Skip to main content

tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 25, 2022 2:00am-2:31am BST

2:00 am
welcome to bbc news. i'm simon pusey. our top stories: the us supreme court overturns the landmark roe v wade ruling, ending the constitutional right to an abortion that dates back nearly 50 years. the historicjudgement will transform abortion rights in america, with individual states now able to ban or restrict the procedure. critics say the ruling is a major setback to a woman's right to choose. president biden has strongly condemned the decision. the court literally taking america back 150 years. this is a sad day for the country, in my view. but it doesn't mean the fight�*s over. but senior republicans, including former vice president mike pence
2:01 am
and mitch mcconnell, welcome the ruling — saying it's a victory for the unborn. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. 50 years of a legally—enshrined right to abortion in the united states has been brought to an end after the country's supreme court decided to overturn its landmark ruling made in 1973. it means tens of millions of women across the us do not have their right to an abortion guaranteed by the constitution and individual us states are now legally entitled to ban the procedure. up to half of america's 50 states are expected to do so, and 13 have already passed so—called "trigger laws," which automatically outlaw abortion with the court's ruling.
2:02 am
our north america editor sarah smith reports. cheering this is a huge, historic moment for america. as they hear the news from the court, there isjubilation from anti—abortionists. chanting: life won today! "life won today", they chant, celebrating a victory after almost 50 years. the devastation abortion has wrought on our country, on a communal level and on a personal level, and this is so vindicating to know that we can now take tangible steps to lessen the violence of abortion in our country. ten years ago, did you ever imagine this would happen? i imagined it a lot, but still... people told me it was impossible, that we would never see this kind of victory, and now i know that victory is not only possible, it's happened. so we're going to work on this momentum, we're going to keep going, we're going to keep fighting and we are going to build better world.
2:03 am
you are a traitor! fury from those campaigning to keep the guaranteed right to abortion, promising to fight back. it's not the will of the people, and this country are supposed to run off off the will of the people. i'm 21 and i'm terrified! we have a lot of work to do to make that happen, but we will never give up. it's 50 years since there was last a significant decision on abortion rights in america, it might be another 50. and it might be 50 more, sure. but we're not going to stop, it doesn't matter. it doesn't matter what they say, abortions will continue, but they will not be legal, and women will die from botched abortions. it's obvious this ruling is not going to end the arguments over abortion in america. in fact, it will inflame them. in this deeply polarised society, abortion is already one of the most divisive issues. even the president is powerless to change the court's ruling. with this decision, the conservative majority of the supreme court shows how extreme it is, how far removed they are from the majority of this country.
2:04 am
they have made the united states an outlier among developed nations in the world. but this decision must not be the final word. abortion rights have been fought over the decades. good evening. in a landmark ruling, the supreme court today legalised abortions. in 1973, the supreme court ruled in the test case of roe v wade that women must have access to abortion across america. a decision totally reversed today. it is my profound honour to be the first president in history to attend the march for life. as president, donald trump deliberately appointed three pro—life justices to the court, making today's ruling possible. he says god made the decision. in fact, it was six of the ninejudges. by a vote of 6—3, the court affirmed that the power to protect unborn life is returned to the people and their elected representatives. the people have won a victory.
