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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 19, 2022 8:00pm-8:31pm BST

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larger week, we will continue with largely dry weather. this is bbc news. the headlines at eight. a bad night for president macron, he looks set to lose his overall majority in the french parliament — the far—left and the far—right have made gains. rail bosses have confirmed that talks to try to avoid this week's strike action will continue with union leaders tomorrow. after the uk's promise of more heavy weapons to ukraine — the new head of the british army says troops should be prepared to fight russia in europe. communities in finsbury park gather to mark five years since the terror attack in which a van was driven into worshippers outside a mosque. and swimming's world governing body votes to effectively ban transgender competitors like american lia thomas from taking part in women's races.
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good evening. projections following parliamentary elections in france show president emmanuel macron is on course to lose his absolute majority. his coalition is on track to win the most seats, with between 210 and 250. but that's short of the 289 needed for a majority in the national assembly. projections show the left—green alliance ofjean—luc melenchon is set to win 150 to 180 seats, becoming the main opposition. mr melenchon says the result marks an �*electoral failure' for mr macron. a hung parliament will make it difficult for the president to press ahead with his planned reforms in his second term of office. we're nowjoined by peter conradi, the europe editor of
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the sunday times newspaper, who joins us from paris. thank whojoins us from paris. you thank who joins us from paris. you forjoining thank whojoins us from paris. you forjoining us. i guess surprising thank you forjoining us. i guess a surprising result?— surprising result? yes, i mean --eole surprising result? yes, i mean peeple were — surprising result? yes, i mean people were suspecting - surprising result? yes, i mean people were suspecting it - surprising result? yes, i mean i people were suspecting it would surprising result? yes, i mean - people were suspecting it would be quite bad for emmanuel macron but not as bad as this. the latest projections i've seen from the french media have macron�*s group, his own party and various allies on only 224, leaving him a long way short, 65 seats short of an overall majority in the national assembly, their house of parliament, which is dire. �* ~ . ., ,. , .,, dire. and melenchon describing it as an electoral — dire. and melenchon describing it as an electoral failure. _ dire. and melenchon describing it as an electoral failure. how— dire. and melenchon describing it as an electoral failure. how much - an electoral failure. how much restriction is this going to be on what macron can achieve in the coming months and years? we're in a cufious coming months and years? we're in a curious situation, _ coming months and years? we're in a curious situation, uncharted - curious situation, uncharted territory for french politics
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because essentially there are three big groups in the parliament, macron�*s alliance, melenchon�*s alliance, called the nupes, a mixture of moderate left and far left parties and also marine le pen's national rally, of the far right and a fourth group, the republicans, the mainstream conservatives. essentially what macron has to do, he has to find these other 50 or so votes from parties either to the left of him or the right of him. that means perhaps taking seats or encouraging some of the republicans, the centre—right, to team up with him, and perhaps encouraging some of the more moderate left parties in that alliance to team up with him. but it's tricky because he's in a sense going to have to turn in both directions simultaneously because there isn't enough votes on either side with people he can team up
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with, so it's going to be messy. haw with, so it's going to be messy. how do ou with, so it's going to be messy. how do you think — with, so it's going to be messy. how do you think the _ with, so it's going to be messy. how do you think the left were able to make such gains? how were they able to win over the voters? this make such gains? how were they able to win over the voters?— to win over the voters? this is artl a to win over the voters? this is partly a product _ to win over the voters? this is partly a product of _ to win over the voters? this is partly a product of the - to win over the voters? this is partly a product of the way - to win over the voters? this is| partly a product of the way the french electoral system works. here, it is first past the post as in britain but there are two rounds. therefore it's all about making alliances in the first round, taking you through to the second round run—off. this time for the first time underjean—luc melenchon, who is a very far left figure, he managed, however, to team up with the socialist party, the commonest, who are more moderate and also with the greens, meaning the total left vote wasn't much greater than last time in 2017 but because they stood together and divided the country up between them they advanced in many more constituencies in the second round and went on to do well. fix, round and went on to do well. a couple of months ago it seemed as if
