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tv   Breakfast  BBC News  June 25, 2022 6:00am-10:01am BST

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good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: protests in cities across the us, as the supreme court removes the constitutional right to abortion. in several states the band becomes instant, and clinics begin to close. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network begins, with only a fifth of train services expected to run. backbench conservative mps consider fresh attempts to force borisjohnson from power, after two damaging by—election defeats.
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# you can give them my best butjust know, i'm not yourfriend... the american singer billie eilish becomes the youngest ever headliner at glastonbury, as music fills the festival for the first time in three years. good morning. can day three beat frantic friday at headingley, where a battling, brutal century from jonny bairstow rescued england from collapse in the third test against new zealand. and it's fresher and windier weekend for all, some showers in the east but others will stay dry. i will have all the details here on breakfast. it's saturday 25 june. our main story: protests have taken place in the us overnight after a supreme court ruling removed american women's constitutional right to abortion. clinics have already begun closing in some parts of the country, with 13 states triggering bans on abortions immediately, as frances read reports.
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protests from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe versus wade is seismic. make... ., , ,~ make... protest say they are horrified that _ make... protest say they are horrified that millions - make... protest say they are horrified that millions will. make... protest say they are i horrified that millions will lose their legal right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years.— in place for 50 years. we were called for _ in place for 50 years. we were called for this _ in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment. - in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment. and . in place for 50 years. we were l called for this moment. and this in place for 50 years. we were - called for this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility. to make abortion unthinkable and illegal throughout our nation, to ensure no woman stands alone in a post row america, to be deposed roe generation!— america, to be deposed roe aeneration! m m ~ ,, generation! cheering and applause elizabeth made — generation! cheering and applause elizabeth made the _ generation! cheering and applause elizabeth made the decision _ generation! cheering and applause elizabeth made the decision to - elizabeth made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding
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out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk.— put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being _ put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned - put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and| it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states already where as of this minute, abortion access is denied and illegal, ifeel pretty numb and pretty angry about that. and truly, ifeel a little bit helpless. that. and truly, i feel a little bit helless. ~ that. and truly, i feel a little bit helless. . that. and truly, i feel a little bit helless. , that. and truly, i feel a little bit helless. ~ , ., , , helpless. while some states say they will keep full — helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion _ helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, - helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 - will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws that mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life was at risk. others are expected to either introduce new restrictions or resurrect pre— row bands and in states where opinions on abortion are split, the legality of the procedure could be determined on an election by election basis or buyout legal battles. critics of the decision say it is an injustice