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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 20, 2022 6:00am-9:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. a week of disruption on the railways begins ahead of the biggest walk—out in 30 years. the message to travellers here in liverpool and across the uk is don't travel if you don't have to. this morning the rmt union is warning there could be more strikes over the coming six months. the legal battle to prevent doctors turning off life support for brain damaged 12—year—old archie battersbee. his parents are trying overturn a previous high court decision. i think that nobody, and i mean nobody, has archie's best interests at heart like a mother.
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in sport, england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open after clinching his first major trophy, sealing a sensational victory in boston. why gorilla populations in parts of africa are on the rise. we have a special report form the front line of a conservation success story. it's monday 20th june. train services across england, scotland and wales will run on a severely reduced timetable from this evening, ahead good of the biggest walk—out on the railways in 30 years.
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strikes will take place on almost all major lines from tomorrow, with disruption expected all week. the rmt rail union has warned it will intensify industrial action if a deal over pay isn't reached and says it will run its campaign for as long as it takes. morning. here's our business reporter esyllt carr. a chilly for this it'll be a week of huge disruption. and it starts tonight as services begin winding up ahead of the first of three days of industrial action. thousands of workers represented by the rmt union to awful for people if they need to get to jobs and to work and to places. i support the rail strike because no one's listening to them. the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it's a huge inconveniencel
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to people's lives, isn't it? it's having a big impact on people. it's a pain for me because i'm travelling down to london on tuesday. but i'm going to fly now. so i'd rather not from the ecological point of view. but that's what i have to do. i have to wait and see. and if there's a train, there's a train. if not, i'll have to find other ways of getting to work. so far, talks between the union and network rail have been unsuccessful. northwest introduce both labour and the rmt have called on the government to step in. i think the campaign will intensify if we don't get a settlement, but we're determined and available to get a settlement at any time. rain later. but they must loosen the shackles with the employers so they can make a deal. we want to protect our members' jobs. their conditions, and we need a pay rise. so it's a fairly
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straightforward issue. grant shapps is putting a lot of hyperbole into it, but we can settle this if he allows these companies to negotiate. we really require details and acceptance that reform can go ahead and then that allows us to then work our how do we get a settlement for our staff and make sure that we move the industry forward. there is room for compromise. we can work together, this is resolvable. talks are due to continue today, but the advice for passengers is to only travel if necessary on strike days. esyllt carr, bbc news. let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson. so, a big week, it will affect a lot of people. how likely will government get involved in talks? they are maintaining it is for the employer come on the rail companies are network rail to negotiate with the unions. there will be talks and an attempt to try and see the
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dispute. labour is a saying effectively people cannot get around the table if the government has taken a table away. they mean that they are saying rail companies are constrained in the amount of extra cash they can offer in the way of pay to rail workers. the government says this can be sorted out and they are also saying it is crazy they would want to see this kind of strike action go ahead of themselves. but i don't think they are going to get directly involved in this dispute. we are seeing in westminster political slagging match going on with the government saying labour isn't condemning the strike and labour saying the government isn't doing enough. i expect that ding—dong battle to go on for some time. that will not necessarily solve the problem this week. the question is what the government does next, there are talks of allowing agency workers to come into cover for striking train staff, and some people in the conservative party are pushing the government, which will
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not happen this week or immediately, but it with the government also to guarantee minimum levels of service on the railways which would require new legislation. with the rail unions think strike action could intensify, this might have some way to run. the family of a 12—year—old boy, who has brain damage, will find out today if they can appeal against a ruling that his life support treatment should stop. archie battersbee was found unconscious at his home in essex in april. doctors at the royal london hospital say he's medically dead but his parents disagree. his mother, hollie dance, says she'll continue to fight for treatment. he's in there, hejust — physically, for whatever reason, whether it's locked—in syndrome, whether he's paralysed, you know, and there's an injury that's not been sort of looked into, i don't know. but i feel he's in there. inside, i'm broken, but i've had to go and fight and fly.
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i've got no choice. i haven't got time to think about my feelings, my emotions at the minute, because this is a fight for archie's life. i can deal and address my emotions after this battle. at the minute, i can't let my guard down for a split second. the new head of the british army has warned his troops they must be prepared to face a renewed threat from russia. in a letter addressed to "all ranks and civil servants", general sir patrick sanders said that russia's invasion of ukraine shows the need "to protect the uk and be ready to fight and win wars". he added the army and allies must now be "capable of defeating russia". nato's chief has warned the war in ukraine could last for years and the west must prepare to continue backing the country. secretary—generaljens stoltenberg said the costs of war were high, but the price of letting moscow achieve its military goals was even greater. joe inwood is in kyiv for us this morning.
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this is a really stark warning, isn't it? , ., , , ~ ., isn't it? yes, absolutely. a warning we are not— isn't it? yes, absolutely. a warning we are notjust _ isn't it? yes, absolutely. a warning we are notjust hearing _ isn't it? yes, absolutely. a warning we are notjust hearing from - isn't it? yes, absolutely. a warning we are notjust hearing from jens i we are notjust hearing from jens stoltenberg from nato, prime minister borisjohnson said the same thing yesterday in an article in the times newspaper. we are seeing a consensus now that the west is in this for the long run, that will be welcomed by president volodymyr zelensky, for him this is an existential crisis, a fight for the very future of his country. it's a fight he says is intensifying and will continue to intensify over coming weeks. we have seen a commitment by the west and bite nato to carry on this military support but they face the challenges among populations as the war continues and its effect are felt elsewhere around the world, the cost of living going up, a lot is connected to this war. that will be a challengeable and nato to maintain that level of
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support that this country needs in the fight against the apathy of war. brazilian police say they're looking forfive more people believed to be involved in the murder of the british journalist dom phillips and indigenous expert bruno pereira. three suspects have already been arrested in connection with the killing in the amazon. the pair were investigating the involvement of criminal gangs in illegalfishing and mining when they went missing. at least 59 people have died in lightning strikes and landslides triggered by severe monsoon storms in india and bangladesh. millions of people have been stranded while emergency workers have struggled to reach those affected. the flooding is expected to get worse over the next few days. the french president emmanuel macron has suffered a major political setback, after his centrist alliance lost its parliamentary majority. his coalition, "ensemble", lost around 100 seats, with major gains for both marine le pen's far—right party and a new alliance led by far—left
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leaderjean—luc melenchon. 0ur paris correspondent lucy williamson reports. emmanuel macron's presidency just got tougher. early projections suggest his centrist coalition has lost a third of its seats. it's now more than 50 seats short of a majority. just look at the mood. translation: the situation is unprecedented. _ a the national assembly has never seen a configuration of this type in the fifth republic. the situation constitutes a risk for our country in view of the challenges that we have to face. this is now president macron's main opposition. a new alliance of green and left wing parties dominated by far left mps. the initial estimates confirming their new status as the first opposition party of france. translation: it's the total defeat
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of the president's party _ and there is no majority. we have achieved the political objective we gave ourselves to bring down the man who, with such arrogance, twisted the arm of the whole country to get elected. but this was the big surprise of the night. marine le pen's far right national rally partyjumped from a handful of seats to almost 90. plenty of opposition to the president from all sides. translation: we're going to continue to bring french people together - as part of a great popular movement, unifying all patriots from the right and the left. the parliamentary opposition to mr macron's centrist coalition is now much stronger than before, but it's also more fractured, with one bloc led by jean—luc melenchon on the far left of the chamber, and another by marine le pen on the far right. french politics is realigning around these three political groups.
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some voters say it's no bad thing if president macron is forced to negotiate with his opponents. others believe denying the government a majority only leads to stagnation. president macron is facing a new era of political opposition that some see as good for democracy and others as bad for france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. this might not surprise you! pop star ed sheeran has been named as the most played artist of last year in the uk. # bad habits lead to late nights ending alone # conversations with a stranger i barely know.# his song, bad habits, was also the most played single of 2021, according to new data from music licensing company ppl. sheeran is the first artist to manage both feats in two different years, having also done it in 2017.
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he will do it again. of course he will commit _ he will do it again. of course he will commit he _ he will do it again. of course he will commit he is _ he will do it again. of course he will commit he is brilliant. - he will do it again. of course he will commit he is brilliant. it - will commit he is brilliant. it might be kate bush this year, he is brilliant is brilliant stop when she had number one in the hit parade! hit parade, showing your age! not quite as hot this week, the highest temperature it will be about 30 degrees. it is a chilly start this morning, temperatures only around 20a degrees in the islands. in the south the remnants of yesterday's
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front putting away taking the cloud and dribs and drabs of rain with it. you can see the my cloud coming in across the north—west of scotland. apart from a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine,. a lot of dry and sunny weather across england and
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wales, the audio in scotland. most of us dry with 2a degrees. a private members bill calling for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment will be presented in parliament today. conservative mp nickie aiken decided to take—up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. our reporter shelley phelps has been to meet them both. you are pumped full of so many awful hormones. it's a huge, huge roller coaster. and each day was really difficult. so i'd end up taking presentations to the clinic to try and get the work done. you're injecting yourself more than once a day. sometimes you're having more than one blood test a day. and it was extremely difficult, coupled with the need to hide
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what was going on from your employer as though it was something to be ashamed of. anne, not her real name, says she was forced out of herjob in the city after a dispute with her employer over the time she needed to take off work for ivf treatment. she left the company and signed a non—disclosure agreement. i was asked the question, how much did i want a career and how much did i want a family? and that question was surprisingly easy to answer, but it was a question no woman should ever be asked. around 50,000 women have ivf each year, with many having multiple cycles. the success rate per embryo transfer varies from 32% for women under 35 to under 5% for women over a3. that's according to the uk's fertility regulator. currently, there's no statutory right to time off work for fertility treatment. so, there isn't any legal
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right to taking time off, whether paid or unpaid. for any fertility treatments in the workplace until there has been successful implementation of fertilised ova, for example, when we're looking at in—vitro fertilisation, ivf, which is one of the most common fertility treatments. a conservative mp is calling for more legal protection. the crux of my bill is to be able to give women the power and the confidence that if they are going to go through ivf treatment, that they will be supported by their employer and by society as a whole. here in london's harley street, there's several fertility clinics. the local mp says that queues of women form here early in the mornings as they try to get appointments without having to take time off from work. business community representatives, the british chambers of commerce, say many employers operate broad and flexible working practices to help people balance work and family commitments.
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anne gave birth to a daughter and says she's speaking out in the hope of making things better for her future. shelley phelps, bbc news. 18 minutes past six. let's take a look at today's papers. this week's rail strike dominates almost all of monday's front pages. "network derailed" is the metro's headline, as it says britain's biggest rail strike in more than 30 years will seejust one in five services running. the guardian says the government is facing growing anger over its refusal to join last—ditch talks to avert the strike. the paper says the conservative mp and former rail ministerjake berry was among those who said ministers should take part in negotiations. "we regret to announce that this country is returning to the 1970s" is the headline on the sun, which says that teachers, bin men and post workers are all threatening to strike this summer. away from the rail story, the telegraph claims that police
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have failed to solve a single burglary in almost half of the uk over the past three years. gorgeous pictures coming up, are you ready for some cuteness? and sounds! up, everybody! it's been more than a0 years since sir david attenborough met the mountain gorillas of rwanda. they were, at the time, on the brink of extinction. despite the odds, their numbers have increased, thanks to a huge conservation effort. our climate editor, justin rowlatt,
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has been to uganda to visit them. the morning mist rises from bwindi impenetrable forest in uganda. one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive. so we're just hacking our way through the forest because obviously the gorillas go wherever they want. there are no paths up here. have you seen something, luke? oh, there's one down there! there's a gorilla! gentle groaning. there are baby gorillas in the trees and also juvenile gorillas on the ground. it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. rumbling. and that, i think, was a gorilla fart! wow!
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the population is healthy and growing steadily. it is a dramatic turnaround. when sir david attenborough made his famous visit to a mountain gorilla family back in the 19705, it was, in his words, tinged with sadness because he feared he might be seeing the last of their kind. poachers preyed on the mountain gorilla population and the civil wars in rwanda and the democratic republic of congo made conservation in those countries very difficult. this park in uganda, the bwindi impenetrable forest, was made a national park in 1991. next, says the warden in charge, they needed to get local people onside.
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the communities are critical in conserving the gorillas because, you know, these communities live next to the park. and so we feel that they should be part of the conservation and they should get benefits from conservation. key among those benefits have been the revenues from this, from tourism. and tourism also supports a thriving economy. tourism really does help wild animals if it's done right. when i first started out, there were only about five lodges. now there's as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs, the ngos have created jobs, so there's lots of employment that has happened. you know, they can sell crafts, they can sell accommodation, meals. and so all of that makes a big difference. some of the tourist income and money from gorilla charities helped create alternative income for these men. they used to make their living
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poaching animals from the park. some were offered jobs as rangers. others were offered land and training to grow crops. now we are called the ambassadors of the park because we are helping a lot the conservation of the park. we monitor and give reports monthly. conservation charities say carefully managed ecotourism can really help protect biodiversity. and protect the gorillas' habitat, and you protect so much else. but tourism alone is not enough. look how abruptly the tree cover ends here in uganda. the parks are big, but as the gorilla population grows... we're definitely seeing that gorilla families are more crowded. they're bumping into each other more, which unfortunately is often
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associated with aggression. we're seeing higher rates of infanticide so infants can oftentimes be killed when these families come together. bigger parks cost more money. the un wants countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation. the developing world wants $100 billion a year to help fund that. we've been told by scientists, we only have this century. and we only have one planet. there's no planet b. mountain gorillas show we can save species from the brink of extinction. the question now is whether the world is ready to commit the money and resources to make it happen on a much bigger scale. justin rowlatt, bbc news, bwindi impenetrable forest.
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you can watchjustin's film, mountain gorillas: a conservation success, on the bbc iplayer now. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. this time tomorrow — train and tube services won't be running as workers go on strike over pay and job losses. talks are due to continue today — as a special seven—day train timetable is introduced ahead of the walk—outs. the action is planned for tomorrow, thursday and saturday. the tube strike is only planned for tomorrow. but expect disruption on the railways for most of the week. i'll have more travel news injust a moment. today marks the second anniversary of three men being stabbed to death
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during a terror attack in reading. james furlong, joe ritchie—bennett and david wails died after they were attacked by khairi saadallah — who's serving a whole—life jail sentence. tonight there will be a minute's silence at 7:00 to remember the victims. a private members bill calling for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment is being presented in parliament today. conservative mp for cities of london and westminster nickie aiken decided to take—up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. transport for london has just days left to find a new sponsor for the cable car which links the excel centre with the o2 arena. the multi—million—pound ten—year deal with emirates is about to end this week — with other potential sponsors proving difficult to find. the cable car cost
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£60 million to build, and has been criticised for being too expensive and not attracting enough passengers. i've mentioned the tube strike planned for tomorrow — let's take a look at how things are looking this morning. onto the weather now with kate. good morning. with the sun coming up so early at the moment, we've already had a glorious sunrise — this is over in harrow on the hill from weather watcher sian, and also down in red hill from weather watcher me on the hill. just a little bit of cloud just accentuating those colours. now the cloud today is going to disappear, there is a lot of fine dry weather in the forecast — not only for today, but for the next few days. and temperatures starting to feel a little warmer again — 22 celsius today. warm evening in the sunshine, and then overnight conditions don't really change. it's dry and it's clear — the minimum temperature somewhere between seven and 11 celsius. but another bright start
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as we head into tuesday. again, high pressure in charge is building in from the west, blocking these fronts down in the south, so it is going to be another day of sunshine — lots of it. the wind reasonably light and temperatures just start to sneak up a little. it's getting warmer as we head further through this week — temperatures tomorrow getting up to 26 celsius. now temperatures rise even further for wednesday and thursday — 28, 29 celsius, you might even get a 30. but, come friday, low pressure takes over, so conditions turning more unsettled and cooler for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. coming up on breakfast this morning... what we all need on a monday morning — even more pictures of gorillas —
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but what does mountain gorilla conservation tells us about protecting other species? the bbc�*s climate editorjustin rowlatt will be here to tell us about his trip to africa. poet tony walsh joins us to talk about his new poem in honour of the incredible manchester arena survivor martin hibbert and his epic kilimanjaro challenge. a new series of back in time follows the sharma family as they experience what life used to be like for south asian brits in birmingham. as we've been hearing this morning, tens of thousands of rail workers will go on strike tomorrow, causing huge disruption on the network. a severely reduced timetable will be brought in from this evening. if you use the trains or anyone in the house uses the trains this week you need to listen to what it will
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mean for you. nina is at liverpool lime street station for us this morning with the latest. ready for a big week. good morning. feefinu ready for a big week. good morning. feeling very — ready for a big week. good morning. feeling very much — ready for a big week. good morning. feeling very much like _ ready for a big week. good morning. feeling very much like business - ready for a big week. good morning. feeling very much like business as i feeling very much like business as usual here this morning that i was just getting a coffee and chatting to someone who has come over from canada for a week, her plan being to take the train around the uk and that won't happen. that is one example of plans being heavily disrupted in the week ahead. how did we get here? the male domain rail union and providers have not been able to come to a deal over pay and conditions of sale from tomorrow 40,000 workers will walk out. let's have a look at how it is set to affect you. it will be from tomorrow and then one strikes on thursday and saturday. 20% of services will be running and they will only run between 7:30am and 6:30pm. understandably the advice is on
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those days not to travel and basque you absolutely have to. this is what the overall picture is like, where services are running. there is connectivity between main cities but head out to more rural areas and it will be impossible to hop on a train. england in places like penzance and bournemouth in the south, you won't be to take a train at all. in the north—west that includes places like blackpool and chester. in scotland you will see those lines are running from london up those lines are running from london up to the big cities of glasgow and edinburgh but north of the central belt, aberdeen, inverness, the criticism is they have been completely cut off. and in wales, only two routes will be running — a service from radyr in cardiff, to treherbert, merthyr tydfil and aberdare, and the service from cardiff to the severn tunnel. but that is it for wales. but it's notjust the days of the strike that will be affected — a special timetable has been released for the days between the strikes, with around 60% of services running. do check out whether your services
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are going ahead if you are travelling on those days, and expect extra passengers. but what if you've already bought tickets? if your service is cancelled you are entitled to a refund but will be able to travel and other services with other service providers if they are available. that might not happen for all types of tickets so get in touch with your train provider if you have bought an advanced ticket. the advice this week is do not travel unless you absolutely have to. it is notjust morning commuters that will be effective. schoolchildren getting two exams, people getting to nhs appointments, there is a big eltonjohn, rolling stones gigs in london, also glastonbury festival coming up, the england test match. all of these events will be affected. lots more people getting in cars, so expect bottlenecks in the roads around those events. one of the areas in england that will be affected by strike action is devon, with no services running into cornwall.