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marine le pen, you know, any success was quashed, but some gains for the far right tonight. wider you think people weren't expecting them to have as much success as they did? yeah that's interesting because in fact you could say the real winner this evening is marine le pen. yes, her party is in third place but she's got many, many more seats, she's got many, many more seats, she's projected to get many more seats than people expected. in the current outgoing department her party has eight seats and it is projected to get 89. you know, it was difficult to predict. she was deliberately dampening expectations, playing things down. jean—luc melenchon was making a lot of noise through the campaign, trying to present it as a duel between himself and emmanuel macron. but marine le
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pen was very quietly campaigning. she spent a lot of time going around constituencies, particularly in the north, fairly economically deprived north, which is a good source of voters for her party, and also the south. almost below the radar she was working away and she's got her reward this evening. i've been watching her at her victory rally, she's very much claiming this as a triumph for her party.— she's very much claiming this as a triumph for her party. thank you for discussin: triumph for her party. thank you for discussing that _ triumph for her party. thank you for discussing that and _ triumph for her party. thank you for discussing that and for _ triumph for her party. thank you for discussing that and for your- discussing that and for your analysis. hugh scofield is in paris. this is something that not many people expected. in terms of how bad a night it was going to be for macron. ., a night it was going to be for macron. . �* , ., a night it was going to be for macron. . �*, ., , ., ., �*, macron. yeah. it's a blow and it's auoin to macron. yeah. it's a blow and it's going to mean — macron. yeah. it's a blow and it's going to mean his _ macron. yeah. it's a blow and it's going to mean his second - macron. yeah. it's a blow and it's going to mean his second term i macron. yeah. it's a blow and it's going to mean his second term isj going to mean his second term is going to mean his second term is going to mean his second term is going to be a very different one from his first term. there's no arguing now that he's under a pincer movement from the extremes, if you
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can called them that any more, because they are the majority, between them, in the country. the left—wing alliance, dominated by jean—luc melenchon, the far left, and the surprise of the evening, as you were hearing, this showing bite marine le pen's party. they had more or less written her off saying she never does well in the parliamentary elections because the system doesn't favour her but it's quite clear a lot of the constituencies where her man or woman was up against eight macron person, her person has done it. one interesting angle from the british perspective, the question which i think will be raised, whether the stade de france events of two weeks ago, the fiasco there, played a part in that. because that was an event that the right and the far right lighted on as evidence of how the government was trying to play down local hooliganism,
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delinquency, and blamed the liverpool fans. it became absolutely the belief of people on the right that the government was trying to hide the real problem, which was local delinquency. that may however have played, i'm certainly not alone in saying that it may have played into her hands and could have injured it into her doing so well tonight. injured it into her doing so well toniaht. ., . , , ., tonight. how much is this a reflection _ tonight. how much is this a reflection of _ tonight. how much is this a reflection of the _ tonight. how much is this a reflection of the political i tonight. how much is this a . reflection of the political mood tonight. how much is this a - reflection of the political mood of people at the moment? how much is it to do with macron's personal failing? to do with macron's personal failin: ? ~ to do with macron's personal failinu? , to do with macron's personal failina? ~ , ., to do with macron's personal failin: ? ~ , , ., ., failing? well, i suppose the two go touether. failing? well, i suppose the two go together. people, _ failing? well, i suppose the two go together. people, there's- failing? well, i suppose the two go together. people, there's clearly i failing? well, i suppose the two go together. people, there's clearly a | together. people, there's clearly a lot of people out there who have never liked him and knew this from the presidential election. it wasn't a vote of attachment to him, it was rejection of the other, marine le pen, and a lot of people who would have voted forjean—luc melenchon, voted macron to keep out marine le
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pen. the large majority, no love lost for macron but they voted for him because he kept out the far right. if he'd been up against jean—luc melenchon, then the right would have come into keep him out. he did contribute to his own undoing tonight by misjudging the country completely in between the two rounds. between the two elections, the presidency and legislative. assuming that because he'd won the presidentials that there would be this momentum carrying on, we voted him in, give him more tools for the job and so on, but it didn't happen. it's happened every 20 years after a presidential election, the newly elected president has got his majority quite easily but in this case it was different because he was re—elected. so there was no desire to do him any favours at all and that's been his undoing tonight and