2:05 am
singing: jesus loves the little children... | anti—abortion activists view today's victory as merely a first step. they will now take their campaigns to every state which continues to allow terminations, trying to get abortion banned in the whole of the united states. sarah smith, bbc news, washington. and sarah told us more about what might happen next. well, already several states have enacted immediate bans on abortion, and more will follow in the days and weeks to come. you heard president biden there, saying he thinks this is a sad day for america. well, even though he and the democrats control the white house and both houses of congress, there's nothing they can do about this supreme court ruling. and the democrats don't have enough votes in the senate to be able to pass a new law that would guarantee abortion rights. so for now, president biden
2:06 am
says what he can do is try to make sure that women who want abortions but live in states that have banned the procedure are able to travel to other places where their termination can still be performed, places like new york state, which now says it's a safe haven for women seeking the procedure. and this really radical decision that has come from this very conservative supreme court is not necessarily going to stop here. we heard one of the justices today making it clear that he thinks the court should now revisit some other progressive rulings, the ones that guarantee things like access to abortion or legalised same—sex marriage. it's possible that the court could look again at these, and their in—built conservative majority could overturn them. there could be really significant and sweeping change coming to america. sarah smith there. the governor of california, gavin newsom, has been speaking with other leaders from states in the western united states
2:07 am
to announce what they described as new action to protect women. he expressed his anger at the us supreme court's ruling. well, i'm a little less sorry than i am pissed. a little less sorry than i am resolved and angry, to do more, and to do better. at the same time, an expression of appreciation, i'm grateful i'm here in california. i'm grateful i'm governor of california. i'm grateful i represent a state that's fighting forfreedom, fighting for reproductive rights, a state that has long stood tall. and i'm sorry that more people do not have those protections today. this is notjust about women. this is notjust about choice. this is notjust about reproductive freedom. they are coming after you next. it's a serious moment in american history. gavin newsom, the governor of california there. the bbc�*s peter bowes is in california and has more on actions being taken by the state after the decision and the mood among average
2:08 am
americans abortion rights. this is hugely divisive, although it is interesting that in recent surveys of public opinion, a majority have favoured the precise opposite of what the supreme court has done. that is, maintaining the abortion rights of women. so it is going to be fascinating moving ahead, and one of the thingsjoe biden and other politicians have been talking about is essentially putting this issue on the ballot in november of this year, the mid—term elections, and potentially in a couple of years time for the next general election in 202a. by that, what he's referring to is that clearly the democrats will be campaigning to elect those public officials, and especially members of congress, that could ultimately see a majority in both houses large enough to pass a law in congress, a national law, that would essentially reintroduce the national rights
2:09 am
to abortion across the board. now, that's a long shot at the moment for the democrats, given the current political make—up. but such is the strength of feeling that it is possible, it is feasible, but it could become such an issue, such an issue i think perhaps growing and speed towards those elections, but it could influence the electorate, i think, quite a lot. it is going to affect millions of women, and it already has right away in many states? yes, it has. we have heard about those trigger states, some of which have already introduced the ban on abortion. we just heard from the governor of california there. what we didn't hear, what is also interesting, is what he has been doing. he has signed a law here in california to protect abortion providers and indeed women from potential civil lawsuits from other states that have banned abortion. that's a pre—emptive strike at the
2:10 am
likelihood, we are expecting thousands of extra women to come into california from other states where abortion has been banned, of course the right to an abortion is preserved and enshrined in the constitution and the fear is that there will be civil litigation from other states against individuals in this state. so the california state is moving as a pre—emptive strike to protect those women. what it is doing, essentially, they could be messy legal times ahead, but it is essentially pitting one state against another. we'rejoined from oregon by ben sisney, who is senior litigation counsel for the american centre for law and justice. thank you forjoining us. what is your reaction to the ruling? the acl jr is your reaction to the ruling? the acljr celebrating is your reaction to the ruling? the acljr celebrating today. we are very aware that there is
2:11 am
a lot of work to be done across the country as we work to protect life and protect women from being exploited by the abortion industry but we are certainly celebrating this decision today. we have been fighting on this issue for 30 years, and to see this development, this is a massive win, it is a massive win for life, for the unborn, for women, and also to the united states constitution.— women, and also to the united states constitution. what legal reason did _ states constitution. what legal reason did the _ states constitution. what legal reason did the supreme - states constitution. what legal reason did the supreme court. reason did the supreme court have reductions today? 50. reason did the supreme court have reductions today? so, roe v wade and _ have reductions today? so, roe v wade and the _ have reductions today? so, roe v wade and the planned - v wade and the planned parenthood casey decision, the idea of stare decisis precedents, it is an idea that courts use to guide them and to give way to prior decisions, to streamline decision—making for courts going forward, and it makes sense. it is a good principle. but blind adherence to it, asjustice gorsuch