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john maguire has been out and about in torquay to hear how people there are feeling. the grand hotel has graced the torquay seafront for 150 years. it has 130 rooms, sea views, swimming pools, and pretty much its own railway station. platform one for the... normally an asset, but not this week. we'rejust hiring people that can do the job. yeah. as we're hiring chefs and food and beverage operators. here we go. over a devon cream tea — and we went for cream first, by the way — the hotel's owner, keith richardson, tells me it's an issue for guests, and for some staff. i would think it's quite significant with two aspects in mind — we have customers coming from up north and london to our hotel by train. and, as you know, the train station is a stone's throw away from my front door. and the other innovation this last
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few months is that we have been training in staff from as far away as plymouth to make up for the lack of staff in torbay. it's an hour's drive to plymouth, so plainly, for staff to come from there by train, they've got to get to the train station at the other end, as well as the train journey. for those who let the train take the strain, plans will need to change — meaning, hassle, stress and expense. and what if you commute to school and have a—levels this week? the rail strikes won't let me get to my exams. i'll have to get a hotel and i'll have to spend quite a lot of my summer budget on getting a hotel so that i can sit my exams. if i went to a friend's house, that would be the only other option, and i didn't want to do that because me and my parents decided that i wouldn't be able to... we wouldn't... i wouldn't have a good night's sleep for my exam, and that's not a good thing. so which one shall we go for? well, the biggest one. right. so i would go for...
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ooh! oh, its huge. and even the best—laid plans are being thwarted — kay darton's due for a hip replacement, and wanted to see family before her operation. she booked a train journey from south devon to coventry — including help at each station — but will now miss the trip, and fears she'll lose the money she's spent. just the day that i'd chosen to go and see my son and his family in coventry. and so i thought, well, with covid and everything, and i'm due to have an operation next month, i thought i'd go first for a treat. and then i heard they were going on strike and i thought, "oh no!" just the day. and then i applied for a refund — non—refundable, and it was nearly £300. so i thought, "hmm, it's not my day." yes, so it's a big disappointment. £300 is quite a lot to lose! the rmt union says it's taking
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the action to protect pay, conditions, and jobs. whether for business or pleasure, to work, or to see friends and family — before the pandemic, rail travel was breaking new records as people chose the train. but in the week ahead, that choice will be severely limited. john maguire, bbc news, devon. the good news is people will be entitled to a refund if their service is cancelled but it is obviously a very anxious time for many. fist obviously a very anxious time for man . �* ., ., , ., many. at the moment, who is in a osition many. at the moment, who is in a position to — many. at the moment, who is in a position to wait _ many. at the moment, who is in a position to wait for _ many. at the moment, who is in a position to wait for that _ many. at the moment, who is in a position to wait for that 300 - many. at the moment, who is in a position to wait for that 300 quid l position to wait for that 300 quid to come back? there is frustration from some commuters who say everybody is facing inflation of 9%, teachers, nurses, social workers are not getting pay rises above 3% at the moment but others are saying, look, if the rails don't take a stand, if someone doesn't, how long the public sector pay continue to be
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squeezed against the rates of inflation. the government at the moment is seeking to distance itself from this dispute say it is between main rail union and between the railway and employers but the truth is they do have leveraged weight comes to pay on the rail networks, which they proved over the pandemic. the big question is, can they give way on this strike when it looks like other public sector strikes are planned in the weeks and months ahead and they are looking to destruction in the coming days, can they afford not to? we destruction in the coming days, can they afford not to?— they afford not to? we will be talkin: they afford not to? we will be talking about _ they afford not to? we will be talking about this _ they afford not to? we will be talking about this a _ they afford not to? we will be talking about this a lot - they afford not to? we will be talking about this a lot this i talking about this a lot this morning. we have got a spokesperson from labour, we are talking to the government about it, just trying to find out at what point can they intervene? will they intervene? what will happen next? of it all goes ahead, what do you need to know to plan your week? we will have all the facts and figures and roots over the facts and figures and roots over the next couple of hours. there is a switch off from the rail strike. if you are just waking up you might not you arejust waking up you might not know the good news thatjohn can
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bring us. late last night matt fitzpatrick winning the open, one of only three englishmen to win, illustrating what a significant achievement. also playing in the states on the pga tour, not have many victories before. you kind of think of a steady growing... where has he come _ think of a steady growing... where has he come from? _ think of a steady growing... where has he come from? what - think of a steady growing... where has he come from? what a - think of a steady growing... where i has he come from? what a surprise, it ma be has he come from? what a surprise, it may be a — has he come from? what a surprise, it may be a name — has he come from? what a surprise, it may be a name people _ has he come from? what a surprise, it may be a name people hadn't - has he come from? what a surprise, | it may be a name people hadn't heard of but a brilliant achievement nonetheless. certainly puts him up there with the very best names in there with the very best names in the world of golf who have won the biggest prizes of all. matt fitzpatrick, sheffield born and bred, winning the us open. holding off the world's best players including the current world number one, to win by a shot. here's joe lynskey. oh, so proud of you! on the boston greens, the sound came from sheffield. for matthew fitzpatrick, this was a moment for his family
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and history for british golf. americans dominate the us open. now he's just the third englishman to win it in 90 years — and so many tried to stop him. fitzpatrick played on the last day with will zalatoris — south yorkshire against san francisco — and between them it was so close. the two were neck—and—neck through the back nine. to stay in touch, fitzpatrick found the spectacular. at 27, he hadn't won a major before, but here he was in the sand at the last hole with a shot the greats would be proud of. that's one of the best shots i've ever seen. zalatoris would need this putt to force a play—off. for him, it was heartbreak. but for fitzpatrick, to do it here meant so much — on this same course, he won the us amateur atjust 18. back then, he had to stay
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with a boston family. this week, the same one have housed his mum and dad. nine years on with two trophies, this place feels like home. it's what you grow up dreaming of. it's something i've worked so hard for, for such a long time. and, you know, there was a big monkey on my back trying to win over here and everyone — all they ever talked about was that and, you know, to do it as a major for my first win, there's nothing better. fitzpatrick wraps his clubs in a sheffield united badge. now he's won where so few brits have before. and us open silver is heading to the steel city. joe lynskey, bbc news. we can speak now to matt fitzpatrick�*s former coach, graham walker. good morning. good morning. how are ou good morning. good morning. how are you feeling. — good morning. good morning. how are you feeling. how _ good morning. good morning. how are you feeling, how will _ good morning. good morning. how are you feeling, how will you _ good morning. good morning. how are you feeling, how will you be _ good morning. good morning. how are you feeling, how will you be feeling - you feeling, how will you be feeling today? i you feeling, how will you be feeling toda ? . , , today? i am sure he is feeling ecstatic _ today? i am sure he is feeling ecstatic i _ today? i am sure he is feeling ecstatic. i think— today? i am sure he is feeling ecstatic. i think anybody -
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today? i am sure he is feeling ecstatic. i think anybody who | today? i am sure he is feeling i ecstatic. i think anybody who has helped him in the past and is helping him in the present well have enjoyed a few scoops last night i'm sure there will be a few sore heads in sheffield but, you know, ithink everyone who has been involved with him over the years will tell you what a lovely lad he is also what a hard—working lad. he was always very diligent, and even as a youngster he was very, very good at note—taking, good at improving things, very good with his questioning. when he came up with his questioning. when he came up for a lesson, he would always have a plan stop what would you like to work today? driving. i only play, wedge play, always very specific in what he wanted.— wedge play, always very specific in what he wanted. having worked with him, did you — what he wanted. having worked with him. did you see _ what he wanted. having worked with him, did you see a _ what he wanted. having worked with him, did you see a win _ what he wanted. having worked with him, did you see a win of _ what he wanted. having worked with him, did you see a win of this - what he wanted. having worked with him, did you see a win of this size i him, did you see a win of this size coming? him, did you see a win of this size cominu ? ~ , ., him, did you see a win of this size comin.? . him, did you see a win of this size cominu ? ~ i. ., ., ~ ., him, did you see a win of this size comina? ~ ., , coming? well, if you look at his pedigree. _ coming? well, if you look at his pedigree. he —
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coming? well, if you look at his pedigree, he has— coming? well, if you look at his pedigree, he has won _ coming? well, if you look at his pedigree, he has won right- coming? well, if you look at his pedigree, he has won right the l coming? well, if you look at his i pedigree, he has won right the way through the levels. he won the british boys, seven times on tour, he won early on tour, his first one was at woburn. but i think in the early stages you only ever know a few players who are deemed for greatness but what you can say is if you get really good information and work hard at it, lots of things are possible and he is certainly one of those hard workers. lode possible and he is certainly one of those hard workers.— possible and he is certainly one of those hard workers. we are seeing some pictures _ those hard workers. we are seeing some pictures with _ those hard workers. we are seeing some pictures with his _ those hard workers. we are seeing some pictures with his family. - some pictures with his family. wedding yesterday on father's day, and he was joined wedding yesterday on father's day, and he wasjoined by his dad on the 18. health —— winning yesterday. how influential have his family being? they are a great golfing family. i gave russell the odd golf lesson, as well, and i used to say he got his golf swing from his mum. i taught sue in the past, as well. they are a really good golfing family and then you have got his brother, alex, caddied for him when he won the us
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amateur and he is a very good player in his own right, as well. they understand golf, they are around golf, county golf, national golf. they are steeped in it. it is interesting, _ they are steeped in it. it is interesting, you _ they are steeped in it. it is interesting, you talk- they are steeped in it. it is interesting, you talk about the game, certainly in the states at the moment, some players already bulking up, as they try to hit the ball as hard and fire as they can but matt is the polar opposite, he is a much smallerfigure and sort is the polar opposite, he is a much smaller figure and sort of in contrast to what we see from those bigger guys on the tour. he is small but he has worked _ bigger guys on the tour. he is small but he has worked hard _ bigger guys on the tour. he is small but he has worked hard with - bigger guys on the tour. he is small but he has worked hard with his - but he has worked hard with his present coach and he has worked high with all his coaching team and i know they have... if you look at the coverage yesterday he was hitting the ball a good distance but if your golf swing is working well it goes a long way.
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golf swing is working well it goes a lona wa . . golf swing is working well it goes a lonuwa. ,, ., , �* golf swing is working well it goes a lonwa. .,,�* ., long way. size doesn't always matter, does _ long way. size doesn't always matter, does it? _ long way. size doesn't always matter, does it? i— long way. size doesn't always matter, does it? i hope - long way. size doesn't always matter, does it? i hope you l long way. size doesn't always . matter, does it? i hope you have managed to enjoy a drink or two and basked in the success of one of your former players. a great moment. great to speak to you. graham walker, matt fitzpatrick�*s former coach. max verstappen held off the ferrari of carlos sainz to win the canadian grand prix, to extend his lead in the f1 championship to 46 points. he'd led from the start and might have cruised to victory were it not for a crash with 21 laps to go. that brought the safety car out, putting sainz right behind the dutchman, only for verstappen to hold on, to claim his sixth win of the season. lewis hamilton, with problems last time out in baku, grabbed his second podium finish of the season. it was really exciting at the end. i mean, i was giving it everything i had. of course, carlos was doing the same. you know, following — it's tricky around here, but i could see he was pushing, charging, pushing. but, of course, naturally, when you're undres duress, it's a bit easier to charge. so, yeah, the last few laps are a lot of fun.
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swimming's world governing body fina has voted to stop transgender athletes from competing in women's elite races, if they have gone through any part of male puberty. it means transgender athletes will have to have tranistioned by the age of 12 to be eligible for women's events. fina say they plan to create an open category at competitions for swimmers whose gender identity is different from their birth sex. we are faced with some very complex challenges. i believe that we will have a solution that protects the competitive fairness of our competition, but sends a clear message to every single athlete — you are all welcome. england's cricketers won their one—day series against the netherlands — with a match to spare. in a rain—affected match the netherlands set england a target of 236 to win from their 41 overs.
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and although england lost four wickets, victory was never really in doubt — moeen ali hitting the winning runs with just under five overs to go. and a name to watch out for in the men's singles at wimbledon. matteo berrentini defending his title at queen's beat serbia's filip krajinovic 7—5 6—4 to claim the seventh atp title of his career. the world number ten claimed back—to—back titles, having beaten andy murray to win the stuttgart open last week. made a final last year, winning again on the grass at queens. you would think that is a good place to think... that could be the go to guy this year, maybe. if he is practising on the grass today, what will the weather look like? lets have a look outside our window. looking lovely and still on the
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water. fancy a dip?— looking lovely and still on the water. fancy a dip? looking lovely and still on the - water. fancy a dip?_ let's water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not. water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not- carol— water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not- carol can _ water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not. carol can tell— water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not. carol can tell us _ water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not. carol can tell us how— water. fancy a dip? shall we? let's not. carol can tell us how the - not. carol can tell us how the weather is looking. good morning. many of us are waking up good morning. many of us are waking up to— good morning. many of us are waking up to sunshine. beautiful weather watcher_ up to sunshine. beautiful weather watcher picture, blue skies. but one thing _ watcher picture, blue skies. but one thing worth— watcher picture, blue skies. but one thing worth noting is the pollen levels _ thing worth noting is the pollen levels again high or very high across— levels again high or very high across most of the uk, grass and metal_ across most of the uk, grass and metal pollen. last night's front continuing to move away, still the odd spot — continuing to move away, still the odd spot of rain, a lot of dry weather, _ odd spot of rain, a lot of dry weather, a _ odd spot of rain, a lot of dry weather, a lot of sunshine. a chilly start_ weather, a lot of sunshine. a chilly start around — weather, a lot of sunshine. a chilly start around the borders into the highlands and you can see we also have this _ highlands and you can see we also have this cloud coming in. it is a weather— have this cloud coming in. it is a weather front and eventually it will bring _ weather front and eventually it will bring rain — weather front and eventually it will bring rain to the outer hebrides and the northern isles. breezy down the north— the northern isles. breezy down the north sea _ the northern isles. breezy down the north sea coastline. we will see a bit more _ north sea coastline. we will see a bit more cloud coming in here so it will he _ bit more cloud coming in here so it will he a _ bit more cloud coming in here so it will he a hit — bit more cloud coming in here so it will be a bit cooler temperatures widely— will be a bit cooler temperatures widely in— will be a bit cooler temperatures widely in the high teens or low 20s. away— widely in the high teens or low 20s. away from — widely in the high teens or low 20s. away from our weather fronts we are looking _ away from our weather fronts we are looking at _ away from our weather fronts we are looking at 12 — away from our weather fronts we are looking at 12 to 14. that weather
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front _ looking at 12 to 14. that weather front will— looking at 12 to 14. that weather front will slip southwards and eastwards the course of the night and some — eastwards the course of the night and some of this rain on it will be heavy— and some of this rain on it will be heavy for— and some of this rain on it will be heavy for a — and some of this rain on it will be heavy for a time and it will weaken as it pushes — heavy for a time and it will weaken as it pushes down across the borders and into— as it pushes down across the borders and into northern ireland. not as cold start— and into northern ireland. not as cold start into tomorrow where currently — cold start into tomorrow where currently we have about two to 4 degrees — currently we have about two to 4 degrees in — currently we have about two to 4 degrees in parts of scotland. ahead of that— degrees in parts of scotland. ahead of that we _ degrees in parts of scotland. ahead of that we are looking at overnight lows of— of that we are looking at overnight lows of eight to 13 degrees. tomorrow the weather front is a weak feature, _ tomorrow the weather front is a weak feature, could bring some spots of rain across — feature, could bring some spots of rain across the north york moors, cumhria, — rain across the north york moors, cumhria, lrut— rain across the north york moors, cumbria, but the exception rather than the _ cumbria, but the exception rather than the rule. the cloud breaking across— than the rule. the cloud breaking across parts of eastern scotland, which _ across parts of eastern scotland, which could trigger the odd shower but ahead — which could trigger the odd shower but ahead of that a lot of dry weather, _ but ahead of that a lot of dry weather, sunshine and temperatures up weather, sunshine and temperatures up to about _ weather, sunshine and temperatures up to about 26 degrees. there is a chance _ up to about 26 degrees. there is a chance we — up to about 26 degrees. there is a chance we might see the are shower moving _ chance we might see the are shower moving across the channel islands with highs — moving across the channel islands with highs of 20 degrees. as we continue — with highs of 20 degrees. as we continue into wednesday, more cloud coming _ continue into wednesday, more cloud coming in _ continue into wednesday, more cloud coming in across the north and the west _ coming in across the north and the west we — coming in across the north and the west. we will start to feel a bit more _ west. we will start to feel a bit
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more humid and you can see breezy conditions _ more humid and you can see breezy conditions across the north west. in the south, still a lot of clear blue skies and it is getting hotter. 28, possibly— skies and it is getting hotter. 28, possibly 29 degrees the high as we push towards the london area. widely we are _ push towards the london area. widely we are looking at below —— out the low to _ we are looking at below —— out the low to mid — we are looking at below —— out the low to mid 20s. which knife was, and we have _ low to mid 20s. which knife was, and we have 12 _ low to mid 20s. which knife was, and we have 12 to— low to mid 20s. which knife was, and we have 12 to 21 as a range of temperatures. —— push northwards. later— temperatures. —— push northwards. later in_ temperatures. —— push northwards. later in the — temperatures. —— push northwards. later in the week, still a lot of hot and — later in the week, still a lot of hot and sunny weather to have, but once _ hot and sunny weather to have, but once again — hot and sunny weather to have, but once again as we head towards the end of— once again as we head towards the end of the — once again as we head towards the end of the week it turns more unsettled _ end of the week it turns more unsettled and more of us will see some _ unsettled and more of us will see some rain— unsettled and more of us will see some rain and it looks like that will be — some rain and it looks like that will be the _ some rain and it looks like that will be the case into next week, as welt _ thank you very much. in view of the beach. ., �* , ., beach. that's what we need. the summer is _ beach. that's what we need. the summer is here. _ beach. that's what we need. the summer is here. but _ beach. that's what we need. the summer is here. but can - beach. that's what we need. the summer is here. but can you - beach. that's what we need. the summer is here. but can you getj beach. that's what we need. the i summer is here. but can you get to the beach if you are going on holiday this week? it the beach if you are going on holiday this week?— the beach if you are going on holiday this week? it will be a challenge- — holiday this week? it will be a challenge. if— holiday this week? it will be a challenge. if you _ holiday this week? it will be a challenge. if you use - holiday this week? it will be a challenge. if you use the - holiday this week? it will be a l challenge. if you use the trains holiday this week? it will be a i challenge. if you use the trains it will be tricky- _ challenge. if you use the trains it will be tricky. even _ challenge. if you use the trains it will be tricky. even after- challenge. if you use the trains it will be tricky. even after today, | will be tricky. even after today, the last—minute discussions are
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under way but what happens on the railways because of these three days of strikes will be tricky.— of strikes will be tricky. labour has a . e of strikes will be tricky. labour has age the — of strikes will be tricky. labour has age the government - of strikes will be tricky. labour has age the government to - of strikes will be tricky. labourl has age the government to stop boycotting the talks that are due to be ongoing and intervene right now. we're joined now by the shadow transport secretary, louise haigh. good morning to you. thank you for joining us. can we get some clarity as to where labour stands on the strikes? you have not exactly condemn them, not supported them. where are you? we condemn them, not supported them. where are you?— where are you? we have been very clear we don't _ where are you? we have been very clear we don't want _ where are you? we have been very clear we don't want these - where are you? we have been very clear we don't want these strikes i where are you? we have been very| clear we don't want these strikes to go ahead, as you have been covering this morning there will be enormously destructive this week for hundreds of thousands of people across the country. it is not actually inevitable even at this 11th hour that they will go ahead. the government has within its power to convene talks urgently, cream the industry and the trade unions together to fight a resolution and avoid industrial action, and it is