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it's a very difficult, torrid few days ahead of him. the transport secretary says it's not for the government to intervene to prevent three days of strikes on the railways this week. grant shapps has dismissed calls from the rmt union to get involved in the dispute as a "stunt" — he says it's for the employers and unions to reach an agreement. mr shapps says the strikes would be an "act of self—harm", but the labour leader, sir keir starmer, says the government wants the strikes to go ahead to �*sow division' in society. here's our political correspondent, nick eardley. get ready for the biggest rail strike in a generation. for three days, spread over the next week, the rail workers' union, the rmt, will down tools. massive disruption is expected across the country, and in some places like hull no services will be running in or out on strike days. awful for people if they need to get to jobs and to work, and to places. don't like strikes.
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maybe asking for a bit too much of a pay rise? i support the rail strike because no one's listening to them. _ the transport minister's not been listening to them for decades. - ministers have faced pressure to get involved to broker a deal to prevent disruption. but speaking to the bbc this morning, the transport secretary laid the blame squarely at the door of the union. i don't think there is any need for these strikes at all, and i appeal directly to people working for the railways. you are being led down a cul—de—sac by the union leadership, telling you that there is no pay rise when there is, trying to create some sort of class war when there's none to be had. we want people to be paid more, we want sensible reforms and modernisation of our railways so that we can run it for the passengers. union leaders say after inflation, members are facing a real—terms pay cut. they're also worried about conditions and job cuts. we don't want to be the cause of the disruption in people's lives. we want a settlement to this
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dispute but we're facing a crisis for our members. we are faced with thousands ofjob cuts, despite what grant shapps says. there has been no guarantee that these redundancies won't be compulsory. the blame game ahead of this week's strikes is already under way. the government is adamant that this action doesn't need to happen. but in truth this is comfortable political territory for the conservatives, who can say they are taking a hard line on industrial action, and blame what they say are unreasonable union bosses. the rmt, though, says that this sort of action is absolutely essential to protect members at a time when the cost of living squeeze is hitting the pound in everyone's pocket. this was central london yesterday, thousands calling for better pay. there have been warnings of more disputes in the coming months. labour has avoided questions on the rights and wrongs of rail union demands. but it has said ministers need to do more. the strikes should not go ahead.
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but here's the truth, borisjohnson and grant shapps want the strikes to go ahead. they want the country to grind to a halt so they can feed off the division. not true, says the government. but this week will see significant disruption on the railways, and there could be more to come. nick eardley, bbc news. scotrail is calling on passengers to plan ahead and expect "serious disruption" ahead of three days of strikes this week. network rail staff, including signallers, are among those taking part in the uk—wide industrial action by members of the rmt union in a dispute about pay and conditions. scotrail is limiting trains to five routes in the central belt. richard forbes reports. the industrial action will only officially cover three days, tuesday, thursday and saturday. however the unions say the reality is that the days in between will also be disrupted as staff struggle to get
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services back up to speed. because of this reduced capacity, scotrail is asking people to think twice about travelling. our advice is not to travel on those days and to alter your travel pattern. bus services just wouldn't be able to take the volume of passengers that normally travel by rail, so that's why we want to be as straight and up front as we possibly can by explaining the impact of this uk—wide strike across the whole of the uk. a limited service will continue to run on the central belt on strike days but the first train will be at 7:30am and the last train will terminate by 6:30pm. people outside waverley station in edinburgh earlier were largely sympathetic towards the strikers. they've got to keep the right to strike, which is important to keep in a country like scotland, a free country, so i respect their right to strike for more money. it's a huge inconvenience to people's lives, isn't it? it's having a big impact on people. i mean, we're lucky. this weekend, we've managed to dodge it. but yeah, you can understand why they're doing it. everybody needs more money. it's a pain for me because
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i am travelling down - to london on tuesday. i'm going to fly, now. i'd rather not from - the ecological point of view, but that's what i have to do. it is a pain but i— understand their position. i'm not complaining too hard. although the negotiations are due to continue this week some decisions have already been made. the caledonian sleeper sets off this evening and then won't run again until next sunday night. richard forbes, bbc news. and the biggest teaching union, the neu, has said it will ballot its members on strike action in england unless the government offers a pay rise of more than 3%. the union, which has 450,000 members, will write to the education secretary, nadhim zahawi, this week. any strike would take place in the autumn. and we'll find out how this story — and many others — are covered in tomorrow's front pages.
