at and i think that is the most — where my game is at and i think that is the most important thing. so he should be- — it's the show—piece final, in rugby union's english premiership, this afternoon at twickenham. it's leicester, who dominated the season, on top of the table, against saracens, in their first season back, after promotion from the championship. they're the two most successful clubs, over the last two decades, but that doesn't tell the story of their recent troubles. i've been taking a look. for 20 english rugby's famous clubs,
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a season of redemption. lester and saracens research and once more with a chance to recapture the glory days. the tigers have found their roar again, days. the tigers have found their roaragain, last days. the tigers have found their roar again, last heard days. the tigers have found their roaragain, last heard in days. the tigers have found their roar again, last heard in the premiership final in 2013. barren years followed for the tigers, up to the applicable moment that the team, which had won seven titles up to the turn—of—the—century found themselves a rock bottom and facing relegation. it makes a turnaround under the new coach and today's return to the showpiece at twickenham all the more remarkable. , ., , ., , showpiece at twickenham all the more remarkable. , ., , ., remarkable. unbelievable, lots of us remarkable. unbelievable, lots of u -s and remarkable. unbelievable, lots of ups and downs — remarkable. unbelievable, lots of ups and downs through _ remarkable. unbelievable, lots of ups and downs through the - remarkable. unbelievable, lots of ups and downs through the years | remarkable. unbelievable, lots of. ups and downs through the years but do see the club back into a premiership final is massive. 50 premiership final is massive. so happy for our supporters, so happy for the _ happy for our supporters, so happy for the club — happy for our supporters, so happy for the club and everybody at the club, _ for the club and everybody at the club, that — for the club and everybody at the club, that the board of directors — the people — club, that the board of directors — the people who saw the club through very difficult circumstances, i am very difficult circumstances, i am very happy— very difficult circumstances, i am very happy for the players as well. ironically. — very happy for the players as well. ironically, they were only by
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saracens who went down after a massive points deduction for breaching salary cap rules. a new experience for the star players who stayed with the club and help them bounce back. i stayed with the club and help them bounce back-— bounce back. i never thought that i would no bounce back. i never thought that i would go to — bounce back. i never thought that i would go to these _ bounce back. i never thought that i would go to these away _ bounce back. i never thought that i would go to these away games, . would go to these away games, especially during covid, which exacerbated that meaning there was very little people. it was like rolling back the years to under 15, under 18. rolling back the years to under 15, under18. full rolling back the years to under 15, under 18. full respect to the championship. it was a humbling experience but i think it was good for us. 50 experience but i think it was good for us. . experience but i think it was good for us, . ,., experience but i think it was good for us. . ., , for us. so much so that in the first season back. _ for us. so much so that in the first season back, the _ for us. so much so that in the first season back, the champions - for us. so much so that in the first season back, the champions of. for us. so much so that in the first i season back, the champions of 2019 beat last season's winners, cathy maclachlan is to beat them in the final. two great clubs, plenty of success but both have come through recent troubles. so who needs this premiership title the most was drug let's battle it out between two legends. lewis moody, seven premiership titles with leicester over the years. brad barrett who has
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won the title five times with saracens. lewis, what is the case for leicester this time? you put it well. i feel of any club needed, deserted, bear in mind that the tigers and saracens were such strong competitive teams over decades. the tigers were really that early 2000 steam, when we beat them in the 2010 final, saracens kind of went on to dominate, so i feel it is only fair that the tigers nugget the opportunity lead the way. after the struggles being in the championship last year, it has been back to _ championship last year, it has been back to the — championship last year, it has been back to the old saracens, and finding — back to the old saracens, and finding a _ back to the old saracens, and finding a way to win is going to play— finding a way to win is going to play to— finding a way to win is going to play to their strengths. we have had that mantra of pounding the rock. appreciate — that mantra of pounding the rock. appreciate the journey as much as the destination, that has been the sort of— the destination, that has been the sort of ingredient and saracens. your— sort of ingredient and saracens. your back— sort of ingredient and saracens. your back i— sort of ingredient and saracens. your back i take my hat off to steve who has _ your back i take my hat off to steve who has come into the season and taken _ who has come into the season and taken leicester from absolutely rock bottom _ taken leicester from absolutely rock bottom to _ taken leicester from absolutely rock
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bottom to record, record seasons, they brought in the wake of kevin simpson. — they brought in the wake of kevin simpson, rugby league great really drives— simpson, rugby league great really drives the _ simpson, rugby league great really drives the team and creates a sense of belonging. so it is an exciting... for me as a fan it is exciting — exciting... for me as a fan it is exciting to _ exciting... for me as a fan it is exciting to go into. i exciting. .. for me as a fan it is exciting to go into.— exciting... for me as a fan it is exciting to go into. i think it will be a tiuht exciting to go into. i think it will be a tight battle _ exciting to go into. i think it will be a tight battle but _ exciting to go into. i think it will be a tight battle but in - exciting to go into. i think it will be a tight battle but in terms i exciting to go into. i think it will be a tight battle but in terms of| be a tight battle but in terms of big final experience, saracens has the edge. big final experience, saracens has the edae. ~ . big final experience, saracens has the edue.~ . ., ,, , big final experience, saracens has theedue.~ . , ., the edge. whatever happens today, the edge. whatever happens today, the two sides _ the edge. whatever happens today, the two sides have _ the edge. whatever happens today, the two sides have more _ the edge. whatever happens today, the two sides have more titles - the edge. whatever happens today, the two sides have more titles of. the two sides have more titles of the two sides have more titles of the past couple decades will certainly re—establish themselves when they feel they belong. it is going to be close! it shows the dominance of those two teams, the fact that lewis said that they have 12 titles between them over the last few decades. belinda clubs. bettie few decades. belinda clubs. battle ofthe few decades. belinda clubs. battle of the titans. _ few decades. belinda clubs. battle of the titans. thank _ few decades. belinda clubs. battle of the titans. thank you, - few decades. belinda clubs. battle of the titans. thank you, mike. . it's one of the most popular shows on earth, with 161 million people tuning in to see ukraine take the top spot this year. yes, eurovision is big business. however, despite ukraine's victory,
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the show�*s organisers have decided the event cannot be held in the country next year, because of the war. they're now in talks with the bbc, as the uk finished second, and cities have already started throwing their hats into the ring to host next year's contest. let's have a look now, at who's put their name forward. the london mayor sadiq khan tweeted that the uk capital "would welcome eurovision with open arms". scotland's first minister got in on the act too, saying, "i can think of a perfect venue on banks of the river clyde. greater manchester's night—time economy adviser sacha lord was also keen. in wales the labour mp kevin brennan pushed for the event to be held in cardiff. he said, "clearly eurovision should be held at the principality stadium cardiff with 70,000 party—goers — no brainer." and leeds is also keen. a statement from the council
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there said: "it goes without saying that leeds will be bidding to host eurovision in 2023." so which city has the best chance? let's speak to the tv critic, scott bryan. good morning. good morning. first, good morning. first, let's good morning. first, let's clarify good morning. first, let's clarify first, let's clarify the good morning. first, let's clarify the rules. ukraine still wants to host it. and this is the ebu saying that they don't think it is actually possible. i suppose, that they don't think it is actually possible. isuppose, all of that they don't think it is actually possible. i suppose, all of these potential host cities in the uk are saying, we would like it to be in ukraine but if it can't be, let's haveitin ukraine but if it can't be, let's have it in my city instead. that is the case? that is very much the case. the european broadcasting union, they call the shots and decide what is going to be happening next. it is notjust down to the concerns that they have in regards to it not being in ukraine, it is the security but also the sheer scale of putting on of the eurovision song contest. it is one of the largest live television
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events in the world, also one of the most complicated. i think only events that are bigger in terms of having a live captive audience are essentially the olympics and maybe the super bowl. the scale of it but also the security of it is a big concern, so in terms of the city in the uk that would be potentially taking it over, it needs to have the infrastructure. it needs to have the size of the delegations, it also needs a stage that could essentially allow our long, big, sizeable team to go in and completely and utterly fulfil it and essentially have six weeks to get out the entire stadium. so it isn'tjust the tourists in the place, it is also whether they can even have it at capacity, because it is only when you go to eurovision and you see the size and scale — that she was a massive stadium — that she was a massive stadium — that you actually see how massive it is. because people who just watched the
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final, you know, you can look at it as a huge pop concert but there are so many people, whether it is for earlier rounds, the visitors, the hotels, the entourage, the catering — it is everything that goes with it. it is a huge machine. it. it is a hue machine. , . it is a huge machine. it is, and it takes over— it is a huge machine. it is, and it takes over an _ it is a huge machine. it is, and it takes over an entire _ it is a huge machine. it is, and it takes over an entire city, - it is a huge machine. it is, and it takes over an entire city, and - it is a huge machine. it is, and it takes over an entire city, and it i takes over an entire city, and it also has all of the previous winners attend. it is unlike anything. it is pretty much the case that when you go to it you are quite overwhelmed by the sheer scale of it. it is because the last time another country stepped in when a country couldn't host was back in the 1980s, 41 years ago when israel couldn't host it for a second consecutive year. i think what has changed in that time is that it has become an awful lot bigger. of course, the last time the uk hosted was in birmingham, 1998. that was a very big tv event butjust in one room. now we would have to pretty much
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close of entire parts of the city, so i think of all the bids that would be put forward by various cities that would have to be taken to consideration, and you have already seen some of the example of proposals, such as the one from leeds, highlighting that they already have a stadium that could be enclosed for six weeks, but also different cities pointing the links to airports, pointing to how much spare space they have in terms of having hotels. it is literally down to whether they would be able to have the amount of people, and quickly — this is only 11 months away. quickly - this is only 11 months awa . r , �* ., , ., away. and it isn't only at the battle of _ away. and it isn't only at the battle of the _ away. and it isn't only at the battle of the cities, - away. and it isn't only at the battle of the cities, it - away. and it isn't only at the battle of the cities, it is - away. and it isn't only at the battle of the cities, it is the | battle of the cities, it is the broadcasters as well, and the bbc made a statement saying that, you know, it will be in discussions to think about how to broadcast this. where does that go? this think about how to broadcast this. where does that go?— think about how to broadcast this. where does that go? this is a really interestin: where does that go? this is a really interesting circumstance _ where does that go? this is a really interesting circumstance because i interesting circumstance because putting on a eurovision song contest certainly isn't cheap, it cost
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between 1000 20 million euros. tickets i can certainly help. the bbc�*s tickets i can certainly help. the bbc�*s unique circumstances that it wasn't the winner — because they are doing it on behalf of ukraine so they might be some help from elsewhere in regard to this. i guess the uk government would want to show solidarity with ukraine so might be able to help as well, but at the time, at this moment bbc hasjust announced that to happen year license fee freeze, they have announced services such as the sports channel and cbbc channel will be moving online over the next two years. i think having the world's biggest live tv event went potentially up to 200 million people now crossed on them as a circumstance where they are probably thinking, no thank you! but, also, knowing that it would put them on to the world stage. the bbc, of course, is hugely internationally respected, they have the cruise that could pull it off well, so there is a bit of a balancing act. what was quite funny and interesting is that during the
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commentary, the actual night, they were going ahead with the jury about nortonjones, somebody at were going ahead with the jury about norton jones, somebody at the were going ahead with the jury about nortonjones, somebody at the bbc is getting nervous. isuppose nortonjones, somebody at the bbc is getting nervous. i suppose right now somebody at the bbc is getting nervous, do something about whether they could pull this off! lovely to see you as always. thank you so much. we'll be talking to eurovision's last uk winner, katrina from katrina and the waves, just before 9:00. we are looking forward to that. i can't wait. i have the song in my head already. now on breakfast, it's time for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. how has the new—look studio for the news at six, the news at ten, gone down with viewers? we'll discuss whether this week's revamp adds anything or gets in the way ofjournalism. work on it has been
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going on under wraps for a few months. but on monday night, the new—look studio for the news at six and the news at ten was unveiled. tonight at ten: a special report from the front line as russian forces tighten their grip on eastern ukraine. several differences could be spotted immediately. firstly, the size of the new studio, which means a lot more walking for the presenter from one side of the set to the other. this concerned carol latham. clive bennett agreed. and richard wondered:
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and steve brown recorded this video for us with his reaction to the changes. just my own opinion, but the new studio b seems to be over lavish and tawdry. sophie looks as though she's in isolation. the weather presenters look as though they are lost. and why is the flooring on different levels? is it because they needed to put in curbing? all in all, a complete waste of valuable funds. there's certainly a lot going on here — a spiral staircase, a large, vertical screen used for imagery, and an even bigger screen where a correspondent can explain the background to a story, speak to the presenter either in person or down the line, or we can have some detailfrom the presenter him or herself. these explainers aren't new, of course, but are now being done on a bigger scale than before,
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and they fail to impress oldman wood, who recorded this message on the newswatch phone line. huw edwards was in discussion with faisal islam. neither man was actually talking to the camera and so neither of them were actually addressing the viewer. this made it appear like a private conversation that we were intruding on. earlier, huw edwards had been talking about the northern ireland protocol whilst stood with the wall display. what we need to focus on of course is the border between northern ireland and the republic of ireland which, just let's repeat and underline, is in the european union. the material, when presented, was dumbed down to a level that would assume that the viewer was not aware that northern ireland was even actually part of the uk. that's bbc news at ten... finally, huw edwards now seems to be obliged to finish his bulletins by traipsing across the studio,
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down one step and then up another, talking as he goes. what a pointless exercise is this, and how long is it going to be before huw accidentally trips on one of the little steps and goes flat on his face? that will make the news, i suppose. thank you for watching and goodnight. the big screen also features at the end of each bulletin with an appearance from all the regional news presenters before their own half—hour bulletins, but the news didn't automatically continue for many viewers, who instead saw this, because regional news still can't be seen in high definition. that's now promised for next year, but mark powlett was unimpressed. weather presenters are also in the new studio
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making use of a screen twice the size of what they had before. then that heat coming in from the south... david smith's reaction: there were also some compliments for the studio revamp, including this from jayagopal nair: matt webb had a positive reaction too, but his also came with a request. the new—look studio b looks absolutely brilliant, it certainly brings new dynamics to the news at six
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and news at ten on bbc one. the surrounding branding hasn't been updated, though, that's been in use since 2008. is there any news as to when the branding will be updated and will be evolved as well? well, plenty of points to put to paul royall, the editor of the bbc�*s news at one, six, and ten. hejoins me now down he joins me now down the line. a new set, but the same titles and branding since 2008. why didn't you just do them all together? one of the things we wanted to achieve with a new set is sort of evolution, not revolution, and so, clearly, the branding is the same. we've updated the set and the physical surrounding, but we didn't want to sort of rupture with the past. the branding is known around the world, and so what we've tried to achieve is, as i say, evolution, not revolution, as we update and sort of look more modern going forward. mm, you say you want to look more modern. could you sum up what was the point of this revamp? we've been in our current
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studio for nearly ten years, and like anything, whether it's a tv studio, a house, a car, at some point, they need an upgrade and we were going to have to do this whether we stayed in the studio we have been using, or whether we moved to the studio, which, remember, is an existing studio within broadcasting house, and so the big driver was if you think that, a, there isjust the passing of time, but also, so much has changed, technology has changed, we needed new screens, for example, and so whatever happened, we were going to be doing this. the new set isn't connecting too well with the audience, though, is it? they say it's too big and it looks it. well, first of all, it's great to have feedback and we welcome feedback, and, like any sort of project or change project, the implementation is really important and we'll listen to all this feedback. we're evolving and iterating as we go. i think the other thing you have to remember is this studio is for the six and ten o'clock news, but it's also going to be used by bbc london,
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it's also going to be used by laura kuenssberg's sunday morning programme, which will start in september, and it will also be the home for all our big political programmes, election night, those sort of things, so it's fulfilling a variety of purposes for a variety of programmes and so it needs to have that flexibility and versatility inherent in it. having said that, i think it works really, really well for the six and ten o'clock news. do you think the explainers you're clearly doing more of, many viewers think they are excessively dumbing down. yeah, well, i would obviously really dispute that. we know from audience research and audience feedback there is a real desire to understand the news more deeply, and that sometimes people find the news alienating because sometimes the density of it, so, for example, the northern ireland protocol, which you're probably referring to, which we explained on monday night, is a very, very dense, difficult subject to explain in a minute or two,
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and so, we did it very, very well and it's a tough subject and i think it was really clear and there's no evidence of dumbing down at all. do you think there's an inherent dilemma in trying to attract new viewers to bulletins when loyal viewers, like the one who complained and said telling us that northern ireland is in the uk is dumbing down, is that a problem for you? i don't think so, because i don't really accept that charge, to be honest. the programmes this week have been full of all the usual world—class journalism, impartialjournalism, that bbc news is known for, whether it's orla guerin, steve rosenberg, chris mason, faisal islam on the current economic situation in the uk and around the world, so i don't really accept that charge. obviously, we are trying to refresh, modernise, evolve the programmes. and fantastic if we can bring in new viewers or people who are only occasional television news viewers, that would be fantastic.
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but i think what we have here is a much bigger and better, impactful news programme for all our audiences. viewers are really noticing the amount of walking. stepping off once step, walking across the studio floor, up another step. it's clearly distracting them and they don't think it's for them, so who is it for? i think, first of all, some viewers may be finding it distracting, but not all viewers, and again, it'sjust to produce a bit more energy and a greater dynamic into the programmes. equally, in the past, when presenters have sat behind a desk for the whole programme, we've had charges of the desk feeling like a barrier between the programme and the presenter, so what we are trying to do is explore ways in which we can perhaps bring a little bit more engagement and interactivity with the studio and the set, which we think will be better for the programme and, ultimately, and, most importantly,
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betterfor the audience. you'll know that newspapers are reporting this set cost £5 million, so they put in a freedom of information request and have not had a response yet. was it a wise use regardless of licence fee money when the bbc is cutting journalists' jobs? like i said at the beginning, we were going to have to spend money one way or the other because everything needed an upgrade, whether it's staying in an old studio or moving into a new studio, we needed to spend money. everything at the bbc, everything that's spent goes through a really rigorous value—for—money process. as i explained earlier, this studio is being used for a variety of programmes and is part of a wider upgrade of all our television news studios so that we are modernised and fit for audiences for the next ten years, having been served very, very well by our current studios for the last ten years. paul royall, thank you so much for coming on and taking viewers' questions there. thanks for all your comments this week. if you want to share your
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opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news on tv, radio, online or social media, e—mail: or you can find us on twitter. you can call us: and do have a look at previous interviews on our website. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye.