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beyond belief that the transport secretary has not even tried to do that. he claims it is a matter purely for the employer and the unions but in fact his own department, the department for transport, set the negotiating mandate both for network rail and the train operating companies, so without him doing that these talks they have been in over the last few weeks, they are basically a sham. it is not possible for them to find a resolution. without him stepping in at this last minute, it is inevitable they will go ahead and it is on his shoulders. if inevitable they will go ahead and it is on his shoulders.— is on his shoulders. if you were in government. _ is on his shoulders. if you were in government. if— is on his shoulders. if you were in government, if you _ is on his shoulders. if you were in government, if you were - is on his shoulders. if you were in government, if you were there i is on his shoulders. if you were in government, if you were there in | is on his shoulders. if you were in i government, if you were there in the department as transport secretary right now, you would bring both sides together, you would be in the room, how would you resolve it? that is exactly right. _ room, how would you resolve it? trisgt is exactly right, we would be convening talks and bringing people together and you don't have to take my hypothetical word for it, that is exactly what we have done very recently in wales, where labour are in government, and where we have
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avoided industrial action with the train operator. labour in government in wales works in social cooperation with both the trade unions and the industry and has reached agreement on no compulsory redundancies, which is one of the main asks from the union, and a fair pay settlement. not always easy, not always perfect, but i'm afraid not only are ligament not lifting a finger, it is impossible to escape the conclusion they are trying to provoke this dispute by not being at the table, by not allowing negotiations to go ahead. it is inevitable and ifind it utterly appalling that the government is in this position where they are washing their hands of that responsibility. mick they are washing their hands of that responsibility-— responsibility. mick lynch of the rmt union _ responsibility. mick lynch of the rmt union thinks _ responsibility. mick lynch of the rmt union thinks labour- responsibility. mick lynch of the rmt union thinks labour has - responsibility. mick lynch of the - rmt union thinks labour has washed its hands of working class people, he says you have lost contact in connection with them, you have to think less about what the daily mail thinks of its lead column and need to be fighting for better pay and jobs. he feels that you as the
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labour party are letting down the striking workers.— striking workers. well, look, of course working _ striking workers. well, look, of course working people - striking workers. well, look, of course working people have - striking workers. well, look, of course working people have a l striking workers. well, look, of. course working people have a right and our right to fight for a pay settlement. the context of this dispute is that working people have suffered the slowest growth in wages over the last decade and this year the biggest decline in living standards since records began. these rail workers kept us going for the pandemic, they kept the country stopped, and they deserve a fair pay rise right now. the government is refusing to be at the table, so it is little wonder that they feel they're only tool is to take this action. but it is in the government's gift. they need to set out patiently how they will bring down inflation and how they will deliver an economic strategy that puts money back in the pockets of working people in the middle of this cost—of—living crisis. working people in the middle of this cost-of-living crisis.— cost-of-living crisis. labour is in a difficult _ cost-of-living crisis. labour is in a difficult position _ cost-of-living crisis. labour is in a difficult position here - cost-of-living crisis. labour is in a difficult position here because| a difficult position here because you don't want to upset commuters, the people who use the railways, but
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you also have historic links to the union movement. can you imagine any labour mps out on picket lines tomorrow supporting the rmt? what labour mps out on picket lines tomorrow supporting the rmt? what i would sa is tomorrow supporting the rmt? what i would say is that _ tomorrow supporting the rmt? what i would say is that the _ tomorrow supporting the rmt? what i would say is that the trade _ would say is that the trade unionists, the ordinary members themselves don't want to go on strike. they will lose money through this strike action. any strike is a representation of a failure, of the talks breaking down. we are on the side of both the public and these rail workers that want a resolution, that once the industrial dispute brought to an end, that can avoid this disruption and ultimately build a railway network fit for the 21st century, my constituents in sheffield suffer from some of the worst delayed and overcrowded trains in the country. what we should be doing now in this cost—of—living crisis and climate crisis is everything we can to encourage people out of their cars and onto public transport. at the heart of this dispute is the fact that governments are demanding 10% cuts to network rail and train operators,
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meaning further cuts to services and staff, which the public rely on. this staff, which the public rely on. as far as pay is concerned, a pay increase for rail workers, what would you be prepared to accept? you have said giving inflation under control, so that is a consideration. but what number would you be thinking the government should be prepared to arbitrate on? for; thinking the government should be prepared to arbitrate on? pat; is prepared to arbitrate on? pay is decided on _ prepared to arbitrate on? pay is decided on collective _ prepared to arbitrate on? pay is decided on collective bargaining sector by sector and it is not up to me to accept that figure arbitrarily what you say you want grant shapps to bring the sides together, that is a crucial part of this. how much pay might go up. doesn't have to be precise but give me a ballpark. of course it is but it is also not the only element of the dispute and it will be subject to negotiations and there are lots of moving parts so i will not sit here and give you a figure for that in this dispute. any severe strategy to down inflation. the idea that pay is contributing to
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inflation simply does not bear out because the average real terms wages are falling. the government needs to set out, and labour has a plan immediately to deal with the cost—of—living crisis, by not going ahead with the national insurance race and by extended business rates relief, but also we need a medium—term plan to bring down inflation by making the economy more resilient particularly in terms of energy security, which is driving a huge amount of information at the moment, the supply chain issues which we have been experiencing, driving up the cost of food in shops. we need that immediate plan from the comments to help people through this cost—of—living crisis and then a long—term economic plan to make the economy more resilient and grow the economy again. i}!(. and grow the economy again. 0k, louise haigh. _ and grow the economy again. 0k, louise haigh, thank you for joining us. we will put all of those points to the government at 7:30am this morning. time now to get the news,
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travel and weather where you are. plan to bring down inflation. good morning, i'm asad ahmad. this time tomorrow, train and tube services won't be running as workers go on strike over pay and job losses. talks are due to continue today as a special seven—day train timetable is introduced ahead of the walkouts. the action is planned for tomorrow, thursday and saturday. the tube strike is only planned for tomorrow. i'll have more travel news injust a moment. today marks the second anniversary of three men being stabbed to death during a terror attack in reading. james furlong, joe ritchie—bennett and david wails died after they were attacked by khairi saadallah, who's serving a whole—life jail sentence. a private members bill calling for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment is being presented in parliament today.
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conservative mp for cities of london and westminster, nickie aiken decided to take—up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. the crux of my bill is to be able to give women the power and the confidence that, if they are going to go through ivf treatment, that they will be supported by their employer and by society as a whole. transport for london has just days left to find a new sponsor for the cable car which links the excel centre with the o2 arena. the multi—million pound ten year deal with emirates is about to end this week with other potential sponsors proving difficult to find. the cable car cost £60 million to build and has been criticised for being too expensive and not attracting enough passengers. i've mentioned the tube strike planned for tomorrow.
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onto the weather now with kate. good morning. with the sun coming up so early at the moment, we've already had a glorious sunrise — this is over in harrow on the hill from weather watcher sian, and also down in red hill from weather watcher me on the hill. just a little bit of cloud just accentuating those colours. now the cloud today is going to disappear, there is a lot of fine dry weather in the forecast — not only for today, but for the next few days. and temperatures starting to feel a little warmer again — 22 celsius today. warm evening in the sunshine, and then overnight conditions don't really change. it's dry and it's clear — the minimum temperature somewhere between seven and 11 celsius. but another bright start as we head into tuesday. again, high pressure in charge — its building in from the west, blocking these fronts down in the south, so it is going to be another day of sunshine — lots of it. the wind reasonably light and temperatures just start to sneak up a little. it's getting warmer as we head
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further through this week — temperatures tomorrow getting up to 26 celsius. now temperatures rise even further for wednesday and thursday — 28, 29 celsius, you might even get a 30. but, come friday, low pressure takes over, so conditions turning more unsettled and cooler for the weekend. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. good morning, welcome to breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. a week of disruption on the railways begins ahead of the biggest
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walk—out in 30 years. the message to travellers here in liverpool aand across the uk is don't travel if you don't have to. this morning the rmt union is warning there could be more strikes if its needs are not met. the legal battle to prevent doctors turning off life support for brain damaged 12—year—old archie battersbee. his parents are trying overturn a previous high court decision. i think that nobody, and i mean nobody, has archie's best interests at heart like a mother. in sport, england's matt fitzpatrick wins the us open to clinch his first major trophy, sealing a sensational victory in boston. a poem celebrating manchester arena survivor martin hibbert�*s kilimanjaro challenge.
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the man who wrote it tells us why he wanted to celebrate the acheivement. a chilly start to the day. it's monday 20th june. our main story. train services across england, scotland and wales will run on a severely reduced timetable from this evening, ahead of the biggest walk—out on the railways in 30 years. strikes will take place on almost all major lines from tomorrow, with disruption expected all week. the rmt rail union has warned it will intensify industrial action if a deal over pay isn't reached and says it will run its campaign for as long as it takes. here's our business reporter esyllt carr.
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it'll be a week of huge disruption. and it starts tonight as services begin winding up ahead of the first of three days of industrial action. thousands of workers represented by the rmt union are striking overjob cuts, pay and changes to working conditions. it'll mean around one in five trains running on strike days, with many services cut on the days in between too. awful for people if they need to get to jobs and to work and to places. i support the rail strike because no one's listening to them. the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it's a huge inconveniencel to people's lives, isn't it? it's having a big impact on people. it's a pain for me because i'm travelling down to london on tuesday. but i'm going to fly now. so i'd rather not from the ecological point of view. but that's what i have to do. i have to wait and see. and if there's a train, there's a train. if not, i'll have to find other ways of getting to work. so far, talks between the union and network rail have been unsuccessful. both labour and the rmt have called on the government to step in.
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i think the campaign will intensify if we don't get a settlement, but we're determined and available to get a settlement at any time. but they must loosen the shackles with the employers so they can make a deal. we want to protect our members' jobs. their conditions, and we need a pay rise. so it's a fairly straightforward issue. grant shapps is putting a lot of hyperbole into it, but we can settle this if he allows these companies to negotiate. however, the government insists it's for the employer to negotiate with the union with transport secretary grant shapps describing the rmt as determined to strike. after receiving government funding to keep services running during the pandemic, rail bosses say any pay rises must come with changes to make the railway more sustainable. we really require details and acceptance that reform can go ahead and then that allows us to then work our how do we get a settlement for our staff and make sure that we move the industry forward. there is room for compromise. we can work together, this is resolvable. talks are due to continue today, but the advice for passengers
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is to only travel if necessary on strike days. esyllt carr, bbc news. nina is at liverpool lime street station. let's keep you in touch with everything you need to know. we will find out the latest line from the government at 7:30am. labour are asking for talks. this will not be a normal week?— asking for talks. this will not be a normal week? , . ., normal week? things are quieter than the would normal week? things are quieter than they would be — normal week? things are quieter than they would be normally _ normal week? things are quieter than they would be normally on _
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normal week? things are quieter than they would be normally on monday i they would be normally on monday morning, there is plenty availability on this train to euston. possibly commuters listening to the warning from unions to not travel this week. if your train is cancelled on tuesday, thursday or saturday if you have paid already you will be entitled to a refund and to travel on a different service provider if they are travelling on those routes. on the other days this week, 60% of services running. take your tickets, you will not be entitled to a refund if you're service is going ahead. the warning from the rail union is that this could not be the end on sunday, it could not be the end on sunday, it could be the beginning if they do not get what they want. the new head of the british army has warned his troops they must be prepared to face a renewed threat from russia. n a letter addressed to "all ranks
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and civil servants", general sir patrick sanders said that russia's invasion of ukraine shows the need "to protect the uk and be ready to fight and win wars". he added the army and allies must now be "capable of. defeating russia". ukraine's president volodymyr zelenskiy is warning russia will escalate its attacks this week as european union leaders consider whether to back kyiv�*s bid tojoin the eu. it comes amid reports that captured ukrainian soldiers will face "war—crimes tribunals" based on the nuremburg trials of the nazis. our correspondentjoe inwood is in the capital, kyiv. there is no sign of any letup in the fighting? there is no sign of any letup in the fiuuhtin? ~ y there is no sign of any letup in the fiuunhtin?, , , , fighting? absolutely, president zelensky says _ fighting? absolutely, president zelensky says that _ fighting? absolutely, president zelensky says that this - fighting? absolutely, president zelensky says that this will - zelensky says that this will intensify, but given that we already see fighting which is said to be as intense world war focused in the east of the country, it's difficult to know what that could mean. he gave this statement in his nightly address and he linked it implicitly to his
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country's attempts to join the european union, we will get more news on that this week. the other comments were from a lawmaker from the donnae x people's republic from the donnae x people's republic from the separatist on clay backed by russia, talking about the idea of facing a nuremberg style trials. those with the trial is the nazis faced at the end of the second world war. this is an attempt by russia to de—nazify the country, they are trying to feed that narrative with linking it with newerfire. the defenders of ukraine were trying to defenders of ukraine were trying to defend their country. so the comparison will seem distasteful to many people in ukraine. a private members bill calling for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment will be presented in parliament today.
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it would introduce a legal right for having time off for fertility medical appointments. the crux of my bill is to be able to give women the power and confidence that if they are going to go through ivf treatment that they will be supported by their employer, and by society as a whole. brazilian police say they're looking forfive more people believed to be involved in the murder of the british journalist dom phillips and indigenous expert bruno pereira. three suspects have already been arrested in connection with the killing in the amazon. the pair were investigating the involvement of criminal gangs in illegalfishing and mining when they went missing. the french president emmanuel macron has suffered a major political setback, after his centrist alliance lost its parliamentary majority.
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his coalition, "ensemble", lost around a hundred seats, with major gains for both the far—right party and a new alliance led by the far—left. our paris correspondent lucy williamson reports. emmanuel macron's presidency just got tougher. early projections suggest his centrist coalition has lost a third of its seats. it's now more than 50 seats short of a majority. just look at the mood. translation: the situation is unprecedented. _ the national assembly has never seen a configuration of this type in the fifth republic. the situation constitutes a risk for our country in view of the challenges that we have to face. this is now president macron's main opposition. a new alliance of green and left wing parties dominated by far left mps. the initial estimates confirming their new status as the first opposition
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party of france. translation: it's the total defeat of the president's party _ and there is no majority. we have achieved the political objective we gave ourselves to bring down the man who, with such arrogance, twisted the arm of the whole country to get elected. but this was the big surprise of the night. marine le pen's far right national rally partyjumped from a handful of seats to almost 90. plenty of opposition to the president from all sides. translation: we're going to continue to bring french people together - as part of a great popular movement, unifying all patriots from the right and the left. the parliamentary opposition to mr macron's centrist coalition is now much stronger than before, but it's also more fractured, with one bloc led by jean—luc melenchon on the far left of the chamber, and another by marine le pen on the far right. french politics is realigning around
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these three political groups. some voters say it's no bad thing if president macron is forced to negotiate with his opponents. others believe denying the government a majority only leads to stagnation. president macron is facing a new era of political opposition that some see as good for democracy and others as bad for france. lucy williamson, bbc news, paris. too many children who are exploited by drugs gangs are being treated as criminals rather than victims, according to a leading children's charity. the bbc has been given rare access to teams working to bring legal cases against people who groom children into crime. our home affairs correspondent daniel sandford reports. shouting. smashing down the door to arrest a teenager who's carried out a drive—by shooting in coventry. walk towards me! do it now!
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walk slowly towards me. keep walking. keep walking! 19—year—old carren monga killed another teenager with a shotgun fired from a stolen car. the boy at the wheel, riaz ahmed, was only 15. both were convicted of murder. two more teenagers involved in the drug—gang violence scarring britain's cities and towns. this sort of activity is nothing less than terrorising a local community, and i think that is the word to use. when you apply class—a drug culture in a local community, this is bringing terror to local streets. we've been inside a new unit based in birmingham of prosecutors specialising in serious violence and drug crime, often involving young people. lawyers here have the delicate task of working out which arrested teenagers may actually be victims themselves — children who've
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been forced into drug dealing by gang leaders. what do we look for? and it varies from case to case. there may be physical evidence — the young person may be malnourished, may be living in squalid conditions, evidencing exploitation. it's something jenny experienced first—hand when her 15—year—old son disappeared from home for two weeks, and returned filthy and terrified. for her safety, we've agreed to disguise her identity. she told me the family received this warning from someone linked to a drugs gang. if you go to the police, you're going to end up dead. your son's going to end up dead. your whole family is going to end up dead. her son had been used by organised criminals to guard and sell drugs 70 miles from home. they'd threatened him and made him think he owed them money. but even though the cps knew he'd been exploited, he still ended up in court. he's a victim and he wasn't
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being treated like a victim. they're out to penalise — that's what it felt like. get him arrested, charge him with whatever they can — as long as someone is being charged for this crime — that's what it felt like. even if it'sjust a child — a vulnerable child, as well. go! with the battle against county lines in full flow, charities believe that despite new initiatives from the prosecution service, too many children who've been exploited by the drugs gangs are still being criminalised rather than protected. daniel sandford, bbc news, birmingham. here's carol with a look at this morning's weather. rumour has it the sun is going to shine. blue skies, green fields, good morning. absolutely right. a sunny day ahead and for many of us as we go through
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the week, a fair bit of sunshine around and it is warm. increasingly it is going to turn a bit more humid. a bank of cloud across southern england is producing some spots of rain, now many of us saw it last night, we have some cloud in the east of england. and across the north west of scotland an approaching weather front is bringing some thick cloud and some spots of rain. away from these areas, a lot of dry weather and a lot of sunshine. temperature responding quite nicely. the cloud through the day across the channel islands will continue to break up and you will see some sunshine. the cloud will thicken up, the breeze will pick up across the north west. some rain across the outer hebrides, and the northern isles. here we are looking at temperatures of 11 to 13 degrees but 20 in aberdeen and newcastle, also in birmingham, 22 in cardiff. this evening and overnight heavy rain in north—west scotland,
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but as it sinks south, it will weaken, and the rain will turn patchy. it will not be as cold start to the day tomorrow across parts of scotland as it was this morning, temperatures for the rest of us are similar to how we started today. tomorrow, a lot of sunshine to england and wales, a weak weather front thinking south, and it could bring the odd spot of rain to cumbria, the north york moors and the odd shower in eastern scotland. away from that, dry, highs of 23 or 24, possibly 25. a promise of sunshine, that is what we need! the family of a 12—year—old boy who has brain damage will find out today if they can appeal against a ruling that his life support treatment should stop. archie battersbee was found unconscious at his home in essex in april. his parents want his treatment to continue but doctors at the royal london hospital say he's medically dead. zoe conway has more.
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he's just so beautiful. he's so angelic. it's no different from at home. he just looks peaceful. he's asleep. for nine weeks, hollie dance has been keeping watch over her son. every night, she sleeps in archie's hospital room. every day she talks to him and she says... you really need to wake up now because we've got the biggest battle of our lives and it would be really great if you actually helped me — you know, wake up and do something. it was in early april that hollie found archie unconscious at home. she believes he was taking part in an online challenge that went terribly wrong. last week, a judge concluded archie is brain—stem dead, and his life support should not continue. but archie's parents want him to be given more time. hollie says she felt him squeeze her hand. he's in there.
