Skip to main content

tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 24, 2022 6:00am-9:00am BST

6:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. cheering. a disastrous night for the conservatives as they lose two by—elections. labour takes wakefield and the liberal democrats overturn a huge majority in tiverton and honiton. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken for britain. they have sent a loud and clear message, it's time for borisjohnson to go. and in the last hour oliver dowden has resigned as the conservative party chairman saying somebody needs to take responsibility for the results. we'll have all the reaction and analysis.
6:01 am
the search for survivors of an earthquake in afghanistan is called off as fears grow of a humanitarian disaster. share of a humanitarian disaster. ways workers and checi staff share ways workers and check—in staff here at heathrow, the uk's biggest airport, have voted to go on strike this summer —— british airways workers. it's finely balanced in the third and final test as england dominate much of day one, before a late fightback from new zealand frustrates the hosts�* bowlers. still a bit of warmth to be had across eastern areas today but over the next few days, turning fresher, windier and more showers. all of the details on breakfast. it's friday the 24th june. our top story. borisjohnson has suffered a major blow after the conservatives lost two by—elections in one night. the liberal democrats
6:02 am
pulled off an historic win in tiverton and honiton, overturning a conservative majority of 2a,000 to lead by more than 6,000 votes. it's the biggest ever majority to be lost in a by—election. in wakefield, labour won back the seat which was taken by borisjohnson in the last election. the party won byjust under 5,000 votes. in the last hour 0liver dowden has resigned as conservative party chairman saying "our supporters are distressed and disappointed by recent events" and he says he shares their feelings. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been following the story overnight. applause following the story overnight. the outcomes may have been predicted, but the manner of the victories, orthe predicted, but the manner of the victories, or the defeats for the conservatives, send a loud and damning message. it's not unusualfor damning message. it's not unusual for governments to lose seats between german elections, the conservatives still hold a large majority despite the losses, but
6:03 am
especially in devon, the result was seismic. true blue tiverton and honiton had a conservative majority in excess of 24,000, that was wiped out by a tsunami as the liberal democrats took the seat and broke a record for the size of the turnover. the winning candidate was in no doubt as to why he won it in such an emphatic way. doubt as to why he won it in such an emphatic way-— doubt as to why he won it in such an emphatic way. tonight, the people of tiverton and — emphatic way. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton _ emphatic way. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have _ emphatic way. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken - emphatic way. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken forj tiverton and honiton have spoken for britain. they have sent a loud and clear message, it's time for boris johnson to go. and go now. applause the by—election was caused by neil parish's resignation after he admitted watching pornography while in the house of commons. embarrassing for him and his party, and the beginning of the end for the
6:04 am
conservative party here. for now, at least. i was before any declaration, and the davey, the liberal democrat leader, did something leaders never do, effectively declaring victory with a cryptic tweet when counting had hardly started. these feel like unprecedented times. and 270 miles north in west yorkshire, wakefield is a traditionally labour seat, but not by much. it was won by the tories three years ago with a majority of around 3300. but that has been overturned, and the labour majority is now more than 4700. the declaration came just minutes before the declaration in devon, and the successful candidate's speech was a remarkably similar.— remarkably similar. tonight, the eo - le remarkably similar. tonight, the --eole of remarkably similar. tonight, the people of wakefield _ remarkably similar. tonight, the people of wakefield has - remarkably similar. tonight, the people of wakefield has spoken | remarkably similar. tonight, the i people of wakefield has spoken on behalf of the british people. they have said unreservedly, boris johnson, your contempt for this country is no longer tolerated. the
6:05 am
vote was forced here after the conviction of the conservative mp imran ahmad khan. he was jailed for sexually assaulting a teenage boy. the party chairman, 0liver dowden, has this morning resigned, saying, someone has to take responsibility. cheering sometimes by—elections are determined by local issues. but if it suits a particular political narrative, they are often seen as a mini referendum on the government of the day. and if that's the case, as many are claiming this morning, then for borisjohnson, waking up at the commonwealth conference in rwanda, thousands of miles away, he will hear what voters in these two areas have said. these results are harsh home truths. john maguire, bbc news. let's get some reaction to those results. iain watson is in wakefield for us this morning. but first let's speak to nick eardley in tiverton.
6:06 am
good morning. so, we have had this result, this terrible result of the conservatives, now we have seen conservatives, now we have seen conservative party chairman 0liver dowden residing. —— resigning. yes. dowden residing. -- resigning. yes, aood dowden residing. -- resigning. yes, good morning. _ dowden residing. -- resigning. yes, good morning, naga. _ dowden residing. —— resigning. 1a: good morning, naga. this should dowden residing. —— resigning. 12: good morning, naga. this should be a safe tory seat, it has been conservative by a century, they won by 24,000 votes just three years ago. last night's result is a really, really crucial blow for the party. it's the biggest by—election majority wiped out ever in uk politics. and the lib dems won it in the end pretty comfortable eat by around 6000 votes. it isn't isolated either. it's the third time in just over a year that the third —— lib dems have overturned big tory majorities in what should be tory heartlands. a lot of conservative mps will be waking up this morning
6:07 am
and looking at these results pretty nervous about what they are seeing. within the last half an hour, the tory chairman, 0liver dowden, has decided that he needs to go. he has put a letter out on social media, saying that the party is distressed and disappointed by what he calls recent events, and he says that he shares their views. it's not completely clear from the first reading of the letter whether mr dowden still thinks that the prime minister is the man to lead the conservative party. borisjohnson has been saying, the idea he would resign is crazy. but i think we are going to hear a lot more speculation about his future and a lot more pressure from nervous conservatives after these two thumpings in by—elections. after these two thumpings in by-elections._ after these two thumpings in b -elections. ., ~ let's speak to iain watson in wakefield where labour have re—claimed their seat. so with those words of oliver dowden ringing in our ears this morning,
6:08 am
iain, that announcement, we cannot carry on as business as usual, says the co—chairman of the conservative party, tell us about what happened in wakefield. let party, tell us about what happened in wakefield-— party, tell us about what happened in wakefield. let me 'ust pick up on that oliver dowden — in wakefield. let me just pick up on that oliver dowden letter. - in wakefield. let me just pick up on that oliver dowden letter. in - in wakefield. let me just pick up on that oliver dowden letter. in the . that 0liver dowden letter. in the wording — that 0liver dowden letter. in the wording that he used he talked about, — wording that he used he talked about, as — wording that he used he talked about, as you said, cannot go on as business _ about, as you said, cannot go on as business as— about, as you said, cannot go on as business as usual and he says that somebody— business as usual and he says that somebody needs to take responsibility. in a sense he has because — responsibility. in a sense he has because he _ responsibility. in a sense he has because he has resigned, but i also expect— because he has resigned, but i also expect he _ because he has resigned, but i also expect he has somebody else in mind in downing _ expect he has somebody else in mind in downing street. he is not absolutely explicit but the feeling was that — absolutely explicit but the feeling was that these by—election defeats for the _ was that these by—election defeats for the conservatives were priced in, for the conservatives were priced in. there — for the conservatives were priced in, there would be no more pressure reapplied _ in, there would be no more pressure reapplied to — in, there would be no more pressure reapplied to the prime minister having — reapplied to the prime minister having won the confidence vote among his own _ having won the confidence vote among his own mps recently. it is the scale — his own mps recently. it is the scale of— his own mps recently. it is the scale of the defeats which has concentrated minds, notjust in tiverton— concentrated minds, notjust in tiverton but here in wakefield. you would _ tiverton but here in wakefield. you would expect labour to win this seat back because it is against the backdrop _ back because it is against the backdrop of a cost of living crisis, the previous conservative mp has
6:09 am
been _ the previous conservative mp has been imprisoned, the current conservative candidate had a vote in no confidence in him by his fellow councillors — no confidence in him by his fellow councillors so it was favourable politically territory for the labour party _ politically territory for the labour party. they are happy with an 8% swing, _ party. they are happy with an 8% swing, they said, but they got more than a _ swing, they said, but they got more than a 12% _ swing, they said, but they got more than a 12% swing. it would take 10~5% — than a12% swing. it would take 10~5% to— than a 12% swing. it would take 10.5% to get a victory in a general election— 10.5% to get a victory in a general election if— 10.5% to get a victory in a general election if the same thing happens across— election if the same thing happens across the — election if the same thing happens across the nation. you cannot read across _ across the nation. you cannot read across from — across the nation. you cannot read across from local elections into general— across from local elections into general elections, nonetheless, the scale of— general elections, nonetheless, the scale of the victory convinced oliver — scale of the victory convinced 0liver dowden to go, and from labour's — 0liver dowden to go, and from labour's point of view they would be delighted _ labour's point of view they would be delighted that they did not just simply— delighted that they did not just simply win back seat that they lost in the _ simply win back seat that they lost in the 2019 election as the so—called red wall of leave voting seats _ so—called red wall of leave voting seats fell— so—called red wall of leave voting seats fell to the conservatives, but they won _ seats fell to the conservatives, but they won it — seats fell to the conservatives, but they won it with almost twice as much _ they won it with almost twice as much. grumblings about circuit
6:10 am
stomachs— much. grumblings about circuit stomach's leadership crace keir starmer's — stomach's leadership crace keir starmer's leadership will fall away, but it— starmer's leadership will fall away, but it will— starmer's leadership will fall away, but it will be difficult for boris johnson _ we'll be getting reaction to the results from across the political spectrum throughout the morning. just after seven o'clock we'll be speaking to shadow transport secretary louise haigh. we were supposed to be talking to 0liver dowden who has resigned as the conservative party chairman this morning, hopefully he will still give us an interview that will bejust after 7.30. efforts are continuing to get aid to survivors of a devastating earthquake in afghanistan that hit a remote area of the country two days ago killing more than a thousand people. hundreds of families are now homeless and are struggling to find food and shelter. 0ur correspondent secunder kermani reports. aid agencies have been transporting food and tents to the earthquake hit parts of giyan and barmal districts, here in paktika province, travelling along the long, dirt bumpy road from sharan, the nearest big city which is where we are now. taliban military helicopters have also been used to fly in supplies because the location is so remote.
6:11 am
taliban officials telling us the search and rescue operation is now over, the focus very much on those who survived this earthquake, getting them adequate food and shelter. mobile health teams are also visiting these villages. yesterday, in a briefing at the un security council, a senior un official described this disaster as a tragic reminder of the myriad dangers facing the afghan people at this moment. the country was already in the middle of an economic and humanitarian crisis with average incomes slashed by about a third, that in a country where many people were already struggling just to survive. and whilst humanitarian aid, that immediate short—term aid is being delivered, wider international development funding that the previous government used to rely on, well, much of that has been cut off ever since the taliban took power last august. prince charles is due to meet borisjohnson at the commonwealth
6:12 am
leaders' conference in rwanda today. downing street insists they're unlikely to discuss the uk's plan to send some asylum seekers to the african country, a policy which the prince is reported to have criticised. 0ur political correspondent, alex forsyth is in the rwandan capital of kigali. good morning. this meeting then, how awkward will it be?— awkward will it be? well, i don't think it isjust _ awkward will it be? well, i don't think it isjust this _ awkward will it be? well, i don't think it isjust this meeting, - awkward will it be? well, i don't l think it isjust this meeting, naga, the whole day has got potential to be pretty awkward with the prime minister because he is out here in kigali, the capital of rwanda, meeting commonwealth leaders to supposedly talk about the benefits of that organisation, why it is still relevant but he has got that first meeting with prince charles since those reported criticism of the government plan to send asylum seekers here to rwanda. yesterday borisjohnson suggested he might defend that plan in the air to the throne raised it. later downing street said it it unlikely to come
6:13 am
up street said it it unlikely to come up so they are trying to play down a row but it does not get away from the tensions existing. beyond that borisjohnson is likely the tensions existing. beyond that boris johnson is likely to face questions here today about his leadership back home after the two by—election defeats. the conservatives have been trying to manage expectations by saying it is not normal for the leading party to win a by—election mid—term but this will overshadow a lot of what boris johnson is doing today. further disruption is expected across rail services today following a second day of strikes with only 60—percent of services expected to run. 0ur consumer affairs correspondent coletta smith has been finding out how the reduced service has been affecting commuters in and businesses in yorkshire. this is day four of the hokey—cokey of in—out rail strikes. staff are back in but it's another slow start, with trains in the wrong place again. just over half the normal timetable is scheduled,
6:14 am
but if myjourney from manchester to bradford on wednesday is anything to go by, don't expect all the advertised trains to be running either. i've come to manchester victoria to try to get a direct train to bradford. but there is nothing running here across the pennines. the next two trains have been cancelled in that direction. they said i will have to wait about an hour and 20 minutes for the next one and even that one, they're not sure whether it's going to run. so the lady in the ticket office wouldn't sell me tickets until she knows that the train is definitely running. unions are hoping if they hold their nerve, they'll get a better pay deal and a guarantee of no compulsory redundancies. network rail say they need to reduce staff to modernise the railways, and the government are worried about the precedent a pay increase would set. so talks are stalled, and passengers are picking their way through. well, i've made it, and although there are plenty of trains running today, i have been surprised by the number of cancellations are particularly to smaller towns across the uk. so there will be plenty of other passengers like me whose journey
6:15 am
has taken a lot longer, and cost them more as a result. for asim, it means his commute to leeds has been more complicated this week. it's difficult to get to work now because of the strikes. i have had people who are going in the car have had to come and get me from bradford. people across yorkshire are also facing a double whammy of bus strikes on arriva services. without public transport, things become a lot more expensive. considering with fuel prices going up as well. and that means asim doesn't have much sympathy with those on strike. no one has ever really said, you know what, i do get paid enough, i'm happy to keep doing thejob i do, you know? everybody wants a little bit more. but despite the rail strikes, the roads haven't been chaos. congestion in most cities has only increased a bit. because so many more people can now work from home. if this had happened back in 2019, at the start of 2019 or 2018, it would have had a real impact on us. because we would have needed people to come into the office. here at leeds building society, they have had about 50% fewer staff in the office than normal this week.
6:16 am
but it has still been business as usual. now we can cope with 1000 people at any point in time working from home, so the benefit of that has been, when we see things like these strikes or indeed when there is an unexpected snowfall, people just work from home and there is no impact on the business. the option for hybrid working has watered down the power of weekday strike disruption. but industrial action at heathrow leaves few other options for passengers heading on holiday. because you can't head to the beach on zoom. coletta smith, bbc news. they'll be further misery for passengers after hundreds of ba staff at heathrow airport voted to go on strike over pay. ben is there for us this morning. so, that time of year, lots of people making plans right now, how might this action affect people? late
6:17 am
might this action affect people? we have might this action affect people? 2 have seen the effects of travel disruption this week, haven't we, with the rail strikes. this travel disruption that is likely to happen at london heathrow will bring more problems than those who are trying to get away. this comes after the big delays at airports and the flight cancellations we have seen in the last few weeks that have affected tens of thousands of passengers. what exactly is going on? let me talk you through the details. 700 of british airways round workers and check—in staff have voted to go on strike over pay. the unions that represent them, gmb and unite, say that british airways impose a 10% pay cut during the pandemic, and that has not been reinstated. british airways say it is disappointed in the action and says it has made a 10% pay offer that has been accepted by most other ba staff. when will it happen? it is
6:18 am
expected to be during the summer holiday peak. and we will get the dates due to be announced in the coming days. if you are planning to travel, you will of course be worried about flight cancellations and we are expecting that this will result in some flights being delayed or cancelled completely. although ba is understood to have plans to cover staff who are out on strike. what should you do if you are worried about your flight? a holiday or flight for the summer, the best thing to do is to contact, if you have booked with a travel agent or tour operator, they will be best placed to talk you through whether or not there are any changes to your flight. of course right now, unless you have been notified in advance, it's quite likely that you really will not know whether your flight has been disrupted. i mentioned the rail strikes, they continue, the next one, the third day of the national railway strike, is tomorrow, again one in five
6:19 am
services expected to run with the network pretty much shutting down completely by six b m. and separately ryanair —— 6:30pm. separately ryanair strike across europe are going out on strike because of low pay and poor conditions, the ryanair boss michael 0'leary has dismissed that as complete rubbish. we tend to use the phrase travel misery a lot these days, the question is, will there be more of that to come? there is no question, there is very big groups of workers either on strike or being balloted on strikes, so i think we are in for a period of a lot of industrial unrest involving a lot of workers, mainly over pay although other issues are coming into play now. this week we have had some big ballots, we have had some big strikes and the heathrow one is the latest one and obviously we could be looking at a strike at heathrow at the same time as some more strikes on the railways. we know the travel industry has
6:20 am
faced staff shortages and these strikes will inevitably cause further disruption. i'm not sure if you can see over my shoulder, there is a sign about construction work which says, thanks for your patience, and that is something that people travelling this summer may well need in abundance.— people travelling this summer may well need in abundance. thank you very much- — we were just saying in the last 40 minutes we have had the resignation of the conservative party chairman 0liver dowden, we were expecting to speak to him, we will be speaking to the labour party and the liberal democrats, we were expecting to speak to him at 7:30am, we have put a call in and the spokesperson has said they are going to get back to us so we will keep you updated. the early hours — us so we will keep you updated. ti2 early hours of this us so we will keep you updated. tu2 early hours of this morning, the election results, the by—election results came in, around an hour and a half after those results, we got the statement from oliver dowden
6:21 am
resigning as chairman. it has been a fast moving morning in terms of key personnel in the conservative party. we will keep you right up to date on that and all of the results throughout the morning. t that and all of the results throughout the morning. that and all of the results throu~hout the mornin:. :, �* ,, ., throughout the morning. i don't know how cuickl throughout the morning. i don't know how quickly the _ throughout the morning. i don't know how quickly the weather _ throughout the morning. i don't know how quickly the weather is _ throughout the morning. i don't know how quickly the weather is moving, . how quickly the weather is moving, but it is changing, good morning, matt, for some of us. it was a glorious day yesterday. it certainly is, changing quite quickly over western areas. pressure and windier over the next few days into the weekend, some warmth in the east but showers will become more and more of the feature. a spell of and more of the feature. a spell of a longer rain across the west of ireland, but that will slowly start to creep its way in later on. a scattering of showers in central and northern scotland, light and patchy rain and drizzle in wales in the south—west. elsewhere mostly dry, a fair bit of cloud, will break up, sunshine for northern and eastern areas. and then this weather front will swing its way into the fringes
6:22 am
of ireland, south—west wales and south—west england, bringing more rain and drizzle. a cooler day in the west, one day in the east. —— a warmer day in the east. there could be heavy and thundery showers later on this evening, swinging north—east across scotland, northern england, could get close to headingley for the test match, and then a spell of rain edging towards the south—west and glastonbury as we head into the evening. the south—east should stay dry, east anglia have had warm conditions. as the weather and swings through, the fresher air will reach through this evening and overnight so the spell of rain for most overnight is brief and then it is dry and declare into tomorrow morning. freshertomorrow is dry and declare into tomorrow morning. fresher tomorrow morning and then the weekend is a sunshine and then the weekend is a sunshine and blustery showers. more details in half an hour. a former paratrooper has set, what he hopes, is a new world record for the lowest ever parachute jump.
