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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 18, 2022 10:00am-10:31am BST

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hello, this is bbc news andthese are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. the british government is to trial a scheme allowing asylum seekers who cross the english channel in small boats to be electronically tagged. where people come here illegally, when _ where people come here illegally, when they break the law, it's important that we make that distinction. that's what we are doing — distinction. that's what we are doing with our rwanda policy, that's what we're — doing with our rwanda policy, that's what we're doing with making sure that asylum can'tjust what we're doing with making sure that asylum can't just vanish into the rest — that asylum can't just vanish into the rest of— that asylum can't just vanish into the rest of the country. supermarkets and utility companies should be helping people struggling with soaring prices — that's according to the uk government's new �*cost of living' adviser. an explosion and gunfire at a sikh temple in kabul — the latest attack on afghanistan's religious minorities.
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police in brazil confirm a body found in the remote amazon rainforest is the missing british journalist dom phillips. #be # be running up that road, be running up that hill # be running up that building... #. and running up that hill— slowly. the single that's a global number one 37 years after it's released. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. electronically tagged under
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a 12—month pilot scheme in england and wales run by the home office. ministers say tagging will help maintain contact with asylum seekers who reach the uk by what they call dangerous routes. critics say people who have fled war and persecution should not be treated in the same way as criminals. simonjones reports. another busy week for the border force in the channel — more than 1000 migrants brought ashore after being picked up at sea. the government says it will seek to remove those who have passed through several safe countries before claiming asylum in the uk. and, as part of a year—long pilot scheme, some of those awaiting deportation will be fitted with electronic tags. officials say there's a greater risk that migrants facing removal will abscond. launching the project, the home office says, "there has been an unprecedented growth in irregular migration. "the pilot will test whether electronic monitoring "will improve and maintain regular contact with asylum claimants "who arrive in the uk via unnecessary and dangerous routes. "for those facing removal, there may be an increased risk "of absconding and less incentive to comply with any conditions "of immigration bail."
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the first to be tagged are set to be the asylum seekers who successfully challenged their removal to rwanda this week — the flight to kagali grounded following last—ditch legal challenges. it's not clear how many people will be tagged in the pilot project, or how keen immigrationjudges will be to introduce electronic monitoring as part of any bail conditions. people who don't comply could be returned to detention or prosecuted. but the refugee council says it's appalling that the government is intent on treating people who have fled war, bloodshed and persecution as criminals. simon jones, bbc news. in the past few minutes the uk prime minister borisjohnson had this to say about the scheme. we re really were really proud of what we do to welcome _ were really proud of what we do to welcome people to this country. don't _ welcome people to this country. don't forget, just in the last couple — don't forget, just in the last couple of— don't forget, just in the last couple of years since i've been prime — couple of years since i've been prime minister we've had i think more _ prime minister we've had i think more than — prime minister we've had i think more than 100,000 people come from
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hon- more than 100,000 people come from hohg kohg~ _ more than 100,000 people come from hong kong. you'll remember the 15,000 _ hong kong. you'll remember the 15,000 afghans, and many, many people _ 15,000 afghans, and many, many people coming from syria, and now well over— people coming from syria, and now well over 115,000, people coming from syria, and now well over115,000, or120,000 people coming from syria, and now well over 115,000, or 120,000 visas well over115,000, or 120,000 visas given— well over 115,000, or 120,000 visas given to _ well over 115,000, or 120,000 visas given to people from ukraine. this is a very. _ given to people from ukraine. this is a very, very generous welcoming country~ _ is a very, very generous welcoming country. quite rightly. i is a very, very generous welcoming country. quite rightly. lam proud of it _ country. quite rightly. lam proud of it the — country. quite rightly. lam proud of it. the government is composed of people. _ of it. the government is composed of people. as _ of it. the government is composed of people, as you know, tom, who trace their immediate lineage to people who have — their immediate lineage to people who have come in fear of their lives to this _ who have come in fear of their lives to this country. but when people come _ to this country. but when people come here — to this country. but when people come here illegally, when they break the law, _ come here illegally, when they break the law, it's — come here illegally, when they break the law, it's important that we make that distinction. that's what we are doing _ that distinction. that's what we are doing with — that distinction. that's what we are doing with our rwanda policy, that's what we're — doing with our rwanda policy, that's what we're with making sure that asylum _ what we're with making sure that asylum seekers can't just vanish into the — asylum seekers can't just vanish into the rest of the country. with me now is enver solomon, chief executive of the refugee council. hello, enver. thanks forjoining on bbc news today. what is your reaction to the news of this electronic tagging trial scheme?