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good morning. welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. our headlines today... asylum seekers who cross the channel in small boats are to be electronically tagged under a new home office pilot scheme. supermarkets and utility companies should be helping people struggling with soaring prices, according to the government's new "cost of living" adviser — we'll be speaking to the boss of iceland later. police in brazil say they have identified the remains of the british journalist, dom phillips. good morning. breathing down the necks of the leaders — rory michael roy continues his charge at the us open, just one shot off night the lead —— rory mcilroy.
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as he chases his first major in eight yearsgoing into, the third round. with the uk in talks to host next year's eurovision song contest, we talk to the last uk winner katrina and the waves about what it takes to stage such a show. good morning. after the peak of the heatwave on friday, things are gradually turning colder and fresher across the uk today. some rain around across parts of wales and central england. still hot and humid in the south, and we could see some thunderstorms into this evening. i'll have all your details here on bbc breakfast. good morning. it's saturday, the 18th ofjune. now, some migrants who cross the channel in small boats are to be electronically tagged — in a 12—month pilot scheme run by the home office. ministers say it will help maintain contact with asylum seekers who reach the uk by what it calls dangerous routes. critics fear it will treat people who have fled war and persecution as criminals. simonjones reports.
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another busy week for the border force in the channel — more than 1000 migrants brought ashore after being picked up at sea. the government says it will seek to remove those who have passed through several safe countries before claiming asylum in the uk. and, as part of a year—long pilot scheme, some of those awaiting deportation will be fitted with electronic tags. officials say there's a greater risk that migrants facing removal will abscond. launching the project, the home office says, "there has been an unprecedented growth in irregular migration. "the pilot will test whether electronic monitoring "will improve and maintain regular contact with asylum claimants "who arrive in the uk via unnecessary and dangerous routes. "for those facing removal, there may be an increased risk "of absconding and less incentive to comply with any conditions "of immigration bail." the first to be tagged are set to be the asylum seekers who successfully challenged their removal to rwanda this week — the flight to kagali grounded following last—ditch legal challenges. it's not clear how many people will be tagged in the pilot project, or how keen immigrationjudges
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will be to introduce electronic monitoring as part of any bail conditions. people who don't comply could be returned to detention or prosecuted. but the refugee council says it's appalling that the government is intent on treating people who have fled war, bloodshed and persecution as criminals. simon jones, bbc news. the home secretary priti patel has described the ruling by the european court of human rights — which grounded the first plane due to take asylum—seekers to rwanda — as "scandalous". the flight had been due to take off on tuesday night before the court intervened. in an interview with the daily telegraph, ms patel said she believed the decision had been politically motivated. supermarkets, energy companies and the leisure industry are being urged to reduce prices for customers, by the government's new cost—of—living advisor. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, david buttress called on businesses to "come to the party" and help with soaring costs
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over the next six months. our political correspondent, lone wells, has been speaking to him. talk to anyone on high streets up and down the uk, and everyone is thinking about the cost of living and what changes they could make. i've definitely cut down on fuel and eating out. being careful about how much electricity i use, but i don't think i'm cutting back that much. turning out lights and trying - to get my daughter to turn her fan off at night, and things like that. people are changing how much they buy but can't control how much goods cost. that's something the government's new cost—of—living tzar david buttress wants to change. he founded the delivery chain just eat, but will have desk here at the heart of government here. but he says his aims are not to change government policy, but to make food, utilities and leisure companies cut their costs to help consumers by the time he leaves the role in the six months' time. i want to work with the bigger industries to make sure that we help
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people to soften the blow of that, to make their money go further. if you think of all the the money that's spent on marketing and doing deals to promote some of the big activities that british people enjoy, well, let's take some of that money, let's refocus it onto what really matters to people which is making prices more competitive. he hasn't always been a fan of the government, tweeting in his past life that decades of neglect by the conservatives have been a contributing factor to child poverty. so how does he feel about advising them now? you have to bear in mind that i had never met any of the team at number ten, at least of all obviously the prime minister, and i think it says everything about this government, and the prime minister, that actually they've put someone like me in place who really cares about it and wants to make a big impact in this area. what's not clear is how he will get businesses on—board and whether they will ask for anything from government in return. his ideas have been welcomed by the trades union congress, but they argue price cuts won't be enough without wages rising. anything that helps hard—pressed families, that keeps down costs
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is going to be welcomed, but i'm afraid these comments ignore the reality that our cost—of—living crisis is actually a wages crisis. we've had the biggest squeeze on wages in this country for 200 years. real wages are well below where they were in 2008 in real terms. and so what we need to see from governments and also from employers is what they're going to going to do to boost the money in peoples' pockets, to boost wages and to give britain a pay rise it really needs and deserves. it really has been extremely difficult... the government has announced a package of support, including a £400 discount on energy bills in october, and payments of £650 on those on means—tested benefits. but the new advisor argues it's time for the private sector to come to the table. lone wells, bbc news. brazilian police have confirmed that the remains of one of the two bodies found in the amazon rainforest are those of the british journalist, dom phillips. the second body — believed to be that of indigenous expert bruno pereira — is still being examined. earlier this week, a suspect confessed to burying the bodies.
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his brother has also been arrested. here's our south america correspondent, katy watson. the grim news confirmed — dom phillips' family can now, in the words of his wife, ale, say goodbye to him with love. these are the two men as their friends and family want to remember them — dom phillips, a passionate journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travelling companion, bruno pereira, was an indigenous expert who knew the community so well and was loved by so many here. the authorities are still trying to establish whether the human remains also include those of bruno pereira. suspect amarildo da costa de oliveira confessed to the crime and lead the search teams to the place he buried the two men. a difficult location, two miles inland from the river, and they needed the help of helicopters, sniffer dogs and divers, but the police said that they still hadn't located the boat belonging to mr pereira
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that the suspect admitted he'd sunk. authorities are also looking for a third suspect, jeferson da silva lima. they say he's currently on the run. the area where the two men disappeared is vast, remote and lawless. on the border with colombia and peru, there are illegalfishermen and poachers and drug trafficking too. indeed, bruno's work trying to protect the indigenous communities from illegal activities made him enemies. he'd been threatened in the past because of his work. police, though, say the investigation suggests the suspects acted alone, not with a criminal organisation behind them. but, that was rejected by univaja, the association of indigenous communities, which had taken part in the search and had been calling for more to be done to find theirfriend bruno and his travel companion, dom. they believe it was a crime planned in detail. katy watson, bbc news.
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a major new round of british military training for ukrainian soldiers has been announced by the prime minister. during a surprise visit to kyiv, borisjohnson told president zelensky the aim was to train up to 10,000 soldiers every four months. we're joined now by our europe correspondent, nick beake, who's in kyiv. good morning. nick — how significant is this announcement? good morning, ben. yes, the prime minister's _ good morning, ben. yes, the prime minister's second visit to ukraine since the war began. president zelensky— since the war began. president zelensky told him his support for ukraine — zelensky told him his support for ukraine had been unparalleled and this was— ukraine had been unparalleled and this was a — ukraine had been unparalleled and this was a visit that came just 24 hours _ this was a visit that came just 24 hours after— this was a visit that came just 24 hours after other european leaders came _ hours after other european leaders came here, — hours after other european leaders came here, the french, german, romahian— came here, the french, german, romanian and italian leaders are here to _ romanian and italian leaders are here to show their solidarity. in terms _ here to show their solidarity. in terms of— here to show their solidarity. in terms of this offer of military support— terms of this offer of military support it looks like it will be training _ support it looks like it will be training. the idea, as you say, 10,000 — training. the idea, as you say, 10,000 troops would be trained every 120 days. _ 10,000 troops would be trained every
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120 days. so _ 10,000 troops would be trained every 120 days, so every four months. and it would _ 120 days, so every four months. and it would give — 120 days, so every four months. and it would give medical expertise, expertise — it would give medical expertise, expertise and cyberattacks, and also dealing _ expertise and cyberattacks, and also dealing with explosives, is detailed stuff _ dealing with explosives, is detailed stuff at _ dealing with explosives, is detailed stuff. at the moment it is on offer and i— stuff. at the moment it is on offer and i am _ stuff. at the moment it is on offer and i am sure the cranes will be grateful— and i am sure the cranes will be grateful and think about what could be done _ grateful and think about what could be done. worth making the point that this won't— be done. worth making the point that this won't make an instant change of the boris _ this won't make an instant change of the borisjohnson said in the long term _ the borisjohnson said in the long term it _ the borisjohnson said in the long term it could be a game changer. we will have _ term it could be a game changer. we will have to _ term it could be a game changer. we will have to see about that. worth stressing — will have to see about that. worth stressing all of this takes time. peopte — stressing all of this takes time. people need to be trained up first of alt _ people need to be trained up first of alt in — people need to be trained up first of all. in the here and now what they— of all. in the here and now what they are — of all. in the here and now what they are saying, the ukrainians, they— they are saying, the ukrainians, they are — they are saying, the ukrainians, they are grateful for all of this political— they are grateful for all of this political support, the flow of activity. _ political support, the flow of activity, leaders coming here, but it is really— activity, leaders coming here, but it is really heavy weaponry that needs — it is really heavy weaponry that needs to — it is really heavy weaponry that needs to be coming here to the country— needs to be coming here to the country so _ needs to be coming here to the country so it can be moved out of the front — country so it can be moved out of the front line on the donbas region, where _ the front line on the donbas region, where they— the front line on the donbas region, where they are in the middle of this really— where they are in the middle of this really intense fighting with the russians and they say at the moment, the ukrainians, they are massively outgunned — the ukrainians, they are massively outgunned by the russians. thanks very much. — outgunned by the russians. thanks very much. nick— outgunned by the russians. thanks very much, nick beake _ outgunned by the russians. thanks very much, nick beake there - outgunned by the russians. thanks very much, nick beake there in - outgunned by the russians. thanks. very much, nick beake there in kyiv. we can speak now to our political correspondent, damian grammaticas, who's
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in our london newsroom. good morning to you. damian, a warm reception for borisjohnson in ukraine, but the visit meant he had to pull out of a conference with conservative mps here in the uk... missing out on this in the uk hasn't gone down entirely well... yes. missing out on this in the uk hasn't gone down entirely well. . .- gone down entirely well... yes, he was the top _ gone down entirely well... yes, he was the top billing _ gone down entirely well... yes, he was the top billing at _ gone down entirely well... yes, he was the top billing at a _ gone down entirely well... yes, he was the top billing at a conference | was the top billing at a conference organised in doncaster by tory mps representing northern constituencies. jake berry, who leads that, had organised this and said there were 30 members, 30 colleagues, 400 members, in attendance at that conference who were expecting the prime minister to give a sort of main address in the afternoon and only discovered during the day that he was actually heading to kyiv instead. so there were reports there was some disappointment. mr berry said clearly people were disappointed and the director of the northern powerhouse partnership, henry morrison, said it was a missed opportunity. but a couple of reports claiming that perhaps there were mps
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or one or two mps grumbling, saying did mrjohnson missed this because he didn't want to come face—to—face with backbench mps after that no—confidence vote he had? was he trying to avoid that? of course the government says no. ben wallace the defence secretary has come out and talked about this as being nonsense, he said it's really important the prime minister should have gone to kyiv, that these events, trips like that, are arranged in secrecy for lvs reasons and there were important issues to discuss. the prime minister wanted to do it ahead of the nato summit in a few days' time. thank you, damian grammaticas there for us. a new service has been launched to help deaf people contact the emergency services. for the first time, users will be able to video call 999 and communicate with operators using british sign language. the service is free to use
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and operates 24 hours a day, seven days a week. campaigners have called it a "breakthrough that will save lives". 37 years after it was first released, kate bush's song running up that hill has reached number one in the uk singles chart. # i'll be running up that road, running up that hill # be running up that building # be running up that building # ifi # be running up that building # if i only could... #. it comes after the song featured in the netflix hit tv series stranger things, introducing kate bush's music to a whole new generation of fans. the song had previously made it to number three in the uk charts in 1985. it is one of those songs when where you say the title you have to say it in the internation it is some way sung. running up that hill. you wouldn't say it... —— in the intonation it was some way am i thought you were going to sing it! we don't do that, we, sarah? no, we
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run up that hill. laughter that is a glorious view. if you were there yesterday i would imagine it was exactly the picture you would have had. where is it? let's be clear, not all of the country had the hot weather and not everyone likes it. that is absolutely right, yes. good morning. this is this morning in fife actually and they have had some cooler air across the region for a couple of days now is beautiful scenes like this, blue skies, lots of sunshine but not the heat and humidity we had further south. but the heat wave in the south has now piqued. yesterday these were the maximum temperatures we saw across parts of england and wales. santon downham, 33 celsius, really hot for this time of year, well above average for much of england and wales. but it was cooler in the north for scotland and northern ireland, belfast sat at 18 yesterday. this is the picture today in fife, as i was saying. cleaner and fresher conditions. little fairweather cloud and i could be a few showers. the cooler air is
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sinking south so for much of the uk it is turning cooler. not everywhere. still the hot and humid air holding on in the south—east but where there are two there is rain in the forecast as well. this will be stalling across the central slice of england and wales. the low pressure to the north is bringing the fresher air but also some brisk winds across western scotland in particular. quite breezy, sunshine and just a few showers in the far north. lots of sunshine for northern england. further south we have that fronts are outbreaks of rain in lincolnshire, east anglia, stretching towards wales and perhaps the south—west of england at times where it will be quite murky. but in the south—east sunny spells lasting through the day, temperatures 27 or 28 degrees so still pretty muggy and hot. a real contrast in terms of the rest of the uk where we are looking at generally the mid to high teens. into the evening hours, as this starts to push back south which we will see it becoming quite heavy and thundery. thunderstorms these ——
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this evening and tonight in east anglia, kent, sussex, london. they will easily later in the night then the next batch of thunderstorms total sin. the channel islands and coastal parts of devon towards the isle of wight starting off your sunday morning. as the front has cleared towards the south, thankfully, if it has been a bit hard to get to sleep over the past few nights, looking cooler and fresher overnight tonight. in fact down into single figures to start off your sunday morning in some places. still a few showers and perhaps the odd thunderstorm on sunday in parts of southern england but the rest of the uk is predominantly dry and bright with sunny spells. still breezy across southern scotland, northern ireland and through the english channel but not as windy tomorrow compared to today. temperatures somewhere around 13 - 20 today. temperatures somewhere around 13 — 20 degrees on sunday. this keep showers lingering into the evening hours across the south but most places looking dry into the evening. a quick look at next week and
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certainly not as hot as the week we have just seen, looking at high teens in the north, possibly the low to mid 20s, though, further south. ben and naga. that feels a little more normal after those crazy temperatures we have had. sarah, thank you. 18 minutes past eight. good morning. a new device designed for people living with tourette's syndrome is being described as a "game—changer" by campaigners. the wearable gadget aims to reduce the involuntary sounds and movements, known as tics, by intercepting signals to the brain. it's currently being tested in a uk—wide clinical trial. our reporter navtej johal has been finding out more. 13—year—old milo loves drumming, drama and defeating his enemies in video games. four years ago, he was diagnosed with tourette's syndrome. his mum says at the time she was devastated. he sort of goes through a period
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of sort of grief, if i'm honest, you know, you get a diagnosis that you don't know much about. i didn't know anything about it. and, you know, you're scared and you're worried and you're like, "what's going to happen?" when i was diagnosed, ithought, oh, god, what am i going to do? i'm going to be bullied for this. i feel like just shortly after that, i think, on that front, it doesn't change anything about like who you are as a person, your personality. so as long as you are a good person, people will be nice to you. tourette's is a neurological condition which usually starts in childhood and causes a person to make involuntary movements and sounds known as tics. if i do tic, i find i tic, i do _
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it is, like, very shortly after. it will come on stronger and more above them. are you trying to suppress a tic right now? yeah, i have to be honest, because when you're talking about it, this is certainly worse. not everyone is able to suppress their tics. milo and his mum are happy for us to show what his tics can look like when they've been building up without release. he says they're not painful. it's easier to do them than to hold them off. but if i'm at school or something, like, i'm not going tojust do them because they'll be embarrassing in class and i can leave class. i have a card or i can, like, go to the loo and i can do it there. although symptoms usually improve after several years, there is no cure for tourette's. ok, so this is the - prototype device that we've built for- the clinical trial... but this little device
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could help to change the life of milo and the estimated more than 300,000 people in the uk with the condition. it's been developed at the university of nottingham. by stimulating that nerve we're able i to change the activity in the brain i |areas associated with producing j ticks so we can press the button and for a period of time reduce the likelihood their tics - iare going to occur without side i effects, without adverse events, without having to travel to get treatment. - so it's a massive game—changer. you! the university has now started a national trial to study the effectiveness of the device. the demand to be involved has been overwhelming. it's been extremely successful. so it's benefited probably around 70% of the people in the trial. i they have seen a marked improvement. i get emails every single day- from all over the world from people asking either can they buy- the device now or can they take part in the clinical trial. i've even had people willing to relocate from the usa, i from singapore, from australia, to the uk for the purpose - of participating in the trial.
