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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 21, 2022 8:00pm-9:01pm BST

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this is bbc news. the headlines at 8: most trains at a standstill, and services that did run ending early in the biggest rail strikes in 30 years — fresh talks to try to resolve the dispute are to take place tomorrow. as travellers switched to buses and bicycles to reach their destinations — the prime minister said change to the rail industry is needed. we need to get ready to stay the course, to stay the course, because these reforms, these improvements in the way we run our railways are in the interest of the travelling public. the government could have made a move to settle this dispute, and instead they're escalating it. the lies that they're telling about railway workers and the railway industry are outrageous.
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a industry are outrageous. fourth hearing into the ja| attack a fourth hearing into the january 6 attack on the us capitol is under way in washington as we speak. prince william, the duke of cambridge, is celebrating his 40th birthday. good evening. millions of passengers have faced disruption today after the biggest strike on britain's railways for 30 years got under way. the rmt union and rail bosses say they will resume talks tomorrow — but even if there's any progress, it will come too late to avoid disruption on thursday, the next planned day of the walk—out. what's the dispute about? as ever, it depends on who you ask. for the union, pay and
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job security are key. rail bosses says it's also about modernisation. they intend to start the process next month. borisjohnson had his say this morning, urging commuters to stay the course because as he said modernisation would be in their interest. our first report is from bournemouth and our transport correspondent, katy austin. hull, bournemouth and much of scotland and wales were among the places which turned into train deserts as thousands of workers walked out in the biggest rail strike in three decades. this is one of the stations where some trains are running today, but across the country, only about 20% of the usual services are operating, and they're finishing much earlier. the last train from glasgow to crewe today departed just after 2.30. major stations, like cardiff, looked empty, as passengers heeded the warning to avoid the railway,
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and many commuters switched back into working from home mode. that's not an option for ruth, who relies on taking the train from southampton to herjob in portsmouth, but there are no services to portsmouth today. i won't be able to work today. i have a work phone, so i can log in that way, but i won't be able to do my full job today. but my colleagues have been really understanding. i've made the effort to try and get there, but today it's not going to happen. commuters queued for london buses earlier as staff on the underground walked out too. leisure plans this week will also be affected. sue, from bradford, sympathises with striking workers, but has had to find another, more expensive way of travelling to a special birthday theatre trip. i would get a return train for only £6 or £8. plan b is taxis. and adding on extra expense, really. the return taxi, i've been given an estimate of £22 each way. the rmt union has rejected a pay
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offer worth 3% and insisted it had no choice but to defend its members against what it called aggressive cuts to jobs and conditions. it has warned that more strikes could follow. i don't think sunday will be the end of it, from what i can see. if we can negotiate a deal this week, it can be. 0therwise, we'll have to look at what campaigns we're going to put on going forward. we think other unions willjoin this dispute on the railway. the rail industry is under pressure to save money after the financial hit from the pandemic, and says ways of working need updating, from using more technology and maintenance to making weekends part of the normal rota. network rail says its changes, involving 1,800 fewerjobs, will enable a higher pay offer. it now hopes to push them through. we'd stop that process at any point if there is a willingness to strike the deal. the prime minister told cabinet the country must prepare to stay
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the course during the strikes. these reforms, these improvements in the way we run our railways are in the interests of the travelling public. they will help to cut costs for fare payers up and down the country. but they're also in the interests of the railways, of railway workers and their families. services are now drawing to their early close across the country. tomorrow morning, fresh talks are planned between the two sides in this dispute. we can speak now to eddie dempsey, senior assistant general secretary of the rmt union. what is your assessment of today's first day of strike action? my assessment _ first day of strike action? ij�*i assessment is, first day of strike action? m: assessment is, our first day of strike action? m; assessment is, our members have clearly shown great bravery and resilience in mounting picket lines and the strike action today. but
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what we have seen from the government is still more misdirection and inflammatory commentary, which hasn't helped anybody at all. we are re—engaging in talks tomorrow. 0ur anybody at all. we are re—engaging in talks tomorrow. our first item of business will be asking for industry to remove their threat of redundancies on our members, and then get around a table to negotiate a settlement to our dispute, which would be a pay rise and job security for people in the industry. just about this _ for people in the industry. just about this next _ for people in the industry. just about this next round of talks, how did this come about? we didn't know about these talks, you may have known about them, but we certainly didn't know about them yesterday, for example. how do these come about? ~ ., for example. how do these come about? ~ . ., ., , ., for example. how do these come about? ~ . . . , . ., about? we had made a statement to sa we are about? we had made a statement to say we are open _ about? we had made a statement to say we are open to — about? we had made a statement to say we are open to discussions - about? we had made a statement to say we are open to discussions at - say we are open to discussions at any time during the action, after the action, before the action. we
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have always attended every opportunity we could get to have discussions to try and resolve this dispute. we have now received an invitation to attend discussions, so we are taking that up. in invitation to attend discussions, so we are taking that up.— we are taking that up. in terms of what the discussions _ we are taking that up. in terms of what the discussions are - we are taking that up. in terms of what the discussions are about. i we are taking that up. in terms of. what the discussions are about. this term, modernisation, in a sense it is about changing the way the industry operates. how far are you willing to go on that? modernisation in the way it — willing to go on that? modernisation in the way it is _ willing to go on that? modernisation in the way it is being _ willing to go on that? modernisation in the way it is being put _ willing to go on that? modernisation in the way it is being put forward - in the way it is being put forward as a euphemism. we ought to see modernisation in the economy. we think that is people going to work and getting paid wages they cannot live on. we think a modern department for transport would know what it is doing and respect the railways. in the industry, you have to understand, we are more than, we are always prepared to change. we use of the most high—tech technology going, with some of the most flexible workers in any industry, we were 24/7 around the clock, seven days a week, in all types of shifts.
