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tv   Outside Source  BBC News  June 20, 2022 7:00pm-8:01pm BST

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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is outside source. here in the uk, last—minute talks fail to stop the biggest rail strike in thirty years. there'll be three days of walk—outs — tomorrow, thursday and saturday — but disruption is expected all week. the trade union representing rail workers blames the government for preventing a deal. faced with such an aggressive agenda cuts tojobs, conditions pay faced with such an aggressive agenda cuts to jobs, conditions pay and pensions, they have no choice but to defend our members industrially and to stop this race to the bottom. the sa will to stop this race to the bottom. the say will cause _ to stop this race to the bottom. the say will cause misery for millions of new look of the story in detail. the israeli prime minister
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and foreign minister agree to dissolve parliament, triggering new elections — the fifth election there in three—and—a—half years. the european union says russia's blockade of ukraine's ports — which prevents millions of tonnes of grain from being distributed across the world — is a "real war crime". this is a desperate attempt to use the foot to make to create hunger. welcome to the programme. we start here in the uk — which is gearing up for the biggest set of rail strikes in thirty years. which is gearing up for the biggest disruption is expected all week. which is gearing up for the biggest there will be rail strikes on tuesday, thursday and saturday. and a london underground strike on tuesday. almost all major lines in england, scotland and wales will be affected.
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the rmt trade union is striking — that stands for the national union of rail, maritime and transport workers. so, thousands of staff are due to walk out — staff working at network rail — responsible for the railways tracks and infrastructure — and, at 13 operating companies which run the trains. the rmt represents lots of different positions from guards to catering staff. the strikes are happening because negotiations failed. let's look at how this all unfolded — and what the different sides are saying. this will strike us one of the largest for years and is being led by one union. largest for years and is being led by one union-— largest for years and is being led by one union. every worker in this country deserves _ by one union. every worker in this country deserves to _ by one union. every worker in this country deserves to negotiate - by one union. every worker in this country deserves to negotiate a i by one union. every worker in this | country deserves to negotiate a pay raise an burden on their conditions because if you're not bargaining for strong trade union, you are begging. there bargaining on behalf of thousands of workers employed by those who operate the trains and network rail which meant its
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infrastructure. and they say it is time for a pay rise and they want to be clear that this is not about train drivers, most of them belong to a different union. this is for cigna looks, cleaners and many others. people who are not high earners, trained guards between 23 and £36,000. to put that in context, the median pay for all employees in the median pay for all employees in the uk was close to £26,000 last year and they say that their members deserve more. are year and they say that their members deserve more-— year and they say that their members deserve more. �* , , ., ., ., deserve more. are members of another -a raise deserve more. are members of another pay raise no _ deserve more. are members of another pay raise no to — deserve more. are members of another oay raise no to three — deserve more. are members of another pay raise up to three years. _ pay raise up to three years. inflation is now ii.i% pay raise up to three years. inflation is now 11.1% on the scale and their ahead of that with evan had a pay deal and they are getting poorer. had a pay deal and they are getting oorer. , , . ., had a pay deal and they are getting oorer, , , . ., , , poorer. they did secure a pay bill for some of— poorer. they did secure a pay bill for some of the _ poorer. they did secure a pay bill for some of the members - poorer. they did secure a pay bill for some of the members but - poorer. they did secure a pay bill for some of the members but as | poorer. they did secure a pay bill. for some of the members but as for inflation, it is high. borisjohnson says that is a reason to show restraint. iiii says that is a reason to show restraint-— says that is a reason to show restraint. ., , . ., ., restraint. if wages continue to chase the _ restraint. if wages continue to chase the increase _ restraint. if wages continue to chase the increase in - restraint. if wages continue to chase the increase in prices, | restraint. if wages continue to .
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chase the increase in prices, then we risk a wage price spiral. they counter this saying... that analysis is disputed but they see that wages in this case should rise. no one is suggesting that some pay freezes required to. they all want to see _ freezes required to. they all want to see a _ freezes required to. they all want to see a sensible pay increase. by to see a sensible pay increase. bv; their to see a sensible pay increase. by their different definitions of sensible. this is simon clark. some ofthe sensible. this is simon clark. some of the practices _ sensible. this is simon clark. some of the practices that _ sensible. this is simon clark. some of the practices that make - sensible. this is simon clark. some of the practices that make her - of the practices that make her railway— of the practices that make her railway very unsustainable at the moment — railway very unsustainable at the moment. and the way our network operates— moment. and the way our network ooeraies is— moment. and the way our network operates is not fit for the 2020. 236
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operates is not fit for the 2020. 296 with operates is not fit for the 2020. with the operates is not fit for the 2020. m3 with the increase to come. restructuring is necessary and it adds we have to have insurance to the people were working there today won't come out of that worst off than they went in. and while the union wants assurances, so to do the train operating companies. bond train operating companies. and acceotance _ train operating companies. and acceptance and _ train operating companies. and acceptance and reform can go ahead and that— acceptance and reform can go ahead and that allows _ acceptance and reform can go ahead and that allows us _ acceptance and reform can go ahead and that allows us to _ acceptance and reform can go ahead and that allows us to work— acceptance and reform can go ahead and that allows us to work on - acceptance and reform can go ahead and that allows us to work on how . acceptance and reform can go aheadl and that allows us to work on how we -et and that allows us to work on how we get the _ and that allows us to work on how we get the staff — and that allows us to work on how we get the staff-— get the staff. they see some reform has to be acceptable _ get the staff. they see some reform has to be acceptable for— get the staff. they see some reform has to be acceptable for the - get the staff. they see some reform has to be acceptable for the offers l has to be acceptable for the offers made both they have a further concern. �* ., ., ., , concern. and in the train operators, we feel that — concern. and in the train operators, we feel that the _ concern. and in the train operators, we feel that the safety _ concern. and in the train operators, we feel that the safety regime - concern. and in the train operators, we feel that the safety regime on i we feel that the safety regime on her railway because they have to cut the maintenance regime in order to cut thejobs. the the maintenance regime in order to cut the jobs-— cut the “obs. the safety concerns are not cut the jobs. the safety concerns are not accepted _ cut the jobs. the safety concerns are not accepted by _ cut the jobs. the safety concerns are not accepted by the - cut the jobs. the safety concerns i are not accepted by the employer's. we need to reduce the number of those around but at some of the key