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frankly, i think it's appalling. let's think about who these people are. these are people who have fled places like afghanistan. the majority of people coming across the channel in the first three months of this year were from afghanistan. we know about the taliban and the atrocities being committed there, the attack on people's human rights, the attack on people's human rights, the attack on women's rights. they will now potentially be tagged, treated as a criminal, simply because they have had to flee the persecutor mission in afghanistan to seek safety in the uk. —— flee the persecution in afghanistan. i think this is a nasty, callous, cruel way to treat people who through no fault of their own have had to flee for their lives to try to find a country that should be welcoming.- their lives to try to find a country that should be welcoming. now, the home office — that should be welcoming. now, the home office said _ that should be welcoming. now, the home office said this _ that should be welcoming. now, the home office said this tagging - that should be welcoming. now, the home office said this tagging will i home office said this tagging will help maintain contact with asylum seekers who reach the uk and potentially allow their claims to be dealt with more effectively. as things stand, is it difficult to maintain that regular contact, and
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is there a way to do that, to keep that contract going, to help process the claims, that doesn't involve tagging? the claims, that doesn't involve tau . in: ? ., the claims, that doesn't involve tai i ini ? ., ., , the claims, that doesn't involve tanin? . ., , the claims, that doesn't involve taiiini? . . , ., tagging? there are many ways and there is no need _ tagging? there are many ways and there is no need to _ tagging? there are many ways and there is no need to tag _ tagging? there are many ways and there is no need to tag people. - there is no need to tag people. actually, this is a diversion tactic from the government's complete failure to run the asylum system in an orderly fashion. at the moment, we have utter chaos. we have over 100,000 people in the asylum system waiting for a decision, we have more than 70,000 waiting over six months and tens of thousands waiting over a year. some even waiting up to five years. that is nothing to do with whether or not the home office can keepin whether or not the home office can keep in contact with people. the home office is failing to actually make regular contact with people simply because it is running a system which is so broken, and instead of trying to come up with gimmicks and headlines such as tagging and treating people as criminals, the government should focus on running an orderly system and do what is done in germany, for
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example, and make sure decisions are made within a matter of months so that people who have a case to stay in the uk are granted protection and those that don't are supported to return to the country from which they've come from.— return to the country from which they've come from. would it allow they've come from. would it allow the home office _ they've come from. would it allow the home office to _ they've come from. would it allow the home office to collect - they've come from. would it allow the home office to collect data . they've come from. would it allow the home office to collect data onj the home office to collect data on people who abscond? it the home office to collect data on people who abscond?— people who abscond? it will allow the home office _ people who abscond? it will allow the home office to _ people who abscond? it will allow the home office to treat - people who abscond? it will allow the home office to treat people l people who abscond? it will allow| the home office to treat people as criminals. people that abscond, individuals that can be easily maintained contact with because they have a case record with the home office. we have already had instances of inappropriate, actually, that were challenged in court, of the government sharing information via the nhs with the police, so there are many ways people can be tracked and kept in contact with. there is absolutely no need to tag them. no other western nation does this and they run orderly asylum systems that are not chaotic like this country. this is a headline grabbing, callous and cruel
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tactic by the government to cover up the fact that it's failing to run an orderly system and its failing to give people a fair hearing in a timely fashion and ensure that we are a country that holds the un convention on refugees.- convention on refugees. enver solomon. _ convention on refugees. enver solomon, chief— convention on refugees. enver solomon, chief executive - convention on refugees. enver solomon, chief executive of i convention on refugees. enverl solomon, chief executive of the refugee council, thank you very much for your time today. the home secretary priti patel has described the ruling by the european court of human rights — which grounded the first plane due to take asylum—seekers to rwanda — as "scandalous". the flight had been due to take off on tuesday night before the court intervened. in an interview with the daily telegraph, ms patel said she believed the decision had been politically motivated.
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the uk government's new �*cost of living' adviser has said businesses are "obliged" to help people hit by soaring prices. david buttress, who co—founded just eat, was appointed this week for six months. he said he would focus on convincing food shops, utility companies and the leisure industry to cut costs for consumers. 0ur political correspondent, ione wells, has been speaking to him. talk to anyone on high streets up and down the uk, and everyone is thinking about the cost of living and what changes they could make. i've definitely cut down on fuel and eating out. being careful about how much electricity i use, but i don't think i'm cutting back that much. turning out lights and trying - to get my daughter to turn her fan off at night, and things like that. people are changing how much they buy but can't control how much goods cost. that's something the government's new cost—of—living tzar david buttress wants to change. he founded the delivery chain just eat, but will have desk here at the heart of government here. but he says his aims are not to change government policy, but to make food, utilities and leisure companies cut their costs to help consumers by the time he leaves the role in the six months' time.