6:23 am
john bream, nicknamed the flying fish, made the leap of just 85 feet into a field in hampshire. he did thejump to raise money for the people this is the cherry picker that john bream has picked to pickle the existing record for low parachute jumping. that's claimed to be 95 feet. john is going forjust 85 feet. in other words, it's only half the height of nelson's column. go for it. but, wait, letsjust see howjohn got here. two years ago, we filmed him off the south coast when he set the world record for a leap out of an aircraft over water. he has made daring drops off trees, bridges and cliffs. no wonder they call john bream the flying fish. john is an ex—paratrooper who spent
6:24 am
months training with experts to attempt this new record. it's literallyjump, bang, crash, yes, we've done it. come on. and this is it. he only has two seconds for the parachute to open. whoo—whoo—whoo—hoo! he's hit the ground at 25 mph. just watch his reaction. i'm a modern day evil knievel. ijust need to ride a motorbike. you did it. i did it, i did it. happy birthday, isla. john says the jump is about helping ukraine. he is just back from there, where he delivered aid for the charity vans without borders. he even managed to get a practice jump in and says his record attempt is a way of highlighting the desperate situation for the ukrainian people. this lowjump is for the people of ukraine.
6:25 am
they need help. when i was there, it was a very proud moment. being british. because what they would say, the locals, they would say the british public were the first to come out and help. it will take a few months to officially confirm the 85 footjump. but in the week of the solstice, this is whatjohn might call a midsummer night's bream. duncan kennedy, bbc news. ?_- ?——he ? —— he was delighted, wasn't he? you have to see it to believe it. hit you have to see it to believe it. if you say to someone, i am dropping 85 feet, you realise how precise he has to be. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. we start this morning with a warning
6:26 am
that thousands of children in london are not fully protected against polio. new data from the uk health security agency show around 34,000 children in the capital haven't had their polio booster by their fifth birthday. polio has an enormous impact on your life. for instance, i lost my childhood, because that was spent in hospitals. if i were to tell you i went into hospital at six months and didn't come out until i was four and a half. a reminder to commuters that they could face travel problems getting around this this morning. train companies say services won't be back to normal until later this morning because of this week's industrial action. well let's have a look at how things are going on london's public transport this morning. there are issues so check before you
6:27 am
travel. and you can go to your local bbc radio station for updates. now, drivers may want to take note . from next week you could be fined if you're caught in a mandatory cycle lane. new enforcement powers given to tfl will target given to tfl will target vehicles that drive within, or cross, the solid white lines along the network. so it will be simialr to a fine for parking on double—red lines or driving in bus lanes. it's a new approach to tackling poverty in east london. a charity shop that sells second—hand clothes has become so popular, it's been given a permanent space in lakeside shopping centre. the money raised from sales helps to provide free clothing for families in need. we do receive return referrals, so our message would be don't feel ashamed. we have a whole community behind us that are coming in daily with donations. 0nto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning.
6:28 am
a few changes happening again weather—wise across the capital today. the air will feel fresher. there will be a noticeable south—westerly blowing. the high pressure has now moved away and low pressure not too far away. an approaching weather front overnight tonight. a scattering of showers and cooler air over the weekend, but also some sunny spells. we are starting with sunny spells this morning. a mild start to the day. still sunny spells through the afternoon but a speckling of cloud around, as well. watch out for the possibility of one or two showers blowing through on this brisk south—westerly wind picking up through the afternoon. temperatures lower than they were, peaking at 23—24 celsius, but still feeling warm in the best of the sunshine. 0vernight tonight, it stays rather breezy. longer spells of rain for a time. that is our weather front coming through, introducing coolerfeeling air over the weekend. so a drop in temperature. possibly quite cloudy with showers. still windy on saturday. lots of dry weather around on sunday, with sunny spells but staying rather breezy.
6:29 am
i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. good morning. let's get back to our main story and the news that borisjohnson has suffered a major blow after losing two by—elections. the liberal democrats pulled off an historic win in tiverton and honiton — overturning a conservative majority of 24,000 to lead by more than 6,000 votes. the conservatives had held the seat since it was created in 1997. your extraordinary efforts have delivered an historic result and sent a shock wave through british politics. tonight, the people of
6:30 am
tiverton and honiton have spoken for britain. they have sent a loud and clear message it is time for boris johnson to go. and go now. applause the other by—election result. labour won the wakefield by—election in west yorkshire, having lost the seat to the conservatives at the 2019 general election. tonight, the people of wakefield have spoken on behalf of the british people. they have said unreservedly borisjohnson, your contempt people. they have said unreservedly boris johnson, your contempt for this country is no borisjohnson, your contempt for this country is no longer boris johnson, your contempt for this country is no longer tolerated. and this morning 0liver dowden has resigned as conservative party chairman saying someone has to take responsibility for the results. let's get some more expert analysis from expert analysis from newsnight�*s policy editor, lewis goodall.
6:31 am
you have been following this overnight end on a morning like this usually we would go through the results but since we have had this news about 0liver dowden in the last 45 minutes, this is significant? we are waiting to see if he will come on this programme. it is extraordinary. _ on this programme. it is extraordinary. even - on this programme. it is extraordinary. even with on this programme. tit 3 extraordinary. even with bad by—election results it is not typical in any way for the chairman of a party to resign in this way. and nor will it be typical, even if they were to do that, to do it in such a way to make it clear they did not necessarily offer their prime minister the support in the process. the letter is extraordinary in the sense that sometimes what is important is what the person does not say. at the very end of the letter, when 0liver dowden says, the killer line, i want to emphasise this is a deeply personal decision i have taken alone. i will as always
6:32 am
remained loyal to the conservative party. normally when someone resigns the last line is something like i will continue to give you my support from the backbenches. this is someone essentially sending a message to the rest of the cabinet inviting them to potentially follow his lead. we have not seen any cabinet resignations from boris johnson's government since lord frost resign. this is a moment of perilfor the prime frost resign. this is a moment of peril for the prime minister, frost resign. this is a moment of perilfor the prime minister, who is not in the country. lip peril for the prime minister, who is not in the country.— not in the country. up until now, the cabinet _ not in the country. up until now, the cabinet has _ not in the country. up until now, the cabinet has been _ not in the country. up until now, the cabinet has been solidly - not in the country. up until now, i the cabinet has been solidly behind borisjohnson and there has been speculation about whether or not there were any characters strong enough to put their head above the parapet. this is why this moment... in that letter, he thanks conservative volunteers and says, they are the backbone of our party and deserve better than this.
6:33 am
although there is nothing obviously stinging to the prime minister, it is what you read between the lines. when i heard he had resigned, my thought was perhaps he is doing it to take a bullet for the prime minister. this is also damaging, he had been one of the prime minister and's most loyalfoot had been one of the prime minister and's most loyal foot soldiers, had been one of the prime minister and's most loyalfoot soldiers, a person who would go on to programmes like this one and try to explain what was going on. he was due to do that this morning to try to explain what had gone on and give some kind of brave face on what had been a terrible set of results for the conservative party. instead he sent a letter that is ambiguous but can be read as an invitation to others to do what he has done. given he is who he is and has been so loyal, thatis who he is and has been so loyal, that is damaging for the prime minister. it will be worrying for number 10. minister. it will be worrying for number10. not least minister. it will be worrying for number 10. not least because he is
6:34 am
not in the country and not easily able to control events as if he were in number 10. able to control events as if he were in number10. brute able to control events as if he were in number10-_ able to control events as if he were in number10. in number 10. we were talking to our correspondence _ in number 10. we were talking to our correspondence following _ in number 10. we were talking to our correspondence following his - in number 10. we were talking to our correspondence following his trip - in number 10. we were talking to our correspondence following his trip to i correspondence following his trip to rwanda. it will be clear in the press will focus on this, other by—election results, which were expected, but perhaps not as much in terms of significant losses. but they will focus on his future. t am they will focus on his future. i am sure they will _ they will focus on his future. i am sure they will be _ they will focus on his future. i am sure they will be on _ they will focus on his future. i am sure they will be on the _ they will focus on his future. t —n sure they will be on the phone to the number 10 political operation and phoning around the cabinet to try to engage support and ensure they are holding firm because the worst possible thing for downing street now, if then someone else walked out. and that starts a cascade. then this entire thing could get away from them quickly. and that is before we focus on the actual thing that ignited this which is these very difficult set of
6:35 am
election results that cannot easily be explained away. you have had two losses in one night. 1991, when a governing party last two by—elections in a single night. the conservatives have lost three by—elections on the trot to the liberal democrats in strongholds, chesham and amersham, north shropshire, and now tiverton and honiton in devon. these are not easily explained away. last night we had the third biggest swing from the conservatives to the lib dems in history. and that comes off the back of a bigger swing we saw in december. what you also have to think about is that the partygate stuff, that is priced in. that damage has been exacting on the prime minister but the economy, and i suspect part of the results is as much about the economy, perhaps more
6:36 am
so than anything else. the economic story has barely begun and we will be looking at a summer potentially of unrest in terms of trade unions. in autumn, the energy price rises. which is why a lot of conservatives are weighing up their future and wondering whether if a seat like tiverton and honiton can go and chesham and amersham and north shropshire can go, and indeed wakefield to the labour party, what will happen to my seat? and in politics, that is often the primary force when making these calculations. abs, force when making these calculations.— force when making these calculations. ., ., ., , ., calculations. a treat to have yuan. thank you- — this is not a normal post by—election morning because of the resignation of oliver dowden. we will be getting reaction this morning. speaking to all the parties
6:37 am
in connection with how things were supposed to be playing out during the morning. 0liver dowden, who was co—chairman of the party and due to join us at 7:30am. they often bring out a senior government figure to speak on occasions like this. he was scheduled to speak at 7:30am. we have been in touch with the conservative party. they are saying wait and see. they do not yet know if he will appear. they will let us know. they will get back to us. we will also speak to the shadow transport secretary and the shadow transport secretary and the liberal democrat party leader at 8:30am. relief supplies are continuing to be delivered to the survivors of a devastating earthquake in afghanistan. hundreds of families have been left homeless. the worst affected areas are remote, making the operation more challenging. former afghan migrant, gulwali passarly, is raising funds
6:38 am
to send to afghanistan we can speak to him now. good morning. your personal circumstances and family there, what are they telling you? good circumstances and family there, what are they telling you?— are they telling you? good morning, m famil are they telling you? good morning, my family they _ are they telling you? good morning, my family they are _ are they telling you? good morning, my family they are ok, _ are they telling you? good morning, my family they are ok, but - are they telling you? good morning, | my family they are ok, but concerned for the safety and wellbeing of those who lost loved ones. all afghans are trying to raise funds. even in southern afghanistan they were struggling to survive before the terrible earthquake. there has been so much destruction. the deadliest earthquake in afghanistan in the last 20 years so our thoughts and prayers go with those families. in devastating situations. we are seeing pictures now. what is the most urgent need? the seeing pictures now. what is the most urgent need?— seeing pictures now. what is the most urgent need? the most urgent
6:39 am
need is basic— most urgent need? the most urgent need is basic supplies, _ most urgent need? the most urgent need is basic supplies, shelter, - need is basic supplies, shelter, clean water, sanitation. 0ver need is basic supplies, shelter, clean water, sanitation. over 2000 injured need to be taken to hospital. the region has been struggling. they have not been able to accommodate many of the injured. they only have a few helicopters. there needs to be a drum the international community, in development, as well. action needs to be taken urgently. it happened on wednesday and now on friday not much has happened. haifa wednesday and now on friday not much has happened-— has happened. how concerned are you that because — has happened. how concerned are you that because of _ has happened. how concerned are you that because of the _ has happened. how concerned are you that because of the taliban, _ has happened. how concerned are you that because of the taliban, there - that because of the taliban, there could be problems in terms of the international response? that could be problems in terms of the international response?— international response? that is unfortunate. _ international response? that is unfortunate. an _ international response? that is unfortunate. an unfortunate i international response? that is - unfortunate. an unfortunate reality taliban are in power. we need to act with compassion and show solidarity to the afghan people who should not
6:40 am
be punished. we need to separate politics from humanitarian action. afghans have struggled to survive the last ten months. millions do not have enough to eat. we had the worst droughts in seven years. and this is the worst earthquake. politics need to be put aside to save lives, to engage the taliban. they came to power as a result of the western abandonment and betrayal of afghans. i was in afghanistan in march and saw the extreme poverty and hunger that was heartbreaking. we need to help with emergency support but more needs to be done to restore the economy. we cannot allow 40 million people to live in hellish conditions with no resources and help and
6:41 am
functions. with no resources and help and functions-— with no resources and help and functions. ., ,, , ., . ., functions. thank you so much for tellin: us functions. thank you so much for telling us about _ functions. thank you so much for telling us about your _ functions. thank you so much for. telling us about your understanding of the situation. mike's here with the sport. been switching around all week. the cricket... england have won the series but it is enthralling. they want to win 3—0 and new zealand want to save face and make it to — one. cricket is a team game. you can get out, no matter what you do, if your team—mate does something the other end. england's cricketers will be anxious to get early wickets on day two of the final test against new zealand at headingley, after the tourists fought back late on the opening day. england looked in control early on in leeds, reducing new zealand to 123 for five. jamie 0verton. with a wicket on his test debut. but then came the freak moment. a massive slice of luck for england
6:42 am
and bowler jack leach. henry nicoll hits the ball well. it looks like it's heading for a four. but it glances the bat of the new zealand player at the other end. that's daryl mitchell. deflects up and into the hands of alex lees. the most unusual catch he will ever take. it's nicoll who's out. he can't believe it. mitchell went on and, along with tom blundell, frustated england's bowlers, with a century partnership, with new zealand closing on 225 for five. england remain positive. it was a great day. a lot of nerves this morning. a little bit nervous going to bowl the first ball. it wasn't my best ball, but we'll take it. nice to get that first wicket, as well. i think we've had a good day. would have liked probably a couple more wickets, but i think if you said to us at the start of play 250—5, we probably would have been very happy with that. now if you're thinking 0verton, i'm sure i've seen him play for england before, that's because his twin craig, who gave him his cap yesterday, is the player who he edged ahead of, to play in this test.
6:43 am
northern ireland's women will head to this summer's euros, on the back of a defeat after losing their only warm up match for the tournament. they were beaten 4—1 by belgium in lier. it was 1—1 at half—time. lauren wade with northern ireland's equaliser. but then they had goalkeeper jackie burns sent off, and belgium ran riot, scoring three goals late on. northern ireland kick off their tournament off against norway onjuly 7th. they face england on the 15th. newcastle united have signed the england goalkeeper nick pope. hejoins from burnley, where he spent six seasons, but his departure was always likely after their relegation from the premier league. and newcastle are a huge draw for any player now with massive financial clout, after their take over by a saudi arabian—backed take over. 0nto rugby league, and defending champions st helens have moved six points clear at the top of the super league, after a dominant win over leeds. saints ran in eight tries in all, including this one from dan norman. they're going for a fourth
6:44 am
consecutive super league title and will take some stopping after this 42—12 win. rory mcilroy will be aiming to pick up where he left off heading into the second round of the travellers championship in connecticut. he shares the lead after his eight—under par opening round, alongside the americanjt poston. that leaves him a shot clear of the chasing pack which includes scotland's martin laird. at the women's pga championship, south korea's in—gee chun is the one to catch after a record equalling opening round. chun is on 8—under par heading in to her second round — that's the joint—lowest score in the history of the event. 0nto the tennis, and there's now only one british player left standing at eastbourne. jack draper is into his first atp tour semifinal after beating fellow british player ryan peniston in straight sets. draper will face maxime cressy this afternoon in the final four after the american beat british number one, and top seed cameron norrie. and disappointment for harriet dart. she was also knocked out in the quarter—finals — losing in straight sets to the two—time wimbledon champion petra kvitova.
6:45 am
the main draw for wimbledon takes place this morning, but two of the favourites have already been getting a feel for centre court. it's like a second home for novak djockovich and rafael nadal. but this is the first time players have been able to practise on the show courts before the tournament. it's to help the new grass bed in to hopefully make it less slippy. because we have seen it in the past. players slipping in early rounds. serena williams went off injured when she slipped in her first round match. they have never been allowed to do that before? you have spent time on the grass. i've never been on the grass. that was the point i am making, they protect it so carefully. i will be there from monday and i am sure we will get a look about how it is prepared, the mowing, watering,
6:46 am
measuring. but that is a new one. players helping to bedded in. thanks. here's matt. is that sunshine? there will be some around. not as hard as this week. and while there has been showers across the country, the south—east might fare better so fingers crossed for wimbledon. things are changing across the uk. still some warmth in the east today. but turning fresher over the next days and plenty of showers for some of you. showers towards the south—west and wales. heavy in north—east scotland. this cloud will bring longer spells of rain late in the day to parts of northern ireland, wales and the south—west.
6:47 am
elsewhere, the sunshine comes out. feeling warm in eastern areas. but more showers and thunderstorms. pushing north—eastwards across scotland. still some sunshine either side. forsome in scotland. still some sunshine either side. for some in scotland, a fine day. clouding over in northern ireland with rain to the south and west. the same in west wales, devon and cornwall. rain edging to glastonbury and maybe to headingley for the cricketers. pretty warm in the sunshine. 0vernight, some brief rain. it pushes northwards and eastwards and gives a sunny start to saturday. a fresh start and through the weekend feeling fresher and windy at times, especially in the west where we will see the most frequent showers. thanks.
6:48 am
we will look at glastonbury now. everyone who goes to glastonbury is obsessed by the weather because it matters. a lot of big acts. billie eilish, sir paul mccartney. but things going on indoors as well. our entertainment correspondent is very talented. look at him there. keep going. this is the circus big top. 0ne keep going. this is the circus big top. one of the landmarks at glastonbury. a huge tent and 27 acts appear every day. this is an act called high society. let's see them in action. mike who is one of the man who runs it. 74 years old. get going, we are live on bbc one. we want to see some
6:49 am
action! some swinging back—and—forth. and here we go. high society, a big top show. flying trapeze act. and we are about to see a 74—year—old in action. glastonbury starts in earnest today. on the main stage, the acts will 0n the main stage, the acts will start to play and the first on, the libertines on the at 1030. i have been out and about finding out which acts the punters want to see. right, where have you come from? knoxville, tennessee. all the way especially for glastonbury? who are you really wanting to see? really excited to see paul mccartney. like, i grew up on the beatles
6:50 am
and i don't know, it seems like a very special opportunity. who's the biggest beatles fan here? probably me. wait a minute, i've seen a problem. rolling stones t—shirt right opposite here. is there going to be a fight? yes. right, let's have a song—off. you give us one line of a beatles song and you give us one line of a stones song. # the black bird singing in the dead of night. # i'm not singing anything on tv. and the beatles won. round one to paul mccartney. thank you, thank you. where are you guys from? we are coming from south korea. especially? yeah. you see i really want to see sam fender. # will you talk in the morning? there we go. billy eilish, noel gallagher, mccartney. # la, la, la la la, la. # la la la la. # heyjude. we're not such good singers, are we?
6:51 am
i don't feel i need to see him any more. # just because you feel good. # doesn't make it right. skunk anansie. who once headlined on the pyramid stage here. i'm looking forward to the pet shop boys. # in a west end town in a dead—end world. # east end boys and west end girls. # west end girls. there we go. i'm wanting to find out who people want to see on the stages, which music acts you want to see. jamie t. # sheila goes out with her mate stella. # gets poured all over her fella. that's all. do you know what i like? you did that on your own. not one of your family joined in to help you. they didn't even clap. well done. i've just realised, there are actually people in the thing you are pushing. i am so used to there being drink when people are pushing. hi, wilfred. that's one of the more intelligent responses i've had today. what music does wilfred like? # upside down, boy you turn me. # inside out.