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ways that we can be more efficient with money. innate ways that we can be more efficient with money-— ways that we can be more efficient with mone . ~ ., ., ., with money. we have a government with money. we have a government with reduced _ with money. we have a government with reduced budgets _ with money. we have a government with reduced budgets and _ with reduced budgets and itemisation. and this is neither safe nor fair. itemisation. and this is neither safe norfair. in context, the pandemic stop till we've committed £16 billion to support the railways through covid—i9. as a result, they continue to operate, the industry survived not a single railway worker had to be furloughed or lost their job. not one. they did support the railways of the pandemic but the question is, what should happen now. covid—i9 is changed i would travel. passenger numbers are down by a fifth and to working home inspection commuter routes like this one. modernise the railways, making more productive and give the industry taxpayer—funded life—support. to
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which the rmt argue that covid—19 which the rmt argue that covid—i9 has been a smoke screen neverjob cuts are planned all along. while their trading statements in public, they're not actually negotiating. the union sung to the employer's and the reality and treasuring in particular, is calling the shots. the opposition labour party since this. ., ., , ., the opposition labour party since this. ., ., , this. not only are they boycotting the talks, there _ this. not only are they boycotting the talks, there actually - this. not only are they boycotting the talks, there actually hobbling| the talks, there actually hobbling them _ the talks, there actually hobbling them and it's imperative that they step them and it's imperative that they steo in~ _ them and it's imperative that they ste in. ., , ., step in. the government denies a bo cott step in. the government denies a boycott bnt _ step in. the government denies a boycott but it _ step in. the government denies a boycott but it is _ step in. the government denies a boycott but it is declining - step in. the government denies a boycott but it is declining to - boycott but it is declining to intervene. boycott but it is declining to intervene-— boycott but it is declining to intervene. �* ., ., ., , ., intervene. are not going to surround the table directly _ intervene. are not going to surround the table directly with _ intervene. are not going to surround the table directly with the _ intervene. are not going to surround the table directly with the trade - the table directly with the trade unions — the table directly with the trade unions because that's not how the government ought to be behaving we are not— government ought to be behaving we are not the _ government ought to be behaving we are not the legal employer. the labour leaders _ are not the legal employer. tue: labour leaders say are not the legal employer. tt;e: labour leaders say that are not the legal employer. t"t9: labour leaders say that this are not the legal employer. tt9 labour leaders say that this is are not the legal employer. t“t9 labour leaders say that this is a political ploy. t labour leaders say that this is a oolitical oloy— political ploy. i do not want the strikes to go — political ploy. i do not want the strikes to go ahead, _ political ploy. i do not want the strikes to go ahead, but - political ploy. i do not want the l strikes to go ahead, but he does! political ploy. i do not want the - strikes to go ahead, but he does! he wants. _ strikes to go ahead, but he does! he wants. mr_ strikes to go ahead, but he does! he wants, mr speaker, he wants the conntry— wants, mr speaker, he wants the country to— wants, mr speaker, he wants the country to grind to a halt so he can
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feed off— country to grind to a halt so he can feed off the — country to grind to a halt so he can feed off the division! the government _ feed off the division! the government denies - feed off the division! t“t9 government denies this too and there also questions for labour. brute government denies this too and there also questions for labour.— also questions for labour. we are backin: also questions for labour. we are backing the _ also questions for labour. we are backing the deal _ also questions for labour. we are backing the deal and _ also questions for labour. we are backing the deal and we - also questions for labour. we are backing the deal and we want - also questions for labour. we are backing the deal and we want to l also questions for labour. we are i backing the deal and we want to see the dispute avoided and it can be. is the dispute avoided and it can be. is the _ the dispute avoided and it can be. is the backing this? how much is a fair pay raise? in this negotiation, their profound tests for the government and the state of commitment. and the state of the unions, and the efforts to change travel habits and the leverage it as servicemembers. something is going to have to give. 0nly travelling by trade if necessary on the straight days and it's a special timetable and here is more from our transport
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correspondent. tt and here is more from our transport corresoondent-_ correspondent. it will be pretty extensive. _ correspondent. it will be pretty extensive, mainly _ correspondent. it will be pretty extensive, mainly because - correspondent. it will be pretty extensive, mainly because the| extensive, mainly because the network rail signals are among those taking part in only about half of the network will be opened in some places love absolutely no trains at all. 0verall, there will be about 20% of those running across england and scotland and wales in about 4000 out of the normal services and on the saturday and the strict is that there would be this will have a knock on impact and for the next day i would and friday and sunday, there are will be as many trains is normal for the structure will not be quite as severe will have about 60% on the status of the straight days, their advice not to travel by train except unless absolutely necessary because the trend will only be going about half seven in the morning and about half seven in the morning and about half six in the evening and those that are on will be very busy. instill
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that are on will be very busy. will there be efforts to mitigate this is a just accepted that this level of disruption is inevitable and people should stay at home if they can? there is a limited amount you can actually do at the moment, really. with network railing, that's survey specialistjob with network railing, that's survey specialist job they're with network railing, that's survey specialistjob they're bringing in some manages to do those roles instead and as i was saying earlier, services can only run from limited time because it's contingency plans can't work for as long and they cannot cover all of the times of the day. some are in place but they cannot disrupt the disruption by any means in the future, we know the government is looking at changing the loss of agency workers could be brought in to try to on some of the places but we need a bit more detail to see exactly how that would work. we heard from several ministers but the need for the rail network to
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modernise and adapt for the 2020 europe. and what with that modernisation might entail for this era? t5 modernisation might entail for this era? , ~ , modernisation might entail for this era? , ~' , ., ., era? is quite key to the whole disute era? is quite key to the whole dispute because _ era? is quite key to the whole dispute because the _ era? is quite key to the whole dispute because the industry. era? is quite key to the whole i dispute because the industry has said, we cannot get a payoff properly into me know whether or not the union will accept these reforms and these ways of working for example, on the railways side of thing and you might use a drone, for example instead of sending people to the tracks, that is an example that network rail gives and for training companies, —— train companies. 0ne companies, —— train companies. one idea would be to make a part of the normal road to where the rmt union says that it involves job cuts in all these reforms involve job cuts and it will not accept that insist terms and conditions need to be accepted and also argues when it comes to a pay rise, that needs to
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really help people cope with the increased cost—of—living the union uses the measure of inflation which is currently ii%. to israel, where prime minister is to step down from his post and dissolve parliament — triggering a fresh election. in the centre is current pm naftali bennett and on the left is foreign minister yair lapid. the pm's been in thejob forjust over a year and has struggled to keep control of his coalition government. under the agreement the current foreign minister, yair lapid, will temporarily take over as prime minister. the new election, in october, will be the fifth in three—and—a—half years. mr bennett's government has previously defeated two votes of no confidence by a narrow majority.