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physically, for whatever reason — whether it's locked—in syndrome, whether he's he's paralysed, you know, and there's an injury that's not been sort of looked into — i don't know, but i feel he's in there. archie used to tell his mum that he wanted to be a world champion. he loved gymnastics and mixed martial arts fighting. archie. my name isjoe egan. each day, get well messages are played to him. from croydon's boxing club, we'd like to wish archie - a speedy recovery. hi, archie. the former wvu champion of the world here. but, man, listen, we're allthinking of you and praying for you. hope you get well soon. hi, archie, it's max whitlock here. one message is from olympic gold medallist max whitlock, who trains at the same gym as archie. you've got everybody| behind you right now, everybody supporting you. come on, archie! and what was your relationship with him like? amazing.
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he's literally like my little sidekick. i can't even go to tesco's without archie being with me and i'll be walking around... coming down the other aisle is archie with his own trolley, doing his own shopping, you know? and i'm like, "oh, arch, you're costing me a fortune!" he's like, "yeah, but i need to eat healthy and i'll give you it back when dad gives me my pocket money on thursday." later today hollie, and archie's father paul battersby, will return to court to seek permission to appeal against the judge's decision that treatment can be withdrawn. do you ever worry that you are prolonging the agony for yourself? no, i don't. i would be more worried if i gave up and spent the rest of my life thinking, "what if ijust held on that little bit longer?" i think that nobody — and i mean nobody — has archie's best interest at heart like a mother. throughout our interview, hollie did not break down or cry. she was remarkably composed. inside, i'm not.
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inside, i'm broken. but i've had to go in fight—and—flight. i've got no choice. i haven't got time to think about my feelings, my emotions at the minute because this is a fight for archie's life. i can deal and address my emotions after this battle. at the minute, i can't let my guard down for a split second. he's a 12—year—old boy — give him a chance! it's a brain injury. nine weeks is nothing. zoe conway, bbc news. let's talk more about what could happen next with legal commentatorjoshua rozenberg. good morning. it is such a sad, heartbreaking, complicated case. what could happen today? i think archie's parents _ what could happen today? i think archie's parents will _ what could happen today? i think archie's parents will ask - what could happen today? i think archie's parents will ask for - archie's parents will ask for permission to appeal and they have
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got to show they have got an actionable case. thejudge got to show they have got an actionable case. the judge could grant them permission to appeal and if she does not, it's possible the court of appeal will grant permission to appeal and then there will be a full hearing before three judges. i don't want to raise hope, because i think the court of appeal is very likely to say that the high courtjudge so all the medical evidence, she considered the law, and unless it can be shown that she made some mistake in assessing the law, it's very unlikely they will reach a different conclusion from the conclusion then the high court judge reached. 50 the conclusion then the high court judge reached-— judge reached. so how soon will there be some _ judge reached. so how soon will there be some kind _ judge reached. so how soon will there be some kind of— judge reached. so how soon will there be some kind of decision l judge reached. so how soon will. there be some kind of decision for there be some kind of decision for the family?— the family? they may hear today whether they _ the family? they may hear today whether they are _ the family? they may hear today whether they are getting - the family? they may hear today i whether they are getting permission to appeal, and there may be an appeal hearing perhaps within two or three weeks, a month or so. nobody wants to drag this out for any longer. and the reason for that was
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expressed by the high courtjudge which is if archie remains on the mechanical ventilation, the life—support system, the likely outcome for him is a sudden death. as thejudge said, outcome for him is a sudden death. as the judge said, the prospect of recovery is nil. although she said sudden death, she also made a declaration that archie died almost three weeks ago on the 31st of may, shortly after mri scans were taken. it wasn't possible to use normal tests for brain stem death, but the doctors are all convinced that there is no prospect of recovery, he isn't —— is indeed brain stem dead. to pick up one of the points that hollie dance made, everybody sympathises with her and understands that she is closest to her son but the judge said that if she had not made the declaration that archie was already dead, she would have said it was not in his best interests to
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continue medical treatment in the form of meth —— mechanical ventilation and it would be lawful for the doctors to end his life support system. for the doctors to end his life support system-— for the doctors to end his life su orts stem. g ., , support system. joshua rosenberg, thank ou support system. joshua rosenberg, thank you very _ support system. joshua rosenberg, thank you very much. _ support system. joshua rosenberg, thank you very much. we _ support system. joshua rosenberg, thank you very much. we will- support system. joshua rosenberg, thank you very much. we will keep | thank you very much. we will keep across that story and wait for decision possibly today. leaders from around the commonwealth are in rwanda this week for discussions about the future of their countries. it comes as a number of caribbean countries consider becoming a republic. it happened in barbados last year, and jamaica could be next. our community affairs correspondent, adina campbell has more. jamaica's north coast, a picture postcard of expansive shorelines and mountainous views. but beyond the dreamy landscape, there's the more serious business of politics and the country's future. ocho rios captures the beauty of this caribbean island and is a tourism hotspot.
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when it comes to the question ofjamaica becoming a republic, people here are split and are quick to tell us how they truly feel. remove the queen. it's not going to be better. when the queen was there, when i was young, jamaica was better. yeah? so i don't see no way to remove the queen. none at all. we need to move on now. it's 60 years of independence, so we need to move on. no, i don't want one. it really doesn't - make any difference. it does not. because what is the queen has done? the queen has done nothing for us since independence. i so it is here not there whether we j are a republic or because nothing| is going to change. the prime ministers are not doing nothing, the queen not doing nothing. so we don't know who to turn to more than god. the jamaican prime minister is determined to take his country in a new direction, drifting away from the british monarchy
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could take years. but he told me, now is the time. in our 60th year we have reached the point where we have to give very serious consideration to the form of our nation. the role of the royal family in caribbean countries is a divisive, often sore subject. when the duke and duchess of cambridge visited jamaica earlier this year, there were protests and repeated calls for slavery reparations. and some politicians feel there's too much distance between the jamaican people and the royal family. jamaica certainly wants to be a republic. and...it�*s not clear that we still need to be a part of the realm. ordinaryjamaicans can't even get a visa to go to the united kingdom. but we still... in parliament, we pray for the health of the queen, and she is the head of state. butjamaicans can't go and visit their head of state.
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what also really matters is the country's future on the next generation. keep that coming back here. at an academy in kingston run by former international cricket star nikita miller, the royal family doesn't seem relevant any more. not much to say about them. i don't know. i know that jamaica used to be under slave by the queen. - do you care about the british royalfamily? mm... not really. not really, not really. i wouldn't mind seeing what being a republic would bring us as a country. i mean, so i'm sure during that period when that conversation started, it would educate us as to why it is important to be a republic and the benefits and the pros and cons. jamaica celebrates 60 years of independence later this summer. but with the foundation set for parting away
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from the queen, even more independence could be on the horizon. adina campbell, bbc news, injamaica. i think we have got better weather than jamaica today. i think we have got better weather thanjamaica today. i i think we have got better weather than jamaica today.— than jamaica today. i think it de-ends than jamaica today. i think it depends where _ than jamaica today. i think it depends where you - than jamaica today. i think it depends where you are. - than jamaica today. i think it - depends where you are. sunshine in most places- _ depends where you are. sunshine in most places- we — depends where you are. sunshine in most places. we have _ depends where you are. sunshine in most places. we have also - depends where you are. sunshine in most places. we have also got - most places. we have also got gorillaz for you this morning, this is going to be great. it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. and that, i think, one of our closest relatives on earth. and that, ithink, was one of our closest relatives on earth. and that, i think, was a gorilla fight! == earth. and that, i think, was a gorilla fight!— gorilla fight! -- fart! that is justin who _ gorilla fight! -- fart! that is justin who has _ gorilla fight! -- fart! that is justin who has been - gorilla fight! -- fart! that is justin who has been sniffing gorilla fight! -- fart! that is - justin who has been sniffing out what mountain rescue conservation projects can do, they have boosted
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the species. stop it! we will find out more from justin who will be here to tell us everything he sensed on that trip! you here to tell us everything he sensed on that trip!— on that trip! you have been thinking about that all _ on that trip! you have been thinking about that all morning. _ on that trip! you have been thinking about that all morning. i _ on that trip! you have been thinking about that all morning. i do - on that trip! you have been thinking about that all morning. i do think. about that all morning. i do think justin cannot _ about that all morning. i do think justin cannot get _ about that all morning. i do think justin cannot get it _ about that all morning. i do think justin cannot get it out _ about that all morning. i do think justin cannot get it out of - about that all morning. i do think justin cannot get it out of his - justin cannot get it out of his nostrils! time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. this time tomorrow, train and tube services won't be running as workers go on strike over pay and job losses. talks are due to continue today — as a special seven—day train timetable is introduced ahead of the walkouts. the action is planned for tomorrow, thursday and saturday. the tube strike is only planned for tomorrow. but expect disruption on the railways for most of the week. i'll have more travel news injust a moment. today marks the second anniversary of three men being stabbed to death
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during a terror attack in reading. james furlong, joe ritchie—bennett and david wales died after they were attacked by khairi saadallah — who's serving a whole—life jail sentence. tonight there will be a minute's silence to remember the victims. a private members bill calling for the introduction of statutory time off for those undergoing fertility treatment is being presented in parliament today. conservative mp for cities of london and westminster nickie aiken decided to take up the issue after being contacted by a constituent who says she was "forced out" of herjob while having ivf treatment. transport for london has just days left to find a new sponsor for the cable car which links the excel centre with the o2 arena. the multi—million—pound ten—year deal with emirates is about to end this week — with other potential sponsors proving difficult to find. the cable car cost £60 million to build, and has been criticised for being too expensive and not attracting enough passengers.
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a look at this morning's tube board now, ahead of the strike tomorrow. iam glad i am glad to say it is a good service on all lines and has been that way all morning, which is always good news. onto the weather now with kate. good morning. with the sun coming up so early at the moment, we've already had a glorious sunrise — this is over in harrow on the hill from weather watcher sian, and also down in red hill from weather watcher me on the hill. just a little bit of cloud just accentuating those colours. now the cloud today is going to disappear, there is a lot of fine dry weather in the forecast — not only for today, but for the next few days. and temperatures starting to feel a little warmer again — 22 celsius today. warm evening in the sunshine, and then overnight conditions don't really change. it's dry and it's clear — the minimum temperature somewhere between seven and 11 celsius. but another bright start as we head into tuesday. again, high pressure in charge — its building in from the west, blocking these fronts down in the south, so it is going to be another day of sunshine — lots of it. the wind reasonably light
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and temperatures just start to sneak up a little. it's getting warmer as we head further through this week — temperatures tomorrow getting up to 26 celsius. now temperatures rise even further for wednesday and thursday — 28, 29 celsius, you might even get a 30. but, come friday, low pressure takes over, so conditions turning more unsettled and cooler for the weekend. that's it. but interest—free loans for people who need them most is being discussed by vanessa feltz on bbc radio london in ten minutes' time. it's an idea that's proved so successful, it's being expanded. i'm back in an hour. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent good withjon kay and sally nugent morning. thank you us good morning. thank you forjoining us this monday morning. our top story is likely to dominate the headlines all week. rail strikes.
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the government is facing growing anger over its refusal to join last minute talks to avert the biggest rail strike for three decades. we're joined now by the chief secretary to the treasury simon clarke. good morning. are good morning. government _ good morning. are good morning. government is _ good morning. are good morning. government is going _ good morning. are good morning. government is going to _ good morning. are good morning. government is going to at - good morning. are good morning. government is going to at any - good morning. are good morning. | government is going to at any point in the next few hours?— in the next few hours? well, we continue to _ in the next few hours? well, we continue to support _ in the next few hours? well, we continue to support the - in the next few hours? well, we - continue to support the negotiations that are rightly under way between the employers and network rail and the employers and network rail and the unions and we want a good outcome. we obviously will continue to help the resolution can be reached until such time as there is no further time left for discussion. i do think it is important we send out a message early this week that industrial action is likely to proceed and that people should therefore take sensible preparations now because there is no point giving false hope that these strikes can be avoided. at this stage it is likely
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they will proceed. the avoided. at this stage it is likely they will proceed.— avoided. at this stage it is likely they will proceed. the rail delivery grou - they will proceed. the rail delivery grou sa they will proceed. the rail delivery group say these — they will proceed. the rail delivery group say these disputes _ they will proceed. the rail delivery group say these disputes are - group say these disputes are completely resolvable, which is the opposite to what you are suggesting. it is fair to say that they are resolvable and we all want to see a good and fair outcome for rail workers. their payers and passengers alike. we are determined to say has that happened. it is also important to be realistic that this is a difficult negotiation and we want to see a positive outcome but we don't anticipate that as of this morning. it is striking the right balance between the fact that negotiations will continue, and they should, but also that people should make sensible preparations.- also that people should make sensible preparations. grant shapps has said it is — sensible preparations. grant shapps has said it is not _ sensible preparations. grant shapps has said it is not the _ has said it is not the responsibility of the government to step in and stop this industrial action. you have a treasury minister in charge of the pay review body process. i'm curious to know, what do you think?— do you think? well, it is important we set an overarching _
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do you think? well, it is important we set an overarching expectation | we set an overarching expectation around public sector pay, which is affordable and sustainable. because in the end if we end up in a spiral whereby public sector workforces come to expect inflation busting pay increases then that will lead to a spiral that we want to avoid, whereby inflation becomes baked in, becomes both more severe and lasts longer than it needs to. we have an independent pay review body process, so with all the different public sector workforces, the independent bodies will submit their reports about the workforces they are responsible for. the police, nurses, doctors and so on, and that process is under way at the moment. there will then be discussions between departments about what they can do in response and we'll see what the outcome of that process is. it is important to emphasise this is an independent process of which the treasury is only one partner. i am really interested _ treasury is only one partner. i am really interested to _ treasury is only one partner. i am really interested to know - treasury is only one partner. i am really interested to know why you use that phrase, inflation busting.
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at the rise of 2% 13% is anti—inflationary, as is five or 6%. where'd you get the inflation busting suggestion from? we where'd you get the inflation busting suggestion from? we have to manaue busting suggestion from? we have to manage some — busting suggestion from? we have to manage some of _ busting suggestion from? we have to manage some of the _ busting suggestion from? we have to manage some of the expectations - busting suggestion from? we have to manage some of the expectations wej manage some of the expectations we have her —— 2% or 3%. we have heard of a 15% pay increases and that simply is not affordable. it is not something which the public sector finances can accommodate but crucially it is not in any one's interest, because what we need to prevent here is a return to the very serious inflation problems which this country faced historically and what we need to prevent returning today. inflation is a serious issue across the western world at the moment, owing to the combination of the impact of covid and russia's invasion of ukraine, which is pushing up commodity prices. we need to manage those pressures in such a way that people get the help that they need, and that is obviously three pay increases. nobody is talking about the pay freeze, but it
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is sensible pay increases. it is also about direct government support and we are putting in place £37 billion package of support for families this year which is designed to offset the pressures we know everyone is facing. rail to offset the pressures we know everyone is facing.— to offset the pressures we know everyone is facing. rail strikes a hu:el everyone is facing. rail strikes a hugely destructive _ everyone is facing. rail strikes a hugely destructive and - everyone is facing. rail strikes a hugely destructive and can - everyone is facing. rail strikes a hugely destructive and can be i everyone is facing. rail strikes a - hugely destructive and can be hugely unpopular. i with a situation where now, at the moment, with members of your own party suggesting the government needs to step in, are you in a situation where, actually, you quite want these strikes to go ahead this week? we quite want these strikes to go ahead this week? ~ ., , ,., , ., �* ., this week? we absolutely don't want them to no this week? we absolutely don't want them to go ahead. _ this week? we absolutely don't want them to go ahead. i _ this week? we absolutely don't want them to go ahead. i recognise - this week? we absolutely don't want them to go ahead. i recognise this i them to go ahead. i recognise this will cause misery for millions of people, and i am profoundly sorry about that. i wish this was not happening. i don't believe it needs to happen. i think unions should be engaging constructively and not holding the threat of strike action over the heads of the travelling public because in the end it is absolutely in everyone's interest, the rail workers themselves, passengers and the taxpayer, that we find way forward. no one is
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suggesting there is some kind of pay freeze required here. we want to see sensible pay increase. later that we need to see reform of some of the practices that make our railway a very unsustainable at the number. we have to recognise that the way our rail network operator is not fit for the 2020s and it is in nobody is interest that continues. for the trade union members themselves, if they wantjobs log into the future, which i certainly want to happen, we need to have a rail industry which is sustainable. we spent some £16 billion on the railways during the pandemic, the equivalent of £600 per household. all we are asking in return is that the industry if one is itself sensibly so it can financially sustain itself and that is not something which at the moment is not something which at the moment is possible to say. we need this to be resolved and that is part of the negotiations, alongside pay, with the unions at the moment. you talk
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about reasonable _ the unions at the moment. you talk about reasonable increase. - the unions at the moment. you talk about reasonable increase. what i the unions at the moment. you talk about reasonable increase. what is| about reasonable increase. what is reasonable? i about reasonable increase. what is reasonable?— reasonable? i will not ascribe an artificial figure _ reasonable? i will not ascribe an artificial figure to _ reasonable? i will not ascribe an artificial figure to that _ reasonable? i will not ascribe an artificial figure to that but - reasonable? i will not ascribe an artificial figure to that but it - artificial figure to that but it means an increase which respects the fact that there is significant inflation but at the same time doesn't seek to compound that by baking in a very high level of inflation and high level pay increases into the future. we are absolutely clear that we will examine the individual independent pay review body recommendations on their own merit but it does mean that we can't have expectations of double—digit pay deals this year because that simply is not affordable.— because that simply is not affordable. , ., ,, ., affordable. there is talk on the front pages _ affordable. there is talk on the front pages of _ affordable. there is talk on the front pages of many _ affordable. there is talk on the front pages of many other - affordable. there is talk on the i front pages of many other papers this morning talking about potential strikes from teachers and nhs staff. are we heading into a of discontent? well, i very much hope not and i don't think there is any reason why that should be the case. there is an independent pay review body process and each government department there are independent experts who set out
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expectations about what the workforces are affected ought sensibly to be offered. the government will then review those recommendations and individual departments will respond to them. i absolutely think that we can get to absolutely think that we can get to a situation where people get good pay office but we have to remind you of the fact we spent £83 billion per year on our debt interest payments after the pandemic, we have high inflation and in the context of those very serious challenges, that everybody needs to be aware of what we are trying to do here which is, in the end, to avoid a problem that will damage the whole of our economy and society. we do not want to see entrenched inflation. you and society. we do not want to see entrenched inflation.— entrenched inflation. you say there is no lan entrenched inflation. you say there is no plan for _ entrenched inflation. you say there is no plan for the _ entrenched inflation. you say there is no plan for the intervene - entrenched inflation. you say there is no plan for the intervene in - is no plan for the intervene in terms of negotiation. is there any contact at all between unions and members of the government, any communication? the members of the government, any communication? the negotiations are conducted quite _ communication? the negotiations are conducted quite properly _ communication? the negotiations are conducted quite properly between - communication? the negotiations arej conducted quite properly between the legal employers and trade unions. it is not as though the leadership of
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the rmt are there to be spoken to in good faith. mick lynch, the general secretary, has said he will not negotiate with the tory government. that gives you the measure of the likelihood of him sitting down for a sensible conversation apart from the legalities of this we have to recognise that we do need negotiating partners to work in good faith and that is a dubious proposition.— faith and that is a dubious --roosition. ., , ., proposition. you say it is not currently _ proposition. you say it is not currently on _ proposition. you say it is not currently on that _ proposition. you say it is not currently on that basis. - proposition. you say it is not - currently on that basis. ultimately the negotiations _ currently on that basis. ultimately the negotiations between - currently on that basis. ultimately the negotiations between the - the negotiations between the employers and the trade unions, we are ultimately obviously keenly interested in making sure we get to a sensible resolution and want to do everything we can to enable that. we want to see sensible productivity reform, sensible pay office designed to achieve the financial sustainability of the railway long into the future. that is our role in this but it is not the case that we will sit around a table directly with the trade unions because that is not how the government ought to
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be behaving. we are not the legal employer. be behaving. we are not the legal emlo er. ,, ., ., ,, ., ,, be behaving. we are not the legal emlo er. ,, ., . ,, ., ~ employer. simon clarke, thank you. thank you- — it is hard to see any sign of progress. all sides are saying there doesn't seem to be much chance. that strike starts tomorrow. the implications begin this evening with the emergency timetables. mean it will run us through what it all means, and the routes affected, in the next half hour. jun means, and the routes affected, in the next half hour.— the next half hour. jun is here with the next half hour. jun is here with the sort the next half hour. jun is here with the sport and _ the next half hour. jun is here with the sport and we _ the next half hour. jun is here with the sport and we are _ the next half hour. jun is here with the sport and we are talking - the next half hour. jun is here with the sport and we are talking about| the sport and we are talking about matthew fitzpatrick. aha, the sport and we are talking about matthew fitzpatrick.— the sport and we are talking about matthew fitzpatrick. a name perhaps that miaht matthew fitzpatrick. a name perhaps that might not _ matthew fitzpatrick. a name perhaps that might not be _ matthew fitzpatrick. a name perhaps that might not be familiar— matthew fitzpatrick. a name perhaps that might not be familiar to - matthew fitzpatrick. a name perhaps that might not be familiar to many i that might not be familiar to many but let's not forget at a time when people are questioning why people are playing the game, there are ludicrous sums of money on offer, what are they in it for? matt fitzpatrick, flanked by his family, winning on his final round yesterday, one of the biggest competitions in golf, there is an illustration of a feel—good moment in golf and he said it was out of this world to do something that very few english golfers have done, to win the us open. what a special
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moment. matt fitzpatrick, a name to look out for. sheffield born and bred, showing real steel winning yesterday, the biggest win of his career. and it follows up his victory there as an amateur nine years ago. joe lynskey reports. oh, so proud of you! on the boston greens, the sound came from sheffield. for matthew fitzpatrick, this was a moment for his family and history for british golf. americans dominate the us open. now he's just the third englishman to win it in 90 years — and so many tried to stop him. fitzpatrick played on the last day with will zalatoris — south yorkshire against san francisco — and between them it was so close. the two were neck—and—neck through the back nine. to stay in touch, fitzpatrick found the spectacular. at 27, he hadn't won a major before, but here he was in the sand
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at the last hole with a shot the greats would be proud of. that's one of the best shots i've ever seen. zalatoris would need this putt to force a play—off. for him, it was heartbreak. but for fitzpatrick, to do it here meant so much — on this same course, he won the us amateur atjust 18. back then, he had to stay with a boston family. this week, the same one have housed his mum and dad. nine years on with two trophies, this place feels like home. it's what you grow up dreaming of. it's something i've worked so hard for, for such a long time. and, you know, there was a big monkey on my back trying to win over here and everyone — all they ever talked about was that and, you know, to do it as a major for my first win, there's nothing better. fitzpatrick wraps his clubs in a sheffield united badge. now he's won where so few brits have before. and us open silver is heading to the steel city. joe lynskey, bbc news.