2:12 am
recently wrote, is a bad idea. and it would lead to continued reliance on decisions like dread scott, komatsu decision, dread scott, komatsu decision, dread scott, komatsu decision, dread scott, the decision where the supreme court held, relying on history, concluding that blacks were lesser than whites. —— dred scott. 0utrageous, but was a supreme court case, should we rely on that? komatsu, the decision where the supreme court allowed the us government to intern japanese americans during world war ii. that was another supreme court decision which was basically overturned, just like dred scott was. there is plessy versus ferguson, the separate but equal doctrine, but had to be struck down. and now today, the very flawed rationale of roe v wade was struck down, and by the way, the casey decision that came later upheld the substance of roe based on the
2:13 am
principle of stare decisis, and i think that is the main take away from the decision that came out this morning, is that blind adherence to a wrong, incorrect decision is a terrible idea, and the court fixed that today.— terrible idea, and the court fixed that today. you call it a wron: , fixed that today. you call it a wrong, incorrect _ fixed that today. you call it a wrong, incorrect decision. it| wrong, incorrect decision. it is highly partisan and incredibly decisive —— are divisive. we have seen lots of protesting today, on both sides. this will be challenged, of course. what do you see being the next steps? 50. of course. what do you see being the next steps? so, now that be power, _ being the next steps? so, now that be power, the _ being the next steps? so, now that be power, the authority, i that be power, the authority, to regulate, to restrict or prohibit abortion has been returned to the states here in the united states, as i think is already happening, but some states are moving, reflecting the will of their majority of their constituents, their population, and moving to restrict abortion, as many of them have tried to do, many times, overthe them have tried to do, many
2:14 am
times, over the years. them have tried to do, many times, overthe years. so them have tried to do, many times, over the years. so they are moving forward without, other states are going to hunker down and continue to try to expand the right to abortion, to unbelievable extremes. abortion up to birth, abortion on demand, without apology. some states were working this year in their legislatures to allow abortion after birth. that is infanticide. yet the pro life, the pro—life movement are the extremists, somehow. iwasjust like to mention, if i could, by the way, president biden mentioned in his comments today that, i believe he put it that this decision makes us an outlier. with all due respect, president biden, that isjust incorrect. this decision returns us, the united states more closer to normal, i'm thinking of nations in europe,
2:15 am
i'm thinking of the uk, asked lord abortion after 2a weeks. italy, i believe, is 90 days. —— our lord. in several countries, i believe ireland, 12 weeks. what they are trying to work on here in the united states is extreme abortion up to birth, so the workload definitely continue,, the nature changes somewhat, the landscape changes with this decision, but the work must continue, the right to protect women. . ~' continue, the right to protect women. ., ~ i. continue, the right to protect women. . ~ �* continue, the right to protect women. ., �* , stay with us on bbc news — still to come. we report from one abortion clinic in arkansas, which may soon have to close its doors.
2:16 am
china market but the killer celebrations. the chinese president said unification was the start of a new era hong kong. the start of a new era hong kona. ., �* , , the start of a new era hong kona. ., �*, , kong. the world's first clone has been — kong. the world's first clone has been produced - kong. the world's first clone has been produced of - kong. the world's first clone has been produced of an - kong. the world's first clone i has been produced of an adult mammal. scientist in scotland produced a sheep called dolly that was cloned in a laboratory using a cell from another sheep. using a cell from another shee -. ., , :: sheep. for the first time in 20 ears, sheep. for the first time in 20 years, russian _ sheep. for the first time in 20 years, russian and _ sheep. for the first time in 20 years, russian and american i years, russian and american spacecraft have docked in orbit and started a new era of cooperation in space. challenger powered past the lighthouse _ challenger powered past the lighthouse at _ challenger powered past the lighthouse at almost - challenger powered past the lighthouse at almost 50 - challenger powered past the . lighthouse at almost 50 knots, shattering _ lighthouse at almost 50 knots, shattering a _ lighthouse at almost 50 knots, shattering a record _ lighthouse at almost 50 knots, shattering a record that - lighthouse at almost 50 knots, shattering a record that had i shattering a record that had stood — shattering a record that had stood for _ shattering a record that had stood for 34 _ shattering a record that had stood for 34 years. - shattering a record that had stood for 34 years. there i shattering a record that had i stood for 34 years. there was no hiding _ stood for 34 years. there was no hiding this— stood for 34 years. there was no hiding this year— stood for 34 years. there was no hiding this year and - stood for 34 years. there was| no hiding this year and elation of richard _ no hiding this year and elation of richard branson _ no hiding this year and elation of richard branson and - no hiding this year and elation of richard branson and his - of richard branson and his groun _ this is bbc news,
2:17 am
the latest headlines: the us supreme court overturns the landmark roe versus wade ruling, ending the constitutional right to an abortion that dates back nearly 50 years. the historicjudgement will transform abortion rights in america with individual states now able to ban or restrict the procedure. in utah, trigger ban laws are ready to be implemented resulting from the supreme court ruling. karrie galloway, the ceo and president of planned parenthood organisationjoined us from utah. we asked how does she, herstaff, and her patients, feel today. well, obviously, devastated. beleaguered for the past six weeks since the trial... the opinion was leaked. it's been a tough day but we've made it through the day. this process in the state is that the ruling from the upper court must be certified.