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soon milo will be one ofjust135 people to take part in the trial. the group testing the device will use it daily for a month, with everyone giving weekly feedback. if it works, it'll be really good because it'll mean i can do those things i haven't been able to do before. i'll be able to experience that childhood magic — it will be amazing. it will be life changing for so many people, so it's brilliant to get the opportunity to be part of it. the trial will last until the end of the year and the hope is that within a few years the device may be available for wider public use. milo says he's looking forward to hopefully playing a small part in helping others like him. navteonhal, bbc news. we can speak more about this now
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with the chief executive of tourette's action, emma mcnally. fascinated by this device. and i know you have worn it to see what it feels like. you have a sun who has two rett syndrome. what does it feel like? my first question —— who has tourette's syndrome. like like? my first question -- who has tourette's syndrome. like impulses auoin u- tourette's syndrome. like impulses going up your _ tourette's syndrome. like impulses going up your wrist _ tourette's syndrome. like impulses going up your wrist and _ tourette's syndrome. like impulses going up your wrist and you - tourette's syndrome. like impulses going up your wrist and you can - tourette's syndrome. like impulses going up your wrist and you can feel it continually going up your arm. uncomfortable? it it continually going up your arm. uncomfortable?— uncomfortable? it felt slightly uncomfortable _ uncomfortable? it felt slightly uncomfortable to _ uncomfortable? it felt slightly uncomfortable to me - uncomfortable? it felt slightly uncomfortable to me but - uncomfortable? it felt slightly uncomfortable to me but i - uncomfortable? it felt slightly i uncomfortable to me but i don't uncomfortable? it felt slightly - uncomfortable to me but i don't have tourette's so i don't deal with tics every day so it is a different feeling than someone would have who has tourette's. you feeling than someone would have who has tourette's-— has tourette's. you obviously speak to --eole has tourette's. you obviously speak to people and _ has tourette's. you obviously speak to people and families _ has tourette's. you obviously speak to people and families who - has tourette's. you obviously speak to people and families who have - to people and families who have tourette's syndrome and you see how life is impacted. how could this change someone's life? it life is impacted. how could this change someone's life? it could be a name change someone's life? it could be a game changer _ change someone's life? it could be a game changer because _ change someone's life? it could be a game changer because we _ change someone's life? it could be a game changer because we hear- change someone's life? it could be a game changer because we hear fromj game changer because we hear from adults who have tourette's and they said, if a cure came out i wouldn't necessarily want a cure because i have lived with this my whole life and it is now a part of me, but then in situations where things are really bad they would then want something to be able to control the tics, because people don't often see
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the pain associated with tourette's, so the amount of pain you're in, and to say if i hurt my arm i would start moving my arm, but if you have tourette's, even if you have a sore arm you are continually going to keep moving it, so even though you are in pain you keep doing the tic and the pain gets worse so if you had a device where in times of pain you could wear the device to stop the tics happening to stop the pain, that would just be a game changer for them. that would 'ust be a game changer for them. ., . , that would 'ust be a game changer for them. ., ., , , .,, that would 'ust be a game changer forthem. ., ., , , ., for them. how many people are living with tourette's? _ for them. how many people are living with tourette's? over _ for them. how many people are living with tourette's? over 300,000 - for them. how many people are living i with tourette's? over 300,000 people in the uk, with tourette's? over 300,000 people in the uk. adults— with tourette's? over 300,000 people in the uk, adults and _ with tourette's? over 300,000 people in the uk, adults and children, - with tourette's? over 300,000 people in the uk, adults and children, with - in the uk, adults and children, with tourette's. i in the uk, adults and children, with tourette's. ., ., , ., , tourette's. i would imagine people have different _ tourette's. i would imagine people have different symptoms, - tourette's. i would imagine people have different symptoms, and - tourette's. i would imagine people| have different symptoms, and their response is very different, and i would guess a lot may not even know they have it if the symptoms are very mild. they have it if the symptoms are ve mild. . , ., ,, . very mild. yeah, it is a spectrum so it can no very mild. yeah, it is a spectrum so it can go from _ very mild. yeah, it is a spectrum so it can go from mild _ very mild. yeah, it is a spectrum so it can go from mild to _ very mild. yeah, it is a spectrum so it can go from mild to really - it can go from mild to really debilitating. d0 it can go from mild to really debilitating.— it can go from mild to really debilitating. do you think the sti . ma debilitating. do you think the stigma around _ debilitating. do you think the stigma around tourette's - debilitating. do you think the stigma around tourette's has changed? it used to be one subject
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of comedy shows, you know, something to laugh at. it was thought of as the swearing disease, you know, the swearing illness. and when people say tourette's, do you think that understanding has changed? flat understanding has changed? not reall . we understanding has changed? iifrit really. we are getting there, but not really. people still see it as the swearing condition, seeing it as being quite comical and a bit of a joke, but it couldn't be further from the truth, really. it can be very, very painful. it can cause you a lot of anxiety being out in public, and ijust think people see it as a bit of a joke and it's not really. it as a bit of a 'oke and it's not reall . ,. ,, it as a bit of a 'oke and it's not reall . y., ,, ., ., really. do you think that almost hinders diagnosis? _ really. do you think that almost hinders diagnosis? 10096, - really. do you think that almost | hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. really. do you think that almost i hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. i have even — hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. i have even heard _ hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. i have even heard of _ hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. i have even heard of adults - hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. i have even heard of adults now i hinders diagnosis? 10096, yeah. ii have even heard of adults now who say that they feel like they have got tourette's, but they weren't diagnosed as a child and they think it is to do with their parents kind of not wanting to take them because some people don't want to be associated with it because it is
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known as the swearing condition. for that reason, a lot of people are probably suffering in silence. it was the case for milo in that report, wasn't it, that he was trying to manage his symptoms on his own? a lot of people are having to deal with this and one would hope that trial is successful and could be one of the solutions, but in the meantime, as we said, a few years until this might become more mainstream and widely available, there are a lot of people suffering in silence. . , ~ in silence. yeah, definitely. we get --eole in silence. yeah, definitely. we get people coming _ in silence. yeah, definitely. we get people coming to — in silence. yeah, definitely. we get people coming to us _ in silence. yeah, definitely. we get people coming to us at _ in silence. yeah, definitely. we get people coming to us at tourette's i people coming to us at tourette's action asking what they can do to help, and there is not that much. one thing we are fighting for is more medical care because there is not enough around the country at the moment. it is predominantly london there are no nice guidelines either for tourette's, which we are fighting for. what is happening is around the country, depending on where you are, you might see community in one area, and one a neurologist and then another debt
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might be no one. basically people are fighting to try to get care and there is nowhere to go, no consistency throughout the country. very, very frustrating. but hopefully this gadget is one step towards helping. so good to talk to you, emma mcnally, chief executive of tourette's action. thanks. it is 27 minutes past eight. good morning. yesterday on breakfast, we were live at the top of a mountain in wales — to watch the start of a special rugby match. you will rememberjohn maguire battling the wind and those players battling the wind and those players battling the wind as well. that memory was held in memory of a man who died last year. his name was andrew williams. his family and friends gathered to mark his life and raise money forfour charities in the process.
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as you can see the weather wasn't always kind to them, but they managed to play for 24 hours straight. we can speak now to andrew's brother paul, who's in brecon rugby club having a well—earned breakfast. how are the limbs, paul? you might have to confess, bits sore and achy, but very worthwhile —— ages. have to confess, bits sore and achy, but very worthwhile --_ but very worthwhile -- yes, i have to confess- _ but very worthwhile -- yes, i have to confess. good _ but very worthwhile -- yes, i have to confess. good morning. - but very worthwhile -- yes, i have to confess. good morning. and i but very worthwhile -- yes, i have i to confess. good morning. and one ruestion, to confess. good morning. and one question. did _ to confess. good morning. and one question, did the _ to confess. good morning. and one question, did the ball— to confess. good morning. and one question, did the ball ever - to confess. good morning. and one question, did the ball ever go i to confess. good morning. and one question, did the ball ever go over| question, did the ball ever go over the edge? you had a backstop but did the edge? you had a backstop but did the ball ever go over the edge of the ball ever go over the edge of the mountain?— the mountain? yeah, i have to confess. _ the mountain? yeah, i have to confess, naga, _ the mountain? yeah, i have to confess, naga, we _ the mountain? yeah, i have to confess, naga, we lost i the mountain? yeah, i have to confess, naga, we lost three i confess, naga, we lost three ball—macs at the end. we took a good supply. film! ball—macs at the end. we took a good supply. filth! thankfully i guy supply. oh! thankfully i guy retrieved — supply. 0h! thankfully i guy retrieved some further stocks but put it this way, a long way out from the retrieval. some casualties, yes. who was player of the match or player of the 24 hours, star player? i have to say, yeah, we had some
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star young kids playing for us. some good friends and sons and daughters of the family, so they were the true stars for us. not your normal place to play rugby so many of us not used to play rugby so many of us not used to it but we had some great young players out there scoring lots of tries yesterday. irate players out there scoring lots of tries yesterday.— players out there scoring lots of tries yesterday. we were looking at the pictures — tries yesterday. we were looking at the pictures of— tries yesterday. we were looking at the pictures of you _ tries yesterday. we were looking at the pictures of you playing - tries yesterday. we were looking at the pictures of you playing in i tries yesterday. we were looking at the pictures of you playing in the i the pictures of you playing in the sunshine and now we are looking at the pictures in the fog. talk to me about playing in the fog. i'm hoping you had a neon ball at some point? everyone who has been in the brecon beacons will know there is a big contrast. we had glorious sunshine yesterday. i would say the breeze took the edge of that but overnight we had some severe fog and, you know, cloud coming in overnight, hence the pictures you saw this morning were a massive contrast. overnight we had some brecons glow sticks and at one point we even attached a glow stick to the ball just so we could see it and continue
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to play. yeah, a bit innovative but it made things work and continues through the full duration.- it made things work and continues through the full duration. look, we know the game _ through the full duration. look, we know the game is _ through the full duration. look, we know the game is important i through the full duration. look, we know the game is important but i through the full duration. look, we | know the game is important but the reason behind the game is even more important. you are raising money for four charities, i think, important. you are raising money for four charities, ithink, and it is of course in memory of your brother andrew, who passed away last year. so far, how has the fundraising been going? sojust going? so just checking now, going? sojust checking now, we have nearly hit the 8500 mark, so 8400 and something, which has been phenomenal, so we have seen a real surge overnight and again this morning. just a huge thanks to everybody who has generously donated. it is fantastic. film everybody who has generously donated. it is fantastic.- everybody who has generously donated. it is fantastic. am i right in sa inc donated. it is fantastic. am i right in saying as _ donated. it is fantastic. am i right in saying as well _ donated. it is fantastic. am i right in saying as well that _ donated. it is fantastic. am i right in saying as well that today i donated. it is fantastic. am i right in saying as well that today would | in saying as well that today would have been andrew's birthday? that’s have been andrew's birthday? that's riaht, have been andrew's birthday? that's right. yeah- — have been andrew's birthday? that's right. yeah. the _ have been andrew's birthday? that's right, yeah. the timing _ have been andrew's birthday? that's right, yeah. the timing was - right, yeah. the timing was everything for today, to be honest. it would have been my brother's 53rd birthday today, so it was
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imperative, in his memory, that the event landed on today. obviously, you know, seeing on his birthday this morning was quite emotional, and we are going to have some celebrations for his life and obviously the event later today. what would he have made of that match, over the 24 hours? gruelling, i should say. — match, over the 24 hours? gruelling, i should say, testing. _ match, over the 24 hours? gruelling, i should say, testing. but _ match, over the 24 hours? gruelling, i should say, testing. but overall i i i should say, testing. but overall i would say really enjoyable. a lot of family, friends, old rugby friends of andrew's coming to join, even passers—by from those out walking up the brecons, such as true to the spirit and community of rugby, really, which we wanted it to be. all about participation and enjoying yourself and we really think we have brought that over the last 24 hours. it is a great achievement and obviously from a great cause and in memory of a wonderful man who of course was part of your lives. a bittersweet day. enjoy remembering
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andrew today, of course on what would have been his 53rd birthday. congratulate all of yourselves as well for doing something brilliant on top of the mountain, being on top of the world. i on top of the mountain, being on top of the world-— of the world. i will do and i will ass on of the world. i will do and i will pass on your — of the world. i will do and i will pass on your thanks. _ of the world. i will do and i will pass on your thanks. again, i of the world. i will do and i will pass on your thanks. again, it| of the world. i will do and i willl pass on your thanks. again, it is just giving the game... thanks for your support. just giving the game... thanks for your support-— just giving the game... thanks for your support. take care, paul. rest u. up. news and more sport with mike coming up. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. supermarkets should be obliged to cut prices for customers, to help with the cost of living
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crisis — that's according to the government's new advisor on the issue. david buttress has called on businesses to "come to the party" and help with soaring costs over the next six months. let's get reaction now to those comments — we're joined by the managing director of iceland — richard walker. good morning to you, richard. we have spoken a lot about the cost of living crisis. prices are rising it feels like just about everything right now. talk to me about what you have seen in—store and how that is changing the habits of customers. yes, it is very true it is very much upon _ yes, it is very true it is very much upon us — yes, it is very true it is very much upon us. some customers only have £25 a _ upon us. some customers only have £25 a week— upon us. some customers only have £25 a week to spend on food. i was worried _ £25 a week to spend on food. i was worried about them before the cost of living _ worried about them before the cost of living crisis. but now it is probably— of living crisis. but now it is probably the one thing that gives me sleepless— probably the one thing that gives me sleepless nights, because we know that fuel— sleepless nights, because we know that fuel is going up, energy going up that fuel is going up, energy going up and _ that fuel is going up, energy going up and the — that fuel is going up, energy going up and the cost of food is also going — up and the cost of food is also going up. _ up and the cost of food is also going up, that is obvious, so there really— going up, that is obvious, so there really is _ going up, that is obvious, so there
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really is very— going up, that is obvious, so there really is very little, if at all, any — really is very little, if at all, any room _ really is very little, if at all, any room to spare. and we are noticing _ any room to spare. and we are noticing changes in shopping habits. there _ noticing changes in shopping habits. there are _ noticing changes in shopping habits. there are less items being put in each _ there are less items being put in each basket because people are managing inflation by simply buying less and _ managing inflation by simply buying tess and i— managing inflation by simply buying less and i am also hearing stories of peopte — less and i am also hearing stories of people getting to the tail and asking _ of people getting to the tail and asking the cashier to tell them to -et asking the cashier to tell them to get -- _ asking the cashier to tell them to get -- tell— asking the cashier to tell them to get —— tell them when it gets to £40 and a _ get —— tell them when it gets to £40 and a stop— get —— tell them when it gets to £40 and a stop and put the rest in the basket _ and a stop and put the rest in the basket. and we have heard of people trading _ basket. and we have heard of people trading down to value ranges or buying — trading down to value ranges or buying more frozen food, because it is a good _ buying more frozen food, because it is a good way of saving money and stopping _ is a good way of saving money and stopping food waste. | is a good way of saving money and stopping food waste.— is a good way of saving money and stopping food waste. i want to come to that call from _ stopping food waste. i want to come to that call from the _ stopping food waste. i want to come to that call from the cost _ stopping food waste. i want to come to that call from the cost of - stopping food waste. i want to come to that call from the cost of living i to that call from the cost of living advisor that private businesses should in his words "come to the party", because that raises a lot of challenges. i am interested about who is most badly affected. we spoke about those on the lowest income to spend more of their disposable income on food and energy but are hardest hit, and we have seen that it is those cheaper budget ranges
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that have soared in price proportionally much more than other products in supermarkets. in proportionally much more than other products in supermarkets.— products in supermarkets. in some instances, products in supermarkets. in some instances. in _ products in supermarkets. in some instances, in some _ products in supermarkets. in some instances, in some stores, - products in supermarkets. in some | instances, in some stores, actually, our £1_ instances, in some stores, actually, our it frozen — instances, in some stores, actually, our £1 frozen range, we have decided to freeze _ our £1 frozen range, we have decided to freeze the price on that to the end of— to freeze the price on that to the end of the — to freeze the price on that to the end of the year because that is so important — end of the year because that is so important to our consumers. now, we were making _ important to our consumers. now, we were making 25% on that. we are now making _ were making 25% on that. we are now making less _ were making 25% on that. we are now making less than zero. it is a loss leader _ making less than zero. it is a loss leader so — making less than zero. it is a loss leader. so we are investing millions of pounds. — leader. so we are investing millions of pounds, but it is a strategic investment to be there for our customers to support them through this and _ customers to support them through this and quite rightly, we need to do as— this and quite rightly, we need to do as much— this and quite rightly, we need to do as much as we can, so we are taking— do as much as we can, so we are taking medium—term decisions, and also taking — taking medium—term decisions, and also taking quite short tactical decisions. we have launched only three _ decisions. we have launched only three items for 3p, decisions. we have launched only three items for3p, online decisions. we have launched only three items for 3p, online only, which _ three items for 3p, online only, which runs— three items for 3p, online only, which runs this week, a basket of essential— which runs this week, a basket of essential items, so there are those of different — essential items, so there are those of different things that we are doing — of different things that we are doing but you are right, the price of staff— doing but you are right, the price of staff is— doing but you are right, the price of staff is going up, and those on the breadline are disproportionately
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affected _ the breadline are disproportionately affected —— the price of stuff. milk and bread — affected —— the price of stuff. milk and bread have gone up by more than the official— and bread have gone up by more than the official inflation figures so it is really— the official inflation figures so it is really tough out there. is it right that _ is really tough out there. is it right that david _ is really tough out there. is it right that david buttress is saying that you should come to the party and help out in this cost of living squeeze, but we also hear from business that you are facing high business that you are facing high business rates and rising energy bills, and raw materials that you get to sell are more expensive. can you afford do it? taste get to sell are more expensive. can you afford do it?— you afford do it? we can, we are a rivate you afford do it? we can, we are a private family _ you afford do it? we can, we are a private family business _ you afford do it? we can, we are a private family business therefore i you afford do it? we can, we are a i private family business therefore we can think— private family business therefore we can think long—term, and we can make decisions _ can think long—term, and we can make decisions like — can think long—term, and we can make decisions like that £1 price freeze because — decisions like that £1 price freeze because we are able to do. not every business _ because we are able to do. not every business has — because we are able to do. not every business has that luxury. they might be a small— business has that luxury. they might be a small business or owned by private _ be a small business or owned by private equity, but a public business _ private equity, but a public business ready have to keep trotting out quarterly profit increases so it depends _ out quarterly profit increases so it depends what kind of business you are, but— depends what kind of business you are, but i— depends what kind of business you are, but i agree with the sentiment.