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0ur correspodentjoel greenberg has more on this and joins us now. the timing was a surprise but they have really been petering on the edge of collapse because there have been key defections which remove the governments majority in parliament, basically. the government was struggling to get bills passed to make policy and an increasing sense that it reached a dead—end and so, there was an atmosphere that it was approaching the end of its term but the timing of the exact day and the prime minister did not give any indication advance notice that this was coming. have a new prime minister taking over and tell us about them. tt minister taking over and tell us about them-— minister taking over and tell us about them. , ., ., , , about them. it should happen next week when — about them. it should happen next week when it _ about them. it should happen next week when it dissolves _ about them. it should happen next week when it dissolves itself - about them. it should happen next week when it dissolves itself and l week when it dissolves itself and the foreign minister will take over as caretaker prime minister until elections which are expected in late
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october. a former tv host well—known personality that entered politics in the head of the centrist party and has been basically of the deputy prime minister and foreign minister but a close partner of the prime minister and originally agreed that at some point, they would rotate positions and switch positions at the moment, he will not take over as caretaker until elections are held. that may be people watching us all around the world were thinking, what on earth is going on with this really politics. fifth election coming in for years and how to explain that as you likely the best explanation is the electorate in israel is polarised and split. brute israel is polarised and split. we have at israel is polarised and split. 9 have at deadlocks were neither block, either the right of the centreleft block and formed a viable coalition with the majority. this government was unusual in that it parties ranging from far right to left and even islamist arab party
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which was an unusual experiment working together to try to put ideological differences aside and in the end, it unravel because of defections on this coalition. in general, the israeli public is quite divided among the middle and it's hard to form a viable coalition with either block and so it is really a struggle as my many elections of just produce more deadlock. the middle of all _ just produce more deadlock. the middle of all of this discussion, whether or not their prior discussions about whether or not this works give and it seems to struggle to produce stable governments that can last longer than a few months. t5. governments that can last longer than a few months.— than a few months. is, there has been talks _ than a few months. is, there has been talks about _ than a few months. is, there has been talks about the _ than a few months. is, there has been talks about the electoral. been talks about the electoral reform and with the reelection of the prime minister which allowed smallerfactions and the prime minister which allowed smaller factions and israel does the prime minister which allowed smallerfactions and israel does not have a constitution, it has basic laws which serve as a defective constitution but for election reform, it is not made it through
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parliament, maybe for political reasons and calculations of different factions but lately, it has produced this repeated that look and repeated result of elections which again, on our will be expected in october. let's turn to france — and a big political setback for president macron. his party lost its majority in parliament having peformed worse than expected, in elections held on sunday. let's look at the results. the president's coalition won 245 seats, well short of the 289 needed to control the national assembly. the left wing alliance headed byjean luc melanchon is second on 131. marine le pen's far right national rally has 89 seats. and christianjackob's right—wing les republicains has 64 seats. mr macron will be the first french president since the 1980's to govern without a parliamentary majority.
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here's the prime minister. the situation is unprecedented. national assembly is never seen a configuration of this type in the fifth republic. the situation constitutes a risk for a country in view of the challenges that we have to face. this political analyst explains the challenge ahead for mr macron. he still is the majority, but not the absolute majority, meaning he's going _ the absolute majority, meaning he's going to _ the absolute majority, meaning he's going to have to get votes from across — going to have to get votes from across the — going to have to get votes from across the aisles for every single oiece _ across the aisles for every single oiece of— across the aisles for every single piece of legislation that he wishes to oass _ piece of legislation that he wishes to pass and that is not going to be an easy— to pass and that is not going to be an easy task. here's one researcher�*s view on why voters turned their backs on macron. is probably paying for the absence of debate — is probably paying for the absence of debate and _ is probably paying for the absence of debate and programme, - is probably paying for the absence of debate and programme, right? | is probably paying for the absence - of debate and programme, right? and that did _ of debate and programme, right? and that did manage — of debate and programme, right? and that did manage to _
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of debate and programme, right? and that did manage to mobilise _ of debate and programme, right? and that did manage to mobilise folks. - was this election was a victory for the extremes, far—left leader jean—luc melenchon succeeded in uniting mainstream parties from the left into an alliance called nupes. they'll likely be the parliament's largest opposition party. marine le pen and her far—right party, the national rally are also in a much stronger position with 89 seats, up from six in 2017. the question now is how macron will govern. this french politics professor sees two ways forward. one, he could try to strike a governing deal regarding the alliance with the conservative republicans, but i don't think you will. that would pool his central alliance too far to the right it would shackle his centrists to the conservatives. the second option and the more likely one as he tries on a
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policy by policy bill by bill basis to get his legislation through and he might take socially oriented policies to the left of the centreleft of the socialist component of the left union and he might take some economic reforms to the conservatives republicans. reem momtaz is with politico in paris. what happened here than? how do you explain this result for viewers, please? explain this result for viewers, lease? �* , explain this result for viewers, lease? 3 , explain this result for viewers, lease? �*, , . ., please? he's paying the price for many mistakes _ please? he's paying the price for many mistakes he _ please? he's paying the price for many mistakes he made - please? he's paying the price for many mistakes he made and - please? he's paying the price for many mistakes he made and a i please? he's paying the price for. many mistakes he made and a few please? he's paying the price for- many mistakes he made and a few bad political choices that he made over the past five years and so his fists presidential term, to go through them quickly, the first one really was that he decided to destroy the left —— right divide and has been at the core of french politics but in
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truth, he hasn't really succeeded in producing a new ideological block and so, his party never actually grew into a real party that has a real local base or even that is easily identifiable in terms of its ideology. to this day, most people don't know whether or not he is on the right are on the left where his heart really lights. that is the first thing in twice now, in 2017 in 2022, he was elected thanks to centreleft and left—leaning voters who they feel, he took for granted. and it was definitely some sort of sanction or punishment that was done this time in these elections and thirdly, he has really been out of sorts since the presidential election in the electoral campaign