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i want to work with the bigger industries to make sure that we help people to soften the blow of that, to make their money go further. if you think of all the the money that's spent on marketing and doing deals to promote some of the big activities that british people enjoy, well, let's take some of that money, let's refocus it onto what really matters to people which is making prices more competitive. he hasn't always been a fan of the government, tweeting in his past life that decades of neglect by the conservatives have been a contributing factor to child poverty. so how does he feel about advising them now? you have to bear in mind that i had never met any
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of the team at number ten, at least of all obviously the prime minister, and i think it says everything about this government, and the prime minister, that actually they've put someone like me in place who really cares about it and wants to make a big impact in this area. what's not clear is how he will get businesses on—board and whether they will ask for anything from government in return. his ideas have been welcomed by the trades union congress, but they argue price cuts won't be enough without wages rising. anything that helps hard—pressed families, that keeps down costs is going to be welcomed, but i'm afraid these comments ignore the reality that our cost—of—living crisis is actually a wages crisis. we've had the biggest squeeze on wages in this country for 200 years. real wages are well below where they were in 2008 in real terms. and so what we need to see from governments and also from employers is what they're going to going to do to boost the money in peoples' pockets, to boost wages and to give britain a pay rise it really needs and deserves. it really has been extremely difficult... the government has announced a package of support, including a £400 discount on energy bills in october, and payments of £650 on those on means—tested benefits. but the new advisor argues it's time for the private sector to come to the table.
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ione wells, bbc news. well, for more on this, i'm nowjoined by tina mckenzie, policy and advocacy chair, federation of small businesses. good to have you with us today, tina. we have been talking a lot about the cost of living crisis of course and you have been talking about the cost of doing business crisis are what you make of these ideas from david buttress? is there something private businesses can work with? i something private businesses can work with? ~ . ., work with? i think the cost of wm work with? i think the cost of living crisis _ work with? i think the cost of living crisis is _ work with? i think the cost of living crisis is inextricably - work with? i think the cost of i living crisis is inextricably linked to the _ living crisis is inextricably linked to the cost— living crisis is inextricably linked to the cost of— living crisis is inextricably linked to the cost of doing _ living crisis is inextricably linked to the cost of doing business . living crisis is inextricably linked . to the cost of doing business crisis and right— to the cost of doing business crisis and right now— to the cost of doing business crisis and right how in _ to the cost of doing business crisis and right now in the _ to the cost of doing business crisis and right now in the united - to the cost of doing business crisis l and right now in the united kingdom we had _ and right now in the united kingdom we had around — and right now in the united kingdom we had around 400,000 _ and right now in the united kingdom we had around 400,000 small- we had around 400,000 small businesses _ we had around 400,000 small businesses close _ we had around 400,000 small businesses close in _ we had around 400,000 small businesses close in 2020, - we had around 400,000 small businesses close in 2020, a i we had around 400,000 small. businesses close in 2020, a huge amount— businesses close in 2020, a huge amount of— businesses close in 2020, a huge amount of businesses _ businesses close in 2020, a huge amount of businesses closing - businesses close in 2020, a huge| amount of businesses closing this yeari _ amount of businesses closing this year. even — amount of businesses closing this year. even more _ amount of businesses closing this year, even more than _ amount of businesses closing this year, even more than last- amount of businesses closing this year, even more than last year, l amount of businesses closing thisl year, even more than last year, so we really— year, even more than last year, so we really need _ year, even more than last year, so we really need the _ year, even more than last year, so we really need the government - year, even more than last year, so we really need the government to| we really need the government to step in— we really need the government to step in and — we really need the government to step in and actually— we really need the government to step in and actually support - we really need the government to step in and actually support small| step in and actually support small businesses — step in and actually support small businesses at _ step in and actually support small businesses at this _ step in and actually support small businesses at this time. - step in and actually support small businesses at this time. they- step in and actually support smalll businesses at this time. they have huge _ businesses at this time. they have huge energy— businesses at this time. they have huge energy increases, _ businesses at this time. they have huge energy increases, increases. businesses at this time. they have l huge energy increases, increases in fuel. _ huge energy increases, increases in fuel. so— huge energy increases, increases in fuel. so we — huge energy increases, increases in fuel. so we really— huge energy increases, increases in fuel, so we really need _ huge energy increases, increases in fuel, so we really need some - fuel, so we really need some intervention— fuel, so we really need some intervention here _ fuel, so we really need some intervention here around - fuel, so we really need somel intervention here around vat, fuel, so we really need some - intervention here around vat, and 'ust intervention here around vat, and just really— intervention here around vat, and just really access _ intervention here around vat, and just really access to _ intervention here around vat, and just really access to finance - intervention here around vat, and just really access to finance as - just really access to finance as well— just really access to finance as well because _ just really access to finance as well because small— just really access to finance as| well because small businesses just really access to finance as - well because small businesses are carrying _ well because small businesses are carrying more _ well because small businesses are carrying more debt— well because small businesses are carrying more debt than _ well because small businesses are carrying more debt than they - well because small businesses are carrying more debt than they havej carrying more debt than they have ever carried~ — carrying more debt than they have ever carried. fire— carrying more debt than they have ever carried-— carrying more debt than they have ever carried. are you saying this is an unfair shifting _ ever carried. are you saying this is an unfair shifting of _ ever carried. are you saying this is an unfair shifting of responsibilityl an unfair shifting of responsibility onto businesses? businesses are very comfortable with responsibilitv — businesses are very comfortable with responsibility. remember— businesses are very comfortable with responsibility. remember it - businesses are very comfortable with responsibility. remember it was - businesses are very comfortable with responsibility. remember it was the i responsibility. remember it was the small— responsibility. remember it was the small businesses— responsibility. remember it was the small businesses in _ responsibility. remember it was the small businesses in the _ responsibility. remember it was the small businesses in the local- small businesses in the local communities— small businesses in the local communities that _ small businesses in the local communities that kept - small businesses in the locall communities that kept people small businesses in the local- communities that kept people going through— communities that kept people going through covid, — communities that kept people going through covid, and _ communities that kept people going through covid, and small— communities that kept people going| through covid, and small businesses are actually—