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whatever— are, but i agree with the sentiment. whatever type of business you are, you need _ whatever type of business you are, you need to — whatever type of business you are, you need to do whatever you possibly can to _ you need to do whatever you possibly can to be _ you need to do whatever you possibly can to be there for your customers. it is an— can to be there for your customers. it is an obligation at the moment. but government has done a lot. they have provided a lot of support to consumers — have provided a lot of support to consumers over the last couple of months _ consumers over the last couple of months and could do more, and i would _ months and could do more, and i would like — months and could do more, and i would like to see them do more not 'ust would like to see them do more not just to _ would like to see them do more not just to support consumers but also businesses. and also business has to work with— businesses. and also business has to work with government to help design policy— work with government to help design policy but _ work with government to help design policy but alsojust work with government to help design policy but also just raise awareness of policies — policy but also just raise awareness of policies that are already out there — of policies that are already out there. interestingly... you of policies that are already out there. interestingly. . .- of policies that are already out there. interestingly... you say that it should not _ there. interestingly... you say that it should not be _ there. interestingly... you say that it should not be happening - there. interestingly... you say that it should not be happening in i there. interestingly... you say thatj it should not be happening in silos, but what is happening behind the scenes? are you having talks with the competitor supermarkets, asda, sainsbury�*s and tesco and you come together and say that the cost of living crisis is here to stay, we collectively need to do something or are you still battling it out between yourselves 's we are far too competitive to be friends with each
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other. wouldn't it be better if you work together? irate other. wouldn't it be better if you work together?— other. wouldn't it be better if you work together? we saw that during the pandemic— work together? we saw that during the pandemic that _ work together? we saw that during the pandemic that competition i work together? we saw that during the pandemic that competition wasj the pandemic that competition was relaxed _ the pandemic that competition was relaxed by the government, we had weekly— relaxed by the government, we had weekly calls with defra with supermarket competitors and i spoke to them _ supermarket competitors and i spoke to them quite a lot, and we were talking _ to them quite a lot, and we were talking about how to keep feeding the nation and keep supply lines running — the nation and keep supply lines running. so it can be effective. we do have _ running. so it can be effective. we do have those dialogues at times. a lot of— do have those dialogues at times. a lot of the _ do have those dialogues at times. a lot of the big four retailers are having — lot of the big four retailers are having it — lot of the big four retailers are having it away, selling cattle, making — having it away, selling cattle, making very excessive profits, we do not sell _ making very excessive profits, we do not sell petrol or diesel but i think— not sell petrol or diesel but i think a — not sell petrol or diesel but i think a temporary vat reduction would _ think a temporary vat reduction would redeploy a lot of those surface — would redeploy a lot of those surface profits into making sure that food — surface profits into making sure that food is available for everyone. let's _ that food is available for everyone. let's talk _ that food is available for everyone. let's talk about your staff. what is the average salary of somebody who works in your supermarkets? it is works in your supermarkets? it is re works in your supermarkets? it is pretty much _ works in your supermarkets? it is pretty much a _ works in your supermarkets? it is pretty much a minimum wage. we have 'ust pretty much a minimum wage. we have just increased it, but it won't be
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beating — just increased it, but it won't be beating official inflation levels, it is £9 — beating official inflation levels, it is £9 50, i wish it was more. we are the _ it is £9 50, i wish it was more. we are the second or third best player on the _ are the second or third best player on the high — are the second or third best player on the high streetjust are the second or third best player on the high street just after marks & spencer— on the high street just after marks & spencer but that differential over the last— & spencer but that differential over the last couple of years has been eroded _ the last couple of years has been eroded and it is something we are not proud — eroded and it is something we are not proud of and as soon as we possibly— not proud of and as soon as we possibly can afford to pay more, we will. possibly can afford to pay more, we will and _ possibly can afford to pay more, we will. and importantly, it is not 'ust will. and importantly, it is not just about _ will. and importantly, it is not just about that headline level of pay. _ just about that headline level of pay, it _ just about that headline level of pay. it is— just about that headline level of pay, it is also about people being able to— pay, it is also about people being able to build the life around you sow it _ able to build the life around you sow it to — able to build the life around you sow it to be do not do zero—hours contracts. — sow it to be do not do zero—hours contracts, we are pushing for as long _ contracts, we are pushing for as long term — contracts, we are pushing for as long term contracts as we can, 16 hours — long term contracts as we can, 16 hours plus— long term contracts as we can, 16 hours plus and we do not pull the trick competitors do which is paying those _ trick competitors do which is paying those below the age of 25 below the minimum _ those below the age of 25 below the minimum wage, because that is a legal— minimum wage, because that is a legal loophole. we pay everyone the same _ legal loophole. we pay everyone the same it— legal loophole. we pay everyone the same~ it is— legal loophole. we pay everyone the same. it is really tough. and cash is very— same. it is really tough. and cash is very tight — same. it is really tough. and cash is very tight at the moment. as a result, _ is very tight at the moment. as a result, as — is very tight at the moment. as a result, as a — is very tight at the moment. as a result, as a business, we certainly will make — result, as a business, we certainly will make a — result, as a business, we certainly will make a lot less profit this year — will make a lot less profit this ear. �* , ., will make a lot less profit this ear. �* , will make a lot less profit this ear. �* .,
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year. are your staff saying that we want to be — year. are your staff saying that we want to be paid — year. are your staff saying that we want to be paid more, _ year. are your staff saying that we want to be paid more, we - year. are your staff saying that we want to be paid more, we need i year. are your staff saying that we want to be paid more, we need to| year. are your staff saying that we i want to be paid more, we need to be, all of the bills at home are going up, because we keep hearing a story that we should not be asking for pay rises because we are all in this together. the bank of england say that asking for pay rises add to inflation and these prices go up again but something has got to give. can you not afford to pay the staff a bit more? it can you not afford to pay the staff a bit more?— a bit more? it sticks in the craw with them _ a bit more? it sticks in the craw with them dictating _ a bit more? it sticks in the craw with them dictating what i a bit more? it sticks in the craw with them dictating what staff i with them dictating what staff should and shouldn't do, but there are other ways as a business that we can help. irate are other ways as a business that we can hel. ~ . are other ways as a business that we can hel-. . ., ., are other ways as a business that we can hel. ~ ., ., can help. we have done something unprecedented, _ can help. we have done something unprecedented, to _ can help. we have done something unprecedented, to give _ can help. we have done something unprecedented, to give all- can help. we have done something unprecedented, to give all the i can help. we have done something| unprecedented, to give all the staff 15% discount off anything in the shop _ 15% discount off anything in the shop so— 15% discount off anything in the shop. so if we cannot necessarily afford _ shop. so if we cannot necessarily afford that — shop. so if we cannot necessarily afford that basic level of pay increase, we can do other things like do _ increase, we can do other things like do aggressive discounts to help them _ like do aggressive discounts to help them through this cost of living crisis _ them through this cost of living crisis because they are feeling it, everyone — crisis because they are feeling it, everyone is— crisis because they are feeling it, everyone is feeling it.— crisis because they are feeling it, everyone is feeling it. good to talk to ou, everyone is feeling it. good to talk to you. richard — everyone is feeling it. good to talk to you, richard walker, _ everyone is feeling it. good to talk to you, richard walker, managing| to you, richard walker, managing director of iceland, thank you for being with us this morning. thank
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ou. it is being with us this morning. thank you- it is 20 _ being with us this morning. thank you. it is 20 minutes _ being with us this morning. thank you. it is 20 minutes to _ being with us this morning. thank you. it is 20 minutes to nine, i being with us this morning. thank. you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some treat you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some great stuff — you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some great stuff going — you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some great stuff going on _ you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some great stuff going on with _ you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some great stuff going on with the i you. it is 20 minutes to nine, some great stuff going on with the golf. i great stuff going on with the golf. i love a major. it must be a dream scenario their weight is panning out at the halfway stage with so many of the top seven players and popular players like rory mcilroy, desperate for a major again, players like rory mcilroy, desperate fora majoragain, right players like rory mcilroy, desperate for a major again, right up there. it's tight at the top of the us open golf leaderboard. the americans, joel dahmen, and colin morikawa lead the way at half way, but rory mcilroy is breathing down their necks. mcilroy is desperate for a major win, after eight years without one, but he got stuck in the thick brookline rough, three holes in. but what was impressive was how he recovered, to stay in touch at 4 under par, one shot off the lead. another great story, is callum tarren, the world number 445, from durham,
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who's still in with a shout. at one stage he held the outright lead before falling back, he's on one under, 3 behind mclroy...who is not letting eight barren major years affect him. i think ithinkl i think i have to go out with a mindset that i'm going to try and win my first again. that is sort of it. i am win my first again. that is sort of it. iam playing win my first again. that is sort of it. i am playing as good golf as i have played in a long time. i have a lot of experience. yes, i have won major championships and other big events, but i don't think, you know, just because i've done that, it doesn't mean that i have hit better golf shots or i will hit better pots, but i'm in a good place and i'm happy with where my game is and i'm happy with where my game is and i think that is the most important thing. now to cricket, and if you thought the big—hitting was impressive, between england and new zealand, in the test match, at trent bridge earlier this week, then england's one day side blew that out of the water in the netherlands. england smashed their way to a world record, 498—4, in the first innings against the dutch. phil salt and david malan
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both scored their first odi centuries, before liam livingston smashed his way to the second fastest 50 in one—day cricket — history offjust 17 balls. but the headlines were saved forjoss buttler, who scored an enormous 162. england bowled netherlands all out for 266, to win by 232 runs. now to tennis, and katy boulter�*s impressive run at the birmingham classic has come to an end. she was beaten in the quarter—finals, by the former world number one simona halep. boulter started really well against the former wimbledon champion in a tight first set, but halep's class eventually told as she won the match in straight sets. and ryan peniston's brilliant run at queen's has come to an end. he was beaten in the quarter—finals in four sets by filip krajinovic. but what a week it has been for the 26 year old at queen's, with the start of wimbledon just nine days away. this was meant to be the season lewis hamilton bounced back
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from the agonising way he lost the formula one title last year, but it's his car that's doing all the bouncing, and seems to be getting worse, after another dismal showing in practice ahead of the canadian grand prix. hamilton has won this race seven times previously, but he ended the day 13th quickest with team—mate george russell in seventh. hamilton said that his merecedes team just have to "tough it out" and work hard on building a better carfor next year. championship leader max verstappen was fastest in his red bull. nothing we do to this car generally seems to work. so, it's... we're trying different setups. me and george went with much different setups in this p2, just to see if one way works and one way doesn't. i'd like to hear whether or not — how it felt for him, but for me it was a disaster. it was... it's like the car is getting worse, like it's getting more and more unhappy the more we do to it. so, i don't know, we'll keep working on it and it is what it is. i think this is
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the carfor the year. the countdown to the rugby league world cup really gets under way this weekend. england are the hosts for the tournament which begins in october and they face a combined all stars side this afternoon, in their penultimate match before the tournament begins. a big game for the players, big for the country, and this is the first chance for the players to put their stamp on their position, with the world cup in october, so, yeah, it's an exciting week. it's good to see the players together, mixing and enjoying each other�*s company, and it's enjoyable for me to get together with my staff and get some work done. that game is at 5.45 this evening after the women's side take on france. come the autumn, the men's and women's and wheelchair world cups will run alongside each other, for the first time — and that's huge for the profile of those competitions. i started in the 2017—18 season, and we didn't get many fans, and there was nothing streamed live on tv, and evenjust
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the development of the game and the progress it's made, the standard that we are at now has totally improved since the last time we played, in 2018, so, yeah, you'vejust got to keep pushing on and forward, really, and it is amazing for the women's game. it's the showpiece final today at the end of rugby union's english premiership season. saracens face leicester tigers at twickenham this afternoon. for the tigers, it's the end of nine barren years, which saw them fall to rock— bottom in the league, but this season they have been transformed, finishing top of the table, while for saracens it marks the end of a brilliant first season back in the top division, after they were relegated for breaching salary cap rules. we will have a full preview for you at 9.30am. those players will be rather glad that it has got a bit cooler, at twickenham this afternoon. i am told all the time. if you step on sarah's
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toes, she will step on yours back! we're all of you! luke i wish i could interfere with the weather to make it do what i want but no such luck. ., , ._ , ., luck. for the past few days that he has been building _ luck. for the past few days that he has been building on _ luck. for the past few days that he has been building on the _ luck. for the past few days that he has been building on the south i has been building on the south across england and wales. we have had really high temperatures. yesterday we got up to just shy of 33 celsius in suffolk. that was the peak of the heatwave in the south. belfast was at 18 so we have had that cool air that has been living in across scotland and —— and northern ireland. this was a picture this morning in lancashire, with some blue sky breaking through the cloud, an improving picture. across much of northern england, scotland and northern ireland, we will see sunny spells, cooler conditions, with that cool air sinking south, some rain around for some of us but we will hold onto the heat and humidity, but one more day towards the far south—east of england, because this weather front is going
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to stall as it shifts its way south, bringing rain across parts of central and southern wales into the midlands, parts of lincolnshire and east anglia we will see some outbreaks of rain with the odd rumble of thunder in the band of rain. to the south of that, largely dry, with sunshine holding on for the likes of kent and essex, so here, we will see the highest temperatures in the mid to high 20s, but further north, sunny spells, scattered blustery showers, the windiest weather in the far north—west of scotland. temperatures between 13—20, for most of us. we have just still got that heat holding on in the south. into the evening hours, we will see this weather front moving south again. as it bumps into that hot, humid air, thunderstorms start to kick off. lightning and thunder across east anglia, the south—east, the london region during the first half of the night. showers easing away then the next batch of heavy showers and thunderstorms arise in the south—west. thunderstorms for the channel islands and perhaps the isle of wight to start your sunday
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morning. if you found it uncomfortable for sleeping in recent nights you will be pleased to hear that it will be cooler and fresher, with temperatures getting down into single figures to start your sunday morning. coolerand single figures to start your sunday morning. cooler and fresher, single figures to start your sunday morning. coolerand fresher, but single figures to start your sunday morning. cooler and fresher, but a lot of dry weather, some sunshine around, some showers, could be quite heavy and possibly thundery for some southern counties of england. looks like most of those will ease away during the second half of sunday, with a few continuing on the far south—west. we have a breeze coming in from the north, a blustery day for northern scotland, and temperatures between 13—21. very pleasant, still. very typical of this time of year. temperatures not as hot as it has been. into sunday evening, just one or two showers in the south—west. a quick look ahead to next week, lots of dry, settled weather with some rain in the far north—west but temperatures in the north are generally in the high teens and in the low to mid 20s next week, further south.—
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week, further south. does it feel aood week, further south. does it feel good when _ week, further south. does it feel good when you — week, further south. does it feel good when you are _ week, further south. does it feel good when you are able - week, further south. does it feel good when you are able to i week, further south. does it feel good when you are able to give i good when you are able to give weather like that? because we are not giving you any grief! it is not giving you any grief! it is alwa s not giving you any grief! it is always good _ not giving you any grief! it is always good to _ not giving you any grief! it is always good to be _ not giving you any grief! if 3 always good to be the messenger of good news, to deliver good news. don't shoot the messenger if you don't like the heatwave, because i know that not everybody likes the heat. so it can be cooler, so probably good news for most of us. sarah, thanks very much. you have been sending in your photos of the hot weather. and there is a theme to lots of these, many of them featuring your pets. that would have been many people, tongue hanging out, panting! here's sandy's dog max, who loves his pram on days like this and 15—year—old tom started his duke of edinburgh award practice expedition by hiking over dartmoor, and that bag looks heavy.
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this is glyn's cocker spaniel mr riley. these are a surprise for us as they are for you. look at that hat. it is are for you. look at that hat. it is a good hat. and andrew sent us a picture while he sat by his pond in cornwall. arlo and nyla... they are fabulous. they have their own personal picnic. is that a little table for ice creams or something like that? that is fabulous. that is so good to start keeping cool on the map as well. they are very nonplussed about it. it is just their faces. don'tjudge them! brilliant pictures. keep them coming in. we will have some more in the next hour. as we've been hearing this morning, cities right across the uk
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have been throwing their hat into the ring in a bid to host next year's eurovision song contest. the last time the uk hosted was in birmingham in 1998 — after a spectacular win by katrina and the waves the previous year. let's take a look. terry wogan: katrina and the waves, won it for the united kingdom, for the first time since 1981, since buck's fizz did it here in dublin. there she is, she is away. katrina and the waves. ronan keating is bringing katrina on, leather trousers are it. here at the point in dublin — one of the best audiences in the world, cheering katrina and the waves, who won it for the united kingdom. love shine a light. see you next year, somewhere in the united kingdom. hats off, please,
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for katrina and the waves. # let our love shine a light in every corner of my dreams. # katrina joins us now. good morning. ben was saying, how has she not changed since 1991? well, you know, if you do what you love and you are passionate about it, then you should stay healthy and glowing your entire life, right, naga and ben?!— glowing your entire life, right, nara and ben?! . ., ,., naga and ben?! katrina, your tweet esterda , naga and ben?! katrina, your tweet yesterday, practically _ naga and ben?! katrina, your tweet yesterday, practically hysterical i yesterday, practically hysterical over the announcement that the uk could host your vision 2023. take me through the gamut of emotions as you heard the news and your reactions.