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was really lackluster and it lacked oomph, it lacked any of his usual visions and its usual momentum and parliamentary elections, little ricky was skimming through not paying enough attention and i really giving enough people of their dues and it really slipped into the fear mongering saying that it was either him that god in absolute majority or chaos would rain in france which usually means that the adversity and this led to quite a defeat even though his coalition still has the largest bloc in parliament today. can give us a quick lesson is that french politics work. how much does they require them if you're she media policies done? the magic number is _ media policies done? the magic number is 289 _ media policies done? the magic
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number is 289 mp, _ media policies done? the magic number is 289 mp, he - media policies done? the magic number is 289 mp, he is - media policies done? the magic number is 289 mp, he is 50 - media policies done? the magic. number is 289 mp, he is 50 seats short of that and that is a really huge problem in the intro, his best bet is to try to come up with some kind of arrangement with the conservatives right around 60 seats but it is not at all in his interests of the interests of the conservatives to help emmanuel macron out like that because they are banking on rebuilding and retaking ownership and control of french politics when emmanuel macron cannot run again for politics. rescue teams in bangladesh and north—east india are trying to reach millions of people marooned by floods. these are pictures from bangladesh. across the two countries, millions of people have been marooned in the past week. the rain's also caused landslides. already, at least 59 people known to have died. power supplies and communications are down, while food and fresh drinking water are running short. some floodwaters are now starting to recede but rescue teams are struggling to reach those
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who need help. 0ur correspondent yogita limaye is in mumbai and gave us this update. scores of people have been confirmed killed but there are many missing as well. 0fficials saying that the number of dead could rise and rescuers, to reach people were stranded, the weather conditions and forecasts say that there is likely to be heavy rainfall of the next few days as well. the situation came about because of unrelenting heavy rainfall over the past week and while this is quite a common occurrence, in these areas, as well as the select regions of bangladesh, the officials are saying that this is the worst flood they have seen in
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years and in these regions, it's absolutely the second time these areas also flooded in may and so it's the second time in just two months that they have seen flooding again. let's shift from mumbai — to sylhet in bangladesh — on the border with india. the authorities say about 60% of the area is now under water. and that is far from the only area in bangladesh there is my village underwater and we saw it was thursday and it's been three days away from home. the water is risinu. three days away from home. the water is rising- my — three days away from home. the water is rising. my house _ three days away from home. the water is rising. my house has _ three days away from home. the water is rising. my house has chest _ three days away from home. the water is rising. my house has chest deep - is rising. my house has chest deep water~ _ is rising. my house has chest deep water~ so. — is rising. my house has chest deep water. so, i'm living here on the road _ water. so, i'm living here on the road with— water. so, i'm living here on the road with a — water. so, i'm living here on the road with a capital keeping my family— road with a capital keeping my family and safe shelter. a lot of things being — family and safe shelter. a lot of things being done _ family and safe shelter. a lot of things being done to _ family and safe shelter. a lot of things being done to help - family and safe shelter. a lot of things being done to help them | things being done to help them including actions from the bangladesh army.
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many people are still marooned and we are trying hard to rescue them and those were staying on top of buildings or other higher grounds, we are trying to reach them with water and food. and it's notjust the military that is helping. akmal shareef is country director of islamic relief bangladesh. i think ithink in i think in terms will be needed, we need _ i think in terms will be needed, we need support for the next seven days we have _ need support for the next seven days we have to _ need support for the next seven days we have to provide rations and in long-term, — we have to provide rations and in long—term, people need to have food security— long—term, people need to have food security for _ long—term, people need to have food security for six months because of the build — security for six months because of the build houses and many of these oeooie _ the build houses and many of these people have lost their habitats and repairing _ people have lost their habitats and repairing those houses will be difficult — repairing those houses will be difficult because we have set a look at another — difficult because we have set a look at another issue because people need whatever— at another issue because people need whatever they need. in this challenges still remain.
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we will turn back to the rail strike on tuesday in the uk in the next few minutes. love the starts of the week with lots of sunshine around in scotland and aberdeen sure, the temperature reached 84 degrees, the warmest of the year so far in scotland. metre and be cooler in scotland and northern ireland but across england and wales next few days in particular, 20 be heating up once again. some changes coming in from the northwest and those lower temperatures in scotland and northern ireland have thickening cloud overnight to bring with some bricks of rain in the rain turning to break up later in the night and will hang on the clear skies across england and wales is going to be a little bit cooler and temptress perhaps seven or 8 degrees from outer conditions across the cloud for scotland and northern ireland. much more cloud for scotland and northern ireland and some of that
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pushing into the far north of england and probably not a great deal of rain in the afternoon we could see a glimpse of sunshine now and again, elsewhere across england and again, elsewhere across england and wales, this week i'd like winds, strong sunshine is where temperatures are continuing to rise by 25 degrees during tuesday afternoon in mill and stresses the southeast of england was in the cloudy skies in scotland and northern ireland, there 17 or 18. but it does mean the pollen levels in scotland wont be quite a sight, still in northern ireland, widely across england and wales. and wednesday and more briskly into northern areas of rain cloud in the northern areas of rain cloud in the northern ireland westin scotland, may be a few spots of rain here but more sunshine breaking up to the cloud in eastern scotland and getting a bit warmer too. he continues to be causing the wells of the temperature continues to climb and getting up to around 27 and 20 degrees on wednesday. heading in thursday, we have a few other friends and went to the north of the uk on trying to come in from the south. weather may be starting to change a bit. most of the rain is
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going to be sitting up towards the northern aisles in scotland still quite cloudy and northern ireland and since i will build this temperatures in england and wales because his and thunderstorms moving across the channel into the force southern england by the end of the day. not before this temperatures are lifted widely to 27 and perhaps nudging 30 in the southeast of england and still fairly warm and eastern parts of scotland. things start to change on friday but more cloud with some service around in a band of rain on friday night pushes his way eastwards and i'll introduce showers in cooler weather this weekend.