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what a moment for matt fitzpatrick. max verstappen held off the ferrari of carlos sainz to win the canadian grand prix, to extend his lead in the f1 championship to 46 points. he'd led from the start and might have cruised to victory were it not for a crash with 21 laps to go. that brought the safety car out, putting sainz right behind the dutchman, only for verstappen to hold on, to claim his sixth win of the season. lewis hamilton, with problems last time out in baku, grabbed his second podium finish of the season. the world governing body of swimming has voted to ban transgender athletes from competing in women's events, unless they have transitioned by the age of 12. it follows controversy over swimmers who were born male, but have transitioned and gone on to win women's races. our sports correspondent jane dougall has more. the world swimming championships getting under way in budapest.
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butjust hours earlier in the same city, the sport's governing body had made a crucial decision. members of fina voted to effectively bar any trans woman who has gone through male puberty from competing in women's events. we have to protect the rights of all our athletes to compete. but we also have to protect competitive fairness at our events, especially women's competition. the policy has been prompted by swimmers such as american lia thomas, the first known transgender swimmer to win a us national college title. thomas will now not be eligible to compete in women's events at the world championships or the olympics. former olympic swimmer and campaigner sharron davies has welcomed it. i'm really proud of my association to be the first to come forward and actually base their rules on proved science. you know, we've been asking for that for five years now. all we've ever wanted is to have
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fair sport for females. it's an incredibly divisive subject. the debate has led to other sports examining their policies, including world cycling's governing body, who will tighten their rules. it follows trans athlete emily bridges' failed attempt to compete in the women's category. fina say they will also create an open category. but those disappointed with today's changes say that's scant consolation. if trans women have undergone an appropriate period of testosterone suppression, then their advantages will be mitigated to the point where we can have meaningful competition between trans women and cis women. fairness and inclusion are the cornerstones of sport. but this issue has seen the two collide. and when feelings run as deep as this, affecting so many, they won't dissipate any time soon. jane dougall, bbc news.
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we wait for details as to how that category will work, and when it will come in. and we saw some berenttini brilliance yesterday. and i wouldn't bet against more to come this summer. here was matteo berrentini defending his title at queen's yesterday, beating serbia's filip krajinovic. it's back—to—back titles on the grass as well, having beaten andy murray to win the stuttgart open last week. he also made the wimbledon final last year. you just wonder. look at the size of that trophy. i'm surprised he is not too exhausted to pick it up and wasn't he lovely with sue barker? said some lovely words about her amazing career. had a wobble. she said she was _ amazing career. had a wobble. she said she was quite emotional. i think there will be a few more conversations like that in the next few weeks. good luck, soon, holding it together stuck held it together, as well.
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let's go to someone who always hold it together. our carol. good morning. if it together. our carol. good morning-— it together. our carol. good morninu. ., , ., morning. if only that were true. this morning — morning. if only that were true. this morning many _ morning. if only that were true. this morning many are - morning. if only that were true. this morning many are starting| morning. if only that were true. i this morning many are starting off on a sunny note but some on a cloudy note as you can see here. it does mean that it will break later and you will see some sunshine. we have the dregs of yesterday's front producing some thick cloud and spots of rain in the south. another weather front across the north west introducing thicker cloud and later some rain. in between, a ridge of high pressure means things are fairly settled and we have a lot of sunshine to look forward to. at times, more cloud in the east. it is quite breezy down the north sea coastline and you can see the rain eventually arriving in the outer hebrides and the northern isles. these are our temperatures. if you are in the breeze and the north west and the temperatures will be lower, here too we have the cloud. inland in the sunshine we are looking at up to 23 degrees, but pollen levels today are high or very high
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everywhere except for north west scotland. into the evening and overnight, you can see the rain turns heavier for overnight, you can see the rain turns heavierfor a time overnight, you can see the rain turns heavier for a time across the north of scotland, but as it sinks into northern ireland and eventually northern england, it will not be heavy at all. fairly light with a fair bit of cloud. not as cold and night as it was last night, for parts of the highlands and southern uplands and for the rest of us temperatures very similar to how we started today tomorrow morning. talking of tomorrow, we have a weather front, talking of tomorrow, we have a weatherfront, the talking of tomorrow, we have a weather front, the odd shower across the channel islands. the weather front since south, fizzles and we this ridge of high pressure keeping things once again fairly settled. on tuesday, a lot of dry weather, fair bit of sunshine across most of england and wales as a weather front since the south and fade. it could still produce some light showers or light rain across cumbria and the naughty work moist but they will be the exception rather than the rule and as the cloud breaks in scotland, especially in the east, we can see
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showers. temperatures range from 12 in the north to highs of about 26 as we push down towards the south. as we push down towards the south. as we head into wednesday, still a lot of dry weather around. we also have this cloud across the north and west and cloud building through the day but then it will melt away as we head into the evening so we'll end “p head into the evening so we'll end up being a sunny evening during wednesday but he could see the other spots of rain from it across the far north temperatures 12 to 15 here, but widely 20, 21, 28, possibly 29 as we move down towards london. increasingly it will turn much more humid than it has been. that takes us into thursday. we have a weather front coming in across the north—west which could produce some spots of rain, and a bit more cloud for northern ireland. as a temperatures not as high, but it cools down and becomes more unsettled on temperatures not as high, but it cools down and becomes more unsettled on friday temperatures not as high, but it cools down and becomes more unsettled on friday and temperatures not as high, but it cools down and becomes more unsettled on friday and into temperatures not as high, but it cools down and becomes more unsettled on friday and into the weekend wife just in time for glastonbury! and then wimbledon next
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week, as well. we glastonbury! and then wimbledon next week. as well-— week, as well. we will watch on tv. thank you- — one week after the manchester arena survivor martin hibbert conquered mount kilimanjaro as he aims to raise a million pounds for the spinal injuries association. in recognition of his achievement, poet and writer tony walsh has penned a poem for martin, let's take a look. from a single act of violence. and the 22 we lost. the hundreds, maybe thousands, who still pay a daily cost. there comes choirs, there comes music, there comes campaigns, there come stories. there come glades of lights and daily fights and love. in all its glory. there comes martin in his wheelchair with just one thing on his mind — and dream, believe, achieve, he says. and onwards, forwards, climb. and with northern bloody—mindedness.
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and crazy as this sounds we'll raise hope. we'll raise awareness. we will raise £1 million. those who saw him at his lowest. at the very gates of hell. those who stitched him back together said, "you're mad." we'll climb, as well, from a base camp on a bomb site, this is wheelchair v volcano. yes, it's rough and yes, it's tough. but martin's often heard to say they'll climb for dignity, humanity for all, like me, who say believe in us achieving. we climb mountains every day. and over rock and over rivers and through heat and sheeting rain and through blood and sweat and fears and through sickness and through pain, over boulders, aching shoulders. something holds us. through the snow. something in us, deep within us. we dig in and on we go. and he made it to the summit
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and united with his mum, and he raised the flag to manchester with a "look, mum, what i've done!" and to those who would divide us, who spread hatred all around, this says love can conquer mountains and it's never coming down. and its strong and it can catch us. it can lift us to the top. and martin, he'sjust starting, and he's never gonna stop. from a single act of violence comes a simple act of love. we rise, we rise, we rise, we rise, we rise. we rise above. still amazing pictures to watch. what an achievement. martin, i hope you had some sleep, if you are watching. he was struggling so much. and tonyjoins us now.
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that is a beautiful piece you have written. it that is a beautiful piece you have written. ., , that is a beautiful piece you have written. ., that is a beautiful piece you have written. . , ., .,. that is a beautiful piece you have written. . , . ., written. it was an achievement do not inspiring _ written. it was an achievement do not inspiring subject _ written. it was an achievement do not inspiring subject to _ written. it was an achievement do not inspiring subject to write - not inspiring subject to write about. as the poem says, from a base camp on a bomb site to the top of kilimanjaro, wrinkling his non—�*s ashes and what an inspiring thing to write about —— sprinkling his mum's ashes. that write about -- sprinkling his mum's ashes. �* ., , ., ., , ashes. at what point did you realise the oem ashes. at what point did you realise the poem is — ashes. at what point did you realise the poem is there? _ ashes. at what point did you realise the poem is there? you _ ashes. at what point did you realise the poem is there? you get - ashes. at what point did you realise the poem is there? you get a - ashes. at what point did you realise l the poem is there? you get a feeling about these — the poem is there? you get a feeling about these things _ the poem is there? you get a feeling about these things and _ the poem is there? you get a feeling about these things and martin - about these things and martin announced at christmas that this was happening and i volunteered to write a poem to help with his fundraising. i asked if he wanted it before or after and he said after and i sought the bbc footage, wrote it quickly a few days ago and the next minute, it is in a bbc film, and the footage the guys have put to it is astonishing.— the guys have put to it is astonishinu. , , ., astonishing. this is the footage, which appears — astonishing. this is the footage, which appears in _ astonishing. this is the footage, which appears in this _ astonishing. this is the footage, i which appears in this documentary. it was played on the bbc yesterday and it is on iplayer. we will give
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details in a moment. it was watching these images that brought the words and poetry together for you. absolutely. i hadn't seen the full film which is on iplayer now and there are things i said that hopefully struck the right chord. it really worked. ijust hopefully struck the right chord. it really worked. i just asked, hopefully struck the right chord. it really worked. ijust asked, did you watch this after you saw the film, and you didn't. but it feels like it works popular i have spoken to martin before and there were some things i knew he wanted in there, so he ., things i knew he wanted in there, so he . ., , ., he wanted it to be love in the face of hate, defiance _ he wanted it to be love in the face of hate, defiance to _ he wanted it to be love in the face of hate, defiance to terrorism. i he wanted it to be love in the face of hate, defiance to terrorism. hej of hate, defiance to terrorism. he wanted it to challenge views people might have about what people with spinal injuries and in wheelchairs are capable of, and he wanted to raise funds for the association and he wanted his mother mentioning. he got his manchester united flight out. �* ., , ,
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out. and might it loved it. this is his reaction _ out. and might it loved it. this is his reaction to _ out. and might it loved it. this is his reaction to the _ out. and might it loved it. this is his reaction to the poem. - from a single act of violence to a simple act of love. we rise, we rise, we rise, we rise, we rise. we rise above. amazing, tony. absolutely amazing. my mum would love that, my mum would love that. would she really? yeah. that means a lot to me. i'm going to have a minute, cos it's... it's touched me, that. itjust doesn't feel real at the minute... yeah. you know, i've only known you a few years, tony, since i've been injured. but to have a a poem written by you — you know, it'sjust... it's probably the biggest thing to come from this, really. no, not at... not at all, mate. he is still coming to terms with what he has been free because it was so epic and yet he is back here after a couple of days and trying to get his head around it. he is overwhelmed _ get his head around it. he is overwhelmed and _ get his head around it. he is| overwhelmed and shattered.
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get his head around it. he: 3 overwhelmed and shattered. notjust the physical effort. a number of years in the planning permit has been a five yearjourney to where he is now and just the emotion of it all i am sure he is absolutely drained. i all i am sure he is absolutely drained. ~ ., , , ., drained. i know this is for martin but what can _ drained. i know this is for martin but what can other _ drained. i know this is for martin but what can other people - drained. i know this is for martin but what can other people take i drained. i know this is for martin - but what can other people take from the words? , ., ., . ., the words? there is quite a radical messaue the words? there is quite a radical message at _ the words? there is quite a radical message at the — the words? there is quite a radical message at the heart _ the words? there is quite a radical message at the heart of— the words? there is quite a radical message at the heart of that - the words? there is quite a radical. message at the heart of that poem. it starts with on the floor of an arena after a bomb and ends with a message of love and people know me from the poem after the bomb in manchester and the last words of that "choose a love". there is a question there about, how do we get from hate and fear and pain and trauma to love and compassion which thatis trauma to love and compassion which that is notjust about trauma to love and compassion which that is not just about this trauma to love and compassion which that is notjust about this story, it is about public policy, about how we rule the world and this is not just a nice poem about an amazing achievement, it asks radical questions of us.—
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achievement, it asks radical ruestions of us. ., ., ,, ., questions of us. you talked about martin remembering _ questions of us. you talked about martin remembering his- questions of us. you talked about martin remembering his mum - questions of us. you talked about j martin remembering his mum the questions of us. you talked about - martin remembering his mum the ashes at the top and you have your own connection. at the top and you have your own connection-— connection. one of the reasons i wanted to _ connection. one of the reasons i wanted to do _ connection. one of the reasons i wanted to do this, _ connection. one of the reasons i wanted to do this, my _ connection. one of the reasons i wanted to do this, my own - connection. one of the reasons i wanted to do this, my own mumj connection. one of the reasons i - wanted to do this, my own mum had a very rare tumour on her spine, even more rare at the top of your spine in the base of your brain and my mum have that manifest. it is something you are born with, it comes from when you are an embryo and my mum was diagnosed with that in her 50s. at one point she was given a fortnight to live and she lived ten years the highest of care needs, lived through the living room ceiling, hoists. that a spinal condition, so i have a degree of understanding of what martin is going through and what the spinal injuries association are all about. martin is trying to raise £1 million and he is about 600 k into that. they are looking to put a spinal specialist nurse in every area of the uk, counsellor, and an advocate and that is vital work. haifa
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the uk, counsellor, and an advocate and that is vital work.— and that is vital work. how do the oems and that is vital work. how do the poems help _ and that is vital work. how do the poems help you. _ and that is vital work. how do the poems help you, how— and that is vital work. how do the poems help you, how does - and that is vital work. how do the | poems help you, how does writing and that is vital work. how do the - poems help you, how does writing the poems help you, how does writing the poems help you, how does writing the poems help you? it poems help you, how does writing the poems help you?— poems help you? it causes me to go inside myself _ poems help you? it causes me to go inside myself and _ poems help you? it causes me to go inside myself and look _ poems help you? it causes me to go inside myself and look for _ inside myself and look for connection to people. lots of poetry seems to whizz past people's hence and i try to go deep and see where the point of connection is, and the poem after the bomb was a really special communal moment that is still in my life five years on. yesterday it was a manchester day. i was getting tweets. it was father's day, somebody sent me a tattoo of my words and there have been many of those. the experience after the bomb was overwhelming, it felt like a lightning rod for all that public feeling and it has caused me to look inside myself a lot over the past few years and try to figure out what is going on in their and how we find ourselves here as a nation, a world
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when that sort of thing happens. putting it down on paper. thank you for coming in and keeping those connections going. you can hear his poem as part of the special documentary. martin's mountain — conquering kilimanjaro, featuring tony's poem, on the bbc iplayer. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast
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withjon kay and sally nugent. our headlines today. a week of disruption on the railways begins ahead of the biggest walk—out in 30 years. the message to travellers here in liverpool and across the uk is don't travel if you don't have to. this morning the union is warning there could be more strikes if they don't get what they want. the legal battle to prevent doctors turning off life support for brain damaged 12—year—old archie battersbee. his parents are trying overturn a previous high court decision. i think that nobody, and i mean nobody, has archie's best interests at heart like a mother. in sport, out of this world. how england's matt fitzpatrick beat all before him to win the biggest title of his career, the us open. why gorilla populations in parts of africa are on the rise. we have a special report form the front line of a conservation success story.
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good morning. afair good morning. a fair bit of sunshine today, some clout around and some rain coming into the north—west later. i will have more through the programme without the echo! train services will run on a severely reduced timetable from this evening, ahead of the biggest walk—out on the railways in 30 years. let's run through some of the details. strike action is taking place on three days, tomorrow, thursday and saturday, where only 20% of services will be available on a severely reduced timetable. it means that trains will only be running between 7.30am and 6.30pm on those days.