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through covid, and small businesses are actually consumers _ through covid, and small businesses are actually consumers as _ through covid, and small businesses are actually consumers as well, - through covid, and small businesses are actually consumers as well, buti are actually consumers as well, but really _ are actually consumers as well, but really to _ are actually consumers as well, but really to turn — are actually consumers as well, but really to turn to _ are actually consumers as well, but really to turn to small— are actually consumers as well, but really to turn to small businesses . really to turn to small businesses and ask— really to turn to small businesses and ask them _ really to turn to small businesses and ask them to _ really to turn to small businesses and ask them to take _ really to turn to small businesses and ask them to take on- really to turn to small businesses and ask them to take on more . and ask them to take on more responsibility— and ask them to take on more responsibility at— and ask them to take on more responsibility at this - and ask them to take on more responsibility at this very- responsibility at this very difficult _ responsibility at this very difficult time, _ responsibility at this very difficult time, i— responsibility at this very difficult time, i think- responsibility at this very difficult time, i think it . responsibility at this very. difficult time, i think it feels responsibility at this very- difficult time, i think it feels a bit, difficult time, i think it feels a bit. well, _ difficult time, i think it feels a bit. well, it— difficult time, i think it feels a bit, well, itjust_ difficult time, i think it feels a bit, well, it just feels - difficult time, i think it feels a bit, well, it just feels a - difficult time, i think it feels a bit, well, itjust feels a bit - bit, well, itjust feels a bit strange _ bit, well, itjust feels a bit strange. you _ bit, well, itjust feels a bit strange. you know, - bit, well, itjust feels a bit strange. you know, we . bit, well, itjust feels a bit. strange. you know, we know bit, well, itjust feels a bit - strange. you know, we know that small— strange. you know, we know that small businesses— strange. you know, we know that small businesses are _ strange. you know, we know that small businesses are closing - strange. you know, we know thatl small businesses are closing every day in _ small businesses are closing every day in the — small businesses are closing every day in the uk, _ small businesses are closing every day in the uk, we _ small businesses are closing every day in the uk, we know— small businesses are closing every day in the uk, we know they- small businesses are closing every day in the uk, we know they are l day in the uk, we know they are carrying — day in the uk, we know they are carrying more _ day in the uk, we know they are carrying more cost _ day in the uk, we know they are carrying more cost than - day in the uk, we know they are carrying more cost than ever. it| day in the uk, we know they are i carrying more cost than ever. it is really _ carrying more cost than ever. it is really about — carrying more cost than ever. it is really about not _ carrying more cost than ever. it is really about not saying _ carrying more cost than ever. it is really about not saying it - carrying more cost than ever. it is really about not saying it is - carrying more cost than ever. it is really about not saying it is what i really about not saying it is what part of— really about not saying it is what part of society _ really about not saying it is what part of society or— really about not saying it is what part of society or the _ really about not saying it is what part of society or the other - really about not saying it is what part of society or the other to i part of society or the other to carry. — part of society or the other to carry. but _ part of society or the other to carry. but it _ part of society or the other to carry, but it is _ part of society or the other to carry, but it is really- part of society or the other to carry, but it is really for- part of society or the other to carry, but it is really for a i part of society or the other to carry, but it is really for a setj part of society or the other to i carry, but it is really for a set of measures— carry, but it is really for a set of measures to _ carry, but it is really for a set of measures to be _ carry, but it is really for a set of measures to be introduced i carry, but it is really for a set of measures to be introduced not. carry, but it is really for a set of. measures to be introduced notjust to help _ measures to be introduced notjust to help consumers _ measures to be introduced notjust to help consumers but _ measures to be introduced notjust to help consumers but to _ measures to be introduced notjust to help consumers but to help i measures to be introduced notjustl to help consumers but to help those small— to help consumers but to help those small businesses— to help consumers but to help those small businesses keep _ to help consumers but to help those small businesses keep people - small businesses keep people employed _ small businesses keep people employed and _ small businesses keep people employed and keep— small businesses keep people employed and keep their- small businesses keep people - employed and keep their businesses open through— employed and keep their businesses open through this _ employed and keep their businesses open through this very— employed and keep their businesses open through this very difficult - open through this very difficult period — open through this very difficult ieriod. �* ., , ,., .,, period. but it does sound as if david buttress _ period. but it does sound as if david buttress is _ period. but it does sound as if david buttress is trying i period. but it does sound as if david buttress is trying to i period. but it does sound as if david buttress is trying to be l david buttress is trying to be imaginative here. for example, he is suggesting businesses take the money they might use for marketing and we redistribute that and use it and instead to cut prices instead —— and redistribute it and use it instead to cut prices for customers. but they wouldn't have the big budget big companies would have, small businesses, i understand. big companies would have, small businesses, iunderstand. from big companies would have, small businesses, i understand. from your perspective, is that useful at all?