2:18 am
we had a waiting room of women all day long in need of reproductive healthcare and we were able to serve everyone today. it could be certified tonight, it could be certified tomorrow. but we made it through today, serving women. and you are staying positive, of course. but what effect is this hard, obviously, in the short, medium term, in the long—term, just today, people are struggling as a result of this, right? 0h, people are struggling. they are calling in tears, as your previous interviewees have said, not knowing what to do. in utah, it is seven hours to the closest clinic outside of utah for people to get access to care. planned parenthood will still be here for those who qualify through exemptions and we will still be here for basic birth control, family planning, helping people get pregnant.
2:19 am
and information, education and fighting for their rights. it is only the access to abortion that has been touched today by the supreme court ruling. it sounds very much like you are not giving up. what is your next move? oh no. planned parenthood... what is your next move? what do you do now? well, we have to educate people. we have to harness people's anger and frustration, that they have to change the people who they voted for. they have to change the policy makers. we have to do that up and down the ballot for the people we send to washington, for the people we send here to the capital, behind me, in salt lake. and we have to get people speaking out. we have done polls and the majority of people in utah do not believe in what happened today. and how do you see in morale? of course, it is going to be
2:20 am
a tough day for you, and america is pretty split on many issues. but this is obviously a tough moment for you. how do you see morale and how do you see people affected by this decision, what are they saying? morale is down, but we've got to harness that. we have to harness it into action. over half the population of the united states lost a right today to control their own body. they have turned it over to politicians. we must harness that frustration into action because we just can't live this way. karrie galloway, live there in washington. there are 13 us states which have laws in place to impose an immediate ban on abortion now that roe versus wade has been overturned by the supreme court. one of them is arkansas. sophie long reports from an abortion clinic in the state capital, little rock. just a warning — her report contains some distressing
2:21 am
detail. it was exactly the ruling they'd been dreading. but the expectation didn't make the court's decision any less devastating. abortion is murder! it has just been upheld! 0utside, they had to turn women away. this isn't a country that i ever thought i would know. i thought that... this country would still care about people. would still care about women. inside, they had to come to terms with the fact that the care they provided here is now a criminal offence. i don't think there's a waiting period there but it is about a five and a half hour drive. and see, it's like having to turn them away. like, that sucks. jennifer thompson first came here as a patient. she says her abortion saved her life, and the care she received here inspired her
2:22 am
to train so she could do the same for others. now i have to tell them, i'm sorry, but there's nothing i can do for you. i'm sorry that your boyfriend beat you every day, that he rapes you all the time. there's nothing i can do. you'll have to find somewhere else to go. i mean, i can give them information to help them try, but it's heartbreaking. this place save my life, literally. for more than ten years, dr willie parker has travelled here from another state because the restrictive laws and the threat of violence orfinancial ruin has long been too great for local doctors to carry out abortions here themselves. i feel angry in the way that anybody who is deeply invested in human rights should feel angry and outraged and indignant any time they are witnessing injustice. we will come to recognise the full cost of criminalising abortion when we start to see the bump and the rise in maternal mortality and morbidity, suffering and death related to conditions
2:23 am
that are unique to pregnancy. i put that to the woman who fought back tears of joy as she signed arkansas' almost total ban on abortion into law. it makes no exception for rape or incest. a termination can only take place now in the case of maternal medical emergency. i don't know if that doctor has any facts to base that hypothetical answer on. we don't have any information to base that conclusion that this doctor has come up with. hopefully this law we are putting in place specifically says to save the life of the mother. for the anti—abortion protesters outside the clinic, this is a good day. we will not fully celebrate until abortion is eradicated fully from our land, until the family planning services, for example, is closed down and does not reopen. then we can celebrate, for sure. they will continue their fight.