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what the government wants to do is to cut its wage bill in order to protect the profits of the private companies and other industry, who have been stripping out billions. we don't think that is modern. from where you sit. — don't think that is modern. from where you sit, network- don't think that is modern. from where you sit, network rail- don't think that is modern. from where you sit, network rail this| where you sit, network rail this morning said the fact they have two sent the same size team to cover every bit of work, regardless of the scale of work, they say they can't move teams around flexibly, they say unions have blocked the use of a new app unions have blocked the use of a new app which would improve training with employers. none of those things like you are to change practices. we have like you are to change practices. - have gotten green since 2012 that allows maintenance teams from different engineering special agents to be sent in a team tasked about the... it is not happening because
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they are unable to plan effectively. so, instead the solution is to turn up so, instead the solution is to turn up all maintenance workers up a few terms and conditions. share up all maintenance workers up a few terms and conditions.— up all maintenance workers up a few terms and conditions. are you saying that because — terms and conditions. are you saying that because they _ terms and conditions. are you saying that because they can't _ terms and conditions. are you saying that because they can't give - terms and conditions. are you saying that because they can't give advance| that because they can't give advance notice to the employers when they are going to move them, this is a minimum notice period? let are going to move them, this is a minimum notice period?- minimum notice period? let me tell ou how minimum notice period? let me tell you how flexible _ minimum notice period? let me tell you how flexible our _ minimum notice period? let me tell you how flexible our members - minimum notice period? let me tell you how flexible our members are. l you how flexible our members are. they can't be sent anywhere to undertake work. they work 39 nights a year. they work for it and i thought we can shift a year. and they can be rostered to work an additional 65 days and weekends throughout the course of the year. we've got people working permanent nights, people working all types of rotations and shift patterns to be flexible. they can send people in teams to tasks in a size that is needed. that has been in a gleam in network railfor ten needed. that has been in a gleam in network rail for ten years. so you are sa in: network rail for ten years. so you are saying they — network rail for ten years. so you are saying they are _ network rail for ten years. so you are saying they are liu _ network rail for ten years. so you are saying they are liu ying -
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network rail for ten years. so you are saying they are liu ying when | are saying they are liu ying when they say that? i are saying they are liu ying when they say that?— are saying they are liu ying when they say that? i am saying they are ever stating — they say that? i am saying they are ever stating their _ they say that? i am saying they are ever stating their case. _ they say that? i am saying they are ever stating their case. -- - they say that? i am saying they are ever stating their case. -- you - they say that? i am saying they are ever stating their case. -- you are | ever stating their case. -- you are l inc? in ever stating their case. -- you are lying? in terms— ever stating their case. -- you are lying? in terms of— ever stating their case. -- you are lying? in terms of technology, - ever stating their case. -- you are lying? in terms of technology, we | lying? in terms of technology, we use all types _ lying? in terms of technology, we use all types of— lying? in terms of technology, we use all types of technology. - lying? in terms of technology, we j use all types of technology. some lying? in terms of technology, we i use all types of technology. some of the stuff that grant shapps has been talking about is pure fantasy. we have wide recognition trends that monitor the track rather than have people inspected, we have got cameras that monitor overhead line equipment. we have got all types of technology in the railway now used to do inspection work. it is just a fantasy to say that is not there. he is claiming we are using steam age technology and working practices, when we are some of the most flexible people in any industry, using the most high—tech technology. i understand what you want to go back to grant shapps, the transport secretary. the person i was quoting
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was the boss of network rail, just so the audience can follow the discussion. what happens if this doesn't work? if at the end of this week of strikes, you will get any resolution. you said there will be further industrial action. there is no plan beyond that, is there? you can keep going on strike, but if the company say they won't move because they can't move, partly because the amount of money set in the budget is ultimately a public surface. your stuff, aren't you? we don't agree with that, — stuff, aren't you? we don't agree with that, we _ stuff, aren't you? we don't agree with that, we believe _ stuff, aren't you? we don't agree with that, we believe they - stuff, aren't you? we don't agree with that, we believe they money stepped out of the industry is a scandal. at the same time, private companies are taking billions out of it. what we say is not more than is allowing private companies, when there is no more competition and rail, to continue stripping money out of other industry. we think that is a scandal and it should stop. at the same time, the changes proposed
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are not about modernisation, they are not about modernisation, they are simply about cutting wages and making railway workers poorer to protect the profits of companies that have been robbing us for years. we are not prepared to stomach that. we are not prepared to stomach that. we have got a cost of living crisis and we don't think it is unreasonable to say that workers in this country should be paid a decent leaving, should havejob security, and have change in their industry dealt with in a just way, rather than being thrown out on the dole. there will be people watching who say they are in less job security than those in the rail industry. relative to other parts of the economy, the rail industry is not one of the worst affected. that is what we are _ one of the worst affected. that is what we are seeing _ one of the worst affected. that is what we are seeing is _ one of the worst affected. that is what we are seeing is a _ one of the worst affected. that is what we are seeing is a scandal l one of the worst affected. that is| what we are seeing is a scandal in this country. we are facing informal firing and rehiring. we saw what happened with tmo:, which was rightly looked at they want to sack railway workers
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and hire cheaper workers. if it was wrong with... and hire cheaper workers. if it was wrong with- - -_ wrong with... thank you for your time. the labour leader sir keir starmer has warned labour front benchers from visiting a picket line — some labour mps though have been seen with with striking railway workers. baroness chapman, shadow minister of state at the cabinet office was asked if the labour party supported the strike action. if we thought coming out and taking a particular position or doing a particular thing would help resolve the strikes, then we would do it, but that's not the judgment that we have taken. and whose side are we on? we're on the side of people, you know, the working women and men of this country who want this resolved, and that includes railway workers, and that includes people who need to get to hospital, who need to get to work,
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who need to get to school. nobody is enjoying this. this is not something that we wanted to see today, it's certainly not something we want to see on thursday or saturday. it's deeply damaging. no one thinks this is a huge triumph, it really isn't. but what matters now is that the people involved in finding a solution are able to do so. the government has a role in this, so far it hasn't stepped up to take that role, but it really needs to do so now. let's talk to our political correspondent, ione wells. la ke lake union are desperate to drag the government into it, they come and are desperate to keep away as far as possible. but are desperate to keep away as far as ossible. �* ., ., ., , ., possible. but a lot of it is about central government _ possible. but a lot of it is about central government because . possible. but a lot of it is about i central government because more possible. but a lot of it is about - central government because more and more of the railway is effectively in the control of ministers? certainly, we now network rail is government funded, this is why there has been pressure from opposition parties calling on the government this week to step up and down those discussions between unions and their
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employers. the government has repeatedly resisted these calls, saying they don't think it will make any difference. saying that if they felt it would make a difference, they would be there. but they say that the unions do not want to negotiate with them and that is it is a strictly a matter for the unions and their employers to resolve. i think what is also interesting is the government? general attitude to inflation, to the cost of living flying into this as well. just today, boris johnson urging people to stay the course when it came to pay rises and in line with inflation. we had to treasury secretary, simon clarke, saying people should resist the temptation to increase pay in line with inflation at the moment, he argued it would lead to an inflationary spiral, like the 70s. that is the government's argument when it comes to the issue of pay, one of the major factors when it comes to the issue of pay, one of the majorfactors behind when it comes to the issue of pay, one of the major factors behind the strike we are seeing at the moment.