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not at all. remember there are more than 55— not at all. remember there are more than 55 million — not at all. remember there are more than 5.5 million small _ not at all. remember there are more than 5.5 million small businesses i than 5.5 million small businesses around _ than 5.5 million small businesses around the — than 5.5 million small businesses around the uk_ than 5.5 million small businesses around the uk and _ than 5.5 million small businesses around the uk and they— than 5.5 million small businesses around the uk and they employ. than 5.5 million small businesses i around the uk and they employ more than 60%_ around the uk and they employ more than 60% of— around the uk and they employ more than 60% of the _ around the uk and they employ more than 60% of the people _ around the uk and they employ more than 60% of the people in _ around the uk and they employ more than 60% of the people in the - around the uk and they employ more than 60% of the people in the uk. i than 60% of the people in the uk. they don't— than 60% of the people in the uk. they don't sit _ than 60% of the people in the uk. they don't sit on _ than 60% of the people in the uk. they don't sit on big _ than 60% of the people in the uk. they don't sit on big marketing i they don't sit on big marketing budgets. — they don't sit on big marketing budgets. they— they don't sit on big marketing budgets, they don't _ they don't sit on big marketing budgets, they don't have - they don't sit on big marketing budgets, they don't have lots i they don't sit on big marketing | budgets, they don't have lots of people. — budgets, they don't have lots of people. they— budgets, they don't have lots of people, they don't _ budgets, they don't have lots of people, they don't have - budgets, they don't have lots of people, they don't have huge i people, they don't have huge investment— people, they don't have huge investment pots. _ people, they don't have huge investment pots. they- people, they don't have huge investment pots. they are i people, they don't have huge i investment pots. they are quite franidy— investment pots. they are quite frankly living _ investment pots. they are quite frankly living day—to—day, - investment pots. they are quite frankly living day—to—day, just l investment pots. they are quitel frankly living day—to—day, just as consumers — frankly living day—to—day, just as consumers are, _ frankly living day—to—day, just as consumers are, and _ frankly living day—to—day, just as consumers are, and they - frankly living day—to—day, just as consumers are, and they are i consumers are, and they are wondering _ consumers are, and they are wondering where _ consumers are, and they are wondering where they- consumers are, and they are wondering where they are i consumers are, and they are i wondering where they are going consumers are, and they are - wondering where they are going to iet wondering where they are going to get finance — wondering where they are going to get finance from. _ wondering where they are going to get finance from. the _ wondering where they are going to get finance from. the late - wondering where they are going to i get finance from. the late payments is a real— get finance from. the late payments is a real issue — get finance from. the late payments is a real issue for— get finance from. the late payments is a real issue for them. _ get finance from. the late payments is a real issue for them. i— get finance from. the late payments is a real issue for them. i would i is a real issue for them. i would like to— is a real issue for them. i would like to hear— is a real issue for them. i would like to hear more _ is a real issue for them. i would like to hear more about - is a real issue for them. i would like to hear more about what i is a real issue for them. i wouldl like to hear more about what the government— like to hear more about what the government in— like to hear more about what the government in this _ like to hear more about what the government in this particular- like to hear more about what the i government in this particular new role can— government in this particular new role can do— government in this particular new role can do to _ government in this particular new role can do to encourage - government in this particular new role can do to encourage big i role can do to encourage big business _ role can do to encourage big business to— role can do to encourage big business to pay— role can do to encourage big business to pay small - role can do to encourage big i business to pay small business on timei _ business to pay small business on time, and — business to pay small business on time, and also— business to pay small business on time, and also what _ business to pay small business on time, and also what other- business to pay small business on . time, and also what other measures they can _ time, and also what other measures they can do — time, and also what other measures they can do to — time, and also what other measures they can do to ensure _ time, and also what other measures they can do to ensure we _ time, and also what other measures they can do to ensure we keep- time, and also what other measuresj they can do to ensure we keep small businesses _ they can do to ensure we keep small businesses alive _ they can do to ensure we keep small businesses alive in _ they can do to ensure we keep small businesses alive in what _ they can do to ensure we keep small businesses alive in what is _ they can do to ensure we keep small businesses alive in what is one - they