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the headlines on bbc news. a bad night for president macron — he looks set to lose his overall majority in the french parliament — the far—left and the far—right far—right have made gains. rail bosses have confirmed that talks to try to avoid this week's strike action will continue with union leaders tomorrow. and swimming's world governing body votes to effectively ban transgender competitors from taking part in women's races. the new head of the british army has told troops they need to prepare to "fight in europe once again". in a letter addressed to all ranks and civil servants, general sir patrick sanders said there was a "burning imperative" for the army to be ready to fight "alongside allies" to defeat russia in battle. earlier, i spoke with our defence correspondentjonathan beale: i don't think it's a surprise that a new head of army has set out a vision, a challenge for his soldiers or that the letter has been leaked,
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given it was sent to every soldier and civil servant working in the mod and that might have been the purpose behind this. nor is it surprising he mentions russia. what is a surprise is the bluntness and also directness of the language he uses on russia, which he mentions four times in the short letter and that standout quote you just gave, "there is now a burning imperative to forge an army capable of fighting "alongside our allies and defeating russia in battle" so essentially saying the raison d'etre of the army is to deter russia, and if necessary, to be ready to fight russia in europe. not because of language you usually get from a civil servant. does this mean we are likely to see british troops deployed to ukraine? it doesn't mean that. politicians have been clear that will not happen, no other western country says they will do that. but what it does mean and what we have seen in the last few years ever since russia invaded crimea, british troops
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and other troops being sent to nato's eastern flank, eastern european countries, the baltic states, to act as a deterrent to russia and we will see more of that. leaders will meet at the end of this month at the nato summit, where they will make announcements. that raises questions about the size of the british army, which as you say, is now at its smallest since the napoleonic wars, 73,000. and it's no secret that the former head, the person who did hisjob before him, in his last interview made a case for reversing some of those cuts and i think those calls will get louder. you think that actually this maybe something that the drives or continues to add momentum to a reversal of those cuts? yes, it's not implicit, it's not set out in this letter and he hasn't said that, patrick sanders, but his predecessor has and there are many people
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who say at the moment, defence experts and people in the military, that given what russia has done in ukraine, there is a case to reverse some of the cuts to the british army, to troop numbers and tank numbers and to increase defence spending. the government would say we've increased defence spending already but i think that pressure will continue. four months into the war in ukraine, many of those most badly—injured by shelling and rocket attacks are being treated overseas. the bbc met some of the younger victims in the early days of the conflict who are now being cared for in germany. but, as wyre davies reports, emergency laws in ukraine which mean men of fighting age must serve in the army make it difficult to keep families together, something that's especially hard on father's day. the victim of a russian rocket attack on the besieged city of mariupol, 13—year—old diana was eventually evacuated to germany. she had life—threatening wounds — shrapnel lodged in her brain and other terrible injuries. her recovery will be
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long and difficult. a talented dancer before the war, she still has big dreams. but the russian shell that maimed diana tore her family apart. her older sister, natasha, and four—year—old niece dominika, were both killed. as the only surviving child, the person diana wants most by her side as her dad, vladimir. they speak every day on the phone. translation: i'm glad to see my dad. but i wish i talked to him like we're talking with you now. in the immediate aftermath of the attack, vladimir was a broken man. it was heartbreaking to see him imploring, "god, why did you bring this upon me?" vladimir still looks to god for solace and answers. but stuck here in western ukraine