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to date number 10 did defend to the fact that they are still going ahead with increasing state pensions in line with inflation, which has led some to argue why it is ok to increase pensions but not wages at this time. ., .., increase pensions but not wages at this time. ., ,, , increase pensions but not wages at thistime. ., ,, , , ., ., this time. you can keep up-to-date with all the — this time. you can keep up-to-date with all the latest _ this time. you can keep up-to-date with all the latest on _ this time. you can keep up-to-date with all the latest on the _ this time. you can keep up-to-date with all the latest on the weak's - with all the latest on the weak's rail strikes at the bbc news website. and we'll find out how this story and many others are covered in tomorrow's front pages at 10:30 and 11:30 this evening in the papers. 0ur guestsjoining me tonight are natasha clark, who's a political and environmental correspondent at the sun, and joe twyman, director of the polling organisation, deltapoll. he can doubtless tell us about public attitudes toward the railway industry. i suppose there was a time when sprinters could price themselves by running against them,
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but i wouldn't want to try that with the modern types. no, i wouldn't recommend la. the modern types. no, iwouldn't recommend la.— the modern types. no, i wouldn't recommend la._ i'm the modern types. no, i wouldn't- recommend la._ i'm fine. recommend la. how are you? i'm fine. i'd been watching _ recommend la. how are you? i'm fine. i'd been watching the _ recommend la. how are you? i'm fine. i'd been watching the tennis. - recommend la. how are you? i'm fine. i'd been watching the tennis. if - recommend la. how are you? i'm fine. i'd been watching the tennis. if you - i'd been watching the tennis. if you don't mind, i'm going to move on. it was a wonderful day at eastbourne for the british players, with katie boulter through to the last 16. wildcard boulter beat last year's wimbledon runner—up, karolina pliskova, coming back from a set down. she won the second set 6—4, and then the third set by the same score to get her first win over a top ten player. she'll next play two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova. i'm super proud of myself today. i went out there, i didn't feel great on the court, and i worked so hard to get out there and battle and fight. against a player like that, it means so much to me coming through that. i think ijust try to
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stay with her on and serve. she was serving well. i had a few things that i let go off. i think that's what made the difference, closing at the game and staying with her as much i could. brooks koepka is the next high profile golfer expected in the men's draw ryan peniston's recent run of impressive form continues after he beat french open quarterfinalist holger rune in three sets. the 26 —year—old will now play spain's pedro martinez for a place in the last eight. another briton is also through to the last 16 with dan evans a 6—4, 6—3 winner over france's adrian mannarino and he'll take on american maxime cressy tomorrow. brooks koepka is the next high profile golfer expected tojoin greg norman's saudi—funded breakaway series. the four—time major champion is set to join the field in the second event of the series in portland, oregon next week. he'd link up with the likes of dustinjohnson, bryson dechambeau and patrick reed, while mexico's abraham ancer also signed up to the liv series earlier today. the pga has suspended those who've joined the new tour.
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bbc sport understands chelsea have agreed to loan romelu lukaku back to inter milan. the deal is yet to be confirmed, with inter—paying a loan fee of around 8 million euros. england begin their third and final test against new zealand tomorrow, but their preparations have suffered a setback, with captain ben stokes missing today's training because of illness. the rest of the squad have been at headingly. england hold an unassailable 2—0 lead in the series. stokes is yet to name an official vice—captain, butjoe root or stuart broad are two possibilities to deputise if he isn't well enough to play. rugby league has banned transgender players from women's international competition until further notice. the ruling follows a decision by swimming's world governing body, fina, to restrict trans athletes�* participation. international rugby league says it needs more time before
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finalising its policy and wants to "balance the individual�*s right to take part against perceived risk to other participants." advocacy groups say the policy violates human rights. the ban will apply to the world cup in england starting in october. anthonyjoshua says he's the comeback king and that he can still unify the heavyweight division. he's been promoting his august rematch against 0lexander usyk in saudi arabia, where he'll try and win back the three belts he lost to the ukrainian last year. differently, the hunger is still there. as i've always said from the get go, stay hungry. keep the motivation high. blips happen, things happen in life, but resilience, mentaltoughness, consistency will always prevail. we are still on the road to undisputed, for sure. are still on the road to undisputed, forsure. it are still on the road to undisputed, for sure. it isjust are still on the road to undisputed, for sure. it is just a little are still on the road to undisputed, for sure. it isjust a little blip in the road. and focus on the target, and focus on the goal. god
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willing, i'll perform and i will become three—time heavyweight champion the world. become three-time heavyweight champion the world.— become three-time heavyweight champion the world. sean, this is the reason _ champion the world. sean, this is the reason why _ champion the world. sean, this is the reason why i've _ champion the world. sean, this is the reason why i've been - champion the world. sean, this is i the reason why i've been distracted. i've been watching serena williams. she hasn't played in the last year. serena williams and 0ns jabeur are up against sara sorribes tormo and maria bouzkova. i'm a i'm a bit confused about what is going on. it is currently at 9—9 in the tie—break in the third set. they have got another match point at the moment. she hasn't played for a year, she's back in the game, and i like stories like that. i apologise for live for. in like stories like that. i apologise for live for-— like stories like that. i apologise for live for. , ., ,, ., for live for. in terms of serena. it looks like — for live for. in terms of serena. it looks like that _ for live for. in terms of serena. it looks like that wild _ for live for. in terms of serena. it looks like that wild card - for live for. in terms of serena. it looks like that wild card was i for live for. in terms of serena. it looks like that wild card was a i for live for. in terms of serena. it | looks like that wild card was a very smart move?—
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looks like that wild card was a very smartmove? ~ , , �*, ., smart move? absolutely, she's going to brina the smart move? absolutely, she's going to bring the crowds _ smart move? absolutely, she's going to bring the crowds in. _ smart move? absolutely, she's going to bring the crowds in. 40 _ smart move? absolutely, she's going to bring the crowds in. 40 years i smart move? absolutely, she's going to bring the crowds in. 40 years of. to bring the crowds in. 40 years of age, it's no mean feat at that age getting out onto the tennis court. there are some outstanding players, people half her age winning grand slams. it will certainly be a monumental achievement in wimbledon if she goes further than the first couple of rounds. remember a couple of years ago, she had that leg injured and had to go away. it is 10-10 at the injured and had to go away. it is 10—10 at the moment. we could be here all night. it will be on the website, and of course we have window booting to look forward to on the bbc. russia has threatened lithuania with serious consequences over a ban on the transport of goods to the russian territory of kaliningrad. the growing row follows lithuania's decision to ban the transit of some goods to kaliningrad, which is bordered only by eu countries and has no land connection to the russian mainland.