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hello, i'm ros atkins, this is 0utside source. here the uk, last—minute talks aimed at preventing the biggest rail strike in 30 years have failed. it looks now likely there will be three days of walkouts. tuesday thursday and saturday with disruption expected all through the week. the trade union that represents railway workers and is blaming the government.— workers and is blaming the government. workers and is blaming the rovernment. .. , . government. faced with such in in festive conditions _ government. faced with such in in festive conditions pay _ government. faced with such in in festive conditions pay and - government. faced with such in in l festive conditions pay and pensions the rmt has no choice but to defend our members industrially and to stop this race to the bottom.— this race to the bottom. ministers sa the this race to the bottom. ministers say the action _ this race to the bottom. ministers say the action will— this race to the bottom. ministers say the action will cause - this race to the bottom. ministers say the action will cause misery . this race to the bottom. ministersl say the action will cause misery for millions but it will turn back to the store in a moment in israel the
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prime minister and forest minister agreed to dissolve parliament, that will trigger another election, a fifth and three and half years. though not till 0ctober, fifth and three and half years. though not till october, we think. the european unions been thinking about russia's blockade of ukrainian boards, is preventing millions of tonnes of grain being distributed, the eu calls it a war crime. this is a deliberate _ the eu calls it a war crime. this is a deliberate attempt _ the eu calls it a war crime. this is a deliberate attempt to _ the eu calls it a war crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use - the eu calls it a war crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the i the eu calls it a war crime. this is i a deliberate attempt to use the food as a war arm. it's a deliberate attempt to create hunger. let's get more on our top story now — the biggest rail strike in 30 years across england, scotland and wales. this across england, scotland and wales. is a story abo cuts, this is a story about proposed job cuts, working conditions, pay, modernisation all during the cost of
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living crisis. the rate at which prices are rising are currently 9%. that's already a four hi. the rate at which prices rise — is at 9% — a 40—year high. and the inflation rate is expected to hit 11% this year. the rmt has called for a pay rise of at least 7% to keep up with the cost of living. that hasn't happened so far. that hasn't let's hear more from them let's hear more from them on why they're striking. they've now proposed there pay rates that are massively under the rates of inflation. they do not address the cost of living crisis and they have prevented a settlement to this dispute. at the behest of the government, the companies are also seeking to implement thousands of job cuts across the network and have failed to give any guarantee against compulsory redundancies. faced with such an aggressive agenda of cuts to jobs, conditions, pay and pensions, the rmt has no choice but to defend our members industrially and to stop this race to the bottom.
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so the unions want more pay and they say that's fair because the railway industry has made million pounds in profits. last year in the railway industry they rolling stock companies network rails contractors and the train operating companies made £500 billion in direct profit. that's a fact, it's in their books. all of these executives that we are dealing with the run salaries in excess of £350,000 a year. somebody�*s making money are the real ways, just got our members. that's the unions perspectives. _ that's the unions perspectives. this is how the government has responded. my message, mr speaker to the workforce is straightforward, your union— workforce is straightforward, your union bosses got you striking under false pretenses. and rather then protecting yourjobs they are actually— protecting yourjobs they are actually endangering them and their railways _ actually endangering them and their railways future. we have a platform for change — railways future. we have a platform for change and what they union to work— for change and what they union to work with— for change and what they union to
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work with industry and government to brin- work with industry and government to bring a _ work with industry and government to bring a much brighter future to art railways _ bring a much brighter future to art railways that means bringing an agile, _ railways that means bringing an agile, flexible workforce but not one that — agile, flexible workforce but not one that strikes every time someone success— one that strikes every time someone success in_ one that strikes every time someone success in improvement to our railways — success in improvement to our railways. strike should be the last resort. _ railways. strike should be the last resort. not — railways. strike should be the last resort, not the first resort. it will— resort, not the first resort. it will stoo— resort, not the first resort. it will stop customers using rail, it will stop customers using rail, it will out — will stop customers using rail, it will putjobs at will stop customers using rail, it will put jobs at risk of a deal canse — will put jobs at risk of a deal cause misery across the country, though— cause misery across the country, though have businesses trying to recover— though have businesses trying to recover from covid, feel hurt railway— recover from covid, feel hurt railway workers themselves. so olease, — railway workers themselves. so please, let's stop dividing the railway— please, let's stop dividing the railway industry and let's start worker— for brighter future. and there are expectations there will be strikes in other industries too — like teachers, junior doctors, nurses and civil servants. some — like binmen and bus drivers — are already striking. and so some aredrawing parallels with the 1970s — when there was huge industrial unrest. this was the winter of discontent in 1979, when there were more than 2,000 strikes in a few months. and today, this was the daily mirror's frontpage —
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it calls now "the summer of discontent". how much does the situation really compare with the nineteen seventies? analysis on how this compares to the 1970s — here's the bbc�*s ben chu. in 1979 there were 13 million i utilise workers in great britain. in 2020 that was out to 6.7 million. in 2020 that was out to 6.7 million. so the current situation may not be the same as it was thirty years ago, but what is clear is this is a significant moment both for unions, and for the government. here's one economist�*s assessment on where we are. i think it is a big moment for the uk because there is a choice for us. workers across are under huge pressure. in some sectors there banding together and say, we want better, we could use our collective bargaining in order to push for better negotiations. in that world the government has a choice, it can either though lies them or it can
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say actually, the right of workers to negotiate a better deal is a core part of how we want the labour market to work. let's talk now to bruce carr qc — he specialises in employment law and industrial action disputes. thank you forjoining us. are you surprised the government is it part of the negotiations are taking place or around this? t of the negotiations are taking place or around this?— or around this? i think they hid behind the _ or around this? i think they hid behind the scenes, _ or around this? i think they hid behind the scenes, there - or around this? i think they hid behind the scenes, there is - or around this? i think they hid behind the scenes, there is no | or around this? i think they hid - behind the scenes, there is no doubt the government must be involved in this. ultimately, the government has the financial cloud to determine the outcome of this dispute. i'm not surprised that you don't see grant shapps sitting on the table with the leaders of the rmt, that's likely to be in unprofitable situation for all parties, i can see that that will bring any sort of resolution. you could be no doubt that there will be discussions behind the scenes between train operating company bosses and the government on how to solve this dispute. find
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bosses and the government on how to solve this dispute.— solve this dispute. and we've heard from the companies _ solve this dispute. and we've heard from the companies who _ solve this dispute. and we've heard from the companies who operate i from the companies who operate the train saying, look, they can't make a firm pay off her until the unions have signed up to a variety of reforms they argue is necessary, would that be a standard way of approaching an issue like this that pay is linked to more structural changes within an industry? t pay is linked to more structural changes within an industry? i think it is now, these _ changes within an industry? i think it is now, these days. _ changes within an industry? i think it is now, these days. certainly - changes within an industry? i think it is now, these days. certainly we | it is now, these days. certainly we see pay deals linked to productivity. there are more educated people bend me then know more about why productivity is as low as it is in this country. it's perhaps unsurprising to see productivity link to pay deals. we are in a bit of a paraffinic storm because whilst we come out of covid more or less, we certainly not come out of the consequences of covid. if you take tsl for example, which was bailed out by the government during the course of the covid pandemic, that's now left gf to help with having to find huge cost savings. ——
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t fl. there i could get those cost savings without offering something in return so you will get the inevitable linkage between pay deals and productivity deals. itrai’e’ere and productivity deals. we've mentioned — and productivity deals. we've mentioned the _ and productivity deals. we've mentioned the companies, i and productivity deals. we've. mentioned the companies, the and productivity deals. we've - mentioned the companies, the union and the government but do you think there should be some sort of arbitrators stepping in to try and get the dialogue going? evidently, is not going at the moment and everyone is facing the consequences of the strike. everyone is facing the consequences of the strike-— of the strike. there is always the theoretical _ of the strike. there is always the theoretical option _ of the strike. there is always the theoretical option of _ of the strike. there is always the theoretical option of going - of the strike. there is always the theoretical option of going and l theoretical option of going and seeking assistance from a cast. i'm not sure what a cast would bring to the party on this, they probably won't think me for saying that. if this dispute is capable of resolution, a lot of thought it was capable of resolution with the existing protagonist, without the need to seek in a cast conciliator to get involved in it. abs, need to seek in a cast conciliator to get involved in it.— to get involved in it. a question about the _ to get involved in it. a question about the legality _ to get involved in it. a question about the legality of _ to get involved in it. a question about the legality of this, - to get involved in it. a question i about the legality of this, because of course unions and workers are within their rights to go on strike.