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isn't where he needs to be. vladimir is desperate to be with his surviving daughter and wife in germany. but current state of emergency rules here in ukraine mean that as a man of fighting age, he can't travel. but he's clearly in no fit state to pick up a gun, so while he waits, he comes here, to church, every day, and prays for those he's lost. translation: if they give me that the permit, i'm _ definitely going to go. i cannot be without them. i'm without my family. i keep thinking about them. i need to go there to support my family. for the sake of diana, for the sake of my wife. you see, i need to carry on for them. and even for the sake of my deceased children. with diana due to undergo another brain operation this week, vladimir lobbied president zelensky directly for permission to travel. and tonight, at the 11th hour, his prayers were quite literally answered. his daughter is still seriously ill. but at least her father will now be by her side. wyre davis, bbc news, ukraine.
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the world governing body of swimming has voted to ban transgender athletes from competing in women's events, unless they have transitioned by the age of 12. it follows controversy over swimmers who were born male, but who transitioned and then went on to win women's races. our sports correspondentjane dougall told us more. the clarity in this policy has been prompted by lia thomas, who was the first known transgender swimmer to win the highest american female national college title early this year. this policy will effectively stop lia thomas competing in any women's categories. it states that the categories of male and female must be kept separate according to scientifically grounded sex—based criteria and any athlete who has gone through any part of male puberty will not be eligible to compete against female swimmers. one of the experts giving evidence, dr michaeljoiner, said that even after the suppression of testosterone, the effects of male
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puberty would still be retained. an open category is due to be set up for some of fina's bigger events. the decision was welcomed by 0lympic silver medallist sharron davies, who is a long—time campaigner. she said she was proud fina was standing up for fair sport forfemales but the lgbtq+ group athlete ally said harmful the criteria was harmful and unscientific and not in line with the internatinoal 0lympic committee principles. today marks five years since the finsbury park terror attack. one man died and many others were injured when a van was driven into worshippers outside a mosque in north london. a service of remembrance has been held. tolu adeoye was there. prayer recital. remembering the life lost and saying prayers for those whose lives were changed forever, when a man deliberately drove a van into a crowd near the muslim welfare house in finsbury park five years ago today.
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51—year—old makram ali was killed in the attack. darren 0sborne from cardiff was found guilty of terrorism—related murder and jailed for a minimum of 43 years in 2018. he also injured several others, including yassin hersi. one of my legs was broken, and the other one was really, you know, damaged. i've seen the dead body of makram ali as well there... and all that things is still fresh to my mind, even though it's been five years. it's been a really very hard time. thank you all for gathering here today to... she sobs. to remember my dad, makram ali. some people say with time it gets easier, but i believe that it never gets easy. that black hole, you always have that black hole in you.
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but it'sjust, you end up creating memories around that, that make that black hole a bit more smaller. there was also a visit to mr ali's memorial tree and plaque today. the met says stopping attacks like this, that devastate lives, is a top priority. it's a really sobering day. i'll finish my day with my kids today. makram ali can't do that. and so tomorrow, i'll get up with thousands of colleagues more and more determined to prevent these terrible events being repeated. the mayor of london, sadiq khan, has said the solidarity shown by all communities in our city in the wake of the attack showed "that we will never let terrorists win by dividing us." a message echoed throughout the day, as speakers called for people to stand up against hate crime and islamophobia. tolu adeoye, bbc london. colin furze has won retrospective planning permission to burrow a tunnel between his house and shed.