can do to ensure we keep small businesses alive in what is one of i businesses alive in what is one of the most — businesses alive in what is one of the most difficult _ businesses alive in what is one of the most difficult times _ businesses alive in what is one of the most difficult times they i businesses alive in what is one of| the most difficult times they have had. the most difficult times they have had i_ the most difficult times they have had ithink— the most difficult times they have had ithink if— the most difficult times they have had. i think if you _ the most difficult times they have had. i think if you are _ the most difficult times they have had. i think if you are in - had. i think if you are in e—commerce_ had. i think if you are in e—commerce business. had. i think if you are in i e—commerce business and had. i think if you are in - e—commerce business and sitting had. i think if you are in _ e—commerce business and sitting in a very profitable — e—commerce business and sitting in a very profitable company— e—commerce business and sitting in a very profitable company and - e—commerce business and sitting in a very profitable company and you i e—commerce business and sitting in a very profitable company and you have hu-e very profitable company and you have huge reserves, — very profitable company and you have huge reserves, maybe _ very profitable company and you have huge reserves, maybe that _ very profitable company and you have huge reserves, maybe that would i huge reserves, maybe that would worki _ huge reserves, maybe that would work. but — huge reserves, maybe that would work. but for— huge reserves, maybe that would work, but for the _ huge reserves, maybe that would work, but for the small— huge reserves, maybe that would i work, but for the small businesses of the _ work, but for the small businesses of the united — work, but for the small businesses of the united kingdom _ work, but for the small businesses of the united kingdom who - work, but for the small businesses of the united kingdom who are i of the united kingdom who are struggling _ of the united kingdom who are struggling to _ of the united kingdom who are struggling to keep _ of the united kingdom who are struggling to keep their- of the united kingdom who are struggling to keep their doorsl of the united kingdom who are i struggling to keep their doors open then this _ struggling to keep their doors open then this doesn't _ struggling to keep their doors open then this doesn't work _ struggling to keep their doors open then this doesn't work for - struggling to keep their doors open then this doesn't work for them. i then this doesn't work for them. like 0k. — then this doesn't work for them. like 0k. tina _ then this doesn't work for them. like 0k, tina mckenzie, - then this doesn't work for them. like 0k, tina mckenzie, from i then this doesn't work for them. i like 0k, tina mckenzie, from the federation — like 0k, tina mckenzie, from the federation of _ like 0k, tina mckenzie, from the federation of small— like 0k, tina mckenzie, from the federation of small businesses, i federation of small businesses, thank— federation of small businesses, thank you — federation of small businesses, thank you very _ federation of small businesses, thank you very much _ federation of small businesses, thank you very much —— -
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federation of small businesses, thank you very much —— 0k, - federation of small businesses, thank you very much -- 0k, tina mckenzie- _ militants have attacked a sikh temple in the afghan capital kabul. two people are said to have been killed. the attackers threw hand grenades at the building but the taliban say a car bomb detonated before reaching the temple. the attack is said to be over now, with the authorities carrying out a clearance operation. here's the latest from our correspondent secunder kermani who is in kabul. well, the attack began around 6.30 in the morning, local time, and it seems the assailants tried to force their way into the compound housing this gurdwara or sikh temple using hand grenades. now, according to taliban officials guards then opened fire on the assailants, forcing them to detonate a car bomb that they had prepared before it reached its target. but that still sent huge plumes of black smoke into the sky
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and there were, for a number of hours, the sound of gunfire and further explosions coming from the site. around an hour ago, though, the taliban said that they'd fully completed the clearance operation of the site and all the assailants had been killed. as you say, from the information that they've released there were two casualties, one sikh civilian and elderly man — it appears he was praying at the time, according to some reports, inside the gurdwara — and one member of the taliban security forces who was assisting in the operation tackling the militants. as to who is responsible, there has been no claim so far, but all suspicion will be that it's the work of the local branch of the islamic state group. they've repeatedly targeted afghanistan's tiny sikh community in the past here. another attack on a temple, a gurdwara, back in 2020, and a suicide bombing in the eastern city ofjalalabad back in 2018 as well. that was secunder kermani. brazilian police have confirmed that the remains of one of the two bodies found in the remote amazon rainforest are those of the british journalist dom phillips. the second body — believed to be that of indigenous expert bruno pereira — is still being examined.