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is that something that notjustice government others restricting how people can strike when the causes this level of disruption? this government _ this level of disruption? this government already - this level of disruption? “tt 3 government already done that. in 2016 increase the threshold or introduce a threshold in order for a ballot to have legitimacy for union and then to call its members on strike to stop you now have to get a 50% turn out. and including rail you have to have 48% of the electorate voting yes. and there is —— 48. because the government introduced those high thresholds, now that the rmt has got them, it seems to be is very difficult for the government to say the members are being misled by their bosses, by their union bosses because the rmt have got thumping majorities which are no doubt being
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used to maximum effect to leverage a settlement that's favourable to their members. so the government has already taken steps in respect of transport. in europe there are some countries that have taken even more draconian steps in relation to transport, for example. and whether we go down that route, we shall see. the consequences of pushing the union into a position where it can never call its members out to take strike action is in my view inevitably lead to left field, not left—wing but left field tactics and different ways of proceeding with industrial disputes using what is commonly known as leverage tactics if you can't call you members or lawfully to take strike action, what else are your options? and your options are leverage tactics. putting pressure on companies by speaking to suppliers and potential customers. and persuading them to persuade the employer to deal after.
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perhaps we can speak in a few days as the strike plays out. that is been invaluable. thank you. as we do every day will bring you up on the situation in the ukraine. and turned back to the growing global food crisis with up they met today, bearin food crisis with up they met today, bear in mind ukraine is one of the biggest exporters of grain. that is chiefly transported by sea so with prussia blockading ukraine sports a lot of grain can get out. today we hear from the e—news foreign policy chief was called this act a war crime. , , :, chief was called this act a war crime. , , . , ., ., , crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the food _ crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the food as _ crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the food as a _ crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the food as a war _ crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the food as a war arm. - crime. this is a deliberate attempt to use the food as a war arm. it's . crime. this is a deliberate attempt| to use the food as a war arm. it's a deliberate attempt to create hunger. in the world. in order to make russia, on date world and under european union and on ukraine. this
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is what's happening. and the typical plague up —— playbook of russian propaganda is they create and blame others. for propaganda is they create and blame others. ., . ., ., others. for creating the global food crisis. others. for creating the global food crisis- let's — others. for creating the global food crisis. let's have _ others. for creating the global food crisis. let's have a look _ others. for creating the global food crisis. let's have a look at some i others. for creating the global food crisis. let's have a look at some of| crisis. let's have a look at some of the numbers of the story. it sought around 20 million tonnes of grain are stuck in silos around ukraine at the moment. that's grain that many countries rely on for that before the war 12% of global wheat exports came from ukraine, some countries in africa and the middle east have been particular badly at. one example, libya relies on ukraine for half its wheat. lebanon around 60% of its wheat. lebanon around 60% of its wheat. this means a globalfood crisis and a crisis around that conflict in ukraine is impacting some of the poorest countries in the world. there are other challenges as this food security expert explains. there are other countries that
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potentially could step up and orovide — potentially could step up and provide food, grain, whether it's the us, canada, india, etc, there are difficulties with transporting that food at the current prices of fnel~ _ that food at the current prices of fnel~ high— that food at the current prices of fuel. high food prices and high fuel orices _ fuel. high food prices and high fuel orices go _ fuel. high food prices and high fuel prices go together. the difficulty is not _ prices go together. the difficulty is not the — prices go together. the difficulty is not the lack of availability of food _ is not the lack of availability of food stocks in the world but the hi-h food stocks in the world but the high prices that they are fetching at the _ high prices that they are fetching at the moment. the high prices that they are fetching at the moment.— high prices that they are fetching at the moment. , ., ., at the moment. the question for the euro ean at the moment. the question for the enrooean union _ at the moment. the question for the european union is _ at the moment. the question for the european union is what _ at the moment. the question for the european union is what he _ at the moment. the question for the european union is what he can - at the moment. the question for the european union is what he can do i european union is what he can do about that? his art european correspondent. t about that? his art european correspondent.— about that? his art european corresondent. �* ., . correspondent. i didn't hear much in the wa of correspondent. i didn't hear much in the way of concrete _ correspondent. i didn't hear much in the way of concrete decisions - correspondent. i didn't hear much in the way of concrete decisions this i the way of concrete decisions this afternoon for the i'm not sure that was ever on the card in this sense, there is some ongoing work in terms of trying to expand land routes to get crucial food supplies out of ukraine for that there are a lot of practical difficulties in terms of doing that i was reading earlier one of the things in terms of railways the size of the rail gauge are
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different in the eu, custom clearances that have to be sorted out as well. really nothing that you can do in terms of land and river roots is going to make up for the blockade on those black seaports. 0f blockade on those black seaports. of course those negotiations are being led by the united nations, which is something the eu says it supports. what was quite interesting, you referred to the blame game issue, what the eu foreign policy chief really seemed keen to stress is that he was saying the situation is not the european unions fault and they were even going to be sending letters to foreign ministers in africa to try to explain the eu sanctions policy, that's after the chair of the african union not long ago raised concerns that the sanctions on some of the russian banks, kicking them out of the swift system was make it harder to purchase things like food and
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fertiliser he saying it's not that you fall, squarely blaming russia body concerns there are at the moment, a concerns the situation could escalate. ear; moment, a concerns the situation could escalate.— could escalate. say it with me for them in a few _ could escalate. say it with me for them in a few minutes _ could escalate. say it with me for them in a few minutes will - could escalate. say it with me for them in a few minutes will look l could escalate. say it with me for| them in a few minutes will look at why belgium has returned the congolese heroes golden tooth. delegates of meeting in kenya for talks towards a global agreement to protect biodiversity and specie extinction. 40 years ago one species were mountain gorillas. species on the brink — but thanks to a huge conservation effort, their numbers are now rising. 0ur climate editorjustin rowlatt has been to uganda to see what lessons can be learnt. this park is one of the last two places on earth where mountain gorillas still survive.