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the enclave is strategically important to russia and was retained by russia after the break—up of the soviet union. kaliningrad is also the main base for russia's baltic fleet. moscow says the ban breaks international law and has summoned the eu ambassador. a fourth hearing into the january 6 attack on the us capitol is under way in washington. today's hearing will focus on the pressure that former president donald trump mounted on state officials to overturn the 2020 election. central to this, arizona and georgia. president biden won both, but by a razor—thin margin, and former president trump pushed for those in charge of the counts to look for neighbours and overturn the results. let's have a listen at some
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of the hearing. did results. let's have a listen at some of the hearing-— of the hearing. did joe biden win the 2020 presidential _ of the hearing. did joe biden win the 2020 presidential election i of the hearing. did joe biden win the 2020 presidential election in j the 2020 presidential election in georgia and by what margin? president biden carried the state of georgia _ president biden carried the state of georgia by approximately 12,000 doubts _ georgia by approximately 12,000 doubts. its georgia by approximately 12,000 doubts. �* , georgia by approximately 12,000 doubts. a , ., ., georgia by approximately 12,000 doubts. r , . . doubts. as i understand that, your office took several _ doubts. as i understand that, your office took several steps _ doubts. as i understand that, your office took several steps to - doubts. as i understand that, your office took several steps to ensure the accuracy of the vote count in georgia. the steps included a machine recount, a forensic audit, and a full hand recount of every one of the 5 million ballots cast. did these efforts, including a recount of every ballot cast in georgia, confirm the result? yes of every ballot cast in georgia, confirm the result?— of every ballot cast in georgia, confirm the result? yes they did. when we did _ confirm the result? yes they did. when we did our— confirm the result? yes they did. when we did our 100% _ confirm the result? yes they did. when we did our 100% hand i confirm the result? yes they did. | when we did our 10096 hand order confirm the result? yes they did. i when we did our 10096 hand order of when we did our 100% hand order of all 5 million — when we did our 100% hand order of all 5 million ballots in the state of georgia, they were all hand recount — of georgia, they were all hand recount it— of georgia, they were all hand recount it and they came remarkably close _ recount it and they came remarkably close to _ recount it and they came remarkably close to the — recount it and they came remarkably close to the first count. upon the
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election— close to the first count. upon the election been certified, president trump, because he was within half a percent. _ trump, because he was within half a percent, could ask for a recount and we recounted them through the scent scanner— we recounted them through the scent scanner and _ we recounted them through the scent scanner and we got the same count. three _ scanner and we got the same count. three counts— scanner and we got the same count. three counts remarkably close which showed _ three counts remarkably close which showed that president trump... let's talk to our correspondent, nomia iqbal, who's in washington. there was a very simple explanation offered for the disparity between the without totals for congressmen and for the president in the same election. he said people voted down the ticket but not the presidential contest. they kind of abstained from voting. that sounds a perfectly rational explanation.
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what these election officials were showing, and worth noting that all three are republican, the arizona state official and the two from georgia, they were essentially the gatekeepers of american democracy. they were talking about this huge pressure from donald trump and his aides to overturn the election result. we heard during the start of the hearing from rusty bowers, from arizona, a state thatjoe biden narrowly won. he talked about a couple of phone calls he had with donald trump, who said to him, "just do it,". mr bowers gave a very matter—of—fact testimony in which he said he refused to do anything illegal. despite that, donald trump still pursued it. the committee is
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trying to show through its evidence and testimony from these live witnesses are no pre—recorded evidence that despite the fact that donald trump was warned by state officials, by some of his own aides, that the strategy was illegal, he still pursued it. he was one of the violence that would erupt eventually, but he still went ahead and did it. the hearing of the state officials has wrapped up, and now we are hearing from an ordinary election worker in georgia, who is giving a very emotional testimony about the huge pressure that she was under. she will simply there to help people out, to count votes, but it took a dramatic turn when rudy giuliani accused her and her mother falsely of trying to commit fraud. she is laying out the death threats she faced, how her life has changed beyond recognition because of the pressure she was under. we are
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hearing about the pressure that state officials faced, but also ordinary workers as well. now it's time for a look at the weather with darren bett. hello there. for many parts of england and wales, it has been a very warm day today in the sunshine. we've seen more cloud, scotland and northern ireland, but it continues to break up a bit, some patchy cloud continuing into the night. for many parts of england and wales, clear skies and temperatures are going to be typically 11 or 12 degrees. we may start quite cloudy in northern ireland. should see some sunshine coming through here and more sunshine than today in scotland, particularly in the east. the sunnier skies are going to be across england and wales. strong sunshine, very high grass pollen levels, and we can add a couple of degrees onto the temperatures as well. widely, 26, 27 degrees. a little bit warmer than today in northern ireland and quite a bit warmer in the sunshine for eastern parts of scotland. heading into thursday, some changes. some heavy, potentially thundery showers moving up from the english channel to southern parts of england and wales. still some cloud for western scotland and northern ireland,
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but otherwise some sunshine. it continues to be a very warm day, but with those showers moving northwards, we've got the highest temperatures in the midlands and also across northern england. hello, this is bbc news. the headlines. 29 minutes past eight now, most trains at a standstill tonight and
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services that did run have already ended, the biggest railway strike took place today and will continue again later in the week. bbc has said the real crosses and union leaders will hold talks tomorrow, something confirmed in the last half hour. switching to buses and bicycles to reach their destinations or didn't travel at all, the prime minister said change to the rail industry was needed. we minister said change to the rail industry was needed.— minister said change to the rail industry was needed. we need to get read to industry was needed. we need to get ready to stay — industry was needed. we need to get ready to stay the _ industry was needed. we need to get ready to stay the course. _ industry was needed. we need to get ready to stay the course. to - industry was needed. we need to get ready to stay the course. to stay i ready to stay the course. to stay the course because these reforms, these improvements in the way we run our railways in the interest of the travelling public. the government could've made _ travelling public. the government could've made a _ travelling public. the government could've made a move _ travelling public. the government could've made a move to - travelling public. the government could've made a move to settle . travelling public. the government l could've made a move to settle this dispute _ could've made a move to settle this dispute instead, they are escalating it. dispute instead, they are escalating it the _ dispute instead, they are escalating it the lies— dispute instead, they are escalating it. the lies they are telling about railway— it. the lies they are telling about railway workers are bridges. a railway workers are bridges. fourth hearing into the january six attack last year is now under way in washington.