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earlier this week, a suspect confessed to burying the bodies. his brother has also been arrested. here's our south america correspondent, katy watson. the grim news confirmed — dom phillips' family can now, in the words of his wife, ale, say goodbye to him with love. these are the two men as their friends and family want to remember them — dom phillips, a passionate journalist writing a book on saving the amazon. his travelling companion, bruno pereira, was an indigenous expert who knew the community so well and was loved by so many here. the authorities are still trying to establish whether the human remains also include those of bruno pereira. suspect amarildo da costa de oliveira confessed to the crime and lead the search teams to the place he buried the two men. a difficult location, two miles inland from the river, and they needed the help of helicopters, sniffer dogs and divers, but the police said that they still hadn't located the boat belonging to mr pereira that the suspect admitted he'd sunk. authorities are also looking for a third suspect, jeferson da silva lima. they say he's currently on the run.
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the area where the two men disappeared is vast, remote and lawless. on the border with colombia and peru, there are illegal fishermen and poachers and drug trafficking too. indeed, bruno's work trying to protect the indigenous communities from illegal activities made him enemies. he'd been threatened in the past because of his work. police, though, say the investigation suggests the suspects acted alone, not with a criminal organisation behind them. but that was rejected by univaja, the association of indigenous communities, which had taken part in the search and had been calling for more to be done to find their friend bruno and his travel companion, dom. they believe it was a crime planned in detail. katy watson, bbc news. a new device designed for people living with
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tourette's syndrome is being described as a "game—changer" by campaigners. the wearable gadget aims to reduce the involuntary sounds and movements, known as tics, by intercepting signals to the brain. it's currently being tested in a uk—wide clinical trial. here's navtej johal. 13—year—old milo loves drumming, drama and defeating his enemies in video games. four years ago, he was diagnosed with tourette's syndrome. his mum says at the time she was devastated. you sort of goes through a period of sort of grief, if i'm honest. you know, you get a diagnosis that you don't know much about — i didn't know anything about it. and, you know, you're scared and you're worried and you're like, "what's going to happen?" when i was diagnosed, ithought, "oh, god, what am i going to do?
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i'm going to be bullied for this." i feel like just shortly after that, i think, on that front, it doesn't change anything about like who you are as a person and your personality. so as long as you are a good person, people will be nice to you. tourette's is a neurological condition which usually starts in childhood and causes a person to make involuntary movements and sounds known as tics. if i do tic, if i need to tic, i do. it is, like, very shortly after, it will come on stronger and more above them. are you trying to suppress a tic right now? yeah, i have to be honest, because when you're talking about it, this is certainly worse. not everyone is able to suppress their tics. milo and his mum are happy for us to show what his tics can look like when they've been building up without release. he says they're not painful. it's easier to do them
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than to hold them off. but if i'm at school or something, like, i'm not going tojust do them because that'll be embarrassing in class, and i can leave class — i have a card or i can, like, go to the loo and i can do it there. although symptoms usually improve after several years, there is no cure for tourette's. ok, so this is the - prototype device that we've built for- the clinical trial... but this little device could help to change the life of milo and the estimated more than 300,000 people in the uk with the condition. it's been developed at the university of nottingham. by stimulating that nerve we're able i to change the activity in the brain i |areas associated with producing j tics, so we can press the button and for a period of time reduce the likelihood their tics - iare going to occur without side i effects, without adverse events, without having to travel to get treatment. - so it's a massive game—changer. you!
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the university has now started a national trial to study the effectiveness of the device. the demand to be involved has been overwhelming. it's been extremely successful. so it's benefited probably around 70% of the people in the trial. i they have seen a marked improvement. i get emails every single day- from all over the world from people asking either can they buy- the device now or can they take part in the clinical trial. i've even had people willing to relocate from the usa, l from singapore, from australia, to the uk for the purpose - of participating in the trial. soon milo will be one ofjust 135 people to take part in the trial. the group testing the device will use it daily for a month, with everyone giving weekly feedback. if it works, it'll be really good because it'll mean i can do those things i haven't been able to do before.