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but the message is still not to travel unless absolutely necessary. so on strike days this is what the overall picture looks like. as you can see, services are mostly limited to the main lines running between the largest cities with rural and district services will be the most affected. in england, this means that there will be no services at all in many places, including penzance, bournemouth, blackpool and chester. while in scotland, the main lines connecting london to edinburgh and glasgow will run but places like aberdeen and inverness will be cut off completely. and in wales, only two routes will operate.
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a service from radyr in cardiff to treherbert, merthyr tydfil and aberdare. and the service from cardiff to the severn tunnel. but, it's notjust the days of the strike that will be affected. an alternative timetable has been released for the days between the strikes with around 60—percent of services running. the message is again not to travel unless it's absolutely necessary. on top of the regular commutes to work and school there are also lots of sporting and music events going on this weekend including glastonbury festival and concerts by the rolling stones and eltonjohn plus an england test match. so there will be lots of people trying to move around the country which means roads will be busier. with last minute discussions
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continuing this morning, the rmt rail union has warned it will continue with industrial action for as long as it takes, if a deal over pay isn't reached. i think the campaign will intensify if we don't get a settlement. we are determined and available to get a settlement at any time. but they must loosen the shackles of the employers that they can get a deal. we want to protect our members jobs, conditions and we need a pay rise. it's a fairly straightforward issue. grant shapps has put a
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lot of hyperbole into it but there is a real mixed bag of opinion about whether strikes should go ahead. inflation at 9%, many other public sector workers not getting a deal better than 3% but other people saying, that isn't as good as for anyone. so why shouldn't the rail strike go ahead because they are making a stand? i have spoken to different people this morning. there
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are a lot of different opinions. we have the overview, what really matters are the human stories behind the disruption. what it will mean to millions of households up and down britain. in devon, connectivity to cornwall will be cancelled across the strike days. the grand hotel has graced the torquay seafront for 150 years. it has 130 rooms, sea views, swimming pools, and pretty much its own railway station. platform one for the... normally an asset, but not this week. we'rejust hiring people that can do the job. yeah. as we're hiring chefs and food and beverage operators. here we go. over a devon cream tea — and we went for cream first, by the way — the hotel's owner, keith richardson, tells me it's an issue for guests,
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and for some staff. i would think it's quite significant with two aspects in mind — we have customers coming from up north and london to our hotel by train. and, as you know, the train station is a stone's throw away from my front door. and the other innovation this last few months is that we have been training in staff from as far away as plymouth to make up for the lack of staff in torbay. it's an hour's drive to plymouth, so plainly, for staff to come from there by train, they've got to get to the train station at the other end, as well as the train journey. for those who let the train take the strain, plans will need to change — meaning hassle, stress and expense. and what if you commute to school and have a—levels this week? the rail strikes won't let me get to my exams. i'll have to get a hotel and i'll have to spend quite a lot
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of my summer budget on getting a hotel so that i can sit my exams. if i went to a friend's house, that would be the only other option, and i didn't want to do that because me and my parents decided that i wouldn't be able to... we wouldn't... i wouldn't have a good night's sleep for my exam, and that's not a good thing. so which one shall we go for? well, the biggest one. right. so i would go for... ooh! oh, its huge. and even the best—laid plans are being thwarted — kaye darton's due for a hip replacement, and wanted to see family before her operation. she booked a train journey from south devon to coventry — including help at each station — but will now miss the trip, and fears she'll lose the money she's spent. just the day that i'd chosen to go and see my son and his family in coventry. and so i thought, well, with covid and everything, and i'm due to have an operation next month, i thought i'd go first for a treat. and then i heard they were going on strike and i thought, "oh no!"
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just the day. and then i applied for a refund — non—refundable, and it was nearly £300. so i thought, "hmm, it's not my day." yes, so it's a big disappointment. £300 is quite a lot to lose! the rmt union says it's taking the action to protect pay, conditions, and jobs. whether for business or pleasure, to work, or to see friends and family — before the pandemic, rail travel was breaking new records as people chose the train. but in the week ahead, that choice will be severely limited. john maguire, bbc news, devon. clearly a very anxious time for millions of people who brought
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prepaid tickets but if your service is cancelled you will be entitled to a full refund. if you are travelling on monday, wednesday, friday or sunday, 60% of services running, if you plan to go on those, look to use your ticket or look for other services. what happens next is the big question. neither side can afford to give way. we are looking ahead to sunday, saying that could be the end of disruption. but the warning from the unions is that it could be the beginning of they don't get their way. talks to continue. let's talk to our political correspondent iain watson. the government being urged to step in but not looking likely at this point? it in but not looking likely at this oint? ., , in but not looking likely at this oint? . , , ., ., point? it was interesting that on this programme _ point? it was interesting that on this programme half— point? it was interesting that on this programme half an - point? it was interesting that on this programme half an hour- point? it was interesting that on | this programme half an hour ago, point? it was interesting that on - this programme half an hour ago, the treasury minister simon clarke said he did not want to send out false hope. although these talks are about to get under way within the next couple of hours, he was saying
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industrial action was still likely. he didn't seem to say that he thought there was going to be a breakthrough. we are facing the biggest disruption in railways for 30 years. it looks as though even the government and unions cannot agree about whether they are willing to talk to each other. the rmt initially said they did not want to speakfor —— to initially said they did not want to speak for —— to the government, then they called for a meeting with grant shapps the transport secretary, and then they called for a meeting with then they called for a meeting with the chancellor rishi sunak. simon clark saying quite clearly that the legal employers are the network rail and the train operators are not the government so the government will not get involved directly in the dispute. even claim if the government did want to get involved in this dispute, unions would not talk to them anyway. the negotiations _ talk to them anyway. the negotiations are - talk to them anyway. the negotiations are conducted quite properly— negotiations are conducted quite properly between the legal employers in the trade unions. i would say
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that— in the trade unions. i would say that it — in the trade unions. i would say that it is — in the trade unions. i would say that it is not as though i think the leadership— that it is not as though i think the leadership of the rmt are there to be spoken— leadership of the rmt are there to be spoken to in good faith, the leader— be spoken to in good faith, the leader of— be spoken to in good faith, the leader of the rmt union said he would _ leader of the rmt union said he would not — leader of the rmt union said he would not negotiate with a tory government which gives you the likelihood of them sitting down for a sensible — likelihood of them sitting down for a sensible conversation. we recognise that we need to —— we need to recognise _ recognise that we need to —— we need to recognise our negotiating partners _ to recognise our negotiating partners will work in good faith. it partners will work in good faith. doesn't partners will work in good faith. it doesn't seem as though anyone is going to be sighing with relief because the train strikes are avoided, it looks like we will have avoided, it looks like we will have a week of disruption. labour say there is time to solve the dispute, claiming the government is hobbling employers by not giving them the freedom to negotiate bigger pay increases, that the unions have been demanding with inflation reaching perhaps 11% later this year. they also say that where they are in government, they would be bringing the two sides together for further talks. �* , , ~ ,
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the two sides together for further talks. i, ~ talks. any strike is a representation - talks. any strike is a representation of. talks. any strike is a | representation of the talks. any strike is a - representation of the failure talks. any strike is a _ representation of the failure of talks— representation of the failure of talks breaking down. we are on the side of— talks breaking down. we are on the side of both the public and these rail workers that want a resolution, that want— rail workers that want a resolution, that want to — rail workers that want a resolution, that want to rid us a real dispute brought— that want to rid us a real dispute brought to — that want to rid us a real dispute brought to an end, to avoid disruption. —— that want the industrial— disruption. —— that want the industrial dispute brought to an end _ industrial dispute brought to an and and — industrial dispute brought to an end. and to build a rail network fit for the _ end. and to build a rail network fit for the 21st — end. and to build a rail network fit for the 21st century.— end. and to build a rail network fit for the 21st century. there could be difficulties between _ for the 21st century. there could be difficulties between the _ for the 21st century. there could be difficulties between the unions - for the 21st century. there could be difficulties between the unions and| difficulties between the unions and employers and the unions and government but we are also getting into the political blame game is keir starmer accuses the government of wanting the strike to go ahead and sowing division, and the government calling on labour to condemn the strikes.— government calling on labour to condemn the strikes. thank you, iain watson in westminster. _ condemn the strikes. thank you, iain watson in westminster. plenty - condemn the strikes. thank you, iain watson in westminster. plenty more| watson in westminster. plenty more through the week as that unfolds. in a couple of minutes, our climate editor is going to be here, justin has been very close, may be too close to some gorillas in uganda. stay watching. close to some gorillas in uganda. stay watching-— close to some gorillas in uganda. stay watching. sniffing them out, ou don't stay watching. sniffing them out, you don't want — stay watching. sniffing them out,
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you don't want to _ stay watching. sniffing them out, you don't want to miss _ stay watching. sniffing them out, you don't want to miss this! - stay watching. sniffing them out, you don't want to miss this! not i you don't want to miss this! not quite thejungle where you don't want to miss this! not quite the jungle where you are. not at all, a library shot telling us about the weather today, some of with cloud but some with sunshine. it will be a warm day today. the dregs of yesterday's rain and cloud is pushing south, cloud coming in from the north sea and the cloud across western scotland is new front coming our way. that will bring in the rain through the through the day. the heaviest will be later on. move away from these areas and we are into sunshine from the word go. the temperature picking up quite nicely as a result. this cloud across the channel islands will melt and you will see some sunshine. as we go through the rest of the day the sunshine prevails. the cloud will thicken across the outer hebrides, and the rain arrives, some of it getting into the northern
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isles through the afternoon. temperatures under the cloud and rain, 11 to 13 degrees. 20 in aberdeen, 20 in birmingham, 22 possibly towards the south. this evening and overnight for a time the rain will be heavy across the north west, as it moves south and east into southern scotland and northern england, the rain will become lighter and more patchy. tomorrow we pick up the rain, it could produce the odd sport in the north york moors and cumbria but that will be righted. a few showers in scotland over the afternoon but most of us dry and sunny, warm and the temperature is rising once again through the day. —— through the week. but not to the extent that some of us saw last friday. we promise you gorillas and we have got gorillas! it's been more than 40 years since sir david attenborough met the mountain gorillas of rwanda they were, at the time,
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on the brink of extinction. despite the odds, their numbers have increased, thanks to a huge conservation effort. our climate editor, justin rowlatt, has been to uganda to visit them. the morning mist rises from bwindi impenetrable forest in uganda. one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive. so we're just hacking our way through the forest because obviously the gorillas go wherever they want. there are no paths up here. have you seen something, luke? oh, there's one down there! there's a gorilla! gentle groaning. there are baby gorillas in the trees and adult and juvenile gorillas on the ground.
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it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. rumbling. and that, i think, was a gorilla fart! wow! the population is healthy and growing steadily. it is a dramatic turnaround. when sir david attenborough made his famous visit to a mountain gorilla family back in the 19705, it was, in his words, tinged with sadness because he feared he might be seeing the last of their kind. poachers preyed on the mountain gorilla population and the civil wars in rwanda and the democratic republic of congo made conservation in those countries very difficult.
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this park in uganda, the bwindi impenetrable forest, was made a national park in 1991. next, says the warden in charge, they needed to get local people onside. the communities are critical in conserving the gorillas because, you know, these communities live next to the park. and so we feel that they should be part of the conservation and they should get benefits from conservation. key among those benefits have been the revenues from this, from tourism. and tourism also supports a thriving economy. tourism really does help wild animals if it's done right. when i first started out, there were only about five lodges. now there's as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs, the ngos have created jobs, so there's lots of employment
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that has happened. you know, they can sell crafts, they can sell accommodation, meals. and so all of that makes a big difference. some of the tourist income and money from gorilla charities helped create alternative income for these men. they used to make their living poaching animals from the park. some were offered jobs as rangers. others were offered land and training to grow crops. now we are called the ambassadors of the park because we are helping a lot the conservation of the park. we monitor and give reports monthly. conservation charities say carefully managed ecotourism can really help protect biodiversity. and protect the gorillas' habitat, and you protect so much else.
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but tourism alone is not enough. look how abruptly the tree cover ends here in uganda. the parks are big, but as the gorilla population grows... we're definitely seeing that gorilla families are more crowded. they're bumping into each other more, which unfortunately is often associated with aggression. we're seeing higher rates of infanticide so infants can oftentimes be killed when these families come together. bigger parks cost more money. the un wants countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation. the developing world wants $100 billion a year to help fund that. we've been told by scientists, we only have this century. and we only have one planet. there's no planet b. mountain gorillas show we can save species from the brink of extinction.
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the question now is whether the world is ready to commit the money and resources to make it happen on a much bigger scale. justin rowlatt, bbc news, bwindi impenetrable forest. justinjoins us now. what an amazing experience. it was, an incredible — what an amazing experience. it was, an incredible experience. _ what an amazing experience. it was, an incredible experience. you - what an amazing experience. it was, an incredible experience. you are - an incredible experience. you are close to the nearest animals to us, it really is amazing. you get that sense of connection, you look in their eyes and you know that they can read you and that you can meet them.. ., . i. can read you and that you can meet them- -— ten them.. how close can you get? ten metres is the _ them.. how close can you get? ten metres is the rule, _ them.. how close can you get? ten metres is the rule, but _ them.. how close can you get? ten metres is the rule, but the - them.. how close can you get? ten metres is the rule, but the baby i metres is the rule, but the baby gorillas are curious and they come close and you don't back away but they are worried about covid contamination, because they are very close relatives to us genetically. the question every child and i want to know, close enough to smell them?
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couldn't smell the fart! but they eat a lot of food, the eat something like £40 a day, vegetarians, and they eat constantly. —— 40 pounds. the forest is like a supermarket full of food and theyjust the forest is like a supermarket full of food and they just sit there and eat and eat like a kid eating crisps, and a lot of digestion when you eat that much food, a lot of digestion in the forest. do you eat that much food, a lot of digestion in the forest.- you eat that much food, a lot of digestion in the forest. do you want to ask another _ digestion in the forest. do you want to ask another question _ digestion in the forest. do you want to ask another question that - digestion in the forest. do you want to ask another question that he - to ask another question that he digestion? | to ask another question that he diuestion? ., , to ask another question that he digestion?— to ask another question that he diuestion? .,, ., ., ., ,~' digestion? i was going to ask if it is like sitting _ digestion? i was going to ask if it is like sitting next _ digestion? i was going to ask if it is like sitting next to _ digestion? i was going to ask if it is like sitting next to meeting - digestion? i was going to ask if it is like sitting next to meeting all| is like sitting next to meeting all morning! you can get close as ten metres? , ., morning! you can get close as ten metres? , . ., ., metres? they wander around the forest, metres? they wander around the forest. they _ metres? they wander around the forest. they go — metres? they wander around the forest, they go wherever - metres? they wander around the forest, they go wherever they i metres? they wander around the i forest, they go wherever they want, you get up in the morning and you go to the gorilla station at the entrance of the park and they assign you a gorilla family. this family that we went to see, you walk in,
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you trek into the jungle, and the tracker has found the gorillas, and new veer off the trail and into the properjungle, and they hack their way through with a machete, and if you are lucky, you find the gorilla family. and there they are amongst the trees and bushes. it is just, you know, an amazing experience. we are talking about the possibility of tourism, _ are talking about the possibility of tourism, how difficult is it, you talk— tourism, how difficult is it, you talk about— tourism, how difficult is it, you talk about tracking to find them, how difficult is it to get to them? it how difficult is it to get to them? it isn't _ how difficult is it to get to them? it isn't that — how difficult is it to get to them? it isn't that difficult, truth is, because the parks follow where the gorillas are, the gorilla families you visit live on the edge of the park so it isn't too far to go. what i found park so it isn't too far to go. what ifound really park so it isn't too far to go. what i found really interesting about the story is the role of tourism in this process of conservation. local people are absolutely adamant that tourism has been at the heart of it, this is a story about economics because tourism has given a value to
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the gorillas, local people can see how valuable the species is and therefore the whole jungle, so there has been this very successful conservation of 300 square kilometres ofjungle. slightly less kilometres of jungle. slightly less than kilometres ofjungle. slightly less than half of the gorilla families are never visited, so there are some that remain separate from humanity because there is a bit of controversy about the idea that you go and visit wild animals, and spent time with them. they get one hour of visit per day, perfamily time with them. they get one hour of visit per day, per family that is in the habituated families, habituated to tourism. it is interesting because what it tells you is that we can conserve rare, wild, endangered species, if you want to. and if we have the resources to do it. in uganda, rwanda, the democratic republic of the congo, to some extent, there has been a successful effort because partly of the cash that the gorillas generate. it is all about balance, _ that the gorillas generate. it is all about balance, isn't it? that the gorillas generate. it is| all about balance, isn't it? yes, ou all about balance, isn't it? yes, you need _ all about balance, isn't it? yes,
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you need careful _ all about balance, isn't it? yes, you need careful ecotourism, . all about balance, isn't it? yes, you need careful ecotourism, it| all about balance, isn't it? yes you need careful ecotourism, it has to be a balance between allowing the species to survive in the wild, and allowing the tories. the other thing about tourism is, —— allowing the tourism. the other thing is the environmental impact like flying around, but it has encouraged this kind of industry around tourism, it's encouraged them to clear forest around the forest if you like. so you have got farms to service the lodges where the tourists go. and actually, it's a little bit harder probably to expand the park if they wish to do that, because there is such intense development are around it. it's a balanced picture but at the time when we face a biodiversity crisis when the world is losing species more rapidly than it has literally since the extension events that saw the end of the dinosaur species, a problem with biodiversity, this story tells you that you can do something about it
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but it takes a lot of time, resources and effort and we have to decide is a world community, we want to put the resources in and make the effort? ~ ., .., to put the resources in and make the effort? . . ., ., , effort? what can the united nations talk about today? _ effort? what can the united nations talk about today? have _ effort? what can the united nations talk about today? have convened i talk about today? have convened negotiations _ talk about today? have convened negotiations to _ talk about today? have convened negotiations to discuss _ talk about today? have convened negotiations to discuss a - talk about today? have convened negotiations to discuss a deal i talk about today? have convened i negotiations to discuss a deal about biodiversity. they are always talking about this, that and the other, but a really ambitious deal, they want humanity to live in harmony with nature by 2015. —— 2050. a very lofty aim but i think we would sign up for it. they want to say 30% of land and sea will be sacrificed to nature and developing countries will get some kind of recompense and money from developed country, money at the heart of everything as always, to protect those areas. they have been fraught with conflict these discussions, early rounds of discussions ended in deadlock, but the woman running them has said to me, there will be compromises, partly because i think she sees that the countries around
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the world recognised, everybody knows that we need to do something about this intrinsically how important it is to do it. she says, we will find compromises, because we have to. because, she says, there is no planet b. have to. because, she says, there is no planet 8-— no planet b. thank you for sharing our no planet b. thank you for sharing your pictures. _ no planet b. thank you for sharing your pictures. a — no planet b. thank you for sharing your pictures, a brilliant _ no planet b. thank you for sharing your pictures, a brilliant story, i your pictures, a brilliant story, all the pictures, or life was there! really enjoyed that, great to have a positive story. really enjoyed that, great to have a positive story-— positive story. that's not what i thou~ht positive story. that's not what i thought you _ positive story. that's not what i thought you were _ positive story. that's not what i thought you were going - positive story. that's not what i thought you were going to i positive story. that's not what i thought you were going to say! | you can watch justin's film, mountain gorillas: a conservation success on the bbc iplayer now. you can hear it in crystal clear quality on there! morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. jannette and gethin can tell us what they have in store. coming up on morning live. with interest rates at a 13 year high, and fears we're heading for a recession, ourfinance expert, iona bain, is here to explain what this means for your money, and from changing rates to changing temperatures, after last week's heatwave, they've dropped by more than 10
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degrees in some places. dr xand explains how this can play havoc with your health. that's right. i whether it's irritating eczema, i headaches or sudden nose bleeds, i'll be telling you why rapid - changes of weather can make some conditions flare up and why- you might want to reconsider buying a fan to cool you down, - to get a better night's sleep. also on the show, millions of families are feeling the heat in the kitchen. with the average food bill set to increase by nearly £300 this year, chef anna haugh shares the hacks that can help make your meals stretch further. plus, you can always haggle for a better price when these two are around. bargain hunt presenters, roo irvine and caroline hawley, tell us how to spot second—hand treasure that could make you more money in the future. and we've got two for the price of one in strictly fitness. janette and aljaz are teaming up to get us grooving on the dance floor in today's workout. look at that, coupled goals! it will be a festival feel this week. too
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much energy on a monday already! see you at 9:15. that's what we need on a monday morning. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm asad ahmad. this time tomorrow, train and tube services won't be running as workers go on strike over pay and job losses. talks are due to continue today — as a special seven—day train timetable is introduced ahead of the walk—outs. the action is planned for tomorrow, thursday and saturday. the tube strike is only planned for tomorrow. but expect disruption on the railways for most of the week. i'll have more travel news injust a moment. today marks the second anniversary of three men being stabbed to death during a terror attack in reading. james furlong, joe ritchie—bennett and david wails died after they were attacked by khairi saadallah — who's serving
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a whole—life jail sentence. tonight there will be a minute's silence to remember the victims. there are reports that a russian women's doubles player has changed nationality in order to get around a wimbledon ban stopping players from russia and belarus taking part in next weeks tennis championships. natela dzalamidze now represents the country of georgia. the moscow—born 29—year—old is currently 44th in the doubles rankings. the all england club introduced the ban following russia's invasion of ukraine. transport for london has just days left to find a new sponsor for the cable car which links the excel centre with the o2 arena. the multi—million—pound ten—year deal with emirates is about to end this week — with other potential sponsors proving difficult to find. the cable car cost £60 million to build, and has been criticised for being too expensive and not attracting enough passengers.