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pharmacies run by the high street chain, boots, have been criticised for telling some patients who need to take multiple drugs that they can no longer be issued with dosette boxes. these are weekly pill organisers which help people keep track of what medicine to take on a daily basis. critics say the plans will present problems for older and more vulnerable patients. 0ur health editor, hugh pym, reports. they are known as blister pack or dosette boxes. tablets for elderly patients prepacked by pharmacists in compartments for different times of day. pat is 88 years old. she suffers from epilepsy and struggles with some memory problems. and here is her dosette box with pills arranged clearly showing what needs to be taken and when. it helps her stay independent at home. but her daughter got a call from the local boots pharmacy saying the dosette boxes would be stopped. they said, "it's ending in four weeks' time, and after that time if you still want us to dispense your mum's medication, then it will have to be in the manufacturer's individual
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boxes." and how difficult would that be? it would be incredibly difficult. there is no way that mum could cope with multiple boxes, with different instructions in each box. a boots spokesperson said the latest royal pharmaceutical society guidance indicates the use of multi—compartment compliance aids is not always the most appropriate option for patients that need support to take their medicines at the right dose and time. pharmacists are speaking with patients to discuss whether it is the right way to support them. but some independent pharmacists are continuing to issue the dosette boxes, but they say it is a costly process. we haven't had any one of our members basically withdrawing their service from the patient, but they are under a lot of pressure, because the service is not funded at the moment. and doctors emphasised how important
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the boxes are for some patients. blister packs enable people with mild dementia or some memory problems to take their own medication and remain independent. they can check that they have taken it and they know they have taken the right thing because it's already sorted. later on, it enables paid carers and families to help them take the medication and remain in a community and remain as well as possible. boots said if patients were concerned, they should contact their local pharmacist. the charity age uk says for those who needed the boxes, it would be deeply regrettable if the service were to go. hugh pym, bbc news. causing fresh surges of the infection around the world. let's speak to the podcast. is there anything different about the
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variance? , ., anything different about the variance? , . ., ., variance? they are in evolved form ofthe variance? they are in evolved form of the omicron _ variance? they are in evolved form of the omicron variant. _ variance? they are in evolved form of the omicron variant. and - variance? they are in evolved form of the omicron variant. and it's i of the omicron variant. and it's like the branches of a tree where as you go down the branch, the branches and branches into you get the very thin twix at the end. these are the twix of the end of the omicron branch. as the virus changes, these are the product of that evolution. what is making it evolve? natural selection. we are now a verily highly immune population because we have been vaccinated and also very high levels of infection has gone through the country. 90% of the population of the uk have at the infection. very high levels of immunity and so, think a big barrier that has been directed against the virus and so, we are in the scheme of cat and mouse where we correct this barrier the virus is trying to find ways around it and that's what these variants are doing. they're finding ways bypass that immunity we are selecting for fitter and fitter forms of the virus that are capable of surmounting that barrier and
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continuing to spread. stand of surmounting that barrier and continuing to spread.— of surmounting that barrier and continuing to spread. and if they do infect someone _ continuing to spread. and if they do infect someone and _ continuing to spread. and if they do infect someone and they _ continuing to spread. and if they do infect someone and they get - continuing to spread. and if they do infect someone and they get ill, i continuing to spread. and if they do infect someone and they get ill, is i infect someone and they get ill, is there anything different about the nature, first of all, but the spread ability, ifi nature, first of all, but the spread ability, if i can use such a poor use of the english language. but the degree of illness that people experience? degree of illness that people experience?_ experience? they are more transmissible. _ experience? they are more transmissible. and - experience? they are more transmissible. and this i experience? they are more transmissible. and this is l experience? they are more i transmissible. and this is because some changes in those variants that make them able to cling onto it and get into ourselves better than their forbearers. if you get more cases, then automatically, you are going to see more cases that is severe because you're getting to more people and if there is a likelihood that a small number of people will get severe disease and your infect lots of people, you automatically get to see more cases of severe disease. it was very reassuring is that while the number of people in hospital with a diagnosis of coronavirus has had an uptick, we
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become a 5000 people are in hs bed for the moment with the diagnosis of coronavirus. the number of intensive care remains reassuringly extremely low. it's about a hundred. to put that in perspective, this time last year, there are fewer cases of coronavirus at hospitaljust as we were welcome delta to our shores, but the number of people in intensive care was three time a higher but the link between getting an infection and becoming severely unwell as been very severely weakened by vaccines and pre—existing communities which reassures us that while we are seeing cases at the moment, our immune defences continue to protect us. a , immune defences continue to protect us. ~ . , , ., , immune defences continue to protect us. many people were vaccinated without that _ us. many people were vaccinated without that last _ us. many people were vaccinated without that last dose _ us. many people were vaccinated without that last dose quite i us. many people were vaccinated| without that last dose quite some months ago now. are we looking at a diminishing benefit from vaccination? i diminishing benefit from vaccination?— diminishing benefit from vaccination? ., , ., vaccination? i would say there is a rante vaccination? i would say there is a ranae of vaccination? i would say there is a range of reasons _ vaccination? i would say there is a range of reasons why _ vaccination? i would say there is a range of reasons why we - vaccination? i would say there is a range of reasons why we are i vaccination? i would say there is a l range of reasons why we are seeing this current search. 0ne range of reasons why we are seeing this current search. one of them is that we have removed all the
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restrictions. we had a jubilee series of celebrations over the countries. many mass gatherings but this is afforded the virus opportunities to spread. we have these variants that have popped up here and there in many countries around the world that are more transmissible and the spread better. and, as required rightly say, it's been a long time since people of been a long time since people of been vaccinated. all those factors together, it does enhance the visibility of the virus transmitted that's when the accounts for why we are seeing this uptick in cases. what matters is whether or not that is translated from cases and the consequences and that's why people will be watching very closely at the moment to see if we do see any enhanced severity, more people ending up in hospital with severe disease or worse. and of the moment, we don't have that signal, but its early days, so it's important not to be complacent but there is no reason to think of the moment that our course is the wrong one. hat to think of the moment that our course is the wrong one. not over et b course is the wrong one. not over yet by any — course is the wrong one. not over yet by any means- _
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course is the wrong one. not over yet by any means. presenter, i course is the wrong one. not over. yet by any means. presenter, thank you very much as ever. such a clear explanation. a former soldier has been sentenced to life in prison for the murder of two of his neighbours in a row about parking. colin reeves was told he will serve a minimum term of 38 years. he was convicted of stabbing to deathjennifer and stephen chapple at their home in norton fitzwarren in somerset in november last year. cctv footage from the night of the murder showed the 35—year—old former royal engineer climbing over the fence to the couple's home. the westminster of the snp, ian blackford, has issued an apology this evening over the way his party dealt with a sexual harassment case. it follows the suspension last week of a senior snp mp, patrick grady. the commons authorities found he'd made an ”unwanted sexual advance” to a party worker. tonight mr blackford said in a statement that the behaviour was �*completely inappropriate, unacceptable and should never have happened�* and was �*sorry that it did�*.