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this is just incredible, this isjust incredible, you can hear the sound of gorillas all around us. the vegetation is so thick. the baby gorillas in the trees. adults and juveniles on the ground. it's incredible to be so close to one of our closest relatives on earth. low burblinig. and that is a gorilla fart. wow. the population is growing steadily, it is a dramatic turnaround. sir david attenborough feared he might be seeing the last of their kind when he visited a mountain gorilla family in the �*70s. so how have the gorillas been saved? tourism really does help wild animals if it is done right. when i first started out they were only about five lodges,
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now there are as many as 70. the lodges have created jobs, the ngos have created jobs, so there is lots of employment that has happened. but tourism alone is not enough. the un is asking countries to set aside a third of their land and sea area for conservation. the developing world says it needs $100 billion a year to help fund that. the hope is deadlock can be broken in nairobi this week. 0ur lead story on outside source is that the uk is preparing for the biggest rail strike in 30 years. after negotiations failed, the government and the unions both blamed each other. israeli prime minister along with the foreign minister along with the foreign minister have agreed to dissolve parliament, that will trigger a fifth election in less than four
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years. to columbia because there has been an historic presidential election results. 40 years ago one species were mountain gorillas. let's turn to colombia now and a historic presidential vote. the country has elected its first ever left—wing leader, former rebel fighter gustavo petro. this was the scene on the streets of the colombian capital, bogota after the result. it was mr petro's third presidential bid and this was his victory speech. change consists precisely in leaving hatred behind, change consists precisely and leaving sectarianism behind. today with this triumph the columbia people have given us, we can propose a dialogue in the americas without excluding any people, any nation. he tookjust over 50% of the vote he defeated his rival the independent by around 700,000 ballots. here he is conceding to feed.
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i accept their result is i should, if we want our institutions to say strong. i sincerely hope that this decision that has been taken will benefit everyone. it's a massive shift for the country. so let's take a look at what mr petro has promised. at the top of the agenda — fighting inequality. that includes pledges for pension reforms, high taxes on unproductive land and free university education. he also wants to wean the country off its dependence on fossilfuels. we've seen similar victories for the left reflected in the wider region. chile, peru and honduras all elected leftist presidents in 2021. but there are challenges ahead for gustavo petro — as one expert in latin american politics explains. we will get into the details of the policies in a moment. t’m we will get into the details of the policies in a moment.— we will get into the details of the policies in a moment. i'm keen to understand _ policies in a moment. i'm keen to understand how _ policies in a moment. i'm keen to understand how the _ policies in a moment. i'm keen to understand how the country, - policies in a moment. i'm keen to| understand how the country, have policies in a moment. i'm keen to l understand how the country, have a capital feels after such a moment, such a shift. t capital feels after such a moment, such a shift-— capital feels after such a moment, such a shift. i was at the petrol hq when the announcement _ such a shift. i was at the petrol hq when the announcement was - such a shift. i was at the petrol hq| when the announcement was made such a shift. i was at the petrol hq - when the announcement was made that he had won and the atmosphere was
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electric. clearly his supporters i think of it till the very end almost didn't want to believe that he would win, here's the first leftist president in the country, something that has not been seen before and therefore they can perhaps believe that it would happen. 0bviously, that it would happen. obviously, there was a huge amount of happiness. but it's divided, there almost half of the for him. i think that's a real concern, there's an awful lot of people who feel that he is a dangerous experiment for the country. that will be his biggest challenge, to try and win over his routers. : , ., .., routers. and you call it inexperience _ routers. and you call it inexperience i'm - routers. and you call it inexperience i'm sure . routers. and you call it - inexperience i'm sure even in routers. and you call it _ inexperience i'm sure even in some ways his supporters would agree with that description. 0ne ways his supporters would agree with that description. one of the practicalities of introducing the more radical experimental policies because that is it a question of him saying, let's do it or does he need to build a broader coalition? itrai’heh to build a broader coalition? when ou talk to build a broader coalition? when you talk about _ to build a broader coalition? when you talk about radical, _ to build a broader coalition? tfg�*t9�*t you talk about radical, something we haven't seen in latin america. what's interesting on the stage when he gave his speech was the
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representation that was offered there was his vice president, a black woman, he talks about the indigenous, he talks about rural colombians, that representation is a huge departure from columbia, is often ruled by the conservative elite. that inclusion in itself is hard. this country has been divided by civil conflict for over two decades, sorry, five decades. between leftist guerrillas, right—wing paramilitary, it's bringing those two groups together. that's what he said is that election showed to colombians. there are lots of people who feel that what is economic policies are suicide for this country and there is a fear of the left, if you like. but bringing those two together, for encouraging that inclusion is clearly a good thing to include two inclusion but it's bringing all those different
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viewpoints together to be able to bring a different future for columbia.— bring a different future for columbia. �* , , ., , bring a different future for columbia. �* , , , columbia. i'm sure you help us follow that _ columbia. i'm sure you help us follow that of _ columbia. i'm sure you help us follow that of the _ columbia. i'm sure you help us follow that of the coming - columbia. i'm sure you help us| follow that of the coming weeks months. , let's talk about belgium because the government there has returned a gold tooth to the families of the congolese at a ceremony in brussels. before we talk about why belgium has done is not let's remember who he was. in 1960 a just 30 years old he became drc is first prime minister, it ended decades of brutal belgium control. the time as prime minister was short. as a secession attempt because political chaos. the troops were sent in and placed under house arrest and these are the last known images of him because he was murdered in 1961 by separatist rebels in collusion with belgium mercenaries. we also know his body was dissolved in up the gold choose what you can see here was taken by a member of the belgian