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a look at this morning's tube board now, ahead of the strike tomorrow. would you believe it, head of that strike, everything is running like clockwork! a good service on all lines. onto the weather now, with kate. good morning. with the sun coming up so early at the moment, we've already had a glorious sunrise — this is over in harrow on the hill from weather watcher sian, and also down in red hill from weather watcher me on the hill. just a little bit of cloud just accentuating those colours. now the cloud today is going to disappear, there is a lot of fine dry weather in the forecast — not only for today, but for the next few days. and temperatures starting to feel a little warmer again — 22 celsius today. warm evening in the sunshine, and then overnight conditions don't really change. it's dry and it's clear — the minimum temperature somewhere between seven and 11 celsius. but another bright start as we head into tuesday. again, high pressure in charge — its building in from the west, blocking these fronts down in the south, so it is going to be another day of sunshine — lots of it. the wind reasonably light
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and temperatures just start to sneak up a little. it's getting warmer as we head further through this week — temperatures tomorrow getting up to 26 celsius. now temperatures rise even further for wednesday and thursday — 28, 29 celsius, you might even get a 30. but, come friday, low pressure takes over, so conditions turning more unsettled and cooler for the weekend. that's it. i'm back in half an hour. but why notjoin nearly 2.5 million followers on bbc london facebook? goodbye followers on bbc london facebook? for now. hello, this is breakfast withjon kay and sally nugent. good morning. 13—year—old olly stephens was murdered in a field near his home in reading by two teeange boys who recruited a girl online to lure him there. following his death, his mum and dad
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discovered the violent and disturbing world their son had been exposed to through his phone. panorama reporter marianna spring has been investigating the role social media played in olly�*s death and talking to his parents as they campaign for tighter regulations for social media sites. let's take a look. lastjanuary, amanda and stuart stephens watched their son olly leave their home in reading, not realising it would be the last time. 15 minutes later, he'd been murdered. it was the life he was living inside his mobile phone that would hold the key to what happened to him. it's this secret world where you can do and say exactly what you want. it was a world that we had no idea existed, and that he was being attacked by it. thames valley police shared evidence with panorama of an online dispute between olly and those involved. they also shared videos of young people linked to the murder, showing off knives and behaving violently.
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to see what young teenage users can be exposed to on social media, i set up a fake account registered as a 13—year—old on five social media sites — on instagram, youtube and facebook, our 13—year—old account was recommended content such as people showing off knives, posts glorifying violence, and knives for sale. olly�*s parents wanted to ask former meta insider frances haugen why a young teenager can be exposed to posts like this on some social media sites. we believe other parents need to know what we've been through. they are open and exposed to so much that is so bad. and you have no idea it's happening under your roof. no—one at facebook,| no—one at instagram, no—one at any of these social media companies says, "i want— to overexpose children to violence." but what did happen is these i products are designed as the sum of lots of little choices. and each time the goal is to get you to spend more time, - view more ads, more revenue.
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each of us only gets this little - tiny peephole to view social media, where we see our own experience. we don't see what. a 13—year—old sees. olly left our house on sunday afternoon for a walk to meet some friends. an hour and a half later, i was saying goodbye to him in an ambulance. for stuart and amanda, a campaign has begun to better protect teenagers like olly on social media. marianna spring, bbc news. ahead of that panorama programme, we can speak now to olly�*s parents, amanda and stuart stephens. thank you forjoining us. i can't imagine how tough this is and i am really sorry for everything you have been free. i bet you can't even believe you are in this situation, having to talk about this, can you? no. no, not at all. evenjust
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listening to that introduction, you just can't actually believe this has happened and this is where we are now, on breakfast television, talking about this. but, yes, thank you for letting us come on today and raise awareness, it's what we want to do. so thank you. we raise awareness, it's what we want to do. so thank you.— to do. so thank you. we are so crateful to do. so thank you. we are so grateful you're _ to do. so thank you. we are so grateful you're able _ to do. so thank you. we are so grateful you're able to - to do. so thank you. we are so grateful you're able to talk i to do. so thank you. we are so grateful you're able to talk to l to do. so thank you. we are so i grateful you're able to talk to us. you still expect him to walk through the door~ _ you still expect him to walk through the door. ., ~ you still expect him to walk through the door. ., ,, , ., you still expect him to walk through the door-_ is _ you still expect him to walk through the door._ is all- you still expect him to walk through the door._ is all very i the door. thank you. is all very surreal, the door. thank you. is all very surreal. you — the door. thank you. is all very surreal, you still _ the door. thank you. is all very surreal, you still expect - the door. thank you. is all very surreal, you still expect him i the door. thank you. is all very surreal, you still expect him to | surreal, you still expect him to walk— surreal, you still expect him to walk through the door. i�*m surreal, you still expect him to walk through the door.- surreal, you still expect him to walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt. _ walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt. i— walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt, i know— walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt, i know there - walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt, i know there is - walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt, i know there is a i walk through the door. i'm so sorry to interrupt, i know there is a bit i to interrupt, i know there is a bit of a delay on power line. i'm going to ask you what role you feel social media played, and how did that start and how did it get to the point where you lost olly?—
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and how did it get to the point where you lost olly? firstly, we didn't understand _ where you lost olly? firstly, we didn't understand what - where you lost olly? firstly, we didn't understand what they i where you lost olly? firstly, we | didn't understand what they were exposed — didn't understand what they were exposed to online. we don't understand all this technology, the chat rooms, we don't understand you can skip _ chat rooms, we don't understand you can skip from — chat rooms, we don't understand you can skip from one room to another within— can skip from one room to another within seconds, conversations were taking _ within seconds, conversations were taking place which we didn't know were _ taking place which we didn't know were going on and part of olly's character. — were going on and part of olly's character, he would protect us rather — character, he would protect us rather than tell us what was going on. rather than tell us what was going on so— rather than tell us what was going on so it _ rather than tell us what was going on. so it played a massive role in the fact— on. so it played a massive role in the fact that they orchestrated his murder— the fact that they orchestrated his murder online but also we didn't understand it was all happening... yeah. _ understand it was all happening... yeah. so _ understand it was all happening... yeah. so im— understand it was all happening... yeah, so i'm very angry with social media _ yeah, so i'm very angry with social media companies. they hide behind their lawyers, their money, but they are making — their lawyers, their money, but they are making money out of children and. _ are making money out of children and. as— are making money out of children and, as parents, you have no control over that. _ and, as parents, you have no control over that. you — and, as parents, you have no control over that. you can control what they watch _ over that. you can control what they watch on _ over that. you can control what they watch on tv. — over that. you can control what they watch on tv, what they see, what movies _ watch on tv, what they see, what movies they watch and music they listen _ movies they watch and music they listen to. — movies they watch and music they listen to, but you cannot control social— listen to, but you cannot control social media and this is a big
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problem _ social media and this is a big problem for us.— social media and this is a big problem for us. social media and this is a big roblem for us. �* , ., ., problem for us. because social media is so private — problem for us. because social media is so private in _ problem for us. because social media is so private in the _ problem for us. because social media is so private in the way _ problem for us. because social media is so private in the way it _ problem for us. because social media is so private in the way it can - problem for us. because social media is so private in the way it can be i is so private in the way it can be consumed. it is on a phone, in their hands, not on a big screen necessarily in the living room. amanda, what have you learned about social media, about how teenagers usedit social media, about how teenagers used it over the last few months, as you have investigated this? i used it over the last few months, as you have investigated this?- you have investigated this? i think it really wasn't _ you have investigated this? i think it really wasn't until _ you have investigated this? i think it really wasn't until we _ you have investigated this? i think it really wasn't until we were i you have investigated this? i think it really wasn't until we were in i it really wasn't until we were in court, witnessing the evidence that was being shown, we couldn't believe the level of violence in the way children were speaking and the images of knives. that violence. we couldn't believe that that could be shown on social media and there would be nothing keeping an eye out
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to make sure that the children were safe, that really was astounding to us and we thought in this day and age if something was triggered with an image, if there were escalations in a language, that they would be software or there would be some form of monitoring happening to stop that in its tracks, but actually what we found to be the case is, for our children, it is a secret world. there is no law enforcement in that world. they can do and say exactly what they want and, in the case of olly, he was being plotted against and spoken about behind his back in the most violent of terms and there was no warning, there was no warning for him, there was no warning for us. it for him, there was no warning for us. . . , for him, there was no warning for us. .,, for him, there was no warning for us. it was very callous and cold, the way they —
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us. it was very callous and cold, the way they talked _ us. it was very callous and cold, the way they talked about i us. it was very callous and cold, i the way they talked about murder, talked _ the way they talked about murder, talked about harming another person. their reaction after they committed their offence was very, very cold and that— their offence was very, very cold and that was quite shocking to see. ithink— and that was quite shocking to see. i think it _ and that was quite shocking to see. i think it has — and that was quite shocking to see. i think it has made us realise that, through mobile phone use from children from a very young age, they have got exposure to the internets, they have exposure to information and things they should not be seeing, and they are becoming desensitised. bud seeing, and they are becoming desensitised. and dehumanised. desensitised _ desensitised. and dehumanised. desensitised and _ desensitised. and dehumanised. desensitised and dehumanised. | desensitised. and dehumanised. i desensitised and dehumanised. there was no love for— desensitised and dehumanised. there was no love for him _ desensitised and dehumanised. there was no love for him on _ desensitised and dehumanised. there was no love for him on that _ desensitised and dehumanised. there was no love for him on that day. absolutely. _ was no love for him on that day. absolutely-— was no love for him on that day. absolutel . ~ ., ., , ., ~' absolutely. what would you like the social media — absolutely. what would you like the social media platforms _ absolutely. what would you like the social media platforms to _ absolutely. what would you like the social media platforms to do? i absolutely. what would you like the social media platforms to do? howl social media platforms to do? how can parents at home watching this now, how can their children be protected?— now, how can their children be rotected? . , ., ~ protected? ultimately, take their -hones protected? ultimately, take their phones away. _ protected? ultimately, take their phones away, but _ protected? ultimately, take their phones away, but that _ protected? ultimately, take their phones away, but that is - protected? ultimately, take their phones away, but that is not i protected? ultimately, take their. phones away, but that is not going to happen. — phones away, but that is not going to happen. we are so interconnected with these _
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to happen. we are so interconnected with these devices now. your work, your social — with these devices now. your work, your social life, everything. newsfeeds are all through the internets. parents need to have that conversation with their children, it is a very— conversation with their children, it is a very difficult conversation. we went— is a very difficult conversation. we went through hell with it. every time _ went through hell with it. every time we — went through hell with it. every time we try to take the phone away there _ time we try to take the phone away there was— time we try to take the phone away there was an echo a reaction. sometimes they were quite bad reactions. they become hooked on their devices, it is an addiction, it needs — their devices, it is an addiction, it needs to— their devices, it is an addiction, it needs to be recognised as that. it is it needs to be recognised as that. it is causing — it needs to be recognised as that. it is causing so much harm within our youth. — it is causing so much harm within our youth, with their attitudes, their— our youth, with their attitudes, their perspectives. but our youth, with their attitudes, their perspectives.— our youth, with their attitudes, their perspectives. but i think we need support. — their perspectives. but i think we need support, actually, - their perspectives. but i think we need support, actually, from i their perspectives. but i think we i need support, actually, from those social media companies. there are so many things they could put in place to make it a safer place for our children to be. it could be helping us, they could be helping our children. it has come to the point now where children are killing children, and social media is a
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platform that is being used and it needs to stop. i think as parents, what we can do is to support the government trying to get through the online safety bill because there are so many changes in their need to take place. you look at the age of children who are going on to these platforms, that is not being regulated. anyone can sign up and there is no accountability for who that person is, so they can say and do exactly what they want. there is no enforcement around that. i think, in an ideal world, what we would love to see happening, is that, as a child does something on social media thatis child does something on social media that is of concern, but that is flagged to a youth team and somebody works with that child to see what is happening. works with that child to see what is ha eninu. , works with that child to see what is haueninu. , ., works with that child to see what is ha eninu. , . ., ~ works with that child to see what is ha eninu. , . ., ,, ., works with that child to see what is ha eninu. , . . ~' . ., ., happening. they are making a lot of mone off happening. they are making a lot of money off our— happening. they are making a lot of money off our children. _ happening. they are making a lot of money off our children. sorry, i money off our children. sorry, stuart, there _ money off our children. sorry, stuart, there is _ money off our children. sorry, stuart, there is that _ money off our children. sorry, stuart, there is that delay. i
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struck by what you said about having those conversations. those conversations with your children, trying to address it with them. that is easier said than done, as you alluded to. often they don't want to have that conversation, or what they will tell you in return is not necessarily the truth of what is going on. it is this complete communication clash.- going on. it is this complete communication clash. yeah. i will cive ou communication clash. yeah. i will give you an _ communication clash. yeah. i will give you an example. _ communication clash. yeah. i will give you an example. we - communication clash. yeah. i will give you an example. we were i communication clash. yeah. i will- give you an example. we were having a conversation with olly that sunday morning. _ a conversation with olly that sunday morning, we knew something was going on but _ morning, we knew something was going on but he _ morning, we knew something was going on but he wouldn't tell us. we looked — on but he wouldn't tell us. we looked through his phone, we didn't understand — looked through his phone, we didn't understand what was on his phone, but he _ understand what was on his phone, but he had — understand what was on his phone, but he had managed to hide everything so we couldn't seen it. had we _ everything so we couldn't seen it. had we seen anything that would have been a _ had we seen anything that would have been a red _ had we seen anything that would have been a red flag, we would not be sat here now _ been a red flag, we would not be sat here now as— been a red flag, we would not be sat here now. as we read through the sequence — here now. as we read through the sequence of events with thames valley _ sequence of events with thames valley police, and they kindly showed — valley police, and they kindly showed us through the sequence of events— showed us through the sequence of events before we went to court, whilst _ events before we went to court, whilst we — events before we went to court, whilst we were talking olly, they were _
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whilst we were talking olly, they were talking about murdering him, stabbing _ were talking about murdering him, stabbing him, hurting him. this struck— stabbing him, hurting him. this struck me — stabbing him, hurting him. this struck me that, as we were talking to olly. _ struck me that, as we were talking to olly. all— struck me that, as we were talking to olly, all this was going on at the same — to olly, all this was going on at the same time. the very warnings we were giving _ the same time. the very warnings we were giving him that morning all came _ were giving him that morning all came to — were giving him that morning all came to fruition that evening. it is heartbreaking. _ came to fruition that evening. it is heartbreaking. it _ came to fruition that evening. it is heartbreaking. it is _ came to fruition that evening. it is heartbreaking. it is heartbreaking| heartbreaking. it is heartbreaking but also you _ heartbreaking. it is heartbreaking but also you feel _ heartbreaking. it is heartbreaking but also you feel other— heartbreaking. it is heartbreaking but also you feel other parents i heartbreaking. it is heartbreaking i but also you feel other parents need to know _ but also you feel other parents need to know that their kids... are but also you feel other parents need to know that their kids. . ._ to know that their kids... are not safe. to know that their kids... are not safe- the)! _ to know that their kids... are not safe- the)! are — to know that their kids... are not safe. they are not _ to know that their kids... are not safe. they are not safe. - to know that their kids... are not safe. they are not safe. they - to know that their kids... are not safe. they are not safe. they are i safe. they are not safe. they are exosed safe. they are not safe. they are exoosed to _ safe. they are not safe. they are exposed to this. _ safe. they are not safe. they are exposed to this. the _ safe. they are not safe. they are exposed to this. the level - safe. they are not safe. they are exposed to this. the level of - exposed to this. the level of violence _ exposed to this. the level of violence i_ exposed to this. the level of violence i have seen, all the hate we received after we lost olly, through— we received after we lost olly, through the social media platforms. one in— through the social media platforms. one in particular was very good because — one in particular was very good because olly's friends sent us pictures— because olly's friends sent us pictures and videos of him in a way we would _ pictures and videos of him in a way we would never have seen because they were — we would never have seen because they were at school, and it gave us a bit _ they were at school, and it gave us a bit of— they were at school, and it gave us a bit ofiov— they were at school, and it gave us a bit ofjoy because we understood it wasn't— a bit ofjoy because we understood it wasn't that he was unhappy at school, — it wasn't that he was unhappy at school, it— it wasn't that he was unhappy at school, it was that he didn't fit the school _ school, it was that he didn't fit the school model but he loved socialising and loved his friends. so that— socialising and loved his friends. so that was brilliant, but then the abuse _ so that was brilliant, but then the
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abuse and — so that was brilliant, but then the abuse and violence i was exposed to. as a grieving — abuse and violence i was exposed to. as a grieving father.— as a grieving father. there was one ve brave as a grieving father. there was one very brave young — as a grieving father. there was one very brave young lady, _ as a grieving father. there was one very brave young lady, she - as a grieving father. there was one i very brave young lady, she contacted me through _ very brave young lady, she contacted me through this platform and she told me _ me through this platform and she told me about the bullying she was receiving _ told me about the bullying she was receiving at school, the fact that somebody had threatened to rape her and they— somebody had threatened to rape her and they were waiting to rape her from _ and they were waiting to rape her from school and i went to see id with this — from school and i went to see id with this information, i handed it to the _ with this information, i handed it to the bbc— with this information, i handed it to the bbc and handed it to parliament and then i wrote to the online _ parliament and then i wrote to the online harm's board and explained the need _ online harm's board and explained the need to know what is going on and social— the need to know what is going on and social media. it is horrifying. amanda — and social media. it is horrifying. amanda and stuart, sadly we have to live it there but thank you so much for sharing your thoughts. i am sure parents across the country are listening to every word and taking it on board. thank you for now and i'm sure we will come to it again. the bbc asked meta, youtube, snapchat and tiktok to respond
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to the issues raised. all the companies expressed their sympathies for olly's family. you can watch a social media murder: olly's story tonight on panorama at 8pm on bbc one. let's go straight to carol for the weather.