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well, we can speak now to david porter, who�*s been following the story for us. in the statement, ian says that staff must have full confidence that the group as they are take complaints seriously. in going to the press because she didn�*t feel anything was happening in terms of her complaints against mr greedy in the least recording of that meeting which led to one mp apologising because of the behaviour at the meeting, rather suggested that mps are saying to each other, we have to do all we can to support mr grady, which doesn�*t really sound like something that might give staff full confidence. this something that might give staff full confidence. , , , ., , confidence. this is been a very uncomfortable _ confidence. this is been a very uncomfortable week _ confidence. this is been a very uncomfortable week for i confidence. this is been a very uncomfortable week for the i confidence. this is been a very i uncomfortable week for the snp at westminster. and in particular, it�*s a leader in black for to us face calls from a position to resign
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because there is a feeling that she meant to type back into that that some people think that snp mps of been too concerned with simple things of what went on rather than the complaint and or the victim in this. you mentioned meeting last week of snp mps knows a private meeting or some people thought that that meeting, ian black ford and other members, other snp mps said they would welcome patrick back into they would welcome patrick back into the snp into the comments when he completed his suspension. a private meeting of mps, you know they were quite often and you do not expect those meetings to be recorded and you do not expect that recording to make the public. the causes you judgment of embarrassment for the snp and it gave the opposition parties and open goal and mr blackford is trying to get back some
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of the initiative by dancing tonight that there will be this external review we have a few details of how it will take place and also sing as well if you will always ensure that staff are properly treated. with all the advance warnings about the strike many people have made alternative arrangements — working from home for example. but for some there�*s been no choice but to get into the car. the aa has reported some traffic hotspots around the country. here�*s our midlands correspoindent phil mackie. it wasn�*t as bad as expected. in most places, and for most of the day, traffic on the major routes was marginally quieter than normal. it seems like the message had got through. at the national traffic 0perations centre on the outskirts of birmingham, the banks of screens were showing free—flowing motorways where, normally, there would be delays. it seems that those who could switched back to a lockdown routine
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and worked from home. things have moved on, technology has improved, we�*re able to talk to each other on social media groups, so things have changed dramatically and people have got a really robust plan b and, in some cases, a plan c as well. plan b forjohn hayes was to work from home, but that�*s not straightforward when you�*re a head teacher at two primary schools in north london. so, i live in stevenage, so i commute via train every day into london. today, i decided that it would be best for me to work from home and organise all my meetings via zoom. because of the additional pressures to the system from the tube strike, i felt that it would be not a good use of my time today to be sitting in trafficjams throughout the day. at watford gap services on the m1, it was also quieter than usual, but some people hadn�*t expected to be here at all. we�*re on an event for works, going to a dragon boat race in windsor, and we�*ve travelled all the way from yorkshire. and, basically, trains
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are on strike, we wanted to do a quickjourney on the trains, but unfortunately, we can�*t do that, so we were stuck on a bus forfour hours, basically! you know what? honestly, it's not been too bad, it's not been too bad at all. a few disruptions, but i was expecting a lot worse, to be honest with you. this is the evening rush hour on the m5 in worcestershire. 0rdinarily, there would be queues in the roadworks, but again, it�*s not too bad. the trouble is, if everybody thinks, "well, it was quiet today, "so i�*m going to drive to work for the rest of the strike," well, we�*ll be back at square one and there will be traffic chaos. and the end of the week will be much busier. after all, this is the road from the midlands and north to glastonbury. phil mackie, bbc news, worcestershire. a texas senate hearing into last
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month�*s uvalde school shooting has been told that the law enforcement response was an "abject failure". a senior state official, steve mccraw, said there were enough police officers to have stopped the gunman three minutes after he entered the building, but they waited more than an hour to go in. nineteen young children and two teachers were killed by an 18—year—old gunman, during his hour and a quarter long rampage in a classroom. let�*s talk to our reporter in washington who�*s been following this story — rianna croxford. ame a me ask you first of all, what have we learned today? the a me ask you first of all, what have we learned today?— a me ask you first of all, what have we learned today? the head of public safe in we learned today? the head of public safety in texas _ we learned today? the head of public safety in texas called _ we learned today? the head of public safety in texas called the _ we learned today? the head of public safety in texas called the response . safety in texas called the response to the shooting and abject failure. 0ffices they had been placed before the lives of the children and three minutes after the shooting began, there were enough armed offices presence with the could�*ve stopped him as many as 11, and they still waited for more than an hour before making any attempts to enter the classrooms. making any attempts to enter the classrooms-— classrooms. what else have we learned? they _ classrooms. what else have we learned? they learned - classrooms. what else have we learned? they learned that i classrooms. what else have we i learned? they learned that there is
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a series of mistakes _ learned? they learned that there is a series of mistakes and _ learned? they learned that there is a series of mistakes and missed i a series of mistakes and missed opportunities and to details really stand out. firstly, the classroom or the shooter was present was unlocked company still waited for the master key before even checking this. through communication issues. and it made it difficult to correlate response. made it difficult to correlate response-— made it difficult to correlate resonse. ~ ., , , response. would come next because this is the only _ response. would come next because this is the only investigation, - response. would come next because this is the only investigation, is i this is the only investigation, is it? ,, ., , ., ., , this is the only investigation, is it? ,, ., , ., ., it? several investigations are currently under _ it? several investigations are currently under way - it? several investigations are currently under way to i it? several investigations are l currently under way to identify it? several investigations are i currently under way to identify any efforts to be learned and the hearing is still ongoing but we are still going to be waiting for a reaction to the parents because many are still mourning in district police officer is being compelled to resign. let�*s ta ke let�*s take a look at the headlines. most trains are at at the headlines. most trains are at a standstill at the stations shut earlier this evening involving the first day of a series of railway strikes and the union says that
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there will be meeting with the real bosses tomorrow after being invited and to hold fresh talks. the prime minister calls on travellers to stay the course switched buses and bikes do not travel at all. and new hearing into the cherry six attack over a year ago in washington. —— january six attack. the highest administrative court in france has upheld a ban on the so called burkini in public swimming pools. burkinis are worn largely by muslim women as a way of preserving modesty and upholding their faith. it rejected an appeal by the french city of grenoble. the court said it could not allow what it called "selective exceptions to the rules to satisfy religious demands", and said this would undermine equal treatment. france has strict laws on which swimming costumes can be worn and the issue of religious expression in public
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places is divisive. grenoble�*s plan to allow full— body burkinis had sparked anger among conservative and far—right groups. he�*s been in the public eye all of his life — key moments from his birth onwards filmed and documented. the duke of cambridge is celebrating his 40th birthday today and he�*s been spending it privately with his family. this milestone comes at a time of increasing responsibility for prince william — as our royal correspondent, daniela relph, reports. where do you go for your 40th? it seems, a supermarket in west london. there was a surprise shopper there this afternoon. the duke of cambridge popped in to give some birthday cake to big issue seller dave martin. the pair met a couple of weeks ago, when prince william went out with dave to sell the magazine. as he enters a new decade, tackling homelessness is the priority for william. he�*s invested in the problem and he�*s invested in trying to find
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a solution for those who are affected by the problem, and "long may it continue" is what i say. on a personal level, marriage to kate and fatherhood have suited him. their children were some of the stars of the show over the platinum jubilee weekend. and his focus on his family will see a big move this summer, when the cambridges leave london to set up home in windsor. the move here has been driven by personal reasons. behind the castle walls, there is greater freedom for the family than they currently have in london, the children will go to school nearby, but it also puts william closer to his grandmother at a time when he is stepping up his official duties. 0ne unresolved issue is the fallout with his brother, prince harry. i do know from sources very close to william that he is still very hurt about some of the things that his brother and his sister—in—law have said and done.