6:52 am
wilfred is unimpressed. i'm with you, wilfred. diana ross. legendary slot. are you going to tell us you have learnt the dance? # upside down. # round and round. # inside out. those are the acts people want to see when the music gets under way in earnest on the main stages today. we are inside the circus tent. you are looking at stuart pemberton, who describes his actors contact juggling. he graduated from circus school in london 2002 and says he has been performing all over the world ever since. he will walk around the festival doing magic and he said he will perform just after midnight tonight. big thanks to him
6:53 am
for getting up early. i am not sure what is in this uk is. let's speak to the man from the trapeze act. mike, that was quite an act to get live on breakfast. just 74 years old. did you do that? t live on breakfast. just 74 years old. did you do that?— live on breakfast. just 74 years old. did you do that? i would have been the next _ old. did you do that? i would have been the next one _ old. did you do that? i would have been the next one up. _ old. did you do that? i would have been the next one up. i _ old. did you do that? i would have been the next one up. i am - been the next one up. i am disappointed _ been the next one up. i am disappointed because - been the next one up. i am disappointed because i - been the next one up. i am disappointed because i wanted to see a 74—year—old flying through the air. a 74-year-old flying through the air. , ., ., . ., ., a 74-year-old flying through the air. i. ., _, ., , a 74-year-old flying through the air. i., ., .., ., , , air. then you need to come to see us later this afternoon. _ air. then you need to come to see us later this afternoon. how _ air. then you need to come to see us later this afternoon. how does - later this afternoon. how does someone _ later this afternoon. how does someone get _ later this afternoon. how does someone get into _ later this afternoon. how does someone get into doing - later this afternoon. how does someone get into doing a - later this afternoon. how does i someone get into doing a trapeze act? ., ., , ., someone get into doing a trapeze act? ., ., i. ., someone get into doing a trapeze act? ., ., ., ,: act? how do you do your first? we were lucky- _ act? how do you do your first? we were lucky- we — act? how do you do your first? we were lucky. we were _ act? how do you do your first? we were lucky. we were in _ act? how do you do your first? we were lucky. we were in the - act? how do you do your first? we were lucky. we were in the time . act? how do you do your first? we - were lucky. we were in the time when people weren't born in circus, we pushed our way in in 1968, 1969. i was a dancer before. that pushed our way in in 1968, 1969. i was a dancer before.— was a dancer before. that helps. let's move _
6:54 am
was a dancer before. that helps. let's move around _ was a dancer before. that helps. let's move around so _ was a dancer before. that helps. let's move around so we - was a dancer before. that helps. let's move around so we can - was a dancer before. that helps. j let's move around so we can see steve. if you stay here. when we are talking about glastonbury, many people think it is just the music. there are so many things going on. explain about the circus big top. well we need to think of winston churchill's granddaughter, she was interested in circus and started the process of getting circus into glastonbury and other performing arts. what acts will people see? allsorts. acrobatic acts, bicycle acts. people interacting with the crowd. and staff in the big top. there is the cabaret tent that has other circus —related acts. there is tonnes of circus acts on the stages all around and across the field. there is the outside circus stage. another stage where they do bmx
6:55 am
riding. what time will you be on? i think this afternoon and the evening show is 5pm. and then slots in the day, i cannot remember. all day, i suppose. i cannot remember the exact time slots. in the daytime normally about 1pm. time slots. in the daytime normally about1pm. t time slots. in the daytime normally about 1m. : time slots. in the daytime normally about1m. :, , about 1pm. i am disappointed we did not aet about 1pm. i am disappointed we did not net to about 1pm. i am disappointed we did rrot get to see _ about 1pm. i am disappointed we did not get to see you _ about 1pm. i am disappointed we did not get to see you flying _ about 1pm. i am disappointed we did not get to see you flying through - not get to see you flying through the air. come back and see us. we will be back around 7:20am. maybe we will be back around 7:20am. maybe we will get mike flying then. studio: i am suggesting if mike has a spare costume, i could see you may be in a similar... i think so. iwill not be in a similar... i think so. i will not be wearing the outfit. but they do train people at glastonbury if they want to go, to have a go on the trapeze. that glastonbury if they want to go, to have a go on the trapeze.- have a go on the trapeze. that is true. i have a go on the trapeze. that is true- i work _ have a go on the trapeze. that is true. i work with _ have a go on the trapeze. that is true. i work with another - have a go on the trapeze. that is.
6:56 am
true. i work with another company outside, and...— true. i work with another company outside, and... you get members of the ublic outside, and... you get members of the public and _ outside, and... you get members of the public and make _ outside, and... you get members of the public and make them _ outside, and... you get members of the public and make them fly - outside, and... you get members of. the public and make them fly through the public and make them fly through the air. i can guarantee that will not be happening at 7:20am. you can follow the bbc�*s glastonbury coverage across iplayer, bbc sounds and online. time to get the news where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. we start this morning with a warning that thousands of children in london are not fully protected against polio. new data from the uk health security agency show around 34,000 children in the capital haven't had their polio booster by their fifth birthday. the virus that causes polio has been detected in a number of sewage samples in london. we have recently seen more of this vaccine like polio virus circulating
6:57 am
in parts of north—east london. because we have seen it over a few weeks, wejust because we have seen it over a few weeks, we just wanted to raise the alarm to say that this is happening, we are seeing it, it is being investigated. there is nothing to worry about if you have been vaccinated and your up—to—date. a reminder to commuters that they could face travel problems getting around this this morning. train companies say services won't be back to normal until later this morning because of this week's industrial action. let's have a look at how things are going on london's public transport this morning. now, drivers may want to take note. from next week you could be fined if you're caught in a mandatory cycle lane. new enforcement powers given to tfl will target vehicles that drive within, or cross, the solid white lines along the network. so it will be simialr to a fine for parking on double—red lines or driving in bus lanes. a charity shop which sells second hand clothes has become so popular it's been given a permanent space
6:58 am
in lakeside shopping centre. the money raised from sales helps to provide free clothing for families in need. we do receive return referrals, so our message would be don't feel ashamed. we have a whole community behind us that are coming in daily with donations. onto the weather now with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a few changes happening again weather—wise across the capital today. the air will feel fresher. there will be a noticeable south—westerly blowing. the high pressure has now moved away and low pressure not too far away. an approaching weather front overnight tonight. a scattering of showers and cooler air over the weekend, but also some sunny spells. we are starting with sunny spells this morning. a mild start to the day. still sunny spells through the afternoon but a speckling of cloud around, as well. watch out for the possibility of one or two showers blowing through on this brisk south—westerly
6:59 am
wind picking up through the afternoon. temperatures lower than they were, peaking at 23—24 celsius, but still feeling warm in the best of the sunshine. overnight tonight, it stays rather breezy. longer spells of rain for a time. that is our weather front coming through, introducing coolerfeeling air over the weekend. so a drop in temperature. possibly quite cloudy with showers. still windy on saturday. lots of dry weather around on sunday, with sunny spells but staying rather breezy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address.
7:00 am
good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. cheering. a disastrous night for the conservatives as they lose two by—elections. labour takes wakefield and the liberal democrats overturn a huge majority in tiverton and honiton. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken for britain. they have sent a loud and clear message, it's time for borisjohnson to go. and this morning oliver dowden has resigned as the conservative party chairman saying somebody needs to take responsibility for the results.
7:01 am
the search for survivors of an earthquake in afghanistan is called off as fears grow of a humanitarian disaster. british airways ground workers and check—in staff here at heathrow, the biggest airport in britain have voted to go on strike this summer. i will explain what that means. a huge slice of luck helps england's cricketers get on top, in the final test against new zealand, but despite this freak incident, the tourists fought back to leave the match finely balanced. warm across eastern areas today but overall turning fresher, windier, the next few days into the weekend, some showers around as well. all of the details coming up. it's friday the 24th june. borisjohnson has suffered a major blow after the conservatives lost two by—elections in one night. the liberal democrats pulled off an historic win in tiverton and honiton overturning
7:02 am
a conservative majority of 24,000 to lead by more than 6,000 votes. it's the biggest ever majority to be lost in a by—election. in wakefield, labour won back the seat which was taken by borisjohnson in the last election. the party won byjust under 5,000 votes. in the last hour oliver dowden has resigned as conservative party chairman saying "our supporters are distressed and disappointed by recent events" and he says he shares their feelings. breakfast'sjohn maguire has been following the story overnight. applause the outcomes may have been predicted, the size of the victories or the defeats for the conservatives, send a loud and damning message. it's not unusual for governments to lose seats between general elections, the conservatives still hold a large majority despite the losses, but especially in devon, the result was seismic.
7:03 am
true blue tiverton and honiton had a conservative majority in excess of 24,000, that was wiped out by a tsunami as the liberal democrats took the seat and broke a record for the size of the turnover. the winning candidate was in no doubt as to why he won it in such an emphatic way. tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken for britain. they have sent a loud and clear message, it's time for borisjohnson to go. and go now. applause the by—election was caused by neil parish's resignation after he admitted watching pornography while in the house of commons. embarrassing for him and his party, and the beginning of the end for the conservative party here. for now, at least. hours before any declaration, sir ed davey, the liberal democrat
7:04 am
leader, did something leaders never do, effectively declaring victory with a cryptic tweet when counting had hardly started. these feel like unprecedented times. and 270 miles north in west yorkshire, wakefield is a traditionally labour seat, but not by much. it was won by the tories three years ago with a majority of around 3300. but that has been overturned, and the labour majority is now more than 4700. the declaration came just minutes before the declaration in devon, and the successful candidate's speech was remarkably similar. tonight, the people of wakefield has spoken on behalf of the british people. they have said unreservedly, boris johnson, your contempt for this country is no longer tolerated. the vote was forced here after the conviction of the conservative mp imran ahmad
7:05 am
khan. he was jailed for sexually assaulting a teenage boy. in devon, the conservative candidate left without being interviewed. but the party chairman oliver dowden has spoken with his feet. he has resigned this morning, saying in his letter to borisjohnson got... letter to boris johnson got. .. meanwhile letter to borisjohnson got... meanwhile his bosses at the commonwealth conference in rowenta. he will hear what voters in these two areas have said even from thousands of miles away. these results, harsh home truths. let's get some reaction to all these events. nick eardley is in tiverton. let's put two things in the mix
7:06 am
right now. we have the chairman of the conservative party, in the last hour and a half also, resigning, so that people get a sense of the letter he has written to the prime minister, in amongst his comments he has said, we cannot carry on with business as usual. you can put these things together for us with the result from tiverton, and the chairman resigning. tt’s result from tiverton, and the chairman resigning.— result from tiverton, and the chairman resigning. it's a triple blow, chairman resigning. it's a triple blow. isn't _ chairman resigning. it's a triple blow, isn't it, _ chairman resigning. it's a triple blow, isn't it, charlie? - chairman resigning. it's a triple blow, isn't it, charlie? you - chairman resigning. it's a triple| blow, isn't it, charlie? you have got two by—election losses that are going to hurt the conservative party, then you have this letter from oliver dowden this morning. he says quite a lot in this letter, he says quite a lot in this letter, he says that conservative supporters are distressed and disappointed by recent events, and that he shares their feelings. recent events, and that he shares theirfeelings. that recent events, and that he shares their feelings. that somebody must take responsibility for what has gone on. his last line is really intriguing as well. he says, he will always remain loyal to the conservative party. he doesn't say
7:07 am
he is loyal to the prime minister. and we don't know from mr dowd and yet whether he thinks that boris johnson should continue in the top job. one of the questions had always been, in all this saga over partygate and all the pressure on boris johnson's partygate and all the pressure on borisjohnson's leadership, wood boris johnson's leadership, wood cabinet borisjohnson's leadership, wood cabinet ministers walk? for the first time, the answer this morning is yes. a senior cabinet minister has decided to walk over these by—election losses. to put the result in tiverton and honiton into a bit more perspective, it is a colossal defeat for the conservatives. they had a majority of 24,000 in the general election just three years ago. they lost comfortably last night, and it is the biggest ever majority to be lost at a by—election. it's a seat that has been tory blue for a century, it isn't any more. and i suspect there will be some conservatives waking up very nervous about the results here,
7:08 am
and the results in wakefield, and wondering whether the prime minister, the leader of the party, is a problem. he said last night that the idea he would resign over these results would be crazy. that was before they came in. i suspect he will face more questions like that later today.— he will face more questions like that later today. thank you very much. let's get some more reaction to those results and oliver dowden's resignation from shadow transport secretary, louise haigh, who ran labour's election campaign in wakefield. good morning to you. the result i imagine that the labour party is delighted by?— imagine that the labour party is deliuhtedb ? ~ , delighted by? absolutely, we were obviously hoping — delighted by? absolutely, we were obviously hoping for _ delighted by? absolutely, we were obviously hoping for a _ delighted by? absolutely, we were obviously hoping for a victory - delighted by? absolutely, we were obviously hoping for a victory last i obviously hoping for a victory last night in wakefield but the results, it went beyond our wildest dreams. it was a higher turnout than we expected and a much bigger swing, and a much bigger vote share as well which went far beyond any that we have achieved for several general elections in a row now. i think there was a narrative about wakefield that it was a safe labour
7:09 am
seat that just happened wakefield that it was a safe labour seat thatjust happened to go blue in 2019 but it has been quite a marginal seat for several general elections in a row and this is one of the biggest majority is that labour has returned for almost 20 years. so we are thoroughly delighted with the trust that the people of wakefield have placed in simon lightwood and keir starmer's labour party. haifa simon lightwood and keir starmer's labour party-— labour party. how big a win is this for labour — labour party. how big a win is this for labour in _ labour party. how big a win is this for labour in comparison - labour party. how big a win is this for labour in comparison to - labour party. how big a win is this for labour in comparison to the i labour party. how big a win is this. for labour in comparison to the fact that it was always expected that the conservatives would lose the seat? emma corrin as. == conservatives would lose the seat? emma corrin as.— emma corrin as. -- as i say, for sometime. _ emma corrin as. -- as i say, for some time, this _ emma corrin as. -- as i say, for some time, this has _ emma corrin as. -- as i say, for some time, this has been i emma corrin as. -- as i say, for some time, this has been are i some time, this has been are relatively marginal seat, we have not achieved a majority of over 2500 since labour last won a general election so it was all was going to be hard—fought but an 18 point lead over the choice is quite phenomenal and a 12.5% swing to labour is reflected across the country would deliver as a general election victory. we firmly believe that the
7:10 am
victory. we firmly believe that the victory last night in wakefield has put us on the part of the general election victory.— put us on the part of the general election victory. when you held the ma'ori , election victory. when you held the majority. as — election victory. when you held the majority. as you — election victory. when you held the majority. as you say. _ election victory. when you held the majority, as you say, just _ election victory. when you held the majority, as you say, just a - election victory. when you held the majority, as you say, just a couple| majority, as you say, just a couple of thousand in 2017, the turnout was 64%, you said the turnout was encouraging, you said a high turnout. the turnout figures we have here is that it was 90% —— 39%. th turnout. the turnout figures we have here is that it was 90% —— 39%. in a here is that it was 9096 -- 39%. in a by-election. — here is that it was 9096 -- 39%. in a by-election, turnout _ here is that it was 90% —— 39%. try a. by—election, turnout is here is that it was 90% —— 39%. try a. by—election down ut is here is that it was 90% —— 39%. try a. by—election down from a general significantly down from a general election, you would normally expect to see it around those levels. i was expecting to see 35% so i was pleased to see those kind of figures come out. it shows a really strong vote of confidence in keir starmer's labour party but it was obviously a massive rejection of borisjohnson and his lack of agenda of his tory government. d0 and his lack of agenda of his tory government-— and his lack of agenda of his tory covernment. , ., , , government. do you genuinely believe that the rejection _ government. do you genuinely believe that the rejection of _ government. do you genuinely believe that the rejection of boris _ government. do you genuinely believe that the rejection of boris johnson i that the rejection of borisjohnson is not the driving force when it comes to by—elections at the moment, rather than the appeal of keir
7:11 am
starmer? t rather than the appeal of keir starmer? ~ rather than the appeal of keir starmer? ,, ., , ,., , starmer? i think it was both. very genuinely- — starmer? i think it was both. very genuinely- and — starmer? i think it was both. very genuinely. and i _ starmer? i think it was both. very genuinely. and i think— starmer? i think it was both. very genuinely. and i think the - starmer? i think it was both. very genuinely. and i think the story i starmer? i think it was both. veryj genuinely. and i think the story of wakefield shows that we are winning back notjust people that we lost the tories in 2019, but there has always been a very strong significant tory vote here in wakefield, and i spoke to many lifelong tory voters who were voting labour for the first time in their life because we ran a positive campaign here based on the priorities of the people of wakefield. they saw this government more interested in playing political games and trying to divide the nation in very stark contrast to the labour party were running a campaign in conjunction with our labour mayors on the ground, prioritising things like bringing down the price of bus fares, restoring bus routes, restoring neighbourhood policing on the street to tackle anti—social behaviour, these are the things that people were raising with us on the doors and that is the campaign we ran in response and they have responded in their droves. llrlul’hat ran in response and they have responded in their droves. what does it mean how? — responded in their droves. what does it mean now? you _ responded in their droves. what does it mean now? you have _
7:12 am
responded in their droves. what does it mean now? you have been - responded in their droves. what does| it mean now? you have been involved in the campaigning in wakefield, what does it mean now where it comes to restoring the so—called red wool for labour? —— red wall for labour? it shows we are building back those votes and helping regain the trust of those voters that we lost in 2019. we need to do much more than when we —— to win back those voters and wakefield demonstrates we are winning the blue voting toys for the first time. for the first time in opposition we have a leader that people in places like wakefield can look to and say, that is the kind of person i want to lead the country, i can trust him as prime minister and running the economy and wakefield put us firmly on the path to winning the next general election. we put us firmly on the path to winning the next general election.— the next general election. we are exectin: the next general election. we are expecting to _ the next general election. we are expecting to see _ the next general election. we are expecting to see keir _ the next general election. we are expecting to see keir starmer i the next general election. we are expecting to see keir starmer in l expecting to see keir starmer in wakefield as well at some point. oliver dowden, the chairman of the conservative party, has resigned, we understand it happened at 5:45am this morning, your reaction to that?