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police. it is a dark moment in belgian misery. here is his aunt reflecting on what today means. translation: it is the end of the error and the start of a new one. the past was a time of exploitation, of fighting but we hope this is going to in n. and we can start a new era of harmony and development and cooperation between equals and responsible exchanges. we've also heard this from a congolese lecturer who believes the belgians could've done a betterjob of his hand back. t belgians could've done a better “0b of his hand back.�* of his hand back. i agree it was a missed opportunity. _ of his hand back. i agree it was a missed opportunity. i _ of his hand back. i agree it was a missed opportunity. i would - of his hand back. i agree it was a i missed opportunity. i would prefer to see _ missed opportunity. i would prefer to see the — missed opportunity. i would prefer to see the king travelled with the remains — to see the king travelled with the remains of lumumba and rest to the congolese _ remains of lumumba and rest to the congolese nation. he didn't do that. it's congolese nation. he didn't do that. it's a _ congolese nation. he didn't do that. it's a mistake in my opinion, it's a missed opportunity. sis
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in my opinion, it's a missed oooortnnity-_ in my opinion, it's a missed o- ortuni . r ., , opportunity. as for why the tooth has been returned _ opportunity. as for why the tooth has been returned now... - it may relate to belgium king phillipe's recent visit to the country. while there... but he stopped short of an apology. professor krossy mavakala has more on the significance of the handover. the importance of the return of one of the truths of lumumba and congo, todayis of the truths of lumumba and congo, today is not as much impact as we imagine. because congolese people are struggling. every day to improve the day—to—day conditions of life. but what is important and what could have an impact of the return of the dues of lumumba is about the people,
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the people, the place of birth of the people, the place of birth of the prime minister lumumba. there is symbolism. so the impact could have two dimension, the first is spiritual. you know as in african we have two kinds of burials. so when a baby has given birth there is the first pair that you can call the umbilical cord that will be buried in the place of birth. the second time that some are buried is when he passes away. time that some are buried is when he oasses away-— passes away. there is more information _ passes away. there is more information on _ passes away. there is more information on that - passes away. there is more information on that story i passes away. there is more| information on that story on passes away. there is more - information on that story on the bbc news website was up if you want to catch all the explainers i make you can get
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those through our app. you could see that there now. that's it for this edition. thanks for watching. see you tomorrow. bye— bye. hello, good evening. it really has been a lovely start to the week, lots of sunshine around and in scotland and aberdeenshire, the temperature reached 24 degrees, the warmest day of the year so far in scotland. it may turn to bit cooler in scotland and northern ireland tomorrow but across england and wales in the next few days in particular, it is going to be heating up once again. there are some changes coming in from the northwest, hence those lower temperatures in scotland and northern ireland. here, we've got thickening cloud overnight to bring with it some outbreaks of rain cover that rain tending to break up later on in the night will hang onto clear skies across england and wales, here
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a little bit cooler, temperatures perhaps down to seven or 8 degrees with up milder conditions underneath the cloud for scotland and northern ireland put up a much more cloud for northern ireland. much more cloud for scotland and northern ireland markham some of the club pushing into the far north of england for the probably not a great deal of rain left over in the afternoon and we could see eclipse of sunshine now again for them elsewhere across england and wales this is where we got light winds, strong sunshine and this is where temperatures are continuing to rise, 25 degrees on tuesday afternoon in the midlands towards the south—east of england, where as in the cloudy skies scotland and not an island, or 18. it does mean that pollen levels in scotland will be quite aside, still very high in northern ireland and widely across england and wales. in wednesday and there is more breeze coming into northern areas, continuing to bring cloud into general and allocable western scholar, maybe a few spots arrayed here. but more sunshine breaking up through the cloud in general and allocable western scholar, maybe a few spots arrayed here. but more sunshine breaking up through the cloud in eastern scotland so to climb and getting up or 28 degrees on wednesday. heading into thursday and we've got a few other fronts, one to the north of the uk, one try to the north of the uk, one tried
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coming to change a bit. most of the rain is good to be sitting up towards another isles of scotland so getting a bit warmer here. it continues to be across england and wales where the temperatures are tending to climb and getting up to 27 or 28 degrees on wednesday. heading into thursday and we've got a few other fronts, one to the north of the uk, one tried coming from the south. the weather may be starting to change a bit. most of the rain is good to be sitting up towards another isles of scotland. still quite cloudy for western general by the end of the day. not before those temperatures have lifted widely to 2728 degrees, perhaps nudging 30 and they south east of england there is still fairly warm for eastern part of scotland. things start to change on friday but more cloud, showers around, a band of rain on friday night he pushes its way eastward. that will introduce showers and cooler this weekend.
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this is bbc news. the headlines... the biggest railway strike in 30 years is to go ahead tomorrow, after last—ditch talks failed to resolve a dispute over pay, jobs and conditions. tt dispute over pay, 'obs and conditionsh dispute over pay, 'obs and conditions. , ., , , ., conditions. it will put 'obs at risk and cause misery _ conditions. it will put jobs at risk and cause misery across - conditions. it will put jobs at risk and cause misery across the - conditions. it will put jobs at risk. and cause misery across the country and cause misery across the country and hit businesses trying to recover from covid and hurt railway workers, so let us stop dividing the railway industry and let us start working for a brighterfuture. industry and let us start working for a brighter future.— for a brighter future. lowering existin: for a brighter future. lowering existing salaries _ for a brighter future. lowering existing salaries and - for a brighter future. lowering | existing salaries and increasing for a brighter future. lowering - existing salaries and increasing the working _ existing salaries and increasing the working week. these attacks mean that no _ working week. these attacks mean that no trade union in this country conld _ that no trade union in this country could accept that agenda. the arents could accept that agenda. the oarents of _ could accept that agenda. t“t9 parents of 12—year—old archie battersby are given the go—ahead to take their case to the appeal court as they battle to keep him alive
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despite doctors insisting he is

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