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there is not the closeness there once was. i think there�*s probably quite a few bridges to be rebuilt before they get to that stage. the years ahead will be filled with significant change, but for now, at 40, the once cautious, contained prince has become a more open, confident future king. daniela relph, bbc news. let�*s talk to the model who has creep, to appear and a major advertising campaign. thank you very much for talking to us this evening. and the decision that the mayor wanted to get rid of this man because he argued that he felt it was discriminatory in the courts is no, it is defending the policy but this is a rather peculiar about this. this was on, the excuse was that it had something to do with
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hygiene which has all sorts of uncomfortable and unpleasant implications. it is they hang up do you think the french have about the bikini and about muslim women dressed in general?— bikini and about muslim women dressed in general? thank you for havin: me dressed in general? thank you for having me to _ dressed in general? thank you for having me to speak _ dressed in general? thank you for having me to speak on _ dressed in general? thank you for having me to speak on this - dressed in general? thank you for having me to speak on this and i l having me to speak on this and i think it isjust having me to speak on this and i think it is just the fear of an attack on their culture or their way of life in this we know, muslims have never had the best media coverage which doesn�*t help. the reality for me is suggest is another way of control, unfortunately it just seems to be around the job. hagar just seems to be around the 'ob. how freedom is just seems to be around the job. how freedom is sometimes used as a justification for restriction. yes. justification for restriction. yes, exactl . justification for restriction. yes, exactly- the _ justification for restriction. yes, exactly. the reality _ justification for restriction. yes, exactly. the reality is, - justification for restriction. yes, exactly. the reality is, the i justification for restriction. yes, exactly. the reality is, the way l justification for restriction. yes, j exactly. the reality is, the way i see things is it�*s quite hypocritical and on one hand where promoting inclusivity and representation in positive representation in positive
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representation in positive representation in so many muslim women and women who just choose to cover themselves and they go to the beach or public swimming pool should not have to be sidelined in the conversation about inclusivity would naturally include them too and it is where the hypocrisy comes in and it just doesn�*t make any logical sense to start working on that. just doesn't make any logical sense to start working on that.— to start working on that. muslim women who _ to start working on that. muslim women who prefer— to start working on that. muslim women who prefer to _ to start working on that. muslim women who prefer to cover- women who prefer to cover themselves, and makes many places no go areas. you know we can still go but if you want to get in the water but if you want to get in the water but you don�*t want to get a close went like most people do, they put on a bathing suit, what�*s the difference in the same material being used except you�*re discovering a bit more of your body and again, i think this conversation is beyond even muslim women, think it�*s just women in general having the right to decide what they want to wear or not wear and in decide what they want to wear or not wearand in this decide what they want to wear or not wear and in this case, this seems to be an attack on women choosing to
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cover up. a few years ago, it was women need to cover up whereas a few years ago, i mean like decades ago. now, �* , _, , years ago, i mean like decades ago. now, �* , .., , ., ., now, it's the complete other end of the spectrum _ now, it's the complete other end of the spectrum into _ now, it's the complete other end of the spectrum into shows _ now, it's the complete other end of the spectrum into shows in - now, it's the complete other end of the spectrum into shows in society. the spectrum into shows in society how the things that don�*t really have any foundation can so easily be manipulated and changed and that is where morals and having a foundation based on something solid is so important so that we are not easily manipulated interviews and ideologies. manipulated interviews and ideologies-— manipulated interviews and ideolo . ies. . ., manipulated interviews and ideoloties. . ., ., ideologies. the french would argue that the whole _ ideologies. the french would argue that the whole idea _ ideologies. the french would argue that the whole idea is _ ideologies. the french would argue that the whole idea is based - ideologies. the french would argue that the whole idea is based on i that the whole idea is based on banishing religion from the public space and that, they have so much history of one religion persecuting another going back to the catholics in the 15 60s the damascus. giving a religion a particular protection of prominence that other religions
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don�*t have, when advantage over another. i don't have, when advantage over another. ., �* ., , another. i don't look at is advancing one _ another. i don't look at is i advancing one religion, there's so many different ways that people express their religious values and it's not always stress, it can be speech or so many different areas. before we start to him pack every little thing, it ultimately comes down to again, hypocrisy is one rule for one group of people and another set of rows for another and the only time that needs to be discussed in change or control or something is if cultural views, change or control or something is if culturalviews, how change or control or something is if cultural views, how they affect people negatively or create harm and in this case, women covering up, i cannot see how this causes any harm. some people cover—up because they don't want to get this skin burnt. some of us don't have a choice now.