7:13 am
well, i think this morning, your reaction to that? well, ithink it this morning, your reaction to that? well, i think it is right but once again, everybody else seems to have to take responsibility and resign other than the main man and i would have hoped that borisjohnson would take his fair share of responsibility of this devastating blow of these two by—election losses but knowing the measure of the man as i do, i very much doubt he will. do you see this as an opportunity, of borisjohnson's cabinet up until this time has been very united, do you see this as a potential start of the resignations? == you see this as a potential start of the resignations?— the resignations? -- further resignations? _ the resignations? -- further resignations? i— the resignations? -- further resignations? i very - the resignations? -- further resignations? i very much . the resignations? -- further. resignations? i very much hope the resignations? -- further- resignations? i very much hope that tory mps will now reflect and recognise that the british public are sick to death of this government, that wants to divide this country and play political games, ratherthan this country and play political games, rather than resolve the many issues that this country is facing. we have heard time and time again that people are worried about the cost of living, the price of petrol,
7:14 am
not being able to afford their weekly shop. and instead of tackling those issues, the government are turning on themselves and are trying to score cheap political points at the labour party, and i hope that tory mps reflect on that now and finally remove their deceitful, dishonest leader that frankly treat this country with nothing but contempt. this country with nothing but contempt-— this country with nothing but contemt. :, , ., ,, ., ., contempt. louise haigh, shadow transort contempt. louise haigh, shadow transport secretary _ contempt. louise haigh, shadow transport secretary for _ contempt. louise haigh, shadow transport secretary for labour, l transport secretary for labour, thank you for your time this morning. thank you for your time this morning-— borisjohnson isn't here in the uk for the by—election results, he's in rwanda due to meet prince charles at the commonwealth leaders' conference. downing street insists they're unlikely to discuss the uk's plan to send some asylum seekers to the african country, a policy which the prince is reported to have criticised. our political correspondent, alex forsyth is in the rwandan capital of kigali. good morning, alex. you will be very well aware of what is going on here with those by—election results, as
7:15 am
will the prime minister. i know there are important meetings there to do with the meetings but this is likely is it not to overshadow what the prime minister has to say. i'll be expecting him to take questions on this? == be expecting him to take questions on this? : be expecting him to take questions on this? ., , . ., on this? -- are we expecting him to take questions? _ on this? -- are we expecting him to take questions? this _ on this? -- are we expecting him to take questions? this will _ on this? -- are we expecting him to. take questions? this will overshadow what the prime minister is here for, this meeting of commonwealth leaders, trying to talk about the work of the commonwealth is doing but that will be completely drowned out by those domestic problems that he is now facing. we have not heard from the prime minister's camp yet this morning but we are expecting him to speak to reporters in the next couple of hours or so. we did get a chance to question him before we got on the plane 23 and at that point he was pretty robust. when he was asked —— on the plane to kigali. if he he said that governments often lose mid—term by—elections and asked if he would quit, he said, are you
7:16 am
crazy? the scale of the victories was unexpected and the resignation of oliver dowden the party chairman was for some completely unexpected. what will really matter today is the prime minister's words and tone, how he reacts and responds to this, we should hearfrom him in the next few hours. what borisjohnson wants to be talking about is his big diplomatic push. he is notjust here at this meeting of commonwealth leaders but going on to meet t7 and nato leaders after this. not due backin nato leaders after this. not due back in the uk for a few days yet but it is what is happening at home which is going to dominate. thahk which is going to dominate. thank ou ve which is going to dominate. thank you very much- — which is going to dominate. thank you very much. to _ which is going to dominate. thank you very much. to bring _ which is going to dominate. thank you very much. to bring you i you very much. to bring you up—to—date on who we will be talking to, it has been fast moving, as it was scheduled, we were expecting to speak to oliver dowden in his role thenis speak to oliver dowden in his role then is conservative party chairman, but clearly, following that announcement, there was a moment of confusion and we were told we would find out who we would be speaking
7:17 am
to, and in the last half hour or so we have been told we will be talking to the deputy prime minister dominic raab, that will be at 7:30am. 17 minutes past seven. efforts are continuing to get aid to survivors of a devastating earthquake in afghanistan that hit a remote area of the country two days ago killing more than 1,000 people. hundreds of families are now homeless and are struggling to find food and shelter. our correspondent secunder kermani reports. aid agencies have been transporting food and tents to the earthquake hit parts of giyan and barmal districts, here in paktika province, travelling along the long, dirt bumpy road from sharan, the nearest big city which is where we are now. taliban military helicopters have also been used to fly in supplies because the location is so remote. taliban officials telling us the search and rescue operation is now over, the focus very much on those who survived this earthquake, getting them adequate food and shelter.
7:18 am
mobile health teams are also visiting these villages. yesterday, in a briefing at the un security council, a senior un official described this disaster as a tragic reminder of the myriad dangers facing the afghan people at this moment. the country was already in the middle of an economic and humanitarian crisis with average incomes slashed by about a third, that's in a country where many people were already struggling just to survive. and whilst humanitarian aid, that immediate short—term aid is being delivered, wider international development funding that the previous government used to rely on, well, much of that has been cut off ever since the taliban took power last august. there'll be further misery for passengers after hundreds of ba staff at heathrow airport voted to go on strike over pay. ben is there for us this morning.
7:19 am
in that time of year, a lot of people will be concerned and worried about how this might impact them so take us through what we know. you ma well take us through what we know. you may well be — take us through what we know. ym. may well be wondering if you are travelling this summer how this could affect you. i will come of that in a moment. let me explain what the strike is about and who is involved. 700 british airways ground workers and she can strike —— check—in staff have voted to strike this summer. it is a row about pay, their unions gmb and unite say that british airways imposed a 10% pay cut during a pandemic which has not been reinstated. ba for its part says it has made a 10% pay offer which other staff have accepted, and it says it is disappointed by this action. it is ground workers and check—in staff at the moment but the gmb union says that other workers within ba may well follow suit. t within ba may well follow suit. i don't think this is going to stop with— don't think this is going to stop with customer check—in staff. many
7:20 am
of our _ with customer check—in staff. many of our members across the ba business — of our members across the ba business are sick to death of the cuts within— business are sick to death of the cuts within the company, they have seen the company been run into the ground _ seen the company been run into the ground over— seen the company been run into the ground over many years, they are very angry— ground over many years, they are very angry about the cynical exploitation of the pandemic by people — exploitation of the pandemic by people at the top in ba, and people want to— people at the top in ba, and people want to see their pay and conditions are restored. this is a profitable business. — are restored. this is a profitable business, the aviation sector is bouncing — business, the aviation sector is bouncing back, our people are dealing — bouncing back, our people are dealing with really difficult circumstances in the airport and they— circumstances in the airport and theyiust — circumstances in the airport and theyjust want to be paid properly for their— theyjust want to be paid properly for theirjob. theyjust want to be paid properly fortheirjob-_ theyjust want to be paid properly for theirjob. for their 'ob. strikes are expected to for theirjob. strikes are expected to ha en for theirjob. strikes are expected to happen during _ for theirjob. strikes are expected to happen during the _ for theirjob. strikes are expected to happen during the peak- for theirjob. strikes are expected. to happen during the peak summer holiday period. we don't know the exact dates yet but the union has said it will announce those early next week. what should you do if you are worried about potential impacts on you and your travel plans? contact your travel agent and find out what their advices. or at the moment, assume that if you have not heard otherwise, that yourflight will go ahead as normal. i have to say, i got off a flight earlier this week, we landed on time, the steps
7:21 am
were brought to the airline on air plane on time, we were not allowed to disembark because there was a shortage of ground staff. after ten or 15 minutes the passengers were getting restless. we could be in for a little bit more of that this summer. a little bit more of that this summer-— a little bit more of that this summer. ., ~ , ., , . summer. thank you very much, heathrow _ summer. thank you very much, heathrow airport. _ heathrow airport. we are getting comments from ruan to buy the premise that was johnson who is there —— from rwanda from the prime minister borisjohnson. he is talking about, there were reported, i stress, reported comments by prince charles and his comment on the home office policy for migrants, asylum sentence —— seekers to be sent to rwanda. the prime minister has been saying there are lots of prejudices about rwanda that need to be blown away. and he has been
7:22 am
reacting to the by—election results this morning, inevitably he would be asked that, he has said, we have got to recognise there is more we have got to do and we certainly will, that has come through after oliver dowden, the conservative chairman has resigned. he has also said, i have got to listen to what people are saying, in particular to the difficulties people are facing over the cost of living. he says, it's absolutely true, we have had some tough by—election results. those comments are coming through, alex forsyth, she is covering the event in rwanda, saying it would be inevitable she he would be questioned about that. just after 7:30am, dominic raab, the deputy prime minister, will be speaking to us. that is coming up in a few minutes. let's whisk you away for a moment to the lovely matt and a lovely picture and a lovely calm scene, look at that!
7:23 am
it is indeed. some sunshine in north—east england, eastern areas still have some warmth today but there is much more cloud elsewhere. it will be several days of change turning fresher and windier and plenty of showers around especially across western areas. the showers are few and far between this morning, one or two light ones towards the south—west, some across scotland, a few clipping towards the very south east of england in the short term. elsewhere dry, the morning cloud will break up, some sunny spells but we will see the cloud bubble up again into the afternoon. a scattering of heavy thunder showers, and some longer spells in the south—west and northern ireland. and west wales. it will be a pleasant day in the sunshine but be on guard for darkening skies late afternoon and into the evening upon parts of scotland, heavy and thundery showers
7:24 am
moving north—east, could get very close to headingley, this area of cloud will be approaching glastonbury later, set to bring some rain or drizzle into the evening. in the south—east, the warmest conditions, it should stay dry but we will see a bit of patchy rain for some of you into the first part of the night. the weatherfront swinging north, clearer skies into tomorrow morning. fresher, breed here to start your saturday morning. it will not be cold to begin with and over the weekend there will be sunny spells around but plenty of showers especially across western areas and it will be windier. more details later. thank you. let me bring you up we are trying to follow events this morning. this is in relation to the by—election results overnight. as you would know, normally on a day after a by—election result he would have a senior figure from the tory party he would come and do the rounds, talk to the media. let me take you
7:25 am
through where we are this morning. we were expecting the former now conservative chairman oliver dowden to be the person put up by the conservative party to talk about the results this morning. just before we came on airthis results this morning. just before we came on air this morning, around quarter to six, we were told that he would not be coming on because he had resigned. that made some sense, there was a period of time when the conservative party said they would get back to us as to who they would offer up to do the interview with us and other media outlets this morning. we were told about 20 minutes ago that the deputy prime minister dominic raab would be doing the interviews. in the last two or three minutes we were told, i will try and give you the quote, it is now definitely not dominic raab, says the conservative party. i am trying to be absolutely clear, so you understand, they say it is a changing situation. we are waiting to find out, as you will know, just after 7:30am is the time we are scheduled to speak to someone from
7:26 am
the conservative party, we wait and see. :, , y , the conservative party, we wait and see. ., , , , ., , the conservative party, we wait and see. .,, , , .,, ., we'd like to tell you about a teenager called jason. he was born with complex disabilities and needs round the clock care, but that hasn't stopped him from becoming a devoted fundraiser. jason's mum made a light—hearted appeal ahead of his school prom to see if anyone could help him arrive in style. and as ian haslam reports, he did just that. give me the big thumbs up! this is vip helicopter passenger jason, who is about to fly off in style to his school prom. at the controls, david fishwick, the self—made burnley millionaire and star of the bank of dave tv show, whose life story is being made into a netflix movies. there's a book there, harry, just on the back seat, can you see it? "how to fly helicopters in three easy steps", can you see it? can you just pass me that? so, louise, all this came from a halfjoking comment on social media, didn't it?
7:27 am
ijust basically said, "big boy going to college, in september, and i will be going to my prom and my mum said i will need a fast car and a fancy suit". and just sort of left it at that with a picture, really. i didn't even look at my phone, i had a really busy day, didn't really think much about the tweet because i put a lot of tweets out there. and then when i looked at it, and i saw all these notifications on there, and read it, ijust couldn't speak for a while. because how does that happen? he's very excited about all the helicopter thing, we have watched a lot of videos, and i have bought him a little helicopter toy. jason was born with a chromosome abnormality, and his parents were told he might not live to adulthood. it was a huge setback but the family were determined to give him the best life possible. they also set up jason's wheels community trust, which helps give children with disabilities access to specially adapted bikes. the community helped us raise enough money to buy him a bike, an adapted cycle, which is a two seater cycle, at £5,000.
7:28 am
and when he did, he has loved it. we thought, how many other people are like this, how many people are not able to do things? and jason gets really excited by helping people? yeah, he does. as does david fishwick. when he heard jason was looking for a lift to his leavers' ball, he was on board, literally. i think it's fair to say you have made this young man's day, haven't you? well, hopefully we can make it really special. we've got a jet ranger here, it flies up to 20,000 feet, 150 miles an hour. he got in touch on twitter and his mum said, can you do something special forjason? and i know that he does such a lot for the community, he's a really special young man. so let's make his day very special. the helicopterjourney went a little round the houses as jason was shown some of the sights of east lancashire from above.
7:29 am
right, here they come, then, what an arrival this is! i remember going to my school prom, i think my dad gave me a lift in his old ford sierra. very clean but it wasn't a helicopter. seeing his reaction, priceless, just totally priceless. he could see his house from miles away, accrington stanley as well. that then is how you arrive in style. ian haslam, bbc news. they did arrive in style! that is one very happy _ they did arrive in style! that is one very happy young - they did arrive in style! that is one very happy young man. i they did arrive in style! that is l one very happy young man. over they did arrive in style! that is i one very happy young man. over the weekend there _ one very happy young man. over the weekend there will— one very happy young man. over the weekend there will be _ one very happy young man. over the weekend there will be some - one very happy young man. over the weekend there will be some rain i weekend there will be some rain around so it could be a bit wet in glastonbury. but you have got billie eilish and sir paul mccartney, who cares when you have got brilliant music like that, no spirits will be dampened. music like that, no spirits will be dampened-—
7:30 am
music like that, no spirits will be damened. :, , ., , ., dampened. colin is keeping an eye on what is happening _ dampened. colin is keeping an eye on what is happening inside _ dampened. colin is keeping an eye on what is happening inside the - dampened. colin is keeping an eye on what is happening inside the big i what is happening inside the big top. what is happening inside the big to -. :, what is happening inside the big to -. ., . . , what is happening inside the big to. ., . . , , what is happening inside the big to. ., . . ,, top. live from the circus big top tent, 27 top. live from the circus big top tent. 27 acts — top. live from the circus big top tent, 27 acts every _ top. live from the circus big top tent, 27 acts every day, - top. live from the circus big top tent, 27 acts every day, you i top. live from the circus big top tent, 27 acts every day, you are j tent, 27 acts every day, you are looking at the rosie, skywalker, one of the only female skywalk is in the world. she grew up in banbury, she studied musical theatre, but five years ago, she made the switch to the circus and was taught how to do this trick by her husband's mum, which makes you wonder, how much she likes her! then we have antonio from nottingham, a fire eater, his father was a circus owner, he did what is known as a john major, ran away from the circus, moved into sports retail but 12 years ago, ran back and has been a fire eater ever since. this is one of 100 stages at glastonbury. it takes 67,000 staff here at glastonbury to put on all of the events. today, the music on the big stages gets going. billie eilish will become the youngest ever solo
7:31 am
act to headline, at the age of 20. her mother muggy baird is also on the bill, introducing a documentary, —— her mother maggie baird. and tomorrow paul mccartney will be the oldest ever headline and the age of 80. and he is playing a show at 5pm in a room at ibm, you can only get tickets —— in frome. you could only get a ticket if you went down yesterday, the queues were huge. first, the news, weather and travel where you are. good morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. health officials are warning that thousands of children in london are not fully protected against polio. it comes after the virus that causes polio was found in a number of sewage samples.
7:32 am
but no actual cases of polio have been detected. new data from the uk health security agency show around 34,000 children in the capital haven't had their polio booster by their fifth birthday. we have recently seen more of this vaccine—like polio virus circulating in parts of north—east london. because we have seen it over a few weeks, we just wanted to raise the alarm to say that this is happening, we are seeing it, it is being investigated. there is nothing to worry about if you have been vaccinated and your vaccine is up—to—date. if you're commuting you might have some problems this morning. train companies say services won't be back to normal until later because of this week's industrial action. let's have a look at how things are going on london's public transport this morning. there's a few problems out there this morning, so check before you travel.
7:33 am
drivers may want to take note. from next week, you could be fined if you're caught in a cycle lane. new enforcement powers given to tfl will target vehicles that drive within, or cross, the solid white lines along the network. so it will be simialr to a fine for parking on double—red lines or driving in bus lanes. a charity shop in east london which gives free clothes to struggling famililies has become so popular it's been given a permanent space in lakeside shopping centre. the money raised from sales of second—hand clothes helps to provide free clothing for those in need. we do receive return referrals, so our message would be don't feel ashamed. we have a whole community behind us that are coming in daily with donations. onto the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a few changes happening again weather—wise across the capital today. the air will feel fresher.
7:34 am
there will be a noticeable south—westerly blowing. the high pressure has now moved away and low pressure not too far away. an approaching weather front overnight tonight. a scattering of showers and cooler air over the weekend, but also some sunny spells. we are starting with sunny spells this morning. a mild start to the day. still sunny spells through the afternoon but a speckling of cloud around, as well. watch out for the possibility of one or two showers blowing through on this brisk south—westerly wind picking up through the afternoon. temperatures lower than they were, peaking at 23—24 celsius, but still feeling warm in the best of the sunshine. overnight tonight, it stays rather breezy. longer spells of rain for a time. that is our weather front coming through, introducing coolerfeeling air over the weekend. so a drop in temperature. possibly quite cloudy with showers. still windy on saturday. lots of dry weather around on sunday, with sunny spells but staying rather breezy.
7:35 am
i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in an hour. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. we can bring you up—to—date on what has been a busy morning on politics. we've been talking about the by—election results and the resignation of the conservative party chairman oliver dowden this morning. is attending the commonwealth leaders' conference the prime minister said the election results were tough and that he has to recognise the difficult time voters are going through at the moment. let's speak now to the backbench conservative mp roger gale, who cast a vote of no confidence in borisjohnson in the ballot a couple of weeks ago. good morning. your reaction. i would be interested in your reaction to oliver dowden, chairman of the party, his resignation. he
7:36 am
oliver dowden, chairman of the party, his resignation.— party, his resignation. he is a decent man. _ party, his resignation. he is a decent man, an _ party, his resignation. he is a decent man, an honourable i party, his resignation. he is a i decent man, an honourable man. party, his resignation. he is a - decent man, an honourable man. he has done clearly what he believed he had to do. he can no longer defend the indefensible. brute had to do. he can no longer defend the indefensible.— the indefensible. we were talking earlier to the _ the indefensible. we were talking earlier to the labour _ the indefensible. we were talking earlier to the labour party - the indefensible. we were talking earlier to the labour party and i the indefensible. we were talking | earlier to the labour party and the labour party has gone in a similar vein, saying he has taken responsibility but it is for boris johnson to take responsibility and resign. you have said an honourable prime minister would consider his position after that result, the vote of confidence, which he won. do you still believe that the prime minister should resign? yes, absolutely — minister should resign? yes, absolutely l _ minister should resign? yes, absolutely i do. _ minister should resign? yes, absolutely i do. the - minister should resign? yes, absolutely i do. the results . minister should resign? yes, | absolutely i do. the results of minister should resign? 12: absolutely i do. the results of the by—election is... by the way, commiserations for both candidates who fought long and hard. they deserve better. but the result was clearly a massive vote of no confidence in the prime minister.