2:24 am
but the supreme court's ruling will fundamentally change the course of the lives of all women who passed the protesters every day to provide the care they did here, along with those and millions of others across the united states. sophie long, bbc news, little rock, arkansas. 0ur north america correspondent anthony zurcher offered some context on this historic ruling. what you're seeing now is instantly millions of americans, millions of women, are no longer going to be able to get legal abortions in their states, and if they want abortion will have to look at travelling across state lines to get them. the abortion cases, roe v wade and planned parenthood v casey which was decided in 1982 upholding the abortion protections, they rested on this idea of due process in the 14th amendment to the us constitution, that there were certain things that americans as citizens were guaranteed of their life, liberty and property etc. 0ther supreme court precedents
2:25 am
rested on that similar idea of due process rights, the right to contraception, striking down anti—sodomy laws, the right to gay marriage. the concern among democrats, among some legal scholars, is that undercutting the principles behind roe v wade and planned parenthood v casey reduces the strength of those decisions, and in fact if you look at one of the opinions in this case byjustice clarence thomas, he said that those cases, deciding those issues, should be looked at in a new light based on this decision by the supreme court. there is concern even if justice alito and others in the majority said they should not be concerned, there is concern among some that this is just the first step and other rights are going to be injeopardy. that's it for us now pull that
2:26 am
you get more news from our website of course but from the other is of the team thank you for watching, other is of the team thank you forwatching, do other is of the team thank you for watching, do stay tuned to bbc news. hello. plenty of fine weather around this weekend but showers in the forecast too. however, some of us may miss them all together and end up with a dry weekend but i will add that around coastal areas it could be windy at times and feel a little on the cool side. this changeable weather is brought by an area of low pressure which will basically park itself over ireland, it has already arrived and the showers are becoming frequent across some western areas and they will be over the course of the next 24 hours. we have had showers in the last few hours they will continue through early saturday morning across parts of western scotland but generally speaking it is a dry end to that night with clear spells and temperatures raining from around 10— 15 degrees, not particularly cold first
2:27 am
thing in the morning. let's have a look at the forecast for saturday then. here is the area of low pressure with clouds and showers swirling around, this is a cool atlantic breeze so around these coastal areas of cornwall, devon and the coast of wales, the irish sea and into scotland. it will be chilly. temperatures around 15—16 degrees in some spots. basically, the further east you are the sunnier and warmer it will be. 0ut towards the west always a chance of catching some showers even heavy ones, not just through the afternoon but in the evening as well. they will have a tendency to drift northwards carried by the breeze circling this area of low pressure. that was saturday, this is sunday. look at this, even some persistent rain at times expected in northern ireland and some of the western part of the uk, further east dry and bright and in fact east anglia and the south—east and along the south coast of england it should be a mostly sunny day on sunday. here, temperatures up to 23 degrees in one or two spots but more typically talking about the mid or high teens a little bit further towards the west.
2:28 am
and the low pressure is still with us early next week but what happens is, it actually moves away and another one takes its place, bringing spells of rain to western parts of the uk once again. overall, we are in a spell of fairly unsettled weather. here is the outlook for some of our major cities, you can see the further north and west you are, the more changeable it is with these showers. the best of the weather will always be further south and south—east. have a good weekend.
2:29 am
2:30 am
this is bbc world news. i'm simon pusey. our top stories — the us supreme court overturns the landmark roe versus wade ruling, ending the constitutional right to an abortion that dates back nearly 50 years. there's renewed pressure on british prime minister borisjohnson, after the conservatives suffered a double defeat in parliamentary by—elections. a second earthquake has shaken an area in south eastern afghanistan, causing yet more death and destruction. and — making a comeback after the pandemic — the legenday glastonbury festival kicks off for the first time in three years.

47 Views

info Stream Only

Uploaded by TV Archive on