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but tell me, on the question, really interesting point. there were some feminists who have agonised over this because they worry that particularly, the full body covering is a kind of statement of male power over women and they worry that some women are, it becomes a tool of control. it women are, it becomes a tool of control. ., , . ~ ., women are, it becomes a tool of control. ., , ., ., . , control. it goes back to who decides that they should _ control. it goes back to who decides that they should be _ control. it goes back to who decides that they should be the _ control. it goes back to who decides that they should be the ones - control. it goes back to who decides that they should be the ones to - control. it goes back to who decides| that they should be the ones to save those people who they assume are being controlled and like everything, every group of people, this can be good and bad is going to be things where, it is unfair and it's that's for the people to maybe step in and support, but in this case it's the freedom to be able to wear what you want and you don't know everyone�*s individual reasoning. there might be the woman who is being oppressed and the covering but that goes against democracy if you just eradicate. fix,
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democracy if you just eradicate. a brief thought, do you think it could ever come in this country? mo. brief thought, do you think it could ever come in this country? no. not aood old ever come in this country? no. not good old britain. _ ever come in this country? no. not good old britain. it— ever come in this country? no. not good old britain. it is— ever come in this country? no. not good old britain. it is too _ good old britain. it is too much, that would be wild. i don't think so. i have higher expectations for this country which is a good thing. so, no. . ~' ,, this country which is a good thing. so, no. ., ~ i. this country which is a good thing. so, no. ., ~ . this country which is a good thing. so, no. . ~' . ., so, no. thank you so much for your time and so — so, no. thank you so much for your time and so is _ so, no. thank you so much for your time and so is lovely _ so, no. thank you so much for your time and so is lovely to _ so, no. thank you so much for your time and so is lovely to have - so, no. thank you so much for your time and so is lovely to have you i time and so is lovely to have you want. take care. goodbye. —— have you on. it's the august the of the year. as you may know, today is the longest day of the year. at sunrise, six thousand people from all over the world gathered at stonehenge to mark the summer solstice. we leave you tonight with some of the wonderful pictures from the stones and that big moment at a quarter to five this morning. to commemorate the victims of the
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battle. please make this the station stone. , , ., ., ., . stone. this is one of the once around the — stone. this is one of the once around the circle _ stone. this is one of the once around the circle to _ stone. this is one of the once around the circle to mark- stone. this is one of the once around the circle to mark offl stone. this is one of the once i around the circle to mark off the equinoxes — it's a nice vibe. this place is good — it's a nice vibe. this place is good it— it's a nice vibe. this place is aood. , , ., it's a nice vibe. this place is ood. , , . , ., it's a nice vibe. this place is ood. , , . . , good. it is interesting that so many --eole good. it is interesting that so many people care. _ good. it is interesting that so many people care. it's — good. it is interesting that so many people care, it's not _ good. it is interesting that so many people care, it's notjust _ good. it is interesting that so many people care, it's notjust you, - good. it is interesting that so many people care, it's notjust you, a - people care, it's notjust you, a bunch of other people appreciate being here as well it's is nice to be around people that appreciated. lu first time, were actually from canada. so, we flew in yesterday
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crazy 2a hours it's also my birthday crazy 24 hours it's also my birthday today _ crazy 24 hours it's also my birthday today it _ crazy 24 hours it's also my birthday today. it was a reason to get out here. — today. it was a reason to get out here. ~ , , today. it was a reason to get out here. ~' , , ., here. like witnessing all the different energies _ here. like witnessing all the different energies of - here. like witnessing all the different energies of all - here. like witnessing all the different energies of all the | different energies of all the different— different energies of all the different people _ different energies of all the different people that - different energies of all the different people that comei different energies of all the . different people that come and everyone — different people that come and everyone is_ different people that come and everyone is here _ different people that come and everyone is here for— different people that come and everyone is here for a - different people that come and everyone is here for a common purpose. — everyone is here for a common purpose. which _ everyone is here for a common purpose. which is _ everyone is here for a common purpose, which is to _ everyone is here for a common purpose, which is to see - everyone is here for a common purpose, which is to see the i everyone is here for a common- purpose, which is to see the sunrise and experience _ purpose, which is to see the sunrise and experience this _ purpose, which is to see the sunrise and experience this wonderful- purpose, which is to see the sunrise and experience this wonderful world and experience this wonderful world and is _ and experience this wonderful world and is definitely _ and experience this wonderful world and is definitely a _ and experience this wonderful world and is definitely a sight to _ and experience this wonderful world and is definitely a sight to see i and experience this wonderful world and is definitely a sight to see and l and is definitely a sight to see and something — and is definitely a sight to see and something to _ and is definitely a sight to see and something to feel. _ hello there. the heat is continuing to build just for a few days, before it becomes cooler this weekend. today, it was the turn of england and wales to see temperatures into the mid 20s in the strong sunshine and blue skies. there's been much more cloud, though, across scotland and northern ireland, so temperatures today not quite as high as they were yesterday.
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that cloud, though, is continuing to thin, so this evening and into the night, we'll have some patchy cloud for scotland and northern ireland. generally across england and wales, any cloud that wehave at the moment will melt away and we'll have clear skies. temperatures typically overnight ii—i2. could be a little bit milder than that in northern ireland if it stays cloudy here, but i suspect we'll break through that cloud and give some sunshine through the day on wednesday. and more sunshine to come across scotland, particularly in the east. the sunnier skies continue to be across england and wales. no wind at all, those temperatures rising rapidly once again, adding a couple of degrees on today's values, so for many, 26—27 degrees. it'll be a warmer day than today in northern ireland and much warmer, i think, for eastern scotland in the sunshine. but when you do have the sunshine we've got high or even very high grass pollen levels once again tomorrow. the heat is building underneath the clearer skies and light winds, under that area of high pressure, but it's getting eroded a bit on thursday, particularly from that
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weather front in the south. and that will bring with it some showers. it looks like those are moving a little further north more quickly, through the english channel, into southern england, eventually into south wales, the south midlands, maybe even into east anglia before the end of the day. some sunshine ahead of that, but still some cloud for western scotland and northern ireland, so temperatures quite not so high here. otherwise, another very warm day, but because the showers are moving northwards more quickly, the highest temperatures are going to be pushed further north, through the midlands and northern england. and things continue to break down a bit by the end of the week — pressure falling, some heavy showers around, this band of rain approaching the southwest, with cooler air coming in behind that for the weekend. we do have some heavy and potentially thundery showers still from overnight, moving northwards across northern and western parts of the uk, ahead of that band of rain in the southwest later on. so we've got more cloud around to end the week, so temperatures are going to be
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a little bit lower. but with more sunshine and dry weather for eastern england, it's still going to be very warm. you're watching the context on bbc news. hearings today and they're looking at his efforts to pressure state electorates and overturning the results of the 2020 elections. anyone who got in the way of donald trump's continued hold on power was the subject of a dangerous and escalating campaign of pressure. every single allegation, we checked, we ran— every single allegation, we checked, we ran down the rabbit trail to make sure that _ we ran down the rabbit trail to make sure that i _ we ran down the rabbit trail to make sure that i want numbers were accurate — the first images showing armed police waiting in a corridor during last month's school shooting in uvalde. the biggest train strike in 30 years across the uk —
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but fresh talks tomorrow between the rmt union

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