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good morning. it is a sunny start to the day across many areas. there is some cloud around, particularly across the channel islands, and also coming in across north—west scotland, where we have weather fronts. this high pressure is keeping things fairly quiet and settled. it will be breezy down the north sea coastline today, some of that cloud coming inland. for most, a lot of blue sky, train arriving in the outer hebrides later, fairly breezy here, and breezy through the english channel. temperatures today, where we have the cloud i2 english channel. temperatures today, where we have the cloud 12 to iii degrees. in the sunshine we could get to 18 to 22. one thing worth mentioning is the pollen level. high or very high more or less across the board. away from the north—west, where the levels are low or moderate. through the evening and overnight, there will be some heavy rain for a overnight, there will be some heavy rainfora time, overnight, there will be some heavy rain for a time, crossing the north—west of scotland. the rest of
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us looking at clear skies. temperatures very similar start the day tomorrow as they are today, except for across the southern uplands and parts of the highlands, where we started today between two and [i where we started today between two and 4 degrees. tomorrow it will not be as cold. into tomorrow, our weather front will feed in situ and weather front will feed in situ and we still have this weather front draped across a channel islands which could produce the odd shower. in between once again a lot of dry weather. a week by the front producing the spots of rain in cumbria, north ewhat moist, and as a cloud melts away across parts of scotland in the afternoon, that could trigger a shower. for most of england, wales and northern ireland, dry, sunshine around, and we are looking at highs of up to about 25 degrees. thank you very much. good temperatures, looking good. i will take you back in time. fik. ok? the popular history series back in time returns tonight following the first asian family
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to appear on the bbc series so far. it follows the sharmas from solihull as they get a taste of what life was like for past generations of south asian brits. let's take a look. hello! how are you? manisha's cousins, the desai family, arejoining the sharmas. look how much she's grown! in their modern lives, the sharmas and the desais spend time together regularly. but in 1962, many families hadn't seen each other for years. shall we stick some music on? yay! music plays. whoo! you canjust imagine the joy people would have had to see their family after such a long time. it must have been really refreshing to see some familiar faces. - for them back then, - it must have been a big thing. the irony of it all was because of this ban that they were imposing,
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the numbers in this country of british asians grew exponentially. you got this one wrong, mr politician, because what you wanted, you ended up achieving the complete opposite. vishal and manisha sharma are with us in the studio and presenter noreen khan joins from birmingham. good morning, everybody. great to see you this morning. vishal and manisha, you are cringing. look at that dancing! why did you get involved in the shell, what convinced you to take part? he will blame me so _ convinced you to take part? he will blame me so i— convinced you to take part? he will blame me so i will— convinced you to take part? he will blame me so i will start. _ convinced you to take part? he will blame me so i will start. blame - convinced you to take part? he will| blame me so i will start. blame him first. it blame me so i will start. blame him first- it was — blame me so i will start. blame him first. it was me, _ blame me so i will start. blame him first. it was me, actually! _ first. it was me, actually! laughter _ laughter i applied, it was a whatsapp message lloii'i i applied, it was a whatsapp message going through a friend group thing
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and it— going through a friend group thing and it said, i love back in time as and it said, i love back in time as a starter— and it said, i love back in time as a starterand— and it said, i love back in time as a starterand it and it said, i love back in time as a starter and it said and it said, i love back in time as a starterand it said in and it said, i love back in time as a starter and it said in birmingham and the— a starter and it said in birmingham and the requirements, need to be from _ and the requirements, need to be from birmingham, to asian, remember davtime _ from birmingham, to asian, remember daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, from birmingham, to asian, remember daytime gigs in the 90s.— daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, tick. i a- lied daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, tick. i applied and _ daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, tick. i applied and l— daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, tick. i applied and i gave _ daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, tick. i applied and i gave a _ daytime gigs in the 90s. tick, tick. i applied and i gave a passing - i applied and i gave a passing wordm — i applied and i gave a passing word... looks interesting, shall i apply? _ word... looks interesting, shall i apply? and — word... looks interesting, shall i apply? and he said, "whatever, yeah, 'ust apply? and he said, "whatever, yeah, just do— apply? and he said, "whatever, yeah, just do it1'— apply? and he said, "whatever, yeah, just do it." submit, it was gone. she court— just do it." submit, it was gone. she court my guard down. i don't she court my guard down. idon't know— she court my guard down. idon't know what— she court my guard down. i don't know what i— she court my guard down. i don't know what i said _ she court my guard down. i don't know what i said yes _ she court my guard down. i don't know what i said yes to _ she court my guard down. i don't know what i said yes to but - she court my guard down. i don't know what i said yes to but she l know what i said yes to but she obviously — know what i said yes to but she obviously did _ know what i said yes to but she obviously did the _ know what i said yes to but she obviously did the right - know what i said yes to but she obviously did the right thing. i know what i said yes to but she. obviously did the right thing. we saw a obviously did the right thing. saw a clip there but what said obviously did the right thing.“ saw a clip there but what said yes to it end up being? what did you have to go through for the series? you don't realise what you are embarking _ you don't realise what you are embarking on! _ you don't realise what you are embarking on! you _ you don't realise what you are embarking on! you are - you don't realise what you are i embarking on! you are literally in this bubble — embarking on! you are literally in this bubble from _ embarking on! you are literally in this bubble from each _ embarking on! you are literally in this bubble from each era, - embarking on! you are literally in this bubble from each era, from i
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embarking on! you are literally in . this bubble from each era, from the 1950s, _ this bubble from each era, from the 1950s, 1960s. — this bubble from each era, from the 1950s,1960s,1970s,_ this bubble from each era, from the 1950s,1960s,1970s,1980s,- this bubble from each era, from the 19505, 19605, 19705, 19805, and l this bubble from each era, from the. 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and you live, eat, — 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and you live, eat, sleep, — 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and you live, eat, sleep, work— 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and you live, eat, sleep, work exactly- 1950s, 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, and you live, eat, sleep, work exactly how. live, eat, sleep, work exactly how they did — live, eat, sleep, work exactly how they did if— live, eat, sleep, work exactly how they did lfthe _ live, eat, sleep, work exactly how they did. if the music— live, eat, sleep, work exactly how they did. if the music from - live, eat, sleep, work exactly how they did. if the music from the - they did. if the music from the 1960s — they did. if the music from the 1960s and _ they did. if the music from the 1960s and we _ they did. if the music from the 1960s and we were _ they did. if the music from the 1960s and we were in- they did. if the music from the 1960s and we were in the - they did. if the music from thel 1960s and we were in the 1950s they did. if the music from the - 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not— 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not allowed _ 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not allowed to _ 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not allowed to play _ 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not allowed to play it. - 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not allowed to play it. it - 1960s and we were in the 1950s you were not allowed to play it. [it is - were not allowed to play it. it is the food that _ were not allowed to play it. the food that fascinates me. were not allowed to play it.- the food that fascinates me. how were not allowed to play it— the food that fascinates me. how did things change for you? the the food that fascinates me. how did things change for you?— the food that fascinates me. how did things change for you? the food, you realise how much _ things change for you? the food, you realise how much we _ things change for you? the food, you realise how much we as _ things change for you? the food, you realise how much we as a _ things change for you? the food, you realise how much we as a family - realise how much we as a family really— realise how much we as a family really enjoy food and how much choice — really enjoy food and how much choice and variety we have now. it was just _ choice and variety we have now. it was just so — choice and variety we have now. it was just so bland choice and variety we have now. it wasjust so bland and the same every day. normally you would go out for a curry _ day. normally you would go out for a curry or— day. normally you would go out for a curry or a _ day. normally you would go out for a curry or a mexican or something but it was— curry or a mexican or something but it was the _ curry or a mexican or something but it was the same lentils and rice, lentils _ it was the same lentils and rice, lentils and — it was the same lentils and rice, lentils and rice. it's like... my kids— lentils and rice. it's like... my kids were _ lentils and rice. it's like... my kids were like... laughter you don't realise how much you appreciate — you don't realise how much you appreciate cornflakes. - you don't realise how much you appreciate cornflakes.— you don't realise how much you appreciate cornflakes. when we had coins we ate — appreciate cornflakes. when we had coins we ate it _ appreciate cornflakes. when we had coins we ate it all _ appreciate cornflakes. when we had coins we ate it all on _ appreciate cornflakes. when we had coins we ate it all on that _ appreciate cornflakes. when we had coins we ate it all on that first - coins we ate it all on that first day! _ coins we ate it all on that first da ! , , ., , coins we ate it all on that first da! ., day! this shows you dealing with the culinary side — day! this shows you dealing with the culinary side of _ day! this shows you dealing with the culinary side of history. _
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day! this shows you dealing with the culinary side of history. four - day! this shows you dealing with the culinary side of history. four cans i culinary side of history. four cans of baked beans. _ culinary side of history. four cans of baked beans. tonight's - culinary side of history. four cans of baked beans. tonight's recipe| culinary side of history. four cans l of baked beans. tonight's recipe is a baked bean _ of baked beans. tonight's recipe is a baked bean stew, _ of baked beans. tonight's recipe is a baked bean stew, agent - of baked beans. tonight's recipe is a baked bean stew, agent style. i of baked beans. tonight's recipe is i a baked bean stew, agent style. what is that? the — a baked bean stew, agent style. what is that? the message _ a baked bean stew, agent style. twist is that? the message here a baked bean stew, agent style. r“5:11sg1t is that? the message here is to a baked bean stew, agent style. “5:1"1sg1t is that? the message here is to stab it until it opens. it's working. let's put this down before i hurt myself. i think it might be time to add the beans. let's not talk about that. to mimic the taste of home, new arrivals had to be created with what was available in british largest. this is not a thing in my house. curry powder was a direct this is not a thing in my house_ curry powder was a direct result this is not a thing in my house. curry powder was a direct result of britain's relationship with india. you do not see anyone touching this
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stuff. �* ., , ., you do not see anyone touching this stuff. �* ., ,., , you do not see anyone touching this stuff. �* ., ,., you do not see anyone touching this stuff. �* ., ,, stuff. branston pickle was inspired b ben stuff. branston pickle was inspired by ben garlic— stuff. branston pickle was inspired by ben garlic chutney _ stuff. branston pickle was inspired by ben garlic chutney -- _ stuff. branston pickle was inspired by ben garlic chutney -- bengali i by ben garlic chutney —— bengali chutney. by ben garlic chutney -- bengali chutne . ., , , ., . , chutney. you put this on sandwiches, not beans! chutney. you put this on sandwiches, rrot beans! did _ chutney. you put this on sandwiches, not beans! did you _ chutney. you put this on sandwiches, not beans! did you eat _ chutney. you put this on sandwiches, not beans! did you eat it? _ chutney. you put this on sandwiches, not beans! did you eat it? we - chutney. you put this on sandwiches, not beans! did you eat it? we did i not beans! did you eat it? we did come it was _ not beans! did you eat it? we did come it was actually _ not beans! did you eat it? we did come it was actually quite - not beans! did you eat it? we did come it was actually quite nice. i not beans! did you eat it? we did i come it was actually quite nice. new invention. come it was actually quite nice. new invention- it — come it was actually quite nice. new invention. it was, _ come it was actually quite nice. new invention. it was, we _ come it was actually quite nice. new invention. it was, we never- come it was actually quite nice. new invention. it was, we never realised| invention. it was, we never realised how much people — invention. it was, we never realised how much people relied _ invention. it was, we never realised how much people relied on - invention. it was, we never realised| how much people relied on branston pickle _ how much people relied on branston pickle even— how much people relied on branston pickle even in— how much people relied on branston pickle even in the _ how much people relied on branston pickle even in the 1950s. _ how much people relied on branston pickle even in the 1950s. not- how much people relied on branston pickle even in the 1950s. not sure i pickle even in the 1950s. not sure how we _ pickle even in the 1950s. not sure how we didn't _ pickle even in the 1950s. not sure how we didn't get _ pickle even in the 1950s. not sure how we didn't get metal— pickle even in the 1950s. not sure| how we didn't get metal poisoning from the _ how we didn't get metal poisoning from the can! _ how we didn't get metal poisoning from the can! it— how we didn't get metal poisoning from the can! [it is _ how we didn't get metal poisoning from the can!— from the can! it is a health and safety nightmare. _ safety nightmare. we heard your voice there, noreen, what was it like to watch the family as they experience these movements through time?— through time? fascinating, ifelt for them through time? fascinating, ifelt forthem at _ through time? fascinating, ifelt for them at times _ through time? fascinating, ifelt for them at times because i i through time? fascinating, i felt i for them at times because i would go on set every day, whenever we were shooting, and they would be like, we haven't eaten for so many hours and we are so tired, because they were taken out of their home, they had no
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phones, laptops, nothing. everything was taken away from them but i think they did a very good job, considering the circumstances. the whole crew were cramped in that tiny house... that they were staying in. we were in and out. they had a tough time but also it showed how difficult it was in the 1950s and 19605 difficult it was in the 1950s and 1960s from families who had come overfrom india and pakistan and bangladesh. they have nothing but suitcases with some clothes and didn't have access to regular foods. it was a real struggle and i think they showed that. brute it was a real struggle and i think they showed that.— it was a real struggle and i think they showed that. it was a real struggle and i think the showed that. ~ ., , ,., they showed that. we have seen some ictures of they showed that. we have seen some pictures of you — they showed that. we have seen some pictures of you with _ they showed that. we have seen some pictures of you with a _ they showed that. we have seen some pictures of you with a nice _ they showed that. we have seen some pictures of you with a nice big - pictures of you with a nice big smile, turning up with a parcel to put them through their paces. the smile does not disguise how difficult some of this was. what did you learn doing this, yourself? gosh, i think itjust gave me and, i think, everyone that worked on this show, real appreciation, think, everyone that worked on this show, realappreciation, ithink, forwhat show, realappreciation, ithink, for what our parents and
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grandparents actually went through. even though we have heard the stories over the years and have an idea, but to see a family actually live that life and live in a home thatjust had a bed and the kitchen pretty much have nothing in it. when i thought back to when my parents would have arrived and what they would have arrived and what they would have arrived and what they would have gone through, it gives you a whole new found respect for what they did, what they achieved, and the impact that the south asian immigrants made, notjust in birmingham but across the uk, and that they continue to make. 1 birmingham but across the uk, and that they continue to make.- that they continue to make. i have to ask you — that they continue to make. i have to ask you to _ that they continue to make. i have to ask you to come _ that they continue to make. i have to ask you to come did _ that they continue to make. i have to ask you to come did you - that they continue to make. i have to ask you to come did you have i that they continue to make. i have to ask you to come did you have a| to ask you to come did you have a favourite decade? what was the best it? ., ., , favourite decade? what was the best it? ., "3:1, favourite decade? what was the best| it?— because it? for me it was the 1980s. because it? for me it was the 1980s. because it was nearly — it? for me it was the 1980s. because it was nearly over? _ it? for me it was the 1980s. because it was nearly over? partly! _ it? for me it was the 1980s. because it was nearly over? partly! the i it was nearly over? partly! the music, finally _ it was nearly over? partly! the music, finally having _ it was nearly over? partly! the music, finally having a - it was nearly over? partly! the music, finally having a vcr i it was nearly over? partly! the music, finally having a vcr to | it was nearly over? partly! the i music, finally having a vcr to play. dial up _ music, finally having a vcr to play. dial up internet, _ music, finally having a vcr to play. dial up internet, my— music, finally having a vcr to play. dial up internet, my kids— music, finally having a vcr to play. dial up internet, my kids don't- music, finally having a vcr to play. dial up internet, my kids don't getl dial up internet, my kids don't get that but— dial up internet, my kids don't get that but that — dial up internet, my kids don't get that but that was _ dial up internet, my kids don't get that but that was a _ dial up internet, my kids don't get that but that was a thing. - dial up internet, my kids don't get that but that was a thing. the i dial up internet, my kids don't get. that but that was a thing. the music was brilliant, — that but that was a thing. the music was brilliant, it— that but that was a thing. the music was brilliant, it always _ that but that was a thing. the music was brilliant, it always takes - that but that was a thing. the music was brilliant, it always takes me i was brilliant, it always takes me back _ was brilliant, it always takes me back. "3: was brilliant, it always takes me back.- interestingly i was brilliant, it always takes me back.- interestingly it i was brilliant, it always takes me| back.- interestingly it was back. 1980s? interestingly it was the 1950s
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back. 1980s? interestingly it was the 19505 and _ back. 1980s? interestingly it was the 19505 and 1960s _ back. 1980s? interestingly it was the 19505 and 1960s and - back. 1980s? interestingly it was the 19505 and 1960s and 1 - back. 1980s? interestingly it was the 19505 and 19605 and 1 think | back. 1980s? interestingly it was| the 1950s and 1960s and i think it was because we didn't have the gadgets — was because we didn't have the gadgets. i didn't have to keep nagging — gadgets. i didn't have to keep nagging everyone to put it down, talk to— nagging everyone to put it down, talk to me, because we had to talk to each— talk to me, because we had to talk to each other and we have the board games _ to each other and we have the board games we — to each other and we have the board games. we had a lot of fun. the food was not _ games. we had a lot of fun. the food was not the _ games. we had a lot of fun. the food was not the best but the entertainment and the family time was really— entertainment and the family time was really precious. that entertainment and the family time was really precious.— was really precious. that is really interesting- _ was really precious. that is really interesting. we _ was really precious. that is really interesting. we have _ was really precious. that is really interesting. we have avoided i was really precious. that is really interesting. we have avoided youj interesting. we have avoided you some baked beans and some curry powder. it is already. lovely to meet you, thank you for sharing and chatting with us. back in time for birmingham starts tonight on bbc two at 8pm. you're watching bbc breakfast, it's 8.59.
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this is bbc news, i'm luxmy gopal. the headlines at 9am... train passengers prepare for the biggest railway strikes in 30 years, starting tomorrow. if there is a train, there is a train. if not, i will have to find some other way of getting to work. i support the rail strike because no one is listening to them, the transport minister has not been listening to them for decades. it is a huge inconvenience to people's lives. how will the week's industrial action affect you? are you a key worker struggling to find a way into work? perhaps you're a student taking exams and worried about gettng to school? we want to hear from you. you can get in touch with me on twitter, i'm at luxmy—g or you can use #bbcyourquestions. a major setback for emmanuel macron after he loses his majority in parliamentary elections less than two months after winning his second term as france's president.

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