7:37 am
another one. fortnight ago, 41% of the conservative parliamentary party indicated they had no confidence in the prime minister. i think an honourable man would have gone at that time. this prime minister seeks to struggle on. i understand this morning he said he will listen, but he will carry on. he is not listening and he is blundering on. we are now fighting i think for the soul of the party, which is what i care about. d0 soul of the party, which is what i care about-— soul of the party, which is what i care about. i. ,, ., care about. do you think now when oliver dowden, _ care about. do you think now when oliver dowden, as _ care about. do you think now when oliver dowden, as the _ care about. do you think now when oliver dowden, as the closest i oliver dowden, as the closest member, one of the closest to the prime minister, has resigned. this has to be led from the front. if a prime minister sees people around him expressing votes of no confidence, and at this moment, the cabinet has been united in support for the prime minister. do you see oliver dowden's move as a trigger
7:38 am
perhaps for more expressions of discontent? it perhaps for more expressions of discontent?— perhaps for more expressions of discontent? , , , , discontent? it is possible but it is u . discontent? it is possible but it is u- to discontent? it is possible but it is up to colleagues _ discontent? it is possible but it is up to colleagues in _ discontent? it is possible but it is up to colleagues in the _ discontent? it is possible but it is up to colleagues in the cabinet i discontent? it is possible but it isj up to colleagues in the cabinet to decide whether they can go on supporting a prime minister who frankly has trashed the reputation of the conservative party, my party, for decency, integrity and compassion. i am a one nation conservative. the people of the west country by and large you exercised their vote yesterday our one nation conservatives and think the same way i do and they have expressed their view in the ballot box. the i do and they have expressed their view in the ballot box.— view in the ballot box. the prime minister ought _ view in the ballot box. the prime minister ought to _ view in the ballot box. the prime minister ought to understand i view in the ballot box. the prime| minister ought to understand that and go. he had the majority support him in the vote of no confidence. margaret thatcher had a majority and she honourably resigned. theresa may had a majority and she honourably resigned. this prime minister is choosing to hang the door handle at number 10, choosing to hang the door handle at number10, but choosing to hang the door handle at number 10, but it cannot go on for
7:39 am
ever and certainly will not go on until the next general election. lloathe until the next general election. who would ou until the next general election. who would you like _ until the next general election. who would you like to _ until the next general election. who would you like to see in his place? i am not playing that game. the media has said over and again the problem is problem is there is not an obvious alternative. the problem is we are spoilt for choice. there are several people who would make good prime minister is within the party and one of those will emerge between now and the next general election and leaders into the next general election which i trust we will win. : general election which i trust we willwin. : : , general election which i trust we willwin. . ., , ., general election which i trust we willwin. : :, general election which i trust we willwin. . ., , will win. are any of those people who would _ will win. are any of those people who would make _ will win. are any of those people who would make good _ will win. are any of those people who would make good prime i will win. are any of those people i who would make good prime ministers in the current cabinet? some who would make good prime ministers in the current cabinet?— in the current cabinet? some of them are in the cabinet _ in the current cabinet? some of them are in the cabinet and _ in the current cabinet? some of them are in the cabinet and some - in the current cabinet? some of them are in the cabinet and some of - in the current cabinet? some of them are in the cabinet and some of them l are in the cabinet and some of them outside of it. are in the cabinet and some of them outside of it— outside of it. boris johnson has faced challenges, _ outside of it. boris johnson has faced challenges, particularly l outside of it. boris johnson has| faced challenges, particularly in the past year, and attacks on his leadership and he has not gone. you are calling for it and in your words to do the honourable thing. do you believe he will resign anytime soon? johnson has great faith in himself.
7:40 am
the problem is, increasingly, the public, and i think the conservative parliamentary party do not have faith in him.— parliamentary party do not have faith in him. ., ., ,, i. faith in him. roger gale, thank you for our faith in him. roger gale, thank you for yourtime- _ for your time. it has been a busy morning in politics. roger gale was speaking as an individual mp. normally we would speak to a conservative minister at this time and that was planned. if i go through the timeline it will help you. this morning, the by—election results, tory losses, they came in just after 4am. we were scheduled to speak to oliver dowden, conservative party chairman. an hour and a half later we understand he resign. he pulled out of the interview that should have been now and we were told the conservative party was working on who might speak to us. we were told we would speak to deputy prime minister dominic raab. but
7:41 am
that has gone away. they told us definitely not dominic raab. and we will wait to find out whether we will wait to find out whether we will have a figure from the conservative party, whether a member of the cabinet or senior figure. we are still waiting. mike is not waiting. so much to look forward to. i love sport with tales of the unexpected. there was an incident yesterday that had pundits searching for the rule book. you are batting, it hits charlie's bat at the other end and who is at? you are out, even though it is not your fault. that is worse than being run out by your team—mate. you can see the annoyance. it's spiced things up on the opening day. it's so finely poised going into the second day of the final test and so much will depend on whether england's bowlers, can strike early on and remove the stubborn new zealand
7:42 am
pair, who've led the fightback at headingley. england looked in control for much of day one reducing new zealand to 123 for five. jamie overton with a wicket on his test debut. but then came the freak moment and a massive slice of luck for england and bowlerjack leach. henry nicoll hits the ball. it looks like it's heading for a four. but it glances the bat of the new zealand player at the other end. that's daryl mitchell and deflects up and into the hands of alex lees. the most unusual catch. mitchell went on though, and along with tom blundell, frustrated england's bowlers, with a century partnership... with new zealand closing on 225 for 5. england though, remain positive. it was a great day. a lot of nerves this morning. a little bit nervous going to bowl the first ball. it wasn't my best ball, but we'll take it. nice to get that first wicket, as well. i think we've had a good day.
7:43 am
would have liked probably a couple more wickets, but i think if you said to us at the start of play 250—5, we probably would have been very happy with that. now if you're thinking, i'm sure i've seen him play for england before, that's because his twin craig, who gave him his cap yesterday, is the player who he edged ahead of to play. england's women continue their preparations for next month's euros when they face defending champions the netherlands at elland road tonight. it will be a reunion for england head coach sarina weigman, who was in charge of the dutch when they lifted the trophy. it's a very special game. obviously, because i'm from the netherlands, i've worked with that team for many years. now i work for england so it's a very special game for me and it's really nice to see the team again. northern ireland's women lost their only warm up match for the tournament. lauren wade's equaliser meant it was one—all, until the 82nd minute, then three late goals, after goalkeeperjackie burns was sent off, which gave belgium a 4—1 win in lier. northern ireland kick off their tournament off against norway, onjuly 7th.
7:44 am
newcastle united have signed the england goalkeeper nick pope. hejoins from burnley, where he spent six seasons, but his departure was always likely after their relegation from the premier league. and newcastle are a huge draw for any player now with massive financial clout, after their take over by a saudi arabian—backed take over. onto rugby league, and defending champions st helens have moved six points clear at the top of the super league, after a dominant win over leeds. saints ran in eight tries in all, including this one from dan norman. they're going for a fourth consecutive super league title and will take some stopping after this 42—12 win. rory mcilroy shares the lead heading into the second round, of the travelers championship, in connecticut. his opening round of eight—under par puts him out in front, alongside the americanjt poston. they are a shot clear, of the chasing pack, which includes scotland's martin
7:45 am
laird. at the women's pga championship, south korea's in—gee chun is the one to catch after a record equalling opening round. chun is on eight under par, heading in to her second round, that's the joint—lowest score, in the history of the event. onto the tennis, and a first for britain's jack draper. he's the only brit left standing at eastbourne after the likes of harriet dart and cam norrie went out. draper, though, is into his first atp tour semifinal after beating fellow british player ryan peniston in straight sets. draper will face maxime cressy. that's this afternoon, in the final four — after the american, beat british number one, and top seed, cameron norrie. and ahead of the main draw, for wimbledon, which takes place this morning, two of the favourites have already been getting a feel of centre court. it's like a second home for novak djockovich and rafael nadal. but this is the first time players have been able to practise on the show courts before the tournament. it's to help the new grass bed in to hopefully make it less slippy.
7:46 am
we have seen problems it has caused for people like serena williams last year. she will be out there on centre court this afternoon. and people will see the likes of andy murray and emma raducanu practising. to see if they are fit. and we will find out who they are playing in the draw takes place. and that is a first, having access before? they are thinking let's get somewhere and tear on it to bed it in. i am somewhere and tear on it to bed it in. iam no somewhere and tear on it to bed it in. i am no expert on lawns but that is the idea. if the grass beds in there will be fewer bare patches and less slippy. you have never been allowed on it? you have never been allowed on it? you are not allowed to go on. it is hallowed ground. only players. thanks. in the 1980s, the majestic red kite was one of only three globally threatened species in the uk, but a successful breeding programme has led to a remarkable turnaround for the bird of prey. now british—born red kites
7:47 am
are being flown to spain in an attempt to rescue dwindling populations there. our environment correspondent helen briggs reports. soaring high in the sky above the countryside, living proof of a conservation success story. three decades ago, red kites were rescued from the brink of extinction by reintroducing wild birds from sweden and spain. dr ian evans was one of the pioneers. it all went out of expectation. it was such a huge success, which was amazing. obviously, the birds in spain, unfortunately, in the last 20 years, haven't done so well, so it's a great opportunity to go back. that is why we went to spain in the first place, to save kites, and we can do that now by helping them with the kites we have got here. at six weeks old, the birds are naturally shy in
7:48 am
the presence of humans, behaving as they would around predators. the birds are protected under law and conservation experts were given special permission to take them out of the country. it's a great honour to have been involved in this project from the start. you just feel really proud, the fact you can do some good for the environment and for such marvellous species. there is not much more magnificent than a kite soaring above you. this ancient forest is the perfect habitat for red kites and they have thrived here since they were reintroduced in the �*90s. the red kite chicks will be flown to madrid then taken by road to aviaries, where they will spend a few weeks perfecting their flight before they are released into the wild. the first arrivals are settling in in the spanish countryside and are due to be released over the summer. you need about 90—100 birds to create a sustainable
7:49 am
population in a given area. this is the start of a three—year project. 30 birds will go this year and we hope 30 birds in each of the next two years will also go to spain. that should be sufficient to create a new breeding nucleus of the birds. it is hoped they will flourish in their new habitat and help secure the future of red kites across europe. helen briggs, bbc news, northamptonshire. beautiful images. here's matt. join me in looking at the scene over glastonbury. i was watching the flags, a breeze. it is mixed fortunes for those camping. it is not a wash—out which is the main thing. the flags will be blowing more over the weekend with the breeze picking up. they have missed the worst of the rain showers
7:50 am
over the past 24 hours and will only get a few, i think, in the next 24. big changes on the way. north—east wales yesterday gives a flavour of what is happening. 28 celsius. same area this weekend will be 19 degrees. a degree or so lower than we expect this time of year. but we still hold onto heat in the eastern half of the country but sunshine and showers developing again. there is some light rain in wales and the south—west, not far from glastonbury. some rain might clip the south—east corner. showers in the south—east corner. showers in the north of scotland. sunny spells developing and in the afternoon heavy, thundery showers potentially in northern england and in parts of scotland. and then longer spells of rain. it is 26 in eastern part of
7:51 am
the country and this is where pollen levels are at their highest. we can return to glastonbury. while there will be glimpses of sunshine, often large amounts of cloud. the damp conditions this evening as the weather front works its way through. and to headingley, it should be fine for the most part but there could be interruptions in the cricket as showers develop. they were clear and this weather front will work northwards. most will see a brief speu northwards. most will see a brief spell of light drizzle. temperatures tonight into double figures but not as mild as the past few nights. we have more rain in western areas at times because low pressure is set to dominate into the weekend. areas close to it, particularly northern ireland, you will see rain throughout saturday. showers in
7:52 am
western areas could clip glastonbury. a lot of you will spend saturday dry. still pleasant in the sunshine. 18—20, 22 may be in eastern areas. showers continue into the evening for some of you. rain in northern ireland linked to low pressure. it does not move a great deal. it will still be there on sunday. and if anything, longer spells of rain in north—west scotland and england. showers in other western areas. dry and sunny to the south and east. temperatures here starting to drop and with a stronger wind on sunday, it will feel here starting to drop and with a stronger wind on sunday, it will feel fresher. we've been talking about the by—election results and the resignation of the conservative party chairman oliver dowden this morning. we've just been getting some reaction to all this from the prime minister who is in rwanda where he's attending the commonwealth
7:53 am
leaders' conference. i think that what governments also have to recognise... although i do not want to minimise the importance of what voters are saying, it is also true that in midterm, governments, post—war, loose by—elections. if you look back to last may, a truly astonishing thing was we managed to win hartlepool in different circumstances. what we need to do now is reflect on where voters are. i think what they are basically feeling is we came through covid well and took a lot of the right decisions there, but we now face pressure on the cost of living, spikes in fuel prices, energy costs, food costs. that is hitting people. we have to recognise that there is more that we have got to do and we
7:54 am
certainly will. we will keep going, addressing concerns of people, until we get through this patch. that is the prime minister who is in rwanda for the commonwealth meeting of leaders. he thanked oliver dowden who has resigned and said he was an excellent party chairman and an excellent party chairman and an excellent culture secretary and again he repeated that they had had tough election results. and he said, we have to recognise there is more we have to recognise there is more we have to do and certainly will. we will keep you up—to—date. it has been busy in terms of politics and the implications of what has happened. oliver dowden resigning just before 6am, the chairman of the conservative party. we will take you somewhere different now. to a boxing club which says it's helped keep hundreds of kids away from crime could be faced with closure as its running costs soar. jav khaliq, who won the ibo welterweight title back in 2000,
7:55 am
offers classes to around 100 people a week. we are joined now byjav along with mohammed and dwayne. and fidel. how are you? what is happening? you are doing a lot of good work there. helping children to have an opportunity to having an alternative to being on the streets and then perhaps be influenced by perhaps negative forces. but what are the difficulties for the club now? its. are the difficulties for the club now? . : :, , are the difficulties for the club now? : : :, , :, are the difficulties for the club now? ~ , ., ., , are the difficulties for the club now? ~ , ., ., ., now? a couple of months ago we received an _ now? a couple of months ago we received an e-mail _ now? a couple of months ago we received an e-mail that - now? a couple of months ago we received an e-mail that our- now? a couple of months ago we received an e-mail that our rentl received an e—mail that our rent would go up three times what it is right now. more than three times. the trust we rent off, rent off the city council and have been told there is nothing that can happen, energy costs have gone up and we will have to pay £1100 a month more
7:56 am
on top of what we pay which we cannot manage. latte on top of what we pay which we cannot manage.— on top of what we pay which we cannot manage. we will have to close. cannot manage. we will have to close- tell _ cannot manage. we will have to close. tell me _ cannot manage. we will have to close. tell me about _ cannot manage. we will have to close. tell me about what i cannot manage. we will have to close. tell me about what it i cannot manage. we will have to close. tell me about what it is . cannot manage. we will have to i close. tell me about what it is like for you at the club? 1 close. tell me about what it is like for you at the club?— for you at the club? i have been boxint 12 for you at the club? i have been boxing 12 years _ for you at the club? i have been boxing 12 years and _ for you at the club? i have been boxing 12 years and started i for you at the club? i have been l boxing 12 years and started when for you at the club? i have been i boxing 12 years and started when i was to _ boxing 12 years and started when i was to i_ boxing 12 years and started when i was 18. i am 30 now. boxing 12 years and started when i was 18. lam 30 now. time is flying by! this _ was 18. lam 30 now. time is flying by! this gym — was 18. lam 30 now. time is flying by! this gym has given me a lot. boxing _ by! this gym has given me a lot. boxing has— by! this gym has given me a lot. boxing has made me more positive. prior— boxing has made me more positive. prior to— boxing has made me more positive. prior to that, — boxing has made me more positive. prior to that, growing up, i did not have _ prior to that, growing up, i did not have anywhere to go. it is easy to fall into _ have anywhere to go. it is easy to fall into a — have anywhere to go. it is easy to fall into a certain lifestyle without places such as this. boxing has given— without places such as this. boxing has given me a place to go. even mentally, — has given me a place to go. even mentally, i— has given me a place to go. even mentally, i have lost family members. this has been a place to lo, members. this has been a place to go. like _ members. this has been a place to go, like escapism, as well. do members. this has been a place to go, like escapism, as well.- go, like escapism, as well. do you see the difference _ go, like escapism, as well. do you see the difference between - go, like escapism, as well. do you see the difference between you i go, like escapism, as well. do you | see the difference between you and your friends, see the difference between you and
7:57 am
yourfriends, what see the difference between you and your friends, what you see the difference between you and yourfriends, what you have see the difference between you and your friends, what you have gained from boxing and perhaps compared to friends not involved?— from boxing and perhaps compared to friends not involved? 100%. when you do not have friends not involved? 100%. when you do rrot have a — friends not involved? 100%. when you do not have a sense _ friends not involved? 100%. when you do not have a sense of _ friends not involved? 100%. when you do not have a sense of direction, i do not have a sense of direction, nothing — do not have a sense of direction, nothing to— do not have a sense of direction, nothing to do, it makes it easier to fall into _ nothing to do, it makes it easier to fall into a _ nothing to do, it makes it easier to fall into a certain lifestyle. i have — fall into a certain lifestyle. i have seen a difference with myself. i have seen a difference with myself. i have _ have seen a difference with myself. i have learned life lessons through boxing, _ i have learned life lessons through boxing, being around my coaches. it has had _ boxing, being around my coaches. it has had a _ boxing, being around my coaches. it has had a great impact on my life and has _ has had a great impact on my life and has translated to other areas of my life. _ and has translated to other areas of my life. my— and has translated to other areas of my life, myjob, my outlook has definitely— my life, myjob, my outlook has definitely changed for the better. mohammed, good morning. can i say, gentlemen, this is probably the longest you have stood still a long time. training in the gym, you are probably busy all the time. what is so good about this place? i probably busy all the time. what is so good about this place?- so good about this place? i have been coming _ so good about this place? i have been coming around _ so good about this place? i have been coming around six - so good about this place? i have| been coming around six months. so good about this place? i have i been coming around six months. it has helped me to stay away from trouble, to keep busy. and since i
7:58 am
have come, i do not want to leave. i enjoy doing something i actually like. it has kept me away from trouble at school.— trouble at school. that really matters. _ trouble at school. that really matters, doesn't _ trouble at school. that really matters, doesn't it? - trouble at school. that really matters, doesn't it? you i trouble at school. that really. matters, doesn't it? you think trouble at school. that really i matters, doesn't it? you think it had a significant impact on the way life was working out? yes. had a significant impact on the way life was working out? yes, because i used to get — life was working out? yes, because i used to get in _ life was working out? yes, because i used to get in trouble _ life was working out? yes, because i used to get in trouble a _ life was working out? yes, because i used to get in trouble a lot. - life was working out? yes, because i used to get in trouble a lot. there i used to get in trouble a lot. there used to get in trouble a lot. there used to get in trouble a lot. there used to be kids in my school who threatened me, saying they would do this and that. then i had thought it would a good idea tojump in that crowd but then i decided to do boxing and jav told me not to do that because it is not good and you will get into more trouble than before. :, :, will get into more trouble than before. :, ., ., will get into more trouble than before. ., ., ., ., , before. you are one of the coaches, i am before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving — before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving the _ before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving the big _ before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving the big smile. _ before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving the big smile. i - before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving the big smile. i bet i before. you are one of the coaches, i am loving the big smile. i bet you| i am loving the big smile. i bet you get a lot of delight out of seeing the good that can come out of a place like that?— the good that can come out of a
7:59 am
place like that? absolutely. we get ount place like that? absolutely. we get young people _ place like that? absolutely. we get young people here _ place like that? absolutely. we get young people here with _ place like that? absolutely. we get young people here with various i young people here with various problems and difficulties to deal with and — problems and difficulties to deal with and coming to boxing gives them discipline. _ with and coming to boxing gives them discipline, gets rid of some of the aggression, gets the endorphins working. — aggression, gets the endorphins working, and changes their lifestyle. it is enjoyable for them. we build — lifestyle. it is enjoyable for them. we build up a good rapport for them and give _ we build up a good rapport for them and give them life skills, plus home truths _ and give them life skills, plus home truths. lt— and give them life skills, plus home truths. , : , , and give them life skills, plus home truths. , ., , , , truths. it is really helpful. it is lovely talking _ truths. it is really helpful. it is lovely talking to _ truths. it is really helpful. it is lovely talking to you. - truths. it is really helpful. it is lovely talking to you. i - truths. it is really helpful. it is lovely talking to you. i feel- truths. it is really helpful. it is lovely talking to you. i feel at| lovely talking to you. i feel at least one of you should punch the punchbag, so we can prove... can someone do that? i can see it behind you on the left. they do not have gloves. keep your hands save. don't do that! thank you so much. good luck. great work you are doing, as we have seen. i bet if we went back in ten minutes it would be furiously busy with
8:00 am
training. it was like a moment of calm. but they would have gloves. health and safety, yes. always. stay with us, headlines coming up. good morning, welcome to breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty. our headlines today. cheering. the conservative party chairman oliver dowden resigns after a disastrous night for the government after it lost two by—elections in one night.