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well, naga and ben, we have to start by saying it would be such a privilege to stand in for ukraine, to have a privilege to be able to host it. it is right because sam came in second that the uk would be the first consideration. there are plenty of cities in the united kingdom that would do a wonderful job. i'm sure that it is all going to be dealt with very sensitively with regard to ukraine and the involvement, and referring back to the fact that they are the rightful winners, but i think as far as the ebu goes right now it isjust winners, but i think as far as the ebu goes right now it is just not safe. and obviously this is an event that takes an incredible amount of planning, they probably should have started planning last month, so it takes a full 12 months to get it all “p takes a full 12 months to get it all up and running. ijust think it is logical that we could start getting excited about it with all due respect to ukraine, for hosting it,
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and pick a city. respect to ukraine, for hosting it, and pick a city-— respect to ukraine, for hosting it, and pick a city. there is something about winning. _ and pick a city. there is something about winning, quite _ and pick a city. there is something about winning, quite clearly i and pick a city. there is something i about winning, quite clearly winning is the highlight, but there must be something so important about being able to bring the ceremony back to your home country a year later. what went through your mind, when you win it in 1997, how important was the element of being able to bring the competition back? it element of being able to bring the competition back?— element of being able to bring the competition back? it was a gigantic honour, competition back? it was a gigantic honour. as — competition back? it was a gigantic honour, as people _ competition back? it was a gigantic honour, as people said _ competition back? it was a gigantic honour, as people said that - honour, as people said that historically you can't win because of political voting. it really goes to show that if you have a good song you will get the votes. sam proved it last year. and the feeling was just overwhelming pride, especially for me. i'm american, and one of these days i will learn myself to talk good! i have lived here for nearly 50 years. so i feel very much a part of it. and it would be such a moment of honour and glory to be able to see the united kingdom take
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able to see the united kingdom take a stab at presenting your vision for 2023. i a stab at presenting your vision for 2023. ., ., ., ., ,~ a stab at presenting your vision for 2023. . ., ., ., ,~ i. a stab at presenting your vision for 2023. . ., ., ., i. . , 2023. i am going to ask you, city, which would _ 2023. i am going to ask you, city, which would you _ 2023. i am going to ask you, city, which would you prefer? - 2023. i am going to ask you, city, which would you prefer? i - 2023. i am going to ask you, city, which would you prefer? i would i 2023. i am going to ask you, city, i which would you prefer? i would like to see it diversify _ which would you prefer? i would like to see it diversify slightly _ which would you prefer? i would like to see it diversify slightly and i i to see it diversify slightly and i would like to see glasgow come in to serious consideration. i think cardiff as well. leeds would be an absolutely brilliant place to host it, probably top of my list this morning but it changes every minute, it would be manchester. a lot of people think that london is obvious, but i also think all of the other cities that are in the running have all of the resources. this is a gigantic operation. it is a huge scale, and i think any of the countries that are up for it would be very suitable and capable of handling the production and the event itself. we will have to wait
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and see who will get it. taste event itself. we will have to wait and see who will get it. we should remember that _ and see who will get it. we should remember that once _ and see who will get it. we should remember that once upon - and see who will get it. we should remember that once upon a i and see who will get it. we should remember that once upon a time i remember that once upon a time eurovision was seen as quite a niche, and terry wogan did it, it was almost comical, but people embrace it from all sides, people of all different kinds of cultures, and particular elements, they absolutely buy into this. and it is another moment, isn't it, to feel good. to feel moment, isn't it, to feel good. tfr feel good? yes, don't it feel good, in fact! i think that your word, niche is a bit of a euphemism. to do is to say that we don't want to do eurovision, it could be a career killer. what about your reputation? i think those days are well gone. you can see that sam has done incredibly well in the charts. love shine a light did well in the charts, but if you don't win or don't do well, it does not always pan out for you career—wise, but these days, it is a global phenomenon. the whole world is
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getting involved. america just had the us song contest, which was an unbelievable event. i think it took two months to find a winner on that one. it is an enormous amount of fun and people love to be involved in it. i certainly did. and look, i'm talking to you this morning so it is the gift that just talking to you this morning so it is the gift thatjust keeps on giving. and we are delighted to talk to you. you talk about it being a huge operation. lots of people will only come into this to watch the final, the one night, but there is so much that goes into it, and this is what the cities will be keeping a close eye on because they need the hotels, the technicians, all of the support, they need the venue, everything that goes with it, transport links and things like that. it was a sense of what is involved. it is things like that. it was a sense of what is involved.— what is involved. it is a gigantic scale but any — what is involved. it is a gigantic scale but any of _ what is involved. it is a gigantic scale but any of those - what is involved. it is a gigantic scale but any of those cities i scale but any of those cities mentioned could absolutely handle it, plenty of hotel and accommodation and transport links and everything that is needed. they
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wouldn't have put themselves in for it if they didn't think they were appropriate. there was a time when eurovision took place in harrogate! you wouldn't think, would you? but i think it is something any other cities can handle, especially manchester!— cities can handle, especially manchester! ., manchester! right here on the doorste -. manchester! right here on the doorstep- you _ manchester! right here on the doorstep. you are _ manchester! right here on the doorstep. you are such i manchester! right here on the doorstep. you are such a i manchester! right here on the doorstep. you are such a goodj doorstep. you are such a good politician, is that what eurovision is all about?!— politician, is that what eurovision is all about? !_ thank| politician, is that what eurovision i is all about? !_ thank you is all about?! yeah, yeah! thank you for talkin: is all about?! yeah, yeah! thank you for talking to — is all about?! yeah, yeah! thank you for talking to you, _ is all about?! yeah, yeah! thank you for talking to you, glorious _ is all about?! yeah, yeah! thank you for talking to you, glorious in - is all about?! yeah, yeah! thank you for talking to you, glorious in the i for talking to you, glorious in the sunshine, thank you very much, take care. lots of negotiating will be going on behind the scenes right now. the headlines, coming up.
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good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and ben thompson. our headlines today... asylum ssekers who cross the channel in small boats are to be electronically tagged under a new home office pilot scheme. supermarkets and utility companies should be helping people struggling with soaring prices — that's according to the government's new 'cost of living' adviser. police in brazil say they have identified the remains it identified the remains is a happy halfway point att us it is a happy halfway point at the us open golf, for rory mcilroy, chasing his first major in eight years.
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and as sir paul mccartney turns 80 years old today, we'll find out more about the special celebrations taking place at his childhood home. after the peak of the heatwave on friday things are turning cooler and fresher across the uk today. some rain around across parts of wales in central england, still hot and humid in the south, and we could see some thunderstorms into this evening. i will have all of your details here on bbc breakfast. good morning. it's saturday, the 18th ofjune. some migrants who cross the channel in small boats are to be electronically tagged — in a 12—month pilot scheme run by the home office. ministers say it will help maintain contact with asylum seekers who reach the uk by what it calls dangerous routes. critics fear it will treat people who have fled war and persecution as criminals. simonjones reports. another busy week for the border force in the channel — more than 1000 migrants brought ashore after being picked up at sea. the government says it will seek
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to remove those who have passed through several safe countries before claiming asylum in the uk. and, as part of a year—long pilot scheme, some of those awaiting deportation will be fitted with electronic tags. officials say there's a greater risk that migrants facing removal will abscond. launching the project, the home office says, "there has been an unprecedented growth in irregular migration. "the pilot will test whether electronic monitoring "will improve and maintain regular contact with asylum claimants "who arrive in the uk via unnecessary and dangerous routes. "for those facing removal, there may be an increased risk "of absconding and less incentive to comply with any conditions "of immigration bail." the first to be tagged are set to be the asylum seekers who successfully challenged their removal to rwanda this week — the flight to kagali grounded following last—ditch legal challenges. it's not clear how many people will be tagged in the pilot project, or how keen immigrationjudges
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will be to introduce electronic monitoring as part of any bail conditions. people who don't comply could be returned to detention or prosecuted. but the refugee council says it's appalling that the government is intent on treating people who have fled war, bloodshed and persecution as criminals. simon jones, bbc news. the home secretary priti patel has described the ruling by the european court of human rights — which grounded the first plane due to take asylum—seekers to rwanda — as "scandalous". the flight had been due to take off on tuesday night before the court intervened. in an interview with the daily telegraph, ms patel said she believed the decision had been politically motivated. supermarkets, energy companies and the leisure industry are being urged to reduce prices for customers, by the government's new cost—of—living advisor. in an exclusive interview with the bbc, david buttress called on businesses to "come to the party" and help with soaring costs over the next six months.
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if you think about all the money spent _ if you think about all the money spent on — if you think about all the money spent on marketing, doing deals to promote _ spent on marketing, doing deals to promote leisure, the big activities british— promote leisure, the big activities british people enjoy, well, let's take some of that money, let's refocus— take some of that money, let's refocus it — take some of that money, let's refocus it on to what really matters to people _ refocus it on to what really matters to people which is making the prices more _ to people which is making the prices more competitive. we put this to the managing director of iceland, richard walker, who explained he has seen a change in consumer habits. it is probably the one thing that does give me sleepless night because as we know food and energy is going up, and the cost of food is going up, and the cost of food is going up, so there really is little if any room to spare. we are noticing changes in shopping habits. there are less items being put in each basket because people are managing inflation by simply buying less. and i'm also hearing stories of, you know, people getting to the till and asking the cashier to tell them when it gets to, say, 40 quid, then they stop and put the rest in the basket.
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that was the boss of iceland there. now, union leaders have confirmed that next week's rail strikes will go ahead, after talks to resolve a bitter row over pay, jobs and conditions failed. network rail has warned that about half of all rail lines will be closed on the 21st, 23rd and 25th ofjune. several operators have already told passengers not to attempt to travel on strike days. brazilian police have confirmed that the remains of one of the two bodies found in the amazon rainforest are those of the british journalist, dom phillips. the second body — believed to be indigenous expert bruno pereira — is still being examined. earlier this week, a suspect confessed to burying the bodies. his brother has also been arrested. here's our south america correspondent, katy watson. the grim news confirmed — dom phillips' family can now, in the words of his wife, ale, say goodbye to him with love. these are the two men as their friends and family
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want to remember them — dom phillips, a passionate journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travelling companion, bruno pereira, was an indigenous expert who knew the community so well and was loved by so many here. the authorities are still trying to establish whether the human remains also include those of bruno pereira. suspect amarildo da costa de oliveira confessed to the crime and lead the search teams to the place he buried the two men. a difficult location, two miles inland from the river, and they needed the help of helicopters, sniffer dogs and divers, but the police said that they still hadn't located the boat belonging to mr pereira that the suspect admitted he'd sunk. authorities are also looking for a third suspect, jeferson da silva lima. they say he's currently on the run. the area where the two men disappeared is vast, remote and lawless. on the border with colombia and peru, there are illegal fishermen and poachers and drug trafficking too. indeed, bruno's work trying to protect the indigenous
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communities from illegal activities made him enemies. he'd been threatened in the past because of his work. police, though, say the investigation suggests the suspects acted alone, not with a criminal organisation behind them. but that was rejected by univaja, the association of indigenous communities, which had taken part in the search and had been calling for more to be done to find their friend bruno and his travel companion, dom. they believe it was a crime planned in detail. katy watson, bbc news. a major new round of british military training for ukrainian soldiers has been announced by the prime minister. during a surprise visit to kyiv, borisjohnson told president zelensky the aim was to train up to 10,000 soldiers every four months. what does this mean? we're joined now by our europe correspondent, nick beake, who's in kyiv. he can explain it all. good morning to you.
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he can explain it all. good morning to ou. , ., he can explain it all. good morning to ou. ., ., ., . ., to you. good morning, naga. we are 'ust to you. good morning, naga. we are just hearing — to you. good morning, naga. we are just hearing overnight _ to you. good morning, naga. we are just hearing overnight there - to you. good morning, naga. we are just hearing overnight there have i just hearing overnight there have been _ just hearing overnight there have been some missile strikes at the centre _ been some missile strikes at the centre of— been some missile strikes at the centre of ukraine, one hitting an oil refinery, _ centre of ukraine, one hitting an oil refinery, and of course that's a reminder— oil refinery, and of course that's a reminder of— oil refinery, and of course that's a reminder of the russian attack that continues — reminder of the russian attack that continues. the fighting is now in the east — continues. the fighting is now in the east of— continues. the fighting is now in the east of the country in the donbas— the east of the country in the donbas region. borisjohnson here yesterday— donbas region. borisjohnson here yesterday following in the footsteps of other— yesterday following in the footsteps of other european leaders earlier in the week— of other european leaders earlier in the week and he said he was here basically— the week and he said he was here basically to underline the strength of british— basically to underline the strength of british support for ukraine. president _ of british support for ukraine. president zelensky said his support was unparalleled, and we got this offer— was unparalleled, and we got this offer from — was unparalleled, and we got this offer from the british to train up to 10,000 — offer from the british to train up to 10,000 ukrainian soldiers every four months, talking about things like medical expertise, dealing with cyberattacks, counter explosives training — cyberattacks, counter explosives training. we have to see if the ukrainians— training. we have to see if the ukrainians are able to accept this, whether— ukrainians are able to accept this, whether they want to, but we need to stress _ whether they want to, but we need to stress it— whether they want to, but we need to stress it won't make an impact immediately although the prime minister— immediately although the prime minister claimed it will make a big, bil minister claimed it will make a big, big difference. the ukrainians say they are _ big difference. the ukrainians say they are really grateful for all these — they are really grateful for all these visitors coming here and showing — these visitors coming here and showing this political solidarity at
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a time _ showing this political solidarity at a time of— showing this political solidarity at a time of course when they want to -et a time of course when they want to get into— a time of course when they want to get into the — a time of course when they want to get into the european union, but they say— get into the european union, but they say what would really help them is an increase in the amount of heavy— is an increase in the amount of heavy weapons coming from their western — heavy weapons coming from their western allies. we know the americans and british are sending these _ americans and british are sending these longer range missiles but they say they— these longer range missiles but they say they are not arriving soon enough — say they are not arriving soon enough and they are not arriving in bi! enough and they are not arriving in big enough— enough and they are not arriving in big enough numbers and they remain, the ukrainians say, vastly outnumbered by the russians on the battlefield. it's only when they are level with — battlefield. it's only when they are level with them in terms of their hardware — level with them in terms of their hardware and capability that they can really— hardware and capability that they can really make an effort to push the russians back, well they might they say— the russians back, well they might they say it — the russians back, well they might they say it is a crucial time and they— they say it is a crucial time and they are — they say it is a crucial time and they are desperate for all the support— they are desperate for all the support they can get.- they are desperate for all the support they can get. mm. nick, thank ou support they can get. mm. nick, thank you very — support they can get. mm. nick, thank you very much _ support they can get. mm. nick, thank you very much with i support they can get. mm. nick, thank you very much with that, i support they can get. mm. nick, i thank you very much with that, from kyiv. we can speak now to our political correspondent, damian grammaticas, who's in our london newsroom. good morning. we saw the pictures there are borisjohnson getting a warm reception in ukraine but making that visit meant he had to miss out on a pretty important conference
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here in the uk?— on a pretty important conference here in the uk? good morning. yes, here in the uk? good morning. yes, he did. here in the uk? good morning. yes, he did- an — here in the uk? good morning. yes, he did. an event _ here in the uk? good morning. yes, he did. an event arranged _ here in the uk? good morning. yes, he did. an event arranged by i here in the uk? good morning. yes, he did. an event arranged by a i here in the uk? good morning. yes, | he did. an event arranged by a group of tory mps from northern constituencies who had a daylong event planned and the prime minister was the sort of highlight, his speech meant to be the highlight of that in the afternoon, and they were expecting him to turn up and of course he didn't because he went to kyiv. the man who organised that conference and was in charge of organising it, jake berry the mp, he said there were around 30 of his members there, and he said about 400 attendees and clearly people were disappointed but he said it was up to downing street to decide the prime minister because my itinerary. some reports that at least one mp was quite cross, saying the prime minister promised after that no—confidence vote that he survived that he would be reaching out to listen to mps concerns and that he hadn't turned up here. the defence secretary ben wallace took to twitter yesterday and said there was a lot of rubbish being spouted about
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this, and he said that these events have to be organised in secrecy and visits sometimes are necessary in person because not everything can be discussed securely over phones. that russia an aggressive signal and warfare operation, but if it was about trading it is not clear whether that is the issue mr wallace said was on the agenda, so that seems to be why the prime minister went. . ~ seems to be why the prime minister went. . ,, , ., seems to be why the prime minister went. . ,, y., ., seems to be why the prime minister went. . ,, ., ,., ., went. thank you, damian grammaticas there. a new service has been launched to help deaf people contact the emergency services. for the first time, users will be able to video call 999 and communicate with operators using british sign language. helena wilkinson reports. briony and her husband andy are both deaf. last summer, he collapsed. unable to call 999, briony drove him to a&e. interpreter: at that time, i absolutely panicked, i i just didn't know what to do.
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and i think if i'd 999 bsl available back then, i would've been able to get advice very quickly, i wouldn't have had the stress, i would've been able to stay calm, i would've knew that help was coming to where we were, but obviously it wasn't available back then. and that drive — that drive, when i was trying to drive and watching him struggling to breathe next to me, and obviously i couldn't communicate with him because he couldn't sign to me — he was struggling to breathe too much. so i know now that 999 bsl is available, and it's just such a relief that deaf people aren't going to have to go through that experience that i had. 999 british sign language will, for the first time, allow deaf people to call directly through to an emergency video calling service, allowing them to communicate in their first language, bsl, through an interpreter. this is how the new service works.