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i'll be able to experience that childhood magic. it would be amazing. it will be life changing for so many people, so it's brilliant to get the opportunity to be part of it. the trial will last until the end of the year and the hope is that within a few years the device may be available for wider public use. milo says he's looking forward to hopefully playing a small part in helping others like him. navteonhal, bbc news. long covid is becoming a growing and under—addressed problem among children — that's the warning from scientists as new figures suggest nearly one in 20 primary school pupils in england are living with the illness. our reporterjamie coulson has been to meet ii—year—old freya, who has been suffering with debilitating symptoms since last october. this was freya chilvers before she caught covid last october — energetic, sporty, and full of life. and this is her now, living with a long list of debilitating symptoms which frequently leave her exhausted and often in pain.
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i get backache, headache, rashes. sometimes i get tinnitus, tired all the time. from going 100 miles an hour, all day long. just bubbly, zesty, really active, jumping around constantly, we see herjust very tired and having to have a rest even after going to school for a few hours. your physiotherapist can teach you how to take your heart rate. long covid has impacted every aspect of freya's life. having missed large periods of school, the ii—year—old still only manages three half—days a week, and she struggles to take part in normal activities. it's very difficult and frustrating that i can't do the things that i wanted to do and that i did do before, like all my dancing and football and theatre shows.
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for months on end, we were in a what they call a boom—bust cycle. so freya has also been diagnosed with me and chronic fatigue syndrome as a result of long covid. so we were... she was, like, going to school for a day, and then it'd end up being two days in bed, three days in bed, and not well enough to walk across the landing because she was just doing too much. how are you feeling? i'm a bit tired, but i'm 0k. thank you. freya is seeing a fatigue specialist, but her recovery has been slow and frustrating. it'sjust hard. it's... it's soul destroying and devastating, and just hope for more good days than bad days. and they think maybe nine months...
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i'll get a bit better after nine months of having it, but i don't know. jamie coulson, bbc news. 37 years after it was first released, kate bush's song running up that hill has reached the top spot in the uk singles chart. # be running up that road, be running up that hill # be running up that building # if i only could, oh... #. it comes after the song featured in the netflix hit tv series stranger things — introducing kate bush's music to a whole new generation of fans. the song had previously made it to number three in the uk charts in 1985. you are watching bbc news. now, for the first time, deaf people who use british sign language will be able to contact 999 through a specialised video service. the new system connects users to the police, ambulance, fire and coastguard via a remote interpreter. campaigners have called it a "breakthrough that will save lives". helena wilkinson reports. briony and her husband andy are both deaf. last summer, he collapsed. unable to call 999,
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briony drove him to a&e. interpreter: at that time, i absolutely panicked, - i just didn't know what to do. and i think if i'd 999 bsl available back then i would've been able to get advice very quickly, i wouldn't have had the stress, i would've been able to stay calm, i would've knew that help was coming to where we were, but obviously it wasn't available back then. and that drive — the drive, when i was trying to drive and watching him struggling to breathe next to me, and obviously i couldn't communicate with him because he couldn't sign to me — he was struggling to breathe too much. so i know now that 999 bsl is available, and it's just such a relief that deaf people aren't going to have to go through that experience that i had. 999 british sign language will, for the first time, allow deaf
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people to call directly through to an emergency video calling service, allowing them to communicate in their first language, bsl, through an interpreter. this is how the new service works. the caller connects to the 999 bsl app on their mobile or online. they press the red button to make the call, that connects them to a bsl interpreter, who contacts a 999 operator. the conversation is then relayed. the deaf community say it's a breakthrough. the app will be an absolute life—changer. it has been years and years in the coming. deaf people have not been able to access emergency services for years directly. they've been able to do it through text relay but that means you're ahving to type, you know, "hello, this is the problem." you know, you can imagine
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doing that — and it's 75% slower thank speaking, so you can imagine trying to have an emergency situation conversation, and that's just not acceptable when you're using written english. if it's life—and—death you need to be able to click, communicate in your first language, directly, and that's what this does, so i am so pleased to see this here now. the deaf community say this is one more step forward towards equality. helena wikinson, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with sarah keith lucas. hello there. whilst we have seen some record—breaking june temperatures across parts of france, it's another very hot day there, for paris, for instance, closer to home here for the uk, we are introducing cooler and fresher air from the north. still holding onto the heat and humidity in the far south—east. we have a weather front bringing cloud and rain to parts of south—west england, across the midlands and east anglia. temperatures, for most of us, in the mid to high teens. still in the high 20s in the far south—east, though. quite a few showers pushing into the north—west of scotland into the evening hours. we have also got some thunderstorms developing for parts of east anglia and the south—east.
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and later in the night pushing in towards the south coast once again. so, some wet, thundery weather to start your morning in the far south of england sick but other places, fresher than they have been in recent nights. more comfortable for sleeping. a lot of dry and fairly sunny weather through the day tomorrow. a little less breezy in the north compared to today. still some heavy showers and thunderstorms possible in the south. they should ease away later, with highs of between 13 and 21. bye— bye.

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