8:01 am
tonight, the people of tiverton and honiton have spoken for britain. they have sent a loud and clear message, it's time for borisjohnson to go. borisjohnson has reacted to oliver dowden's resignation by promising to do more to help people to deal with the cost of living crisis. we've had some tough by—election results and they have been a reflection of a lot of things, but we have got to recognise that voters are going through a tough time at the moment. the search for survivors of an earthquake in afghanistan is called off as fears grow of a humanitarian disaster. hundreds of british airways ground workers and check—in staff here at heathrow, the uk's biggest airport, voted to strike over the summer. i
8:02 am
will explain how your summer holiday plans. and we are live at the glastonbury festival where tonight at the age of 20, billie eilish becomes the youngest ever headline here at the period stage. —— pyramid stage. a huge slice of luck helps england's cricketers get on top in the final test against new zealand, but despite this freak incident, the tourists fought back, to leave the match finely balanced. there is still some heats to be heading in eastern areas but it is cooling down, fresher for heading in eastern areas but it is cooling down, fresherfor all into the weekend, plenty of showers in the weekend, plenty of showers in the west. it's friday the 24th june. the conservative party chairman oliver dowden has resigned saying the party's supporters were distressed and disappointed by recent events and he shares their feelings. it follows a major blow for the conservative party after it was defeated in two by—elections last night. speaking in rwanda, where he's attending
8:03 am
the commonwealth leaders' conference, the prime minister said the election results were tough and that his government has to recognise the difficult time voters are going through at the moment. i think that what governments have also got to recognise is that although i don't want to in any way minimise the importance of what voters are saying, it is also true that in mid—term governments post—war, they lose by—elections. i think if you look back to last may, the truly astonishing thing was that we managed to win at hartlepool with a very different circumstance. what we need to do now is reflect on where voters are and i think what they are basically feeling is that we came through covid well and we took a lot of the decisions now but we are now facing pressure on the cost of living, seeing spikes in fuel prices, energy costs, food costs, that hitting people. we have
8:04 am
got to recognise that there is more that we have got to do, and we certainly will, we will keep going, addressing the concerns of people until we get through this patch. let's take a look at those results. the liberal democrats pulled off an historic win in tiverton and honiton — overturning a conservative majority of 24,000 to lead by more than 6,000 votes. it's the biggest ever majority to be lost in a by—election. in wakefield, labour won back the seat which was taken by borisjohnson in the last election. the party won byjust under 5,000 votes. let's get some reaction to those results. iain watson is in wakefield for us this morning. i understand we are expecting keir starmer, leader of the labour party, to there at some point to celebrate the win for the labour party.
8:05 am
absolutely right, he is expected to quite soon. it is significant which part of the constituency he is attending. this is a seat which had been labour since 1932, apart from 2019 and when that red wall of lever voting seats crumbled. —— leave voting seats crumbled. —— leave voting seat. but this place was traditionally conservative so he wants to say that he is winning over new converts, people who traditionally voted conservative and are coming to him. the bigger question is this. when i was talking to this constituency�*s voters, i'd certainly found people who were switching from toys to labours but it wasn't about keir starmer, they were driven away —— from tory to
8:06 am
labour but it wasn't about keir starmer, it was about being driven away by borisjohnson. one person said they wanted to get rid of his antics, and another said they wanted to get rid of him and his cronies. but the scale of the win to labour say it puts them on course for a general election victory, some polling experts are not sure. but certain it was beyond their expectations when they began this campaign. it may have been the scale of the victory which helped push oliver dowden out of the door of the conservative headquarters, the conservative headquarters, the conservative party chairman. i can conservative party chairman. i can see sopporters — conservative party chairman. i can see supporters gathering - conservative party chairman. i can see supporters gathering ahead of sir keir starmer attending, and i can hear the hustle and bustle there, it does feel like there is an air of excitement.— there, it does feel like there is an air of excitement. there is an area of excitement _ air of excitement. there is an area of excitement here, _ air of excitement. there is an area of excitement here, there - air of excitement. there is an area of excitement here, there is i air of excitement. there is an area | of excitement here, there is hustle and bustle, i can tell you why, how rving interview is the labour leader, keir starmer himself. he is
8:07 am
being cheered by the activists that have gathered in the market square here in the wake constituency, he is flanked by simon lightwood, the successful labour candidate. you probably cannot hear me over the cheering now! let's hear what keir starmer has got to say. latte cheering now! let's hear what keir starmer has got to say.— cheering now! let's hear what keir starmer has got to say. we will get him reacting _ starmer has got to say. we will get him reacting to _ starmer has got to say. we will get him reacting to the _ starmer has got to say. we will get him reacting to the result - starmer has got to say. we will get him reacting to the result in - him reacting to the result in wakefield... him reacting to the result in wakefield. . ._ him reacting to the result in wakefield... ~ ., ., ., ., wakefield... what a candidate! you didn't 'ust wakefield... what a candidate! you didn't just get _ wakefield... what a candidate! you didn't just get this _ wakefield... what a candidate! you didn'tjust get this over _ wakefield... what a candidate! you didn'tjust get this over the - wakefield... what a candidate! you didn'tjust get this over the line, i didn'tjust get this over the line, you absolutely smashed it. a brilliant _ you absolutely smashed it. a brilliant result, a great result for labour~ — brilliant result, a great result for labour. this is a vindication of all of our— labour. this is a vindication of all of our hard — labour. this is a vindication of all of our hard work over the last two years _ of our hard work over the last two years. because what wakefield could see is _ years. because what wakefield could see is a _ years. because what wakefield could see is a labour party confident, united. — see is a labour party confident, united. and _ see is a labour party confident, united, and absolutely focused on
8:08 am
the issues — united, and absolutely focused on the issues affecting working people. and as _ the issues affecting working people. and as a _ the issues affecting working people. and as a result, they put their faith— and as a result, they put their faith in— and as a result, they put their faith in simon, and they put their faith— faith in simon, and they put their faith in— faith in simon, and they put their faith in our— faith in simon, and they put their faith in our party. thank you for everything _ faith in our party. thank you for everything you did to bring about that result. and what a judgment this is— that result. and what a judgment this is on— that result. and what a judgment this is on the tories, and boris johnson — this is on the tories, and boris johnson. what a judgment it is on them _ johnson. what a judgment it is on them 0ut— johnson. what a judgment it is on them. out of touch, out of ideas, and if— them. out of touch, out of ideas, and if they— them. out of touch, out of ideas, and if they had any decency, they would _ and if they had any decency, they would get — and if they had any decency, they would get out of the way for the sake _ would get out of the way for the sake of— would get out of the way for the sake of the country. because i can tell you — sake of the country. because i can tell you i— sake of the country. because i can tell you... lam sake of the country. because i can tell you... i am so proud of you, simon. — tell you... i am so proud of you, simon. i— tell you... i am so proud of you, simon. iam— tell you... i am so proud of you, simon, i am so proud of our labour party _ simon, i am so proud of our labour party and — simon, i am so proud of our labour party. and when we do form that the next labour — party. and when we do form that the next labour government, and we are going _ next labour government, and we are going to _ next labour government, and we are going to do _ next labour government, and we are going to do it, wakefield will go down _ going to do it, wakefield will go down as— going to do it, wakefield will go down as the birthplace of that. thank— down as the birthplace of that. thank you, simon, yourfirst down as the birthplace of that. thank you, simon, your first word as a member— thank you, simon, your first word as a member of— thank you, simon, your first word as a member of parliament.— thank you, simon, your first word as a member of parliament. thank you so much, a member of parliament. thank you so much. each — a member of parliament. thank you so much. each and _ a member of parliament. thank you so much, each and every _ a member of parliament. thank you so much, each and every one _ a member of parliament. thank you so much, each and every one of— a member of parliament. thank you so much, each and every one of you i a member of parliament. thank you so much, each and every one of you who. much, each and every one of you who have turned _ much, each and every one of you who have turned out — much, each and every one of you who have turned out campaign _ much, each and every one of you who have turned out campaign in- have turned out campaign in wakefield _
8:09 am
have turned out campaign in wakefield. we _ have turned out campaign in wakefield. we have - have turned out campaign in wakefield. we have done i have turned out campaign in wakefield. we have done it, have turned out campaign in. wakefield. we have done it, we turned — wakefield. we have done it, we turned away— wakefield. we have done it, we turned away kill— wakefield. we have done it, we turned away kill the _ wakefield. we have done it, we turned away kill the red - wakefield. we have done it, we turned away kill the red again, . wakefield. we have done it, we i turned away kill the red again, and giving _ turned away kill the red again, and giving the — turned away kill the red again, and giving the people _ turned away kill the red again, and giving the people of— turned away kill the red again, and giving the people of wakefield i turned away kill the red again, andl giving the people of wakefield back their voice — giving the people of wakefield back theirvoice in— giving the people of wakefield back their voice in parliament. _ giving the people of wakefield back their voice in parliament. so- giving the people of wakefield back their voice in parliament. so thankl their voice in parliament. so thank you again — their voice in parliament. so thank you again from _ their voice in parliament. so thank you again from the _ their voice in parliament. so thank you again from the bottom - their voice in parliament. so thank you again from the bottom of- their voice in parliament. so thank you again from the bottom of my i you again from the bottom of my heart _ you again from the bottom of my heart now— you again from the bottom of my heart now it's— you again from the bottom of my heart. now it's time _ you again from the bottom of my heart. now it's time to _ you again from the bottom of my heart. now it's time to get - you again from the bottom of my heart. now it's time to get on i you again from the bottom of my. heart. now it's time to get on with the job, _ heart. now it's time to get on with the job, thank— heart. now it's time to get on with the job, thank you. _ heart. now it's time to get on with the job, thank you.— that is their keir starmer, leader of the labour party there. are you going to get a chance to talk to him? ~ :, , going to get a chance to talk to him? ~ ., , ,., going to get a chance to talk to him? i, going to get a chance to talk to him?— you i going to get a chance to talk to | him?— you can him? we hope so, yes! you can imagine. _ him? we hope so, yes! you can imagine, journalists _ him? we hope so, yes! you can imagine, journalists all - him? we hope so, yes! you can i imagine, journalists all clamouring to get a question in to the leader of the labour party. as he was saying there, veryjubilant as you can see, unsurprisingly saying that the labour party has absolutely smashed it. he says it is a vindication of the hard work of the labour party over the past two years. labour party over the past two ears. ~ : labour party over the past two ears. : ., ., , labour party over the past two ears. : ., , labour party over the past two ears, ~ ., .,, , :, years. we are leig -- laser focus on the issues — years. we are leig -- laser focus on the issues of — years. we are leig -- laser focus on the issues of working _ years. we are leig -- laser focus on the issues of working people, i years. we are leig -- laser focus on
8:10 am
the issues of working people, that l the issues of working people, that is why— the issues of working people, that is why they put their faith in simon. _ is why they put their faith in simon, that is why they put their faith— simon, that is why they put their faith in— simon, that is why they put their faith in the — simon, that is why they put their faith in the labour party. this puts us absolutely on track for a labour government, which is now absolutely coming _ government, which is now absolutely comint. :, :, government, which is now absolutely comint. :, ., ., government, which is now absolutely comint. :, :, ., government, which is now absolutely comint. :, ., ., ., coming. you are live on good morning britain,... 0k, ok, some technical problems, as you can imagine will happen. can we hear? no, he is obviously delighted with that result. iain watson, our political correspondent is there as well. let's listen in. the political correspondent is there as well. let's listen in.— well. let's listen in. the country voted yesterday _ well. let's listen in. the country voted yesterday in _ well. let's listen in. the country voted yesterday in both - voted yesterday in both by—elections, no confidence in this out of— by—elections, no confidence in this out of touch, out of ideas government. so this is a historic by-election _ government. so this is a historic by—election as far as we are —— we are concerned. by-election as far as we are -- we are concerned-— by-election as far as we are -- we are concerned. you have got to win back many — are concerned. you have got to win back many more — are concerned. you have got to win back many more seats _ are concerned. you have got to win back many more seats like - are concerned. you have got to win back many more seats like this. i are concerned. you have got to win l back many more seats like this. yes, but this is a — back many more seats like this. yes, but this is a huge _ back many more seats like this. yes, but this is a huge swing _ back many more seats like this. yes, but this is a huge swing to labour. and as _ but this is a huge swing to labour. and as i _
8:11 am
but this is a huge swing to labour. and as i say, — but this is a huge swing to labour. and as i say, for two years, we have been _ and as i say, for two years, we have been changing the labour party to make _ been changing the labour party to make it _ been changing the labour party to make it into that competent party, that party— make it into that competent party, that party which is facing the voters — that party which is facing the voters that is laser focused on the issues _ voters that is laser focused on the issues that— voters that is laser focused on the issues that affect them, and that is why people have put their faith in simon. _ why people have put their faith in simon, but their faith in our labour party— simon, but their faith in our labour partyand— simon, but their faith in our labour party and i— simon, but their faith in our labour party and i could not be proud of this historic moment on the step towards — this historic moment on the step towards the next labour government. you are _ towards the next labour government. you are live _ towards the next labour government. you are live on bbc breakfast news, can i speak to you about this result? let's talk about your result briefly, your reaction to the resignation of oliver dowden is to conservative party chairman? the to -a conservative party chairman? the tory party is _ conservative party chairman? ti2 tory party is absolutely imploding. they know they are out of ideas and out of touch, and if they had any decency, they would get out of the way for the next labour government. what happened here in wakefield was people exercising theirjudgment on this conservative government, and of no confidence. but for me and the labour party, this is very important because for two years, we have been turning our party around, and we were able to show the voters in
8:12 am
wakefield we are a confident and united party, and we are laser focused on the issues that affect working people in wakefield. and thatis working people in wakefield. and that is why they have put their faith in simon, and the labour party. faith in simon, and the labour pa . �* faith in simon, and the labour pa . , faith in simon, and the labour pa , ., ., faith in simon, and the labour pa , ., party. don't you yet have a problem? peole are party. don't you yet have a problem? people are voting _ party. don't you yet have a problem? people are voting no _ party. don't you yet have a problem? people are voting no confidence i party. don't you yet have a problem? people are voting no confidence in i people are voting no confidence in borisjohnson, back in 2012 let me remind you of labour's by—election success in corby. 12% swing like you got here, remind me of what happened the general election. {1371 got here, remind me of what happened the general election.— the general election. of course, but i have had no _ the general election. of course, but i have had no end _ the general election. of course, but i have had no end of _ the general election. of course, but| i have had no end of commentators, of polska for two years, as we rolled up our sleeves and have done the hard work —— polls, and done the hard work of the labour party, and this now puts us on track for a majority labour government. this is hugely significant for the labour party. i am so proud that we can present that confident labour party, utterly focused on the voters, that is what i want to achieve, and this is what i want to achieve, and this is evidence that we are on course for a labour government.-
8:13 am
is evidence that we are on course for a labour government. some of those voters _ for a labour government. some of those voters are _ for a labour government. some of those voters are saying _ for a labour government. some of those voters are saying that - for a labour government. some of those voters are saying that they i those voters are saying that they are defecting to you as a protest this time, and lack of enthusiasm for borisjohnson, not enthusiasm for borisjohnson, not enthusiasm for you. fin for boris johnson, not enthusiasm for ou. . ~ for boris johnson, not enthusiasm for ou. ., ., , for you. on the back of that result and that's when, _ for you. on the back of that result and that's when, i'm _ for you. on the back of that result and that's when, i'm afraid - for you. on the back of that result and that's when, i'm afraid that i and that's when, i'm afraid that argument does not carry. people came to the labour party because the labour party was talking to them and for them, thank you very much. thank you. thank you very much, iain watson, for us in wakefield. sir keir starmer, leader of the labour party, there, celebrating the party's win. we just saw nick briefly, let's go to him now. he is in tiverton, following their win by the liberal democrats and the numbers were historic. there is quite a lot of people to pick up on this morning. you can help me with this. compare and contrast some words coming out of two different politicians this morning. one is in the now former chairman of the conservative party,
8:14 am
oliver dowden, and he said this morning in his letter to the prime minister, we cannot carry on with business as usual. somebody must take responsibility, i have concluded that that, in these circumstances, it would not be right for me to remain in office. and, "the comments of the prior minute. —— and the comments of the prime minister this morning saying, after hearing the results, that he would listen to the voters but keep going. yeah, charlie, that is the debate which will be happening in the conservative party over the next few hours. some say it has been raging for weeks, and it will be raging for weeks still yet. essentially what oliver dowden said in his resignation letter is that the party is despondent, he called it "distressed and disappointed by recent events. he says he shares the view and he says things cannot
8:15 am
continue as they have been. boris johnson has responded saying he completely understands the disappointment in the by—election results but, and i think this is something you are going to hear from borisjohnson a bit more, this government was elected with an historic mandate just over two years ago to unite and level up. the prime ministers going nowhere. he is absolutely intending and continuing. but there have been three really big blows to his authority now. one, that letter from oliver dowden. blows to his authority now. one, that letterfrom oliver dowden. two, the result in wakefield that iain watson was just talking about, and here in tiverton and honasan, perhaps the biggest blow of all because this should be true blue safe tory territory —— tiverton and honiton. 211,000 majority tory in the last general election has gone up in smoke. this is the biggest majority to be lost in a by—election ever in the uk. the lib dems won it pretty come to be last night by 6000 votes.
8:16 am
—— comfortably last night. even if we don't hear over the next few hours, i think many tory mps around this part of the country in the south of england, in the so—called blue wall, the tory heartland, who will be looking at their majorities and pretty nervous. the question they will be asking themselves this morning is a question that tory mps have been weighing up for the last few weeks and months. is boris johnson still the best man to lead them into the next general election? and some over the last few weeks and change their mind. the question now is, will moorejump? —— will more of them jump? we were expecting to speak to a seniorfigure in the we were expecting to speak to a senior figure in the conservative party, we have heard from boris johnson in rwanda right now but we were expecting to hear from a senior figure in the conservative party but no one has been made available to bbc breakfast this morning. as we ve been hearing borisjohnson isn't here for the by—election
8:17 am
results, our political correspondent, alex forsyth is in the rwandan capital of kigali. you knew that it would be the day after these by—elections, they have proven disastrous, and then now, what you could not have predicted is the resignation of oliver dowden. i should be talking to you about this meeting but actually, people are talking about that by—election results, that resignation and the impact on the prime minister. yes. impact on the prime minister. yes, completely — impact on the prime minister. yes, completely right- — impact on the prime minister. yes, completely right. and _ impact on the prime minister. yes, completely right. and i _ impact on the prime minister. ye: completely right. and i think there was some expectation to be honest in the run—up to this meeting of commonwealth leaders that it was likely that would be the case, because even from the conservative party itself, there was a lot of expectation management. there was thinking that these were probably going to be losses but it is the scale of the molasses and the fact that oliver dowden has resigned which was completely unexpected. i have been talking to the number 10 team this morning and there are no wobbles from them, they say the prime and it is not planning on
8:18 am
going back to the uk, he'll carry on with what he is doing out here into galilee, he is going to meetings for the g7 -- galilee, he is going to meetings for the g7 —— he is in kigali. there is no big plan to shift policy direction. they say there has been a sense of public unease because of the turmoil in the conservative party and westminster in recent months but they say they are going to press on, he is going to press on with the issues he thinks voters care about. he says he is going numb work —— nowhere, he recognises that they are tough result and they need to listen to people but he is going nowhere. the attitude from the number 10 nowhere. the attitude from the number10 camp nowhere. the attitude from the number 10 camp this morning is getting on with a job but whether thatis getting on with a job but whether that is enough to convince conservative mps and ministers that borisjohnson is the right man to be at the top.