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the caller connects to the 999 bsl app on their mobile or online. they press the red button to make the call, that connects them to a bsl interpreter, who contacts a 999 operator. the conversation is then relayed. your location, please. the deaf community say it's a breakthrough. interpreter: the app will be an absolute life-changer. - it has been years and years in the coming. deaf people have not been able to access emergency services for years directly. they've been able to do it through text relay but that means you're ahving to type, you know, "hello, this is the problem." you know, you can imagine doing that — and it's 75% slower thank speaking, so you can imagine trying to have an emergency situation
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conversation, and that's just not acceptable when you're using written english. if it's life—and—death you need to be able to click, communicate in your first language, directly, and that's what this does, so i am so pleased to see this here now. the deaf community say this is one more step forward towards equality. helena wikinson, bbc news. rules around mask—wearing in some hospitals and gp surgeries in england have been relaxed, after guidance from nhs bosses to return to pre—pandemic policies. but with the final decision left up to individual organisations, measures can vary significantly across the country. damian o'neill has been looking at the issue in one region in the north east of england. morning. how are you? fine, fine. at the james cook university hospital in middlesbrough, the wearing of masks is no longer compulsory. it's the same across all of south tees nhs trust. in line with changes in national policy and the incidence of covid in the area, we're now at a point where, thankfully, we can step away from mask wearing across the whole organisation. we are focusing on mask wearing
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in the highest risk areas still, and we do want the public to support us with that. the picture elsewhere in the region is mixed. durham and northumbria nhs trusts still insist on masks, but north tees has dropped them. gateshead's director of public health is sympathetic. i think it's never going to feel like the right time, you know, and actually, during the summer months when we know respiratory viruses tend to spread less than they do in the winter months, you know, i guess there has to be a point where a decision is made. i imagine those hospitals will monitor it incredibly carefully in terms of the impact that it's having, and whether it's resulting in spread within the hospital, and in which case i'm sure that they'll reverse that decision. but i do understand why they've made that decision at this stage. meanwhile, health bosses in cumbria say they're optimistic about the covid figures, but they also point out that getting an accurate picture isn't easy. the amount of testing that's been done is so much less— than it was in the past, - but we've got some access
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to modelling that we do ourselves. we think that the modelled rate | is probably at around about 150| cases per 100,000 population per week at the moment, - which is lower thanl it's been for a year. that was the view in one region — but as we said the rules vary across england. we're joined now by rory deighton from the nhs confederation. good morning, rory. we can break this down into _ good morning, rory. we can break this down into a _ good morning, rory. we can break this down into a few— good morning, rory. we can break this down into a few different - good morning, rory. we can break this down into a few different bits. | this down into a few different bits. let's start with masks, as we said being left up to individual authorities, but that might mean there is a very patchy picture across the country depending on where you live in where you visit? absolutely. nhs leaders and doctors and nurses_ absolutely. nhs leaders and doctors and nurses are making decisions on a daily basis_ and nurses are making decisions on a daily basis to — and nurses are making decisions on a daily basis to minimise risk and keep— daily basis to minimise risk and keep patients safe, and those decisions _ keep patients safe, and those decisions will be slightly different in different hospitals, and one of the most — in different hospitals, and one of the most obvious things, i suppose, is the _ the most obvious things, i suppose, is the different types of condition. i would _ is the different types of condition. i would expect, we would all expect,
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mask— i would expect, we would all expect, mask wearing in an intensive care unit, _ mask wearing in an intensive care unit, for— mask wearing in an intensive care unit, for example, whereas if i go in for— unit, for example, whereas if i go in for a _ unit, for example, whereas if i go in fora quick— unit, for example, whereas if i go in for a quick day procedure it might— in for a quick day procedure it might be _ in for a quick day procedure it might be less important. while there is a variation on the types of procedure _ is a variation on the types of procedure and the types of protective equipment we might wear. but even _ protective equipment we might wear. but even with those differences the rules will still vary. it is down to the individual authorities to decide if intensive care or whatever had to masks and a day patient didn't, it is down to those... masks and a day patient didn't, it is down to those. . ._ masks and a day patient didn't, it is down to those... absolutely, and i think that — is down to those... absolutely, and i think that is _ is down to those... absolutely, and i think that is right. _ is down to those... absolutely, and | think that is right. | _ is down to those. .. absolutely, and ithinkthat is right. ithink- is down to those... absolutely, and i think that is right. i think there i i think that is right. i think there is something about us trusting the decisions — is something about us trusting the decisions of local leaders are making _ decisions of local leaders are making. hospitals are different. newer— making. hospitals are different. newer hospitals will have more individual rooms, smaller words. older— individual rooms, smaller words. older hospitals are going to have larger— older hospitals are going to have larger words. we will also have to keep— larger words. we will also have to keep one — larger words. we will also have to keep one eye on the impact of opening — keep one eye on the impact of opening up too much. leaders will have _ opening up too much. leaders will have an _ opening up too much. leaders will have an eye — opening up too much. leaders will have an eye on the elective backlog we have _ have an eye on the elective backlog we have if— have an eye on the elective backlog we have. if we open up too much, our ability— we have. if we open up too much, our ability to— we have. if we open up too much, our ability to eat — we have. if we open up too much, our ability to eat into the 6.6 million people _ ability to eat into the 6.6 million people who are waiting for elective
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care is— people who are waiting for elective care is restricted as well, so in different— care is restricted as well, so in different hospitals different sets of risks, — different hospitals different sets of risks, different conditions, different— of risks, different conditions, different kinds... of risks, different conditions, different kinds. . ._ of risks, different conditions, different kinds... what would be needed for _ different kinds... what would be needed for it _ different kinds... what would be needed for it to _ different kinds... what would be needed for it to be _ different kinds... what would be needed for it to be said, - different kinds... what would be needed for it to be said, no - different kinds... what would be | needed for it to be said, no mask wearing, and that to be the rule? well, i don't think that has ever been _ well, i don't think that has ever been the — well, i don't think that has ever been the rule. i think covid has shone — been the rule. i think covid has shone a — been the rule. i think covid has shone a light on this and i think it is particularly relevant to us at the moment, but we would always expect— the moment, but we would always expect for— the moment, but we would always expect for different conditions for there _ expect for different conditions for there to _ expect for different conditions for there to be different restrictions on different parts of the hospital. so i think— on different parts of the hospital. so i think there is something about trusting _ so i think there is something about trusting local leaders, local clinicians, local nurses to build the right— clinicians, local nurses to build the right balance of risk for patients— the right balance of risk for patients and keep patients safe. you soke there patients and keep patients safe. ti’f7l. spoke there about being able to open up spoke there about being able to open up hospitals again and particularly that relates to things like visitation, being able to get friends and family in to see patients who might be getting treatment. again, the rules will vary? treatment. again, the rules will va ? , ., , ., ~' ,,
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vary? they will vary and i think nhs leaders recognise _ vary? they will vary and i think nhs leaders recognise the _ vary? they will vary and i think nhs leaders recognise the enormous - leaders recognise the enormous benefit — leaders recognise the enormous benefit of having visitors into hospitals, but again the same sorts of risks— hospitals, but again the same sorts of risks apply. if we have lots of visitors — of risks apply. if we have lots of visitors into hospitals, and we bring — visitors into hospitals, and we bring more covid into our hospitals we affect _ bring more covid into our hospitals we affect a — bring more covid into our hospitals we affect a theatre team, for exanipte. _ we affect a theatre team, for example, and we might lose 30 or 40 hospital— example, and we might lose 30 or 40 hospital elective procedures over the next — hospital elective procedures over the next week, so we are continually bringing _ the next week, so we are continually bringing the —— balancing the benefits— bringing the —— balancing the benefits of bringing in more visitors _ benefits of bringing in more visitors against the risks it brings with it _ visitors against the risks it brings with it if— visitors against the risks it brings with it. ., ., ., , with it. if a patient or family member— with it. if a patient or family member needs _ with it. if a patient or family member needs to _ with it. if a patient or family member needs to be - with it. if a patient or family member needs to be with i with it. if a patient or family | member needs to be with the with it. if a patient or family - member needs to be with the patient, for example, have they got the right to say, there is no restrictions any more? i to say, there is no restrictions any more? ~ , . , ~ , more? i think it is really unlikely for somebody — more? i think it is really unlikely for somebody who _ more? i think it is really unlikely for somebody who really, - more? i think it is really unlikely for somebody who really, really | for somebody who really, really needs _ for somebody who really, really needs to — for somebody who really, really needs to be with their loved one not to be _ needs to be with their loved one not to be allowed in. i think in the nhs people _ to be allowed in. i think in the nhs people really believe and really
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value _ people really believe and really value the idea that your family and your care _ value the idea that your family and your care that might quite like it helps _ your care that might quite like it helps healing. absolutely, it's enormously important.- helps healing. absolutely, it's enormously important. cases are risinu . enormously important. cases are rising- covid _ enormously important. cases are rising. covid cases _ enormously important. cases are rising. covid cases are _ enormously important. cases are rising. covid cases are rising, - rising. covid cases are rising, that's a fact. it hasn't gone away and it is very unlikely to go away. when you talk to your members now, how are they feeling about this? talking to our regular gp earlier on who said it was actually hospitalisations, that isn't rising, but the fact is covid exists and the cases are going up, so how are they managing that? it is cases are going up, so how are they managing that?— managing that? it is another risk factor we are _ managing that? it is another risk factor we are building _ managing that? it is another risk factor we are building in. - managing that? it is another risk factor we are building in. we - managing that? it is another risk factor we are building in. we are | factor we are building in. we are looking — factor we are building in. we are looking at— factor we are building in. we are looking at the type of case, type of hospital. _ looking at the type of case, type of hospital, levels of covid now in the last week— hospital, levels of covid now in the last week have gone up... 5000 patients— last week have gone up... 5000 patients with covid in nhs beds. thats— patients with covid in nhs beds. that's up— patients with covid in nhs beds. that's up 22% in the last week. sorry. — that's up 22% in the last week. sorry. that _ that's up 22% in the last week. sorry, that correlation... is that correlated with staff numbers being hit? irate correlated with staff numbers being hit? . ., ., , ., ., hit? we are not seeing that at the moment in _ hit? we are not seeing that at the moment in the — hit? we are not seeing that at the moment in the way _ hit? we are not seeing that at the moment in the way the _ hit? we are not seeing that at the moment in the way the february | hit? we are not seeing that at the - moment in the way the february surge was very— moment in the way the february surge
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was very much about staff and staff ittness _ was very much about staff and staff ittness we — was very much about staff and staff illness. we are in the foothills and we are _ illness. we are in the foothills and we are not— illness. we are in the foothills and we are not quite sure what will happen— we are not quite sure what will happen now but there are definite increases — happen now but there are definite increases in covid in the general population, and again it is that overall— population, and again it is that overall picture of risk that local leaders — overall picture of risk that local leaders will be making decisions on a daily— leaders will be making decisions on a daily basis. if there is more covid — a daily basis. if there is more covid in — a daily basis. if there is more covid in the community it will impact — covid in the community it will impact on _ covid in the community it will impact on the way we want to open up hospitats~ _ impact on the way we want to open up hospitals. white very interesting talking _ hospitals. white very interesting talking to you. thank you. rory deighton— talking to you. thank you. rory deighton from the nhs federation. 9.21. �* , . . ~ deighton from the nhs federation. 9.21. �*, . xi ., 9.21. let's check in with what the weather looks like after what was a pretty scorching day most of the country yesterday, but not everywhere. some! that's right, thanks, ben and naga. good morning. temperatures rising through the course of the week, particularly in the south, england and wales. yesterday saw the peak. hot, humid and sticky out there for some of us yesterday and these were some of us yesterday and these were some of us yesterday and these were some of the maximum temperatures. the hottest spot, santon downham, 33 celsius there, but contrast that to
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18 degrees in belfast, more typical of what we would expect for the stage injune. we have seen the heatwave pq stage injune. we have seen the heatwave p0 in the uk at least. still really hot in france. today paris could get up to 40 celsius. but we are importing cooler and fresher airfrom but we are importing cooler and fresher air from the north. but we are importing cooler and fresher airfrom the north. this is the picture this morning in east yorkshire, a beautiful start to the day of lots of fine weather in fact for much of england, scotland, northern ireland, sunny spells and a few showers is the cooler air sinks south. at some rain in the forecast today because that is where the front will be stalling its way through parts of central england into wales as well. that is bringing the cooler and fresher air from the north. low pressure to the north of scotland, so quite windy conditions piling on. we could see gusts of about 50 mph in the western isles, for instance. plenty of spells of sunshine across the northern half of the uk. further south, sunshine across the northern half of the uk. furthersouth, outbreaks sunshine across the northern half of the uk. further south, outbreaks of rain developing across wales, south—west england through the midlands and towards east anglia. there could be the odd rumble of thunder with some of the heavier
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bursts as well. to the south—east of that, still have the heat and humidity holding on in the bath south—east, the london 25 degrees, could see 2728 perhaps close to kent or east sussex through the day but most of us in the mid to high teens so turning fresher eventually and that fresher air will work its way towards the south as we head into this evening and overnight but as the front meets the hot and humid air thunderstorms are likely to rattle across parts of south anglia and the far south—east tonight. you may well hear some thunder and lightening down towards the channel islands and south—west england into the early hours of sunday. that is how we start sunday morning. the fresher air, some of us and single figures, more comfortable sleeping in the south compared to recent nights. we have the heaviest thunderstorms from the word go. not everywhere seeing these downpours. hit and miss, everywhere seeing these downpours. hitand miss, probably everywhere seeing these downpours. hit and miss, probably gradually easing later in the day but a wet start for the isle of wight, and towards essex, for instance. much of the uk will have a fine on friday
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with spells of sunshine and it won't feel as hot or humid as it has done recently. we have the northerly air, still quite breezy for the north of scotland, 13 for stornoway, 20 or 21 down towards london by the afternoon. into the evening, likely to see a few of those showers in the south still lingering but much of the uk is looking dry and settled. that's largely the story as we had to into next week. quite a bit of dry weather. could be some rain at times in the far north—west, possibly the far south, but temperature is not as high as they have been in the past week or so. high teens to the mid 20s for most of us. back to you both. sarah, thanks so much. we will speak to you later. on breakfast, we've been following the story of 11—year—old tobias — or "captain tobias" as he has become known — who has raised hundreds of thousands of pounds for charity with a series of sporting feats. of course inspired by captain sir tom moore, tobias — who has autism
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and cerebral palsy — is the youngest person on record to feature in the new year honours for his services to fundraising. today he starts his latest challenge, and hejoins us now to tell us all about it, along with his mother, ruth. tobias, ruth, good morning to you. lovely to see you. tobias, i'm going to start with you. good morning. tell us about this challenge you have set yourself. i’m tell us about this challenge you have set yourself.— have set yourself. i'm going to attem -t have set yourself. i'm going to attempt to _ have set yourself. i'm going to attempt to complete _ have set yourself. i'm going to attempt to complete a - have set yourself. i'm going to attempt to complete a one - have set yourself. i'm going to - attempt to complete a one kilometre challenge using my walker without even stopping for a rest. it's going to be tough, but i'm determined to do it. my family and friends are joining me to and completing it in their own challenging way. that sounds very _ their own challenging way. that sounds very impressive, and very challenging, i will say. sounds very impressive, and very challenging, iwill say. tobias, you said other friends are going to
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help, and family. what are you asking other people to do? i help, and family. what are you asking other people to do? i want eve one asking other people to do? i want everyone to _ asking other people to do? i want everyone to complete _ asking other people to do? i want everyone to complete their- asking other people to do? i want everyone to complete their own l asking other people to do? i want i everyone to complete their own one kilometre in a way that's challenging for them. skip, kilometre in a way that's challenging forthem. skip, hop, use a walker or wheelchair — just get out with your friends and enjoy the challenge. out with your friends and en'oy the challenue. . , , challenge. that is very motivational! - challenge. that is very motivational! i - challenge. that is very motivational! i was - challenge. that is very - motivational! i was already challenge. that is very _ motivational! i was already trying to think of what i could do. tobias, this is important, isn't it? why are you doing this challenge? why do you want to make children's playground is much more accessible for children with disabilities? because they should be. you shouldn't leave anyone out. everyone shouldn't leave anyone out. everyone should be included and everyone should be included and everyone should be included and everyone should be able to use their local playground.