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he spent three years digging the passage by hand under his lincolnshire garden, but without permission. the subterranean structure lies four feet deep and could eventually also connect to a special underground bunker he has built. mr furze said he wanted to do it because he thought "it would be cool". since beginning the project in 2018, he's been documenting his progress to his 12 million youtube followers. i spoke to colin earlier and asked him what he would have done if the planning permission had been denied. i suppose we would have had a bit of an argument, wouldn't we? i didn't want to fill it in. you can't really get rid of it, because if anyone has seen the videos, it is steel, concrete, and taking it out would cause more carnage. fingers crossed, the council —like colin. the the council -like colin. the question — the council -like colin. the question is. _ the council -like colin. the question is, why _ the council -like colin. the question is, why by - the council —like colin. the question is, why by hand? i know you said it was cool, but what was going through your mind? the said it was cool, but what was going through your mind?— said it was cool, but what was going through your mind? the ultimate plan is to net through your mind? the ultimate plan is to get from — through your mind? the ultimate plan is to get from the _ through your mind? the ultimate plan is to get from the house _ through your mind? the ultimate plan is to get from the house all _ through your mind? the ultimate plan is to get from the house all the - through your mind? the ultimate plan is to get from the house all the way i is to get from the house all the way down to here, the underground bunker, at the bottom of the garden.
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i thought it would be cool to get down here without having to go outside, propersneaky, likejames outside, proper sneaky, like james bond. outside, propersneaky, likejames bond. underneath the house, underneath the patio and the shed, there are buildings, so i thought you can't take that from above without disturbing the buildings above, so i thought, we'll do that by hand, because who doesn't like the great escape as a film? they had tom, dick and harry, and so i have got terry the tunnel. a great idea, so glad i did it. the bit where i dug down, started with the shed, using a takam and pickaxe to do that bit, because it is solid limestone around here. iwould bit, because it is solid limestone around here. i would wait until everyone had gone out and get the jackhammer out. sideways, i made these hydraulic pins that basically push the rock out of the way. sideways digging was much easier than digging down. we'd put it into tabs and there was a hydraulic winch which took it to the surface and
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take it out in a van, boom, what a system. i thought i'd get three videos out of it, maximum, just digging a tunnel but it is nine videos now and people want more. it's the one project i've done web they can't get enough of it. each video i've tried to make something unique about it, i've got a mine cart railway, to try and move the things around, fabricating the steel and concrete. people still want more. it's been, it's been one of the best youtube project i've ever done! amazing how he can make digging a tunnel so exciting. now, the weather. hello, the really hot and humid air of recent days has now cleared from the uk. sinking south into europe, the heatwave is set to persist across central europe through the early part of this week. we're in cooler and fresher air from the north.
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defining them, a line of cloud, a weather front still giving some showers to the south of the uk this evening but they all clear overnight. northerly wind across the eastern side of the uk easing back and it will turn quite chilly across central and eastern scotland. in rural places we may see lows of three or four. a fresher feel across the uk this sunday night. monday, a lot of sunshine from the get—go. lighter wind in the east. a weather front pushing cloud into the north—west of the uk through the day, some patchy rain for the isles, some patchy rain for the western isles, 0rkney and shetland. cooler here, highs ofjust11—14. elsewhere, temperatures up the couple of degrees on temperatures from sunday. and through the week ahead, we continually dry weather and temperatures will lift.
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hello this is bbc news. the headlines... a bad night for president macron. he looks set to lose his overall majority in the french parliament — the far—left and the far—right have made gains. rail bosses have confirmed that talks to try to avoid this week's strike action will continue with union leaders tomorrow. after the uk's promise of more heavy weapons to ukraine — the new head of the british army says troops should be prepared to fight russia in europe. communities in finsbury park gather to mark five years since the terror attack — in which a van was driven into worshippers outside a mosque. and swimming's world governing body votes to effectively ban transgender competitors like american lia thomas from taking part in women's races.

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