8:19 am
let's ta ke let's take a moment to have a look at the weather.— at the weather. how is it looking? pick flowers! _ at the weather. how is it looking? pick flowers! this _ at the weather. how is it looking? pick flowers! this mcgree - at the weather. how is it looking? pick flowers! this mcgree you - at the weather. how is it looking? | pick flowers! this mcgree you have -ot pick flowers! this mcgree you have got big _ pick flowers! this mcgree you have got big flowers! yes, a lot of cloud around this morning but sunny spells for lots of us. we'll miss in the east but things are turning fresher and there will be showers around. it will be warmest in the east. heavy showers clearing away from northern scotland this morning but overall most places dry, we have to watch this area of rain creeping in across western areas through the day particular into northern ireland, south—west england and wales. we will see sunny spells breakthrough for most but it will help at to lift the temperatures and develop some heavy and thundery showers from the midlands into southern scotland especially. they will work north—east, a warm day across eastern parts, 20 to 21. the west
8:20 am
and here is where the showers will be in the afternoon and evening. there are big gaps between their showers, some places will avoid them altogether. the showers could get close to headingley. we have got an area of more persistent rain and thick cloud across parts of northern ireland, wales, devon and cornwall and somerset, edging in glastonbury for the first part of the evening. that will work north and east tonight so most of us will seek a little bit of rain or drizzle. clearer skies into tomorrow morning. a bit fresher compared to tomorrow morning, —— this morning. but showers will get going in the western areas, longer spells of rain in the west and some of the south and east could stay dry. all of us feeling cooler and windier.
8:21 am
there'll be further misery for passengers after hundreds of ba staff at heathrow airport voted to go on strike over pay. ben is there for us this morning. so what does it mean? 700 british airwa s so what does it mean? 700 british airways british _ so what does it mean? 700 british airways british ground _ so what does it mean? 700 british airways british ground workers - so what does it mean? 700 britishj airways british ground workers and check—in staff have voted to go on strike this summer, it is expected to cause some disruption and possibly some cancellations. the row is about pay, the union said there was a 10% pay cut imposed on staff during the pandemic to help ba survive and that has never been reinstated. british airways say they have made a 10% pay offer that most of its staff has accepted and it is disappointed by this action. the big question is, how will this affect you if you are travelling this summer, how will it affect your travel plans? i am delighted to say
8:22 am
that travel journalist simon travel plans? i am delighted to say that traveljournalist simon calder is with me at heathrow and can answer some of these crucial questions. when will these strikes happen, do we know? we questions. when will these strikes happen, do we know?— questions. when will these strikes happen, do we know? we don't know et, the happen, do we know? we don't know yet, the earliest _ happen, do we know? we don't know yet, the earliest possible _ happen, do we know? we don't know yet, the earliest possible date - happen, do we know? we don't know yet, the earliest possible date is - yet, the earliest possible date is the 8th— yet, the earliest possible date is the 8th ofjuly but the noises from the 8th ofjuly but the noises from the union— the 8th ofjuly but the noises from the union suggests that it could be injuly. _ the union suggests that it could be injuly. friday is probably the day they will— injuly. friday is probably the day they will go for, quite possibly the 22nd of— they will go for, quite possibly the 22nd ofjuly, that would be perhaps when _ 22nd ofjuly, that would be perhaps when they— 22nd ofjuly, that would be perhaps when they might start the action. i must _ when they might start the action. i must say— when they might start the action. i must say this is absolutely pure speculation. it might be called off, they are _ speculation. it might be called off, they are not the most militant workers — they are not the most militant workers in the aviation industry. but probably to coincide with the main _ but probably to coincide with the main school holidays starting in england — main school holidays starting in england and wales, so that could be for example the 22nd, 23rd, 24th of july, we _ for example the 22nd, 23rd, 24th of july, we just don't know. i am one of i estimate — july, we just don't know. i am one of i estimate 2 million passengers who are _ of i estimate 2 million passengers who are booked in the course ofjuly to fly— who are booked in the course ofjuly to fly on— who are booked in the course ofjuly to fly on british airways and at the moment— to fly on british airways and at the moment there is very little any of
8:23 am
us can do. if any of those passengers are watching thinking, what i do — passengers are watching thinking, what i do about flight, what if i have _ what i do about flight, what if i have to — what i do about flight, what if i have to absolutely travel, what can they do _ have to absolutely travel, what can they do now for peace of mind? at they do now for peace of mind? at the moment if you ask your travel agent— the moment if you ask your travel agent or— the moment if you ask your travel agent or british airways, they will simply— agent or british airways, they will simply say, your flight is intended to operate — simply say, your flight is intended to operate absolutely as normal. but we have _ to operate absolutely as normal. but we have seen widespread cancellations and general disruption across— cancellations and general disruption across aviation across british airways _ across aviation across british airways as well but the presumption is the _ airways as well but the presumption is the triple go ahead. you will not be able _ is the triple go ahead. you will not be able to— is the triple go ahead. you will not be able to get a refund. you could if it is— be able to get a refund. you could if it is a _ be able to get a refund. you could if it is a really time critical holiday— if it is a really time critical holiday orjourney that you are making — holiday orjourney that you are making book a ticket on another airline _ making book a ticket on another airline but — making book a ticket on another airline but it will only get your nroney— airline but it will only get your money back if the british airways one turns — money back if the british airways one turns out to be cancelled. european _ one turns out to be cancelled. european air passenger rights rules are on— european air passenger rights rules are on your— european air passenger rights rules are on your side if your flight is cancelled — are on your side if your flight is cancelled for any reason, the airline — cancelled for any reason, the airline that cancels its have to try to find _ airline that cancels its have to try to find you — airline that cancels its have to try to find you a seat on a flight on the same — to find you a seat on a flight on the same day as you were originally hooked _ the same day as you were originally hooked to _ the same day as you were originally booked to travel. | the same day as you were originally booked to travel.— booked to travel. i have heard examples _ booked to travel. i have heard examples where _ booked to travel. i have heard examples where people - booked to travel. i have heard examples where people say i booked to travel. i have heard i examples where people say they booked to travel. i have heard - examples where people say they have tried to use that argument and have
8:24 am
been told, we are not booking you onto another site, not necessarily ba. is that an absolute right and what if the airline refuses? lit ba. is that an absolute right and what if the airline refuses? if you have not what if the airline refuses? if you have got room — what if the airline refuses? if you have got room in _ what if the airline refuses? if you have got room in your _ what if the airline refuses? if you have got room in your credit - what if the airline refuses? if you have got room in your credit card j have got room in your credit card you have — have got room in your credit card you have to— have got room in your credit card you have to book your own ticket but yes, last _ you have to book your own ticket but yes, last week the department for transport — yes, last week the department for transport and the civil aviation authority — transport and the civil aviation authority wrote to the airlines are reminding — authority wrote to the airlines are reminding them of their obligation, and absolutely specifying it, although you are quite right, number of airlines— although you are quite right, number ofairlines are although you are quite right, number of airlines are saying, we don't do that _ of airlines are saying, we don't do that. , ~ ., ., ~ that. the strike we are talking about for british _ that. the strike we are talking about for british airways - that. the strike we are talking l about for british airways ground staff and check—in staff, it applies here at heathrow airport. there are other strikes happening as well, easyjet staff and cabin crew in spain, ryanairstaff easyjet staff and cabin crew in spain, ryanair staff across europe. what kind of disruption can be expected to other airports around the uk this summer? it expected to other airports around the uk this summer?— expected to other airports around the uk this summer? it does sound a bit like the end _ the uk this summer? it does sound a bit like the end of— the uk this summer? it does sound a bit like the end of summer _ the uk this summer? it does sound a bit like the end of summer as - the uk this summer? it does sound a bit like the end of summer as we - bit like the end of summer as we know— bit like the end of summer as we know it _ bit like the end of summer as we know it because of all of this disruption. the vast majority of people — disruption. the vast majority of people are going to get away as planned — people are going to get away as planned. the british airways dispute only affects heathrow terminal five
8:25 am
and terminal three, does not affect gatwick, _ and terminal three, does not affect gatwick, london city or any of their other— gatwick, london city or any of their other hases— gatwick, london city or any of their other bases because the staff there are all— other bases because the staff there are all outsourced. if you have got are all outsourced. if you have got a booking — are all outsourced. if you have got a booking on any of these airlines, 'ust a booking on any of these airlines, just assume — a booking on any of these airlines, just assume it's going to go ahead, and the _ just assume it's going to go ahead, and the overwhelming chance is that it will— and the overwhelming chance is that it will he _ and the overwhelming chance is that it will be. ,, ., ., ~ i. .,, it will be. simon, thank you as alwa s. it will be. simon, thank you as always- you — it will be. simon, thank you as always. you will _ it will be. simon, thank you as always. you will have - it will be. simon, thank you as always. you will have heard i always. you will have heard reporters and presenters like me using the phrase travel misery are not in recent days, i dare say you may hear those words even more over the summer. bits seller of a shame there. an efficient sun is shining here. —— it is a bit of a shame. at least the sun is shining here. morning live follows breakfast on bbc one this morning. kimberley and rav can tell us what they have in store. coming up on morning live. this week we've seen the biggest rail strikes for more than 30 years cause disruption across the uk. with the chaos set to continue, consumer champ, matt allwright, explains the quickest route to a refund. that's right. it's full steam ahead for getting your money back.
8:26 am
whether it's a one—off journey or a season ticket that you've lost out on, i'll tell you exactly what you're entitled to. and they've become a popular mode of transport and are meant to make travelling around easier but tv presenter and disability activist samantha renke investigates how e—bikes and scooters are cluttering up our streets, and in some cases, becoming a dangerous hazard. plus, it's the auto—immune condition that can have a huge impact on a patient�*s mobility. dr ranj explains how ground—breaking research, using bone marrow, could help treat multiple sclerosis, and what to do if the warmer weather is making it worse. also today, we've got exclusive access to wimbledon, ahead of the iconic competition kicking off next week. our gardener, mark lane, has been behind the scenes to discover the secrets to getting its grass courts match—ready, and how you can make your own lawn look ace.
8:27 am
definite grass goals there! plus, actor ryan thomas tells us why he'sjoining stephen fry and prue leith in a day of celebration that aims to help people remember loved ones they've lost, and she's a ray of sunshine who always gets us feeling positive. katya jones is here to round off our week of moves that celebrate glastonbury headliners in strictly fitness. see you at 9:15. a jam—packed programme, thank ajam—packed programme, thank you so much, see you soon. time now to get the news, travel and weather where you are. god morning from bbc london, i'm tarah welsh. health officials say new data shows around 3a thousand children in the capital haven't had their polio booster by their fifth birthday. which means they're not fully protected. it comes after the virus that causes the disease was found in sewage samples. no actual cases of polio have been detected though.
8:28 am
we have recently seen more of this vaccine—like polio virus circulating in parts of north—east london. because we have seen it over a few weeks, we just wanted to raise the alarm to say that this is happening, we are seeing it, it is being investigated. there is nothing to worry about if you have been vaccinated and your vaccine is up—to—date. train companies say services won't be back to normal until later this morning because of this week's rail strike. elsewhere on public transport—we can take a look at how services are doing. the bakerloo line has severe delays and a few other issues out there so do check before you travel. now, drivers may want to take note. from next week you could be fined if you're caught in a cycle lane. new enforcement powers given to tfl will target vehicles that or cross the solid white lines along the network.
8:29 am
so it will be simialr to a fine for parking on double—red lines or driving in bus lanes. a charity shop in east london which gives free clothes to struggling famililies has become so popular it's been given a permanent space in lakeside shopping centre. the money raised from sales of second—hand clothes helps to provide free clothing for those in need. we do receive return referrals, so our message would be don't feel ashamed. we have a whole community behind us that are coming in daily with donations. onto the weather with elizabeth rizzini. hello, good morning. a few changes happening again weather—wise across the capital today. the air will feel fresher. there will be a noticeable south—westerly blowing. the high pressure has now moved away and low pressure not too far away. an approaching weather front overnight tonight. a scattering of showers and cooler air over the weekend, but also some sunny spells. we are starting with sunny spells this morning.
8:30 am
a mild start to the day. still sunny spells through the afternoon but a speckling of cloud around, as well. watch out for the possibility of one or two showers blowing through on this brisk south—westerly wind picking up through the afternoon. temperatures lower than they were, peaking at 23—24 celsius, but still feeling warm in the best of the sunshine. overnight tonight, it stays rather breezy. longer spells of rain for a time. that is our weather front coming through, introducing coolerfeeling air over the weekend. so a drop in temperature. possibly quite cloudy with showers. still windy on saturday. lots of dry weather around on sunday, with sunny spells but staying rather breezy. i'm back with the latest from the bbc london newsroom in half an hour. plenty more on our website at the usual address. now though it's back to charlie and naga. bye for now. hello, this is breakfast with charlie stayt and naga munchetty.
8:31 am
good morning. it was good night for the liberal democrats who overturned a 211,000 tory majority to win the by—election in tiverton and honiton — let's speak to the leader of the party sir ed davey. despite the rain, i can see the smile on yourface despite the rain, i can see the smile on your face already. a night ofjoy for the liberal democrats. yes, a fantastic result for the liberal democrats. the biggest tory majority overturned in british election history so that was the scale of it what happened was people were saying borisjohnson must go. when we spoke to people on the doorsteps they were fed up with the prime minister not fit in decent to be prime minister of our great country. they think he is a lying lawbreaker and does not have a plan for issues worrying people. people
8:32 am
are worried about rising prices. pensioners and families not able to put food on the table, worrying about the price of petrol, and they do not feel the prime minister has a grip. they like what the liberal democrats were saying with a proposal for a vat cut which would give the average family £600. but there is no doubt it was a positive vote for the liberal democrats but a clear message to conservative mps borisjohnson must go. you clear message to conservative mps boris johnson must go.— clear message to conservative mps boris johnson must go. you say the messa . e boris johnson must go. you say the message is — boris johnson must go. you say the message is boris _ boris johnson must go. you say the message is boris johnson _ boris johnson must go. you say the message is boris johnson must - boris johnson must go. you say the message is boris johnson must go. | message is borisjohnson must go. would you not rather the message he the lib dems are the party we want and have confidence in?— and have confidence in? there is definitely that. _ and have confidence in? there is definitely that. it _ and have confidence in? there is definitely that. it was _ and have confidence in? there is definitely that. it was a - and have confidence in? there is definitely that. it was a positive | definitely that. it was a positive vote. our candidate richard ford had beenin vote. our candidate richard ford had been in the british army ten years and left as a major. a local community person. he will be a strong champion for the people of tiverton and honiton. i think you
8:33 am
have seen in council elections and other by—elections, people voting positively for liberal democrats. we have a reputation as a party that speaks for the community they represent and not a party governed by the whips office as with so many tory mps. i think there is a positive vote. i campaigned in a lot of elections and here in east devon and i will be frank, a lot of people want to see the back of boris johnson. ~ ., , want to see the back of boris johnson. ~ . , ., .,' . ., johnson. was there an unofficial act with johnson. was there an unofficial pact with the — johnson. was there an unofficial pact with the labour _ johnson. was there an unofficial pact with the labour party - johnson. was there an unofficial pact with the labour party when | johnson. was there an unofficial i pact with the labour party when it came to tiverton & honiton? ho. came to tiverton & honiton? no. there has — came to tiverton & honiton? no. there has not _ came to tiverton & honiton? no. there has not been _ came to tiverton & honiton? firm there has not been and there came to tiverton & honiton? fin. there has not been and there will not be. myjob as liberal democrat leader is to win as many seats. the seats we can win, it means defeating conservative mps and councillors. we have shown we can do that. in buckinghamshire, north shropshire, a
8:34 am
seat the tories had held 200 years, and now here. liberal democrats are determined to remove as many conservative mps at the next election. we are coming up with policies, positive ideas i think will do that.— policies, positive ideas i think will do that. policies, positive ideas i think willdothat. ,, , ., will do that. the lib dems, you have 14 mp5? will do that. the lib dems, you have 14 mps? that's _ will do that. the lib dems, you have 14 mps? that's right. _ will do that. the lib dems, you have 14 mps? that's right. how _ will do that. the lib dems, you have 14 mps? that's right. how many - will do that. the lib dems, you have l 14 mps? that's right. how many more mps do you expect to have at the next general election? what does this result say to you? it is all very well winning by—elections. we know the politics surrounding them at the moment. but does it translate and how will it translate into a general election? l and how will it translate into a general election?— and how will it translate into a general election? i don't know is the honest _ general election? i don't know is the honest answer. _ general election? i don't know is the honest answer. what - general election? i don't know is the honest answer. what i - general election? i don't know is the honest answer. what i did i general election? i don't know is| the honest answer. what i did not expect a year ago is we would win three by—elections in tory
8:35 am
heartlands and have three more mps. i will not predict the future. i think this feels like the mid—19 90s. think this feels like the mid—19 905. if i think this feels like the mid—19 90s. if i can take you back to those days, a government that had been in a long time, they had lost control of the economy, people were turning to the liberal democrats. that was the last time we won so many by—elections in a short period. what happened after those victories, we increased our seats massively and the tory government was defeated at the tory government was defeated at the subsequent general election. i will not call it yet, but it does have a sense that the conservative government is going to lose power and we will see borisjohnson out and we will see borisjohnson out and there will be more liberal democrat mps at the next general election. ., ,._ democrat mps at the next general election. ., _ i. , democrat mps at the next general election. ., , , election. you say you will see boris johnson out- _ election. you say you will see boris johnson out. we _ election. you say you will see boris johnson out. we had _ election. you say you will see boris johnson out. we had a _ election. you say you will see boris johnson out. we had a resignationl johnson out. we had a resignation today, oliver darren, chairman of
8:36 am
the conservative party.— the conservative party. your reaction to _ the conservative party. your reaction to that? _ the conservative party. your reaction to that? it - the conservative party. your reaction to that? it is - the conservative party. your reaction to that? it is not. the conservative party. your| reaction to that? it is not the resignation i want. i want to see borisjohnson go. people on the doorstep in east devon were not talking about oliver dowden, never heard of him. they have heard of borisjohnson and know he is not decent and fit to be the prime minister of our great country. what minister of our great country. what does it mean? _ minister of our great country. what does it mean? what _ minister of our great country. what does it mean? what does it mean? from your point of view, explained to viewers what oliver dowden resigning means in terms of stability of the conservative party and its image, and how you are taking it. and its image, and how you are takin: it. �* , , , and its image, and how you are takin: it. d , , ., taking it. let's remember, 'ust a week or so i taking it. let's remember, 'ust a week or so ago. i taking it. let's remember, 'ust a week or so ago, 148 i taking it. let's remember, just a | week or so ago, 148 conservative taking it. let's remember, just a - week or so ago, 148 conservative mps voted to have no confidence in the prime minister. that was a staggering result. ithink
8:37 am
prime minister. that was a staggering result. i think the by—election victory of liberal democrats in east devon and the resignation of oliver dowden are more signs that this is a divided conservative party that has not got a plan for the country and that needs to see dramatic change. i would like to see them go but i particularly want boris johnson to particularly want borisjohnson to go particularly want boris johnson to go because that is what people are telling us. conservative mps can have another vote of no confidence in the prime minister if they wanted to, it is in their power. i think if they did it would be more than 148 mps and he could go. if oliver dowden backed up his resignation letter, he would back it up with a letter, he would back it up with a letter no confidence.— letter, he would back it up with a letter no confidence. boris johnson has said the _ letter no confidence. boris johnson has said the conservative - letter no confidence. boris johnson has said the conservative party - letter no confidence. boris johnsonj has said the conservative party will spend time now focusing on the fact the cost of living crisis is that the cost of living crisis is that the front of people's mines. dominic raab has spoken on the bbc today on bbc radio 4 and said the