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should be able to use their local playground-— should be able to use their local -la round. �* ~ , playground. and, mum, tell us little about how this _ playground. and, mum, tell us little about how this all— playground. and, mum, tell us little about how this all came _ playground. and, mum, tell us little about how this all came about - about how this all came about because the challenges have been going on a little while now. take us back to the beginning if you will, ruth. flit back to the beginning if you will, ruth. . ., , ., back to the beginning if you will, ruth. _, , ., , ., ., ruth. of course. it all started on lockdown. _ ruth. of course. it all started on lockdown, 2020. _ ruth. of course. it all started on lockdown, 2020. well, - ruth. of course. it all started on lockdown, 2020. well, actually. ruth. of course. it all started on | lockdown, 2020. well, actually it started _ lockdown, 2020. well, actually it started before that when tobias did a similar— started before that when tobias did a similarthing to started before that when tobias did a similar thing to the thing he is doing _ a similar thing to the thing he is doing today in 2017. he did a tobias in the _ doing today in 2017. he did a tobias in the park— doing today in 2017. he did a tobias in the park one kilometre. it was easier— in the park one kilometre. it was easier for— in the park one kilometre. it was easier for him then, i think. you wanted — easier for him then, i think. you wanted to— easier for him then, i think. you wanted to do another one during lockdown— wanted to do another one during lockdown but lockdown stopped him doin- lockdown but lockdown stopped him doing that. he saw captain tom on the tv— doing that. he saw captain tom on the tv and — doing that. he saw captain tom on the tv and thought, i can do that, and wanted — the tv and thought, i can do that, and wanted to walk up and down the street— and wanted to walk up and down the street using his walker, and it all escatated — street using his walker, and it all escalated from there. he raised an awful— escalated from there. he raised an awful lot _ escalated from there. he raised an awful lot of— escalated from there. he raised an awful lot of money for his two favourite _ awful lot of money for his two favourite charities and we've had all sorts — favourite charities and we've had all sorts of— favourite charities and we've had all sorts of fantastic experiences since~ _ all sorts of fantastic experiences since~ he — all sorts of fantastic experiences since. he went on from his marathon walk to _ since. he went on from his marathon walk to do _ since. he went on from his marathon walk to do and iron man which is the incredibly— walk to do and iron man which is the incredibly massive feet, to trike
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180 kilometres and swim four kilometres, and run using a race runner, — kilometres, and run using a race runner, another marathon, and at the end of— runner, another marathon, and at the end of that _ runner, another marathon, and at the end of that we had a little rest then— end of that we had a little rest then he — end of that we had a little rest then he started to plan his next challenge which is today. this is about raising — challenge which is today. this is about raising money, _ challenge which is today. this is about raising money, naga - challenge which is today. this is about raising money, naga was| about raising money, naga was saying, to make playgrounds more accessible. talking about the difficulties right now and what changes you would like to see to those playgrounds? so changes you would like to see to those playgrounds?— changes you would like to see to those playgrounds? so at the moment we to to those playgrounds? so at the moment we go to the — those playgrounds? so at the moment we go to the packed _ those playgrounds? so at the moment we go to the packed a _ those playgrounds? so at the moment we go to the packed a lot _ those playgrounds? so at the moment we go to the packed a lot and - those playgrounds? so at the moment we go to the packed a lot and tobias l we go to the packed a lot and tobias doesn't _ we go to the packed a lot and tobias doesn't go _ we go to the packed a lot and tobias doesn't go into the playground at all because there is not one piece of equipment that he can use, which makes _ of equipment that he can use, which makes him _ of equipment that he can use, which makes him sad and therefore it makes me sad, _ makes him sad and therefore it makes me sad, and _ makes him sad and therefore it makes me sad, and also very frustrated. he could _ me sad, and also very frustrated. he could use _ me sad, and also very frustrated. he could use some of the equipment when he was _ could use some of the equipment when he was tiny _ could use some of the equipment when he was tiny. we could lift him into them _ he was tiny. we could lift him into them. some bits were not supportive enough _ them. some bits were not supportive enough. but every child, as he said, every— enough. but every child, as he said, every child _ enough. but every child, as he said, every child should be able to use their— every child should be able to use their tocat— every child should be able to use their local playground with their friends — their local playground with their friends and we want to do something about— friends and we want to do something about that _ friends and we want to do something about that and we want to make playgrounds accessible so that there
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is perhaps _ playgrounds accessible so that there is perhaps a swing that a wheelchair can fit— is perhaps a swing that a wheelchair can fit on. _ is perhaps a swing that a wheelchair can fit on, may be another swing which _ can fit on, may be another swing which has — can fit on, may be another swing which has more support on it. the roundabouts at a level to the ground and have _ roundabouts at a level to the ground and have a _ roundabouts at a level to the ground and have a space for a wheelchair. some _ and have a space for a wheelchair. some are — and have a space for a wheelchair. some are quite simple changes and some _ some are quite simple changes and some are _ some are quite simple changes and some are more complex, but it's only i’ili'it some are more complex, but it's only right that _ some are more complex, but it's only right that we — some are more complex, but it's only right that we do it because we should — right that we do it because we should not be leaving children with disabilities out and unable to play next to— disabilities out and unable to play next to their friends in their local playground. | next to their friends in their local playground-— next to their friends in their local playground. ithink, ruth, tobias ut it playground. ithink, ruth, tobias put it really— playground. ithink, ruth, tobias put it really clearly _ playground. ithink, ruth, tobias put it really clearly and _ playground. ithink, ruth, tobias put it really clearly and really - put it really clearly and really well, everyone should have access. everyone should have opportunities. ruth, tobias is a persuasive talker, to be completely honest. i'm already trying to think of howl to be completely honest. i'm already trying to think of how i am going to do it. briefly, what are you going to do, because surely you won't get away with not taking part, and where does he get his chutzpah from, and that determination? i does he get his chutzpah from, and that determination?— does he get his chutzpah from, and that determination? i haven't a clue where he gets _ that determination? i haven't a clue where he gets that _ that determination? i haven't a clue where he gets that determination i where he gets that determination from! _ where he gets that determination
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from! it— where he gets that determination from! it might be a family thing. laughter but today i am going to walk alongside him because using his walker— alongside him because using his watker is — alongside him because using his walker is still difficult for him, and he — walker is still difficult for him, and he still needs me to help him and he still needs me to help him and steer— and he still needs me to help him and steer it, and there are some hidden _ and steer it, and there are some hidden hills today as well. they are hidden _ hidden hills today as well. they are hidden to— hidden hills today as well. they are hidden to everybody else because they only— hidden to everybody else because they only look small but to us they look absolutely enormous, and then i will be _ look absolutely enormous, and then i will be getting on with my challenge as the _ will be getting on with my challenge as the week goes by. can't give too much _ as the week goes by. can't give too much away— as the week goes by. can't give too much away yet, but we have some friends _ much away yet, but we have some friends and — much away yet, but we have some friends and family coming today to do their— friends and family coming today to do their challenge in crazy ways as wett~ _ do their challenge in crazy ways as well. �* . ~ do their challenge in crazy ways as well. �* ., . ., ., “ do their challenge in crazy ways as well. �* ., . ., ., ~ ., ., well. brilliant. well, look, good luck today _ well. brilliant. well, look, good luck today and _ well. brilliant. well, look, good luck today and good _ well. brilliant. well, look, good luck today and good luck - well. brilliant. well, look, good luck today and good luck later l well. brilliant. well, look, good| luck today and good luck later in the week. this one kilometre walk will be taking place in the park in sheffield and i'm sure anyone passing will give you a wave, tobias and ruth, and wish you luck. i am giving a thumbs up to you. good luck to you, tobias. giving a thumbs up to you. good luck to you. tobias-_ giving a thumbs up to you. good luck to you, tobias.- goodbye! - this is breakfast.
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we're on bbc one until ten o'clock this morning, then it's saturday kitchen live. what's on the menu for us, matt? if you had to do something cheffy over a kilometre, what would you do? we were talking to tobias, who has autism who will be walking one kilometre with his stroller, and he wants everyone to think about how they could travel a kilometre in an unusual way, that is challenging to them. ., ., ,, ., unusual way, that is challenging to them. ., ., ~ ., and them. 0k, over a kilometre,... and it has not them. 0k, over a kilometre,... and it has got to — them. 0k, over a kilometre,... and it has got to be _ them. 0k, over a kilometre,... and it has got to be cheffy. _ them. 0k, over a kilometre,... and it has got to be cheffy. i _ them. 0k, over a kilometre,... and it has got to be cheffy. i like - it has got to be cheffy. i like this, this — it has got to be cheffy. i like this, this keeps _ it has got to be cheffy. i like this, this keeps me - it has got to be cheffy. i like this, this keeps me on - it has got to be cheffy. i like this, this keeps me on my i it has got to be cheffy. i like - this, this keeps me on my toes. it could be pancake flipping. turning over pancakes for a kilometre. i will have to have a think about that, anyone got any other ideas? broon. ,., ., ., that, anyone got any other ideas?
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broon. ., ., ., ., broon. good morning, around our table on the _ broon. good morning, around our table on the plastic— broon. good morning, around our table on the plastic chair, - broon. good morning, around our table on the plastic chair, alex . table on the plastic chair, alex jones, what would you do for a kilometre? i jones, what would you do for a kilometre?— jones, what would you do for a kilometre? �* , , ., . kilometre? i can't cook 'ust static, so... i'm hopeless. _ kilometre? i can't cook 'ust static, so... i'm hopeless. i_ kilometre? i can't cookjust static, so... i'm hopeless. ithink- kilometre? i can't cookjust static, so... i'm hopeless. i think the - so... i'm hopeless. ithink the pancake — so... i'm hopeless. ithink the pancake is— so... i'm hopeless. ithink the pancake is probably— so... i'm hopeless. ithink the pancake is probably the - so... i'm hopeless. ithink the pancake is probably the way i so... i'm hopeless. ithink the| pancake is probably the way to so... i'm hopeless. i think the - pancake is probably the way to go. or maybe — pancake is probably the way to go. or maybe a — pancake is probably the way to go. or maybe a stir—fry. _ pancake is probably the way to go. or maybe a stir—fry. the _ pancake is probably the way to go. or maybe a stir—fry. the same - or maybe a stir—fry. the same action~ — or maybe a stir-fry. the same action. �* ., ., ., ., ., action. alex, food heaven, food hell? because _ action. alex, food heaven, food hell? because of— action. alex, food heaven, food hell? because of the _ action. alex, food heaven, food hell? because of the hot - action. alex, food heaven, foodl hell? because of the hot weather action. alex, food heaven, food i hell? because of the hot weather i have one hell? because of the hot weather i have gone with — hell? because of the hot weather i have gone with barbecues, - hell? because of the hot weather i have gone with barbecues, eating | have gone with barbecues, eating outside~ _ have gone with barbecues, eating outside i— have gone with barbecues, eating outside. i don't like lamb. what is our food outside. i don't like lamb. what is your food heaven? _ outside. i don't like lamb. what is your food heaven? it _ outside. i don't like lamb. what is your food heaven? it is _ outside. i don't like lamb. what is your food heaven? it is part - outside. i don't like lamb. what is your food heaven? it is part of- outside. i don't like lamb. what isj your food heaven? it is part of the format, alex! your food heaven? it is part of the format. alex!— your food heaven? it is part of the format, alex! mediterranean kind of salad, something _ format, alex! mediterranean kind of salad, something lovely _ format, alex! mediterranean kind of salad, something lovely in _ format, alex! mediterranean kind of salad, something lovely in the - salad, something lovely in the summer. _ salad, something lovely in the summer, olives, tomatoes, fish, tuna~ _ summer, olives, tomatoes, fish, tuna. �* summer, olives, tomatoes, fish, tuna. ~' summer, olives, tomatoes, fish, tuna. ,, ., summer, olives, tomatoes, fish, tuna. . ,, ., ., tuna. almost like a salad nicoise? i don't like lamb. _ tuna. almost like a salad nicoise? i don't like lamb. but _ tuna. almost like a salad nicoise? i don't like lamb. but you _ tuna. almost like a salad nicoise? i don't like lamb. but you are - tuna. almost like a salad nicoise? i don't like lamb. but you are welsh! j don't like lamb. but you are welsh! it doesn't mean _
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don't like lamb. but you are welsh! it doesn't mean you _ don't like lamb. but you are welsh! it doesn't mean you have _ don't like lamb. but you are welsh! it doesn't mean you have to - it doesn't mean you have to automatically like lamb! there is too much — automatically like lamb! there is too muchjeopardy, i think with tamb — too muchjeopardy, i think with lamb. when i put something in the oven _ lamb. when i put something in the oven i _ lamb. when i put something in the oven i want — lamb. when i put something in the oven i want to know what it is going to be _ oven i want to know what it is going to be like _ oven i want to know what it is going to be like texture —wise and with lamb— to be like texture —wise and with lamb i— to be like texture —wise and with lamb iiust — to be like texture —wise and with lamb ijust never know. and i don't like because — lamb ijust never know. and i don't like because yes, pointless, a bit watery~ _ like because yes, pointless, a bit watery~ so — like because yes, pointless, a bit watery. so that, as a mixture, not good _ watery. so that, as a mixture, not aood. �* , ., ~' watery. so that, as a mixture, not mad, �*, ., 4' ., ., good. fine, let's work on that. jane, good. fine, let's work on that. jane. what _ good. fine, let's work on that. jane, what have _ good. fine, let's work on that. jane, what have you _ good. fine, let's work on that. jane, what have you got? - good. fine, let's work on that. jane, what have you got? we l good. fine, let's work on that. - jane, what have you got? we have taiwanese chicken _ jane, what have you got? we have taiwanese chicken and _ jane, what have you got? we have taiwanese chicken and delicious i jane, what have you got? we havel taiwanese chicken and delicious hoi sin cauliflower— taiwanese chicken and delicious hoi sin cauliflower with _ taiwanese chicken and delicious hoi sin cauliflower with a _ taiwanese chicken and delicious hoi sin cauliflower with a delicious - sin cauliflower with a delicious charred — sin cauliflower with a delicious charred flavour. _ sin cauliflower with a delicious charred flavour. and _ sin cauliflower with a delicious charred flavour. and we - sin cauliflower with a delicious charred flavour. and we are i sin cauliflower with a delicious i charred flavour. and we are back in business _ charred flavour. and we are back in business l— charred flavour. and we are back in business. ~ . charred flavour. and we are back in business. ~' ., .,. charred flavour. and we are back in business. ~ ., business. i like that race, back in business- — business. i like that race, back in business. tom? _ business. i like that race, back in business. tom? i— business. i like that race, back in business. tom? iwill— business. i like that race, back in business. tom? i will be - business. i like that race, back in business. tom? i will be doing i business. i like that race, back in | business. tom? i will be doing the calm and mannered _ business. tom? i will be doing the calm and mannered thing - business. tom? i will be doing the calm and mannered thing in i business. tom? i will be doing the calm and mannered thing in the i calm and mannered thing in the kitchen — calm and mannered thing in the kitchen. braised _ calm and mannered thing in the kitchen. braised beef— calm and mannered thing in the kitchen. braised beef cheek. i. calm and mannered thing in the i kitchen. braised beef cheek. iwill be helping — kitchen. braised beef cheek. iwill be helping as— kitchen. braised beef cheek. iwill
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be helping as well. _ kitchen. braised beef cheek. iwill be helping as well.— kitchen. braised beef cheek. iwill be helping as well. lovely, the tan from greece. _ be helping as well. lovely, the tan from greece, how— be helping as well. lovely, the tan from greece, how was _ be helping as well. lovely, the tan from greece, how was it? - be helping as well. lovely, the tan from greece, how was it? it i be helping as well. lovely, the tan from greece, how was it? it was i from greece, how was it? it was wonderful. _ from greece, how was it? it was wonderful, thank _ from greece, how was it? it was wonderful, thank you _ from greece, how was it? it was wonderful, thank you very i from greece, how was it? it was| wonderful, thank you very much. from greece, how was it? it was l wonderful, thank you very much. i will be _ wonderful, thank you very much. i will be including a little bit of greek— will be including a little bit of greek wine and we have some english wines— greek wine and we have some english wines because it is the start of english — wines because it is the start of english wine week.— wines because it is the start of english wine week. wines because it is the start of enalish wine week. ~ ., ., , ., ., english wine week. what would you do for over a kilometre? _ english wine week. what would you do for over a kilometre? i _ english wine week. what would you do for over a kilometre? i would - english wine week. what would you do for over a kilometre? i would swell i for over a kilometre? i would swell and sniff! good _ for over a kilometre? i would swell and sniff! good one. _ for over a kilometre? i would swell and sniff! good one. and _ for over a kilometre? i would swell and sniff! good one. and not i for over a kilometre? i would swell and sniff! good one. and not spilll for over a kilometre? i would swell| and sniff! good one. and not spill a dro -. and sniff! good one. and not spill a dro. can and sniff! good one. and not spill a drop- can i— and sniff! good one. and not spill a drop- can liust _ and sniff! good one. and not spill a drop. can ijust say _ and sniff! good one. and not spill a drop. can i just say that _ and sniff! good one. and not spill a drop. can i just say that it - and sniff! good one. and not spill a drop. can i just say that it would i drop. can i 'ust say that it would have to be — drop. can i just say that it would have to be a _ drop. can i just say that it would have to be a challenge, - drop. can i just say that it would have to be a challenge, and i drop. can i just say that it would j have to be a challenge, and her, swirling and sniffing is all that she does. ., , ~' swirling and sniffing is all that i she does._ brilliant she does. people think it. brilliant programme _ she does. people think it. brilliant programme thanks _ she does. people think it. brilliant programme thanks again. - she does. people think it. brilliant programme thanks again. mike i she does. people think it. brilliant programme thanks again. mike is | programme thanks again. mike is coming up with the sport and several have the all—important weather. the time is 9:34am. heavy fighting is continuing
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in the east of ukraine — with multiple reports of troops and civilians being killed or injured every day. it's putting severe pressure on the country's medical services. one british surgeon, david nott, has been on the frontline, helping to train ukrainian doctors. our correspondent wyre davies has been to meet him. ata at a hospital in eastern ukraine, well within range of russian rockets, british surgeon david nott carries out a complicated skin graft saving the leg of a woman who suffered catastrophic injuries in russian selling. but such difficult surgery is beyond many less experienced doctors. patients were ut in a experienced doctors. patients were put in a lateral— experienced doctors. patients were put in a lateral position _ experienced doctors. patients were put in a lateral position with i experienced doctors. patients were put in a lateral position with a i put in a lateral position with a chest opened and this is the wrong treatment. he chest opened and this is the wrong treatment. . , chest opened and this is the wrong treatment. ., , , ,., , , ., treatment. he has been passing on his de th treatment. he has been passing on his depth of— treatment. he has been passing on his depth of knowledge _ treatment. he has been passing on his depth of knowledge and - his depth of knowledge and experience.— his depth of knowledge and experience. his depth of knowledge and exerience. ., ., . ., experience. you need to cut it for longitudinal _ experience. you need to cut it for longitudinal axis. _ experience. you need to cut it for longitudinal axis. his _ experience. you need to cut it for longitudinal axis. his foundation l longitudinal axis. his foundation runs courses _ longitudinal axis. his foundation runs courses in _ longitudinal axis. his foundation runs courses in war— longitudinal axis. his foundation runs courses in war zones i longitudinal axis. his foundation runs courses in war zones from | longitudinal axis. his foundation i runs courses in war zones from yemen to south sudan and now the war in
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ukraine. i to south sudan and now the war in ukraine. ~ ., ., , ~ to south sudan and now the war in ukraine. ~ ., ., , ,, ., ukraine. i know what it is like to be under fire, _ ukraine. i know what it is like to be under fire, i— ukraine. i know what it is like to be under fire, i know _ ukraine. i know what it is like to be under fire, i know what i ukraine. i know what it is like to be under fire, i know what it i ukraine. i know what it is like to be under fire, i know what it is l be under fire, i know what it is like to be in an operating theatre which is being shelled when you are trying to do your best to save the life of the patient in front of you but here, what we can do is we can train, we have trained 70 surgeons in six days, and they have seen exactly what to do.— in six days, and they have seen exactly what to do. some of those here are front _ exactly what to do. some of those here are front line _ exactly what to do. some of those here are front line doctors. i here are front line doctors. momentarily back from the fighting, where ukraine is losing too many soldiers. others are civilian medics, learning new skills, because their hospitals are full of people with new kinds of injuries. it is with new kinds of in'uries. it is horrible situation, i with new kinds of injuries. it 3 horrible situation, when you see young guys with mangled extremities, with the shrapnel wounds, with amputations, it isjust with the shrapnel wounds, with amputations, it is just a disaster. the big draw might be david nott back the star of the show is a
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lifelike medical dummy called heston, with 50 complicated procedures replicating war wounds, costing tens of thousands of pounds, it is unique, part of a system that allows nott and his team to teach life—saving skills. travelling across ukraine is tiring work for these veteran war surgeons. their last destination, the front—line city of kharkiv, battered by russian shelling, with thousands of casualties being treated by overstretched local doctors. hate overstretched local doctors. we wanted to overstretched local doctors. - wanted to bring the teaching to them. we wanted them to really understand why you should do the sort of operations, how you can do them, and if you do them properly, you will get a good result. most rewardin: you will get a good result. most rewarding for _ you will get a good result. most rewarding for doctor— you will get a good result. most rewarding for doctor nott, i you will get a good result. most rewarding for doctor nott, medics here putting complex techniques learned on his course into practice. in this case, david handed control of a limb saving operation to the ukrainian surgeon. it might be more front of class in front line these
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days for david nott but it is the quickest way of passing on his breadth of skills to surgeons here, you need them most. —— who need them most. the time now is 9:38am. something big in the world of sport. you have united rugby champion ship, the bulls against the stormers in south africa but at twickenham it is the end of the english premiership season and this is going to be great. the clash of the titans. the season on top of the table against saracens in theirfirst season on top of the table against saracens in their first season back after permission from the championship. they are the two most successful clubs if you ta ke take the last two decades but that does not tell the story of the recent problems and today marks their resurgence again. i have been taking a look.