8:38 am
conservative party needed to spend the next two years focusing on delivering the government plans. do you think that if they managed to deliver and tackle the cost of living satisfactorily, that would be enough for the conservative party to retain seats at the next election? l retain seats at the next election? i doubt it, because their plan at retain seats at the next election? l doubt it, because their plan at the moment involves a lot of tax rises. we have seen 15 tax rises from the conservatives and some of those tax rises by the conservatives have hit the lowest paid demos. they have frozen income tax allowances and dragged some of the lowest paid into income tax. the reverse of what the liberal democrats did when we have the opportunity. this is a conservative government that taxes the poorest. the conservative say they will remove restriction so people in the city can earn higher and higher bonuses. look at what the
8:39 am
conservatives do, not what they say. they allow rich friends in the city to earn huge amounts of money and tax the lower paid. they are an unfair government and do not care about ordinary people. their plans are not speaking to the problems millions of families and pensioners face. so i do not think their plans are right for our country. if they put them forward, i think it will make things worse. we need tax cuts and that is what the liberal democrats have argued for. so ed dave , democrats have argued for. so ed davey. thank _ democrats have argued for. so ed davey, thank you. _ we're joined now by our political editor chris mason. i have been watching you ingesting information on your phone. what i would like to do is cut to the chase. look at boris johnson's comments and chase. look at borisjohnson's comments and reaction. he is in rwanda but gave reaction and he said
8:40 am
that he would listen to voters but keep going. that he would listen to voters but keep going-— keep going. exactly. that is the crux of this. _ keep going. exactly. that is the crux of this. boris _ keep going. exactly. that is the crux of this. boris johnson - keep going. exactly. that is the crux of this. boris johnson is i crux of this. borisjohnson is pointing to the mandate he has from voters from 2019 when yes, he and his party won 13.9 million votes and a huge majority. but what we are seeing in by—elections, electrified by the resignation from oliver dowden this morning, you do not design at 5:30am unless you are in a panic, is a party that is worrying borisjohnson is now a loser. his pitch has always been vote for me because i am a around he was right, he delivered on the deal to conservative mps. now they see evidence that he is a loser. the reality this morning is that his cabinet held his fate in
8:41 am
their hands. an absent prime minister out on the world stage at the commonwealth heads of government summit, and from there he goes to germany to another summit and then to spain for a third summit. he will be out of the country the next week. the cliche about when the cat is a way, the mice can play. that is the reality he faces. he is making calls from rwanda to senior cabinet ministers. those that are loyal i think will pop up on the tv and radio in the coming hours. others, bluntly, are not picking up the phone either to colleagues or to journalists and that is because they are asking a simple question, do they hitch their fortunes to boris johnson, or do something else? that is interesting- _ johnson, or do something else? that is interesting. in _ johnson, or do something else? that is interesting. in relation to the resignation of oliver dowden, looking at the letter. the final line is attracting attention. he says, finally, i would emphasise
8:42 am
this is the letter to the prime minister, i want to emphasise this is a deeply personal decision i have taken alone. i will always remain loyal to the conservative party. there is no reference directly... i was trying to look for it earlier. oliver dowden, in the aftermath of the confidence vote in the prime minister said, the confidence vote in the prime ministersaid, i the confidence vote in the prime minister said, i will vote for boris johnson tonight. he has got the big calls right. and we have spoken to many politicians on the conservative side that that was the fullback argument. a lot of stuff going on but he got the big calls right and oliver dowden has broken away from that narrative.— that narrative. exactly right. five paragraphs— that narrative. exactly right. five paragraphs in — that narrative. exactly right. five paragraphs in that _ that narrative. exactly right. five paragraphs in that letter - that narrative. exactly right. five paragraphs in that letter and - that narrative. exactly right. five paragraphs in that letter and not | that narrative. exactly right. fivel paragraphs in that letter and not a single explicit endorsement of boris johnson. in that final sentence, he professes loyalty, but he professes loyalty to the conservative party. and his actions to demonstrate that loyalty involve walking away from
8:43 am
boris johnson's team loyalty involve walking away from borisjohnson's team and going to the conservative backbenches. in case that is not clear enough, i have been in touch with oliver dowden and his team and asked them in many senses the easiest question, do you have faith and confidence in your leader? easy question, because your leader? easy question, because you can either type out yes or no macro. there was no response. it does not take long to type yes. that was not forthcoming. now we see what oliver dowden might do next. does he give an interview? does he embellish his observations in the letter and say something critical of boris johnson and demand he should go? but crucially, what the other cabinet ministers do. and where does it leave the 30 or so additional conservative mps needed on top of the 148 from a few weeks ago who said they did not already have
8:44 am
confidence in borisjohnson, where does that leave them? what are they pondering this morning? in a situation where sir graham brady, chairman of the backbenchers, became aware of the majority of conservative mps did not have faith in the prime minister, even though the rules mean he survived the vote a few weeks ago and there is a year until there is another one. the truth in politics is if a political leader cannot command a majority of their own mps in support, their time is numbered. oliver dowden's injection into the conversation of that letter this morning electrified that letter this morning electrified that conversation again. it is harder now for the conservatives to say this was priced in, we were expecting this it is a difficult mid term. those things are true but oliver dowden's move this morning starts that conversation again. there are conservatives with jitters
8:45 am
this morning because a lot of them will look at the numbers in the by—elections last night and worry about their own seats at the next election. i am asking you to sum up a lot that has gone on this morning. labour and the lib dems have won. we are using the lib dems have won. we are using the narrative of the conservatives losing but they were wins and we have heard from the leaders who are talking big this morning. absolutely. labour. the result in wakefield is less surprising than that in devon but more important. if there is to be a change in government at westminster, labour have to take seats from the conservatives. and they have demonstrated last night they can do that, albeit in a seat they held at every general election from the 30s until 2019 when they lost it. seats like wakefield are at the top of the pile seats labour have to win if
8:46 am
keir starmer will be prime minister and if he had failed to do that they would have been huge questions for keir starmer but he can smile today and say we are making progress. and the lib dems, their brand was poisoned for many by their time in coalition government. the antidote of time seems to have washed away a bit of that poison and what happened last night was not a flash in a pan, the third time in a year the conservatives have had their seats taken by the lib dems. put those two things together and you have in miniature overnight the nightmare for the conservatives because you have labour taking seats in the north of england they felt, up until recently, they would normally be able to bank. and the lib dems starting to get a foothold again in regions like the south—west of england where previously they would send a minibus of mps to westminster and recently no mps at all. so that is why when we look at the
8:47 am
performance of the other two parties, why the conservatives are worried this morning.— worried this morning. lovely to chat. a worried this morning. lovely to chat- a lot _ worried this morning. lovely to chat. a lot to _ worried this morning. lovely to chat. a lot to go _ worried this morning. lovely to chat. a lot to go through. - worried this morning. lovely to chat. a lot to go through. all i worried this morning. lovely to i chat. a lot to go through. all done very well. we see him just before and just after. frantically. that is what your political editor does. and what do you want also, a bit of good weather. i know you are going to deliver. very warm over the past days. north—east wales, 28 celsius, the warmest part of the country. the same area, as we head into the weekend, look at the change. down on where we would expect at this stage injune. pressure conditions on the way. some heat across the eastern half of the uk today. and like yesterday, some showers developing and some of them later could be
8:48 am
thundery. cloud, lightershowers in the south—west. clearing from scotland. and most dry in the middle part of the day but showers will get going by lunchtime on some of them heavy and thundery across parts of england and scotland. parts of south—west england, wales, northern ireland, where it is fresher, more rain later. temperatures in the east still in the low to mid 20s. it is here we will see the highest pollen levels. going down a little bit in the west, including glastonbury, where they will have more cloud. later, late afternoon into the evening, some spots of rain. hopefully nothing too heavy. heavy showers to end play today perhaps at headingley. a lot of dry weather to come but not as hot as yesterday.
8:49 am
this is the banter rain that pushes across wales and the south—west including glastonbury. fragmenting. and then clearer skies into tomorrow morning. tomorrow morning, 11—15. fresher and more of a breeze. the reason it is changing is this low pressure setting up stall to the west of ireland. the rain band around it. northern ireland will see the worst of that during the day. scotland, england and wales, sunny spells for many. some showers through the day. feeling fresher. temperatures 16—22. three saturday evening, the low pressure pushes eastwards. maybe some wetter weather in the east of northern ireland. saturday night into sunday, the low pressure is still there. it moves eastwards which means wetter conditions on sunday in the west
8:50 am
particularly in north wales, northern england. driest on sunday to the south and east but temperatures around 16—22. nice enough when there is sunshine but with more breeze around and when the showers come it will feel cooler than recent days. there is always that weird moment when you try to get used to the temperature change. last weekend was a big shift. the joy last weekend was a big shift. the joy of living in the uk. are we seeing you tomorrow? i will, see you then. this is about timing and good luck. as recommendations come for music, they do not come higher from as recommendations come for music, they do not come higherfrom sir paul mccartney. the legend put in a request to see if they could squeeze in a performance from an up and
8:51 am
coming rock band called hardwicke circus. take a look at their new single. # so you tell me you don't believe it. # you've got something to live for. # you don't always have to be this way. # walking on broken glass. # walking on broken glass. # all the best people. # all the best people. # walking on broken glass # walking on broken glass # struggle and strife, keeping alive. # running out of time. let's speak to two members of the band now — brothersjohnny and tom foster.
8:52 am
good morning. you just played a gig last night. thank you for getting up for us. we are up and ready. many mornings practising so good to be here. how are you preparing for glastonbury, after the legend, sir paul mccartney, put in a good word? yes, it is amazing. i thought my mates had got together and pulled this prank. but mates had got together and pulled this rank. �* , , ., this prank. but it is true. it is a hue this prank. but it is true. it is a huge moment- _ this prank. but it is true. it is a huge moment. we _ this prank. but it is true. it is a huge moment. we think- this prank. but it is true. it is a huge moment. we think we i this prank. but it is true. it is a | huge moment. we think we are this prank. but it is true. it is a i huge moment. we think we are ready for glastonbury. we have played in prisons. _ for glastonbury. we have played in prisons, clubs, supported other bands— prisons, clubs, supported other bands throughout the country. last night, _ bands throughout the country. last night, st— bands throughout the country. last night, st albans. and now with the recommendation of paul mccartney we are on— recommendation of paul mccartney we are on our— recommendation of paul mccartney we are on our way to worthy farm. what
8:53 am
we will do now. _ are on our way to worthy farm. what we will do now, do _ are on our way to worthy farm. what we will do now, do we _ are on our way to worthy farm. what we will do now, do we have - are on our way to worthy farm. lgdrusgt we will do now, do we have the are on our way to worthy farm. l’drusgt we will do now, do we have the shot of glastonbury right now? the bbc has a lot of coverage. you probably have not got a screen. you are looking out across a mass of tents. hopefully you do not have nerves. you probably live on adrenaline but have you got your heads around the fact you will be playing glastonbury? it's pretty amazing. hard to believe. we have worked hard. we have done gigs after gigs. we just did 15 prisons around the country. it is good to get gigs like this. we hope people at glastonbury can relate to our songs like they do in jail and st albans and all around the country. and since this news we have had a lot of— and since this news we have had a lot of people around the country, new fans —
8:54 am
lot of people around the country, new fans connecting with the music, connecting _ new fans connecting with the music, connecting on a musical level. so a positive _ connecting on a musical level. so a positive thing people are hearing our music— positive thing people are hearing our music and listening to our words and thinking — our music and listening to our words and thinking this is a band from the north— and thinking this is a band from the north to _ and thinking this is a band from the north to be — and thinking this is a band from the north to be contended with. glastonbury, when you grow up and start playing, hook up the guitar, you learn— start playing, hook up the guitar, you learn the undertones and the beatles _ you learn the undertones and the beatles and you want to play at glastonbury. that is why you do it and we _ glastonbury. that is why you do it and we feel— glastonbury. that is why you do it and we feel fortunate. we glastonbury. that is why you do it and we feel fortunate.— glastonbury. that is why you do it and we feel fortunate. we have all foraotten and we feel fortunate. we have all forgotten our _ and we feel fortunate. we have all forgotten our wellingtons. - and we feel fortunate. we have all forgotten our wellingtons. we i and we feel fortunate. we have all forgotten our wellingtons. we are | forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried- _ forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried- i _ forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried. i do _ forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried. i do not _ forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried. i do not think i forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried. i do not think it i forgotten our wellingtons. we are very worried. i do not think it will| very worried. i do not think it will be too bad. just the odd spit and spot. ll be too bad. just the odd spit and sot. , , ., ., . spot. it is the cumbrian weather. we are used to — spot. it is the cumbrian weather. we are used to it- _ spot. it is the cumbrian weather. we are used to it. thanks _ spot. it is the cumbrian weather. we are used to it. thanks and _ spot. it is the cumbrian weather. we are used to it. thanks and good i spot. it is the cumbrian weather. we are used to it. thanks and good luck| are used to it. thanks and good luck with the performance. _ are used to it. thanks and good luck with the performance. that - are used to it. thanks and good luck with the performance. that is i are used to it. thanks and good luck with the performance. that is a i with the performance. that is a great story. we will be with our correspondent colin paterson a
8:55 am
little bit later on. we've been talking about the by—election results and the resignation of the conservative party chairman oliver dowden this morning. the prime minister is in rwanda. and in answer to questions about the by—elections he said the results were tough and he has to recognise the difficult time voters are going through. let's speak now to geoffrey clifton brown, treasurer of the 1922 committee. cani can i get your reaction to what you heard this morning?— can i get your reaction to what you heard this morning? these are dire results. heard this morning? these are dire results- they _ heard this morning? these are dire results. they are _ heard this morning? these are dire results. they are not _ heard this morning? these are dire results. they are not unexpected. l heard this morning? these are dire results. they are not unexpected. i was in tiverton & honiton and saw with my own eyes the reaction of people on the doorstep so they are not unexpected but nevertheless, they call into question, i think, they call into question, i think, the direction of the government at the direction of the government at the present time. let
8:56 am
the direction of the government at the present time.— the present time. let me ask you some blunt _ the present time. let me ask you some blunt questions. _ the present time. let me ask you some blunt questions. does i the present time. let me ask you| some blunt questions. does boris johnson have _ some blunt questions. does boris johnson have your _ some blunt questions. does boris johnson have your support? i some blunt questions. does boris johnson have your support? borisj johnson have your support? boris johnson, what will happen now is he will have to set out how he will resolve the serious problems the country faces. as you are aware, i voted against him in the vote of confidence. however, millions voted for him in the general election and the majority of my party voted for him in that vote of no confidence. i abide by those results but clearly serious discussions will be had in the next days and weeks and then we will have to make difficult decisions. abs, will have to make difficult decisions.— will have to make difficult decisions. �* ., ., , decisions. a lot of people get confused about _ decisions. a lot of people get confused about the _ decisions. a lot of people get | confused about the mechanics decisions. a lot of people get i confused about the mechanics of the business. if you or some of your colleagues still wanted to get rid of borisjohnson, and i am not sure from what you say that is what you think, is there a mechanism now by which there could be another vote of confidence to test the waters, given
8:57 am
the by—election results? is that something you and others will be pushing for now? $5 something you and others will be pushing for now?— something you and others will be pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, — pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, we — pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, we have _ pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, we have had _ pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, we have had the - pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, we have had the vote i pushing for now? as the rules stand in the 1922, we have had the vote of confidence four weeks ago. we cannot revisit that matter for a year. of course, if the party, the parliamentary party as a whole, a widespread number want the rules changed, the executive would consider that. the other mechanism is if he loses confidence, if the cabinet lose confidence in him. ibe cabinet lose confidence in him. be clear, is a change in those rules what you want to happen? l clear, is a change in those rules what you want to happen? i cannot be clear. it depends _ what you want to happen? i cannot be clear. it depends what _ what you want to happen? i cannot be clear. it depends what goes _ what you want to happen? i cannot be clear. it depends what goes on - what you want to happen? i cannot be clear. it depends what goes on in i clear. it depends what goes on in the next days. what the prime minister says to us. to be fair, we owe it to the prime minister to come home and addressed the party, backbenchers, and let him tell us how he thinks he can succeed in
8:58 am
turning the serious problems around. when i have heard that i will be in a position to know whether he has my confidence or not. we a position to know whether he has my confidence or not.— confidence or not. we have heard from him from _ confidence or not. we have heard from him from rwanda. - confidence or not. we have heard from him from rwanda. you i confidence or not. we have heard from him from rwanda. you have probably heard his comments, he said he would listen to voters but keep going. he said he will listen in particular to difficulties people face over the cost of living. he said, we have to recognise there is more we have got to do and we certainly will. does any of that... many people will think they have possibly heard that before. does it inspire you with confidence, what you heard? l inspire you with confidence, what you heard?— you heard? i think he has to go a lot further- _ you heard? i think he has to go a lot further. he _ you heard? i think he has to go a lot further. he has _ you heard? i think he has to go a lot further. he has to _ you heard? i think he has to go a lot further. he has to seriously i you heard? i think he has to go a l lot further. he has to seriously set out how he will deal with these problems, what he wants to achieve for the country, instead of going from crisis to crisis. i do not think quite the prime minister has realised how serious the situation is. ifind those remarks realised how serious the situation is. i find those remarks somewhat complacent. he is. i find those remarks somewhat complacent-—
8:59 am
complacent. he is away at the commonwealth _ complacent. he is away at the commonwealth conference. i complacent. he is away at the | commonwealth conference. he complacent. he is away at the i commonwealth conference. he was complacent. he is away at the - commonwealth conference. he was due to be there. should he be coming back? it sounds like you as a colleague and someone in the party thinks there is a crisis.— thinks there is a crisis. should he come back _ thinks there is a crisis. should he come back now? _ thinks there is a crisis. should he come back now? i _ thinks there is a crisis. should he come back now? i think- thinks there is a crisis. should he come back now? i think there i thinks there is a crisis. should he come back now? i think there is l thinks there is a crisis. should he| come back now? i think there is a serious situation. he must do what he needs to do at the commonwealth heads of government but i would have thought there is a case for him doing that and coming home and talking to key people to discuss what the future is. but that is a matter for him and what the future is. but that is a matterfor him and he what the future is. but that is a matter for him and he will need to make those decisions. l matter for him and he will need to make those decisions. i appreciate our make those decisions. i appreciate your time- — make those decisions. i appreciate your time. that _ make those decisions. i appreciate your time. that is _ make those decisions. i appreciate your time. that is a _ make those decisions. i appreciate your time. that is a conservative l your time. that is a conservative mp.
9:00 am
this is bbc news. and these are the latest headlines... crushing defeats for boris johnson and the conservatives in two by—elections — prompting the resignation of the party chairman, oliver dowden. the prime minister vows to "keep going" we have to recognise there is more we have _ we have to recognise there is more we have got— we have to recognise there is more we have got to do, we will keep going _ we have got to do, we will keep going addressing the people until we -et going addressing the people until we get through this. ukraine's
9:01 am
president zelensky welcomes the decision— president zelensky welcomes the decision to make

43 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on