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but two of english rugby's most famous clubs. it's been a season of redemption, leicester and saracens resurgent once more with a chance to recapture the glory days. the tigers have found their roar again last heard in the premiership final in 2013. barren years then followed for the tigers up to the unthinkable moment that the team, which had won seven titles since the turn of the century, found themselves rock bottom and facing potential relegation just a couple of years ago, which makes the turnaround under head coach steve borthwick and today's return to the showpiece at twickenham all the more remarkable. it's unbelievable. we've had a lot of ups and downs throughout the years and you know, and to see the club back into a premiership final is massive. i'm so happy for our supporters. i'm so happy for the club and everybody at the club, the board of directors, the people who saw the club through a very difficult circumstance, and i'm really happy for the players as well. ironically, leicester were only saved from relegation in 2020
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by saracens, who went down to the championship instead after a massive points deduction for breaching salary cap rules. it was a new experience for the star players who stayed with the club and helped them bounce straight back. going to all these away grounds, i never thought that i would ever go to, especially during covid, which exacerbated that meaning that there was very little people. so it was like rolling back the years to to under 15, under 18. with all due respect to the championship, it was a humbling experience, but i think it was good for us, so much so that in their first season back in the top division, the champions of 2019 beat last season's winners harlequins to reach the final once more. two great clubs then. plenty of success over the years, but have both come through recent troubles. so who needs this premiership title the most? then let's battle it out between two legends. lewis moodie — seven premiership
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titles with leicester over the years, and brad barrett, who's won the premiership title five times with saracens. so lewis, what's the case for leicester then this time? well, you put it well, mike. i feel if any club needs it, deserves it, you've got to bear in mind the tigers and saracens were such strong competitive teams over the decades and the tigers were really that sort of early 2000s team. then when we beat them in 2010, final sarries sort of then went on to dominate. so i feel it only fair that tigers now get the opportunity to lead the way for the next ten years. after the struggles and being in the championship last year, it's been back to back to the old sarries and finding a way to win is certainly going to play into their strengths. we've always had that mantra of pounding the rock, so i think appreciating the journey as much as the end destination has always been the the sort of ingredient at saracens. take your hat off to steve borthwick, who's come in and, in a season, taken leicester
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from absolutely rock bottom to actually have a record season. they brought in the likes of kevin sinfield, rugby league great, who really drives the team and creates that sense of belonging. so it's an it's an exciting... for me as now a fan it's an exciting game to go into. i think it's going to be a pretty tight battle, but i think in terms of big final experience, that's where saracens have the edge. whatever happens today, the two sides that have won more titles than all the others over the last couple of decades will certainly have re—established themselves where they feel they belong. such a difficult one to call, that one. i'm talking of tight, it is tight at the top of the us open leaderboard as well. rory mclroy, is on the coat tails of the leaders who are the americansjoel dahmen, and colin morikawa, but rory mcilroy, is only one shot behind. he is desperate for a major
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win, after eight years without one, but he got stuck in the thick brookline rough, three holes in. but what was impressive was how he recovered, to stay in touch at 4 under par, one shot off the lead. another great story, is durham's callum tarren, the world number 445, who's still in with a shout. at one stage he held the outright lead before falling back, he's on one under, three behind mclroy, who is not letting eight barren major years affect him. now to cricket, and if you thought the big—hitting was impressive, between england and new zealand, in the test match, at trent bridge earlier this week, then england's one day side blew that out of the water in the netherlands. england smashed their way to a world record, 498—4, in the first innings against the dutch. phil salt and david malan both scored their first 0di centuries, before liam livingston smashed his way to the second fastest 50 in one—day cricket — history offjust17 balls. but the headlines were saved forjoss buttler, who scored an enormous 162. england bowled netherlands all out for 266, to win by 232 runs. one football line to bring you. liverpool have agreed to sell striker sadio mane
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to german champions bayern munich. the deal for the 30—year old could be worth up to £35 million. mane arrived at anfield from southampton in 2016. he scored 90 premier league goals and helped them win the title in 2020 and the champions league the season before. this season, of course, the league cup and fa cup. i wonder if lewis hamilton has ever seen that fawlty towers scene, when basil fawlty, loses his patience with his car and attacks it with a tree branch — not that hamilton would ever go that car. a his mercedes car is far too valuable, compared to basil's old hatchback, but they share similar hamilton says nothing they seem to do on his mercedes seems to be
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working after he was 13th in yesterday's practice ahead of the canadian grand prix, a race hamilton has won 7 times, while team—mate george russell was seventh. hamilton said that merecedes just have to 'tough it out�* and work hard on building a better car for next year. championship leader max verstappen, was fastest in his red bull. nothing we do with this car seems to work. we nothing we do with this car seems to work. ~ , ' work. we were trying different setu s, work. we were trying different setups. me — work. we were trying different setups, me and _ work. we were trying different setups, me and george i work. we were trying different setups, me and george to i work. we were trying different setups, me and george to seej work. we were trying different i setups, me and george to see one work. we were trying different - setups, me and george to see one way works and another way doesn't stop i will wait to hear whether or not, but for me, it was a disaster. it is like the car is getting worse. it is getting more and more unhappy, the more and more we do to it. we will keep working on it. it is what it is. i think this is the car, for the year. i is. i think this is the car, for the ear. ~' . is. i think this is the car, for the ear. ~ . , ,., year. i like that he says it is a team effort. _ year. i like that he says it is a team effort, they _ year. i like that he says it is a team effort, they are - year. i like that he says it is a team effort, they are all- year. i like that he says it is a team effort, they are all in i year. i like that he says it is a team effort, they are all in it| team effort, they are all in it together. it must be hard knowing that you have the rest of the season ahead and the car isn't working. he has been talking about it bouncing, in recent weeks. and actually not being safe. and causing injuries.
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there is so much to talk about. you have got so much going on. good luck getting your head around the sports! that is why i love saturdays especially. i was going to try to do a link between the wimbledon, thinking of the fruit... strawberries! for many of us, strawberries are the taste of a british summer — and now is just about the perfect time of year to eat them. getting berries from the farms to our plates — however — is becoming increasingly difficult for the growers, because of labour shortages. paul murphy has been to a fruit farm in nottinghamshire which is having to recruit pickers from as far away as nepal to plug the gap. the berry picking season is about to peak and every pair of hands is needed in the poly tunnels of this farm. buddy has come from nepal more than 4000 miles away where he once had a job
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in the tourism industry. yes, i used to work in a travel and tourism past ten years and now, you know, it's after the covid. the tourism is very quite slow. so this is a really good time for us to come here. and after, you know, finishing this season, we go back to work in the mountains. finding labour has long been a problem for many fruit and veg farms. getting uk workers to do seasonal jobs has proved difficult in the past. this farm has relied on ukrainian and russian people, but the outbreak of war means they've needed to look much further afield. so our permanent staff are mainly bulgarian, romanian and polish people who are returning year in, year out. this year with the war in ukraine, we are having labour come as far as nepal, indonesia. these pickers are here on a temporary government visa designed to allow workers into the uk despite the restrictions of brexit. that scheme ends in 2024 and many farms are wondering where they will then
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source their labour from. in 2020 we wasted about £19 million worth of berries just because of shortage of labour. last year, 2021, it doubled to £39 million worth of perfectly good fruitjust thrown away because we couldn't pick it. a government spokesman told us they are backing uk farmers and growers to ensure they have the workforce they need and that much is being done to attract uk workers into the sector. and would you like to come back another time? sure, i would like to come back here again because our working time is only six months. after six months, i go to nepal and if they will call us, i come back here. the search for workers for this industry is now a global one. a wage of at least £10 per hour has been set by the government for this temporary scheme.
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the hope is that this will help to address a labour shortage that's hitting many farms across the uk. paul murphy, bbc news, nottinghamshire. quite mesmerised by how quickly they were able to pick those strawberries. it is a skill. here's sarah with a look at this morning's weather. he spoke so much about the weather this week, with people having to cope with the heat, and maybe a little bit of respite for those who did not enjoy those high temperatures.— did not enjoy those high temperatures. did not enjoy those high temeratures. , ., �* , temperatures. yes, that's right, aood temperatures. yes, that's right, good morning — temperatures. yes, that's right, good morning to _ temperatures. yes, that's right, good morning to you, _ temperatures. yes, that's right, good morning to you, and - temperatures. yes, that's right, good morning to you, and good| good morning to you, and good morning to you at home. it has been building, with uncomfortable, humid, sticky conditions in the south, but elsewhere we have had fresher air across scotland and northern ireland but the heatjust holding on for another day also in the far south—east. these were the maximum temperatures yesterday across parts of england and wales, temperatures
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up of england and wales, temperatures up to 33 degrees in suffolk, but aberdeen, belfast around 18—22. the cooler air has been heading in across the north and it will continue progress further south. we have a weather front that is lingering through the central slice of the country, bringing low cloud. we have some mist and fog around. this is the picture in devon. that mist and low cloud will linger across parts of the south—west into wales as well. but crucially, for most of us, a cooler day. it was quite sticky and warned last night in the south—east, but some rain around as that cooler air moves in. the weather front bringing the wet weather will be quite slow moving. it will sit across parts of wales, the midlands, towards east anglia. low pressure to the north of scotland, bringing a brisk wind. so some blustery showers for the north—west of scotland. sunny spells were eased in scotland, much of northern england and northern ireland. not a northern england and northern ireland. nota bad northern england and northern ireland. not a bad day at all. we
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have rain across parts of the south—west of england, wales, the midlands, lincolnshire and east anglia. to the far south—east, looking dry for much of the day. temperatures in the mid to high 20s. not as hot as yesterday but still, quite humid. forthe not as hot as yesterday but still, quite humid. for the rest of the uk, looking at temperatures between 13-21. still looking at temperatures between i3—21. still quite windy in the north heading into the evening. this evening, we will see that front putting in towards the south—east. as it bumps into that hot, humid air, it will be sparking off heavy showers and thunderstorms. some thunderstorms for kent and essex. during the second half of the night, that next area of heavy showers and thunderstorms pushes in through the channel islands, the isle of wight and sussex. quite a damp start to sunday in the south. the odd rumble of thunder around. a more comfortable night for sleeping, across england and wales compared to recent nights. and scotland and northern ireland, we have seen the fresh air already and it is sticking around. into sunday, some dry,
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settled weather for much of the uk, still a bit of a breeze in the north, bringing showers to northern scotland. to the south, plenty of sunshine for north—west england into wales, with a chance of their showers keep on going for southern counties of england. temperatures between i3—21, on sunday, so for now we have lost a heatwave, but not looking too bad for the rest of the weekend. some sunshine around either today or tomorrow for most of us. and a fairly quiet picture for the weather into next week.- and a fairly quiet picture for the weather into next week. loving it, sarah, weather into next week. loving it, sarah. thank _ weather into next week. loving it, sarah, thank you _ weather into next week. loving it, sarah, thank you so _ weather into next week. loving it, sarah, thank you so much, - weather into next week. loving it, sarah, thank you so much, have i weather into next week. loving it, sarah, thank you so much, have a | sarah, thank you so much, have a good rest of the weekend. that sounds quite nice, we will have a bit of that. what?! the weather! when a 25—year—old sir paul mccartney wrote "when i'm 61!" he could hardly have imagined that when he was 80 he'd be still on the road and headlining glastonbury. yes, macca is celebrating that big birthday today. happy birthday!
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and as part of the celebrations, some hand—picked young musicians are playing in his old house in liverpool. ian haslam reports. it's so special for me, you know? sir paul's 80th was marked by a concert in the usa last night, with an impromptu singsong led byjon bonjovi. # happy birthday dear paul... that is the mccartney present. this is very much the mccartney past. here is where paul, along with his pal, john lennon, wrote some of the beatles' early hits. it is paul's childhood home, number 20, forthlin road in south liverpool. what a place to be. if he is watching now, and he probably is, what is your message to him down the barrel of that camera? i think you are a super unique person, very talented, very creative and you have been a big influence in my life. "happy birthday" would have done! hoping to tap into the musical history in a project to mark macca's birthday, are young singer songwriters like serena. meanwhile, in the back garden...
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# oooh... you are at sir paul mccartney's house for his 80th birthday. how does that feel right now? amazing. absolutely amazing and wonderful and magical! have you got a message for him on his 80th? paul, we love you, lad. you are a hero to all of us in my family, and happy birthday. and, to his fans, fantastic is what he will always be. here he was at the cavern where it all started. we didn't know if we'd ever have any future, but we did 0k. laughter a big understatement. ian haslam, bbc news. one of the winners of that competition to perform in sir paul's childhood home, is serena ittoo. you saw herjust then with her guitar. she's back in the house for us this morning, and shejoins us now. as pa rt of as part of the competition you had to say what inspired you about the
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beatles, so tell us about your application and how you got to where you are, right now. i}!(. application and how you got to where you are, right now.— you are, right now. ok, so it is an interesting _ you are, right now. ok, so it is an interesting story. _ you are, right now. ok, so it is an interesting story. i _ you are, right now. ok, so it is an interesting story. i was _ you are, right now. ok, so it is an interesting story. i was actually i interesting story. i was actually doing my nlp training here in liverpool not that long ago, in april. i am an nlp practitioner. and my mentor�*s wife so the opportunity and e—mailed me about it. she said i think this may be something you're interested in because she knows that i'm a singer songwriter. and when i read up on the opportunity ijust thought, what an honour and a privilege it would be to even have the opportunity to be able to come to the forthlin house and be inspired by the legacy of the house and the beatles and everything that they stand for and have the opportunity to write a song, inspired by all of its history, and i thought, why notjust go for it, apply for it, and ifound out that i thought, why notjust go for it, apply for it, and i found out that i am one of the four winners of the competition and, so on may 17, we
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came to the house, we had a tour of the house, we were able to sit in each of the rooms, i was in sir paul mccartney's room when i was writing some of my lyrics for the song, and we have gone away within the last month, written songs, came back yesterday, managed to record our songs, and it is going to be live streamed on social media services and things like that, platforms, at ten o'clock today. congratulations, how incredible. _ ten o'clock today. congratulations, how incredible. before _ ten o'clock today. congratulations, how incredible. before we - ten o'clock today. congratulations, how incredible. before we go - ten o'clock today. congratulations, how incredible. before we go any l how incredible. before we go any further we should hear the song, sounds of hope, and you are going to play a little bit. it is sounds of hope, and you are going to play a little bit-— play a little bit. it is called sounds of _ play a little bit. it is called sounds of hope, _ play a little bit. it is called sounds of hope, and - play a little bit. it is called sounds of hope, and i - play a little bit. it is called sounds of hope, and i will| play a little bit. it is called - sounds of hope, and i will sing just the chorus. # my soul is escaping # my soul is escaping # in all you do # in all you do # sound of hope to age our fears away
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# here is the hope to guide you through. # it is very beautiful. thank you what was the inspiration behind that? for me, one was the inspiration behind that? igo" me, one of the things i was so inspired by when i came to the house was just learning that sir paul mccartney and michael mccartney lost their mother at quite a young age, quite soon after moving into the house. and mike actually said that at that time they felt that there was just so little hope and jim, their father, was just so little hope and jim, theirfather, was was just so little hope and jim, their father, was a single was just so little hope and jim, theirfather, was a single parent and he brought his children up. however, they held onto the little hope that they had and for mike, it was through his photography and for sale paul mccartney it was that his music, so i actually wrote the song from the perspective of sir paul mccartney as in music was his sound of hope and his form of escape from just probably the bereavement and
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the pain that he was going through, but it also pays his dreams, and he followed his passions and itjust shows that if you follow your dreams and passions, everything can happen. —— anything can happen. the and passions, everything can happen. -- anything can happen.— -- anything can happen. the beatles had already — -- anything can happen. the beatles had already split _ -- anything can happen. the beatles had already split up _ -- anything can happen. the beatles had already split up by _ -- anything can happen. the beatles had already split up by the _ -- anything can happen. the beatles had already split up by the time - -- anything can happen. the beatles had already split up by the time you | had already split up by the time you were born, so what is your first memory of ever hearing a song by the beatles? mr; memory of ever hearing a song by the beatles? ~ , ., , memory of ever hearing a song by the beatles? g . , ~ , beatles? my family likes the beatles. beatles? my family likes the beatles- l — beatles? my family likes the beatles. i have _ beatles? my family likes the beatles. i have been - beatles? my family likes the beatles. i have been asked l beatles? my family likes the i beatles. i have been asked this question a lot, do you know how the beatles are? yes, i know who they are! my family do like listening to the beatles at home. my first ever memory was probably in primary school. we did a little performance of twist and shout, so that is my first memory. of twist and shout, so that is my first memory-— of twist and shout, so that is my first memory. lovely to talk to you this morning. _ first memory. lovely to talk to you this morning, serena. _ this morning, serena. congratulations again and enjoy everything of that performance. really nice to talk to you, thank you. always good to have some music on the programme. that is it today form bbc breakfast but as usual back
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tomorrow from 6am. enjoy the weekend, goodbye.
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hello, this is bbc news andthese are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the british government is to trial a scheme allowing asylum seekers who cross the english channel in small boats to be electronically tagged. where people come here illegally, when _ where people come here illegally, when they break the law, it's important that we make that distinction. that's what we are doing — distinction. that's what we are doing with our rwanda policy, that's what we're — doing with our rwanda policy, that's what we're doing with making sure that asylum can'tjust what we're doing with making sure that asylum can't just vanish into the rest — that asylum can't just vanish into the rest of— that asylum can't just vanish into the rest of the country. supermarkets and utility companies should be helping people struggling with soaring prices — that's according to the uk government's new 'cost of living' adviser. an explosion and gunfire at a sikh temple in kabul — the latest attack on afghanistan's religious minorities.
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police in brazil confirm a body found in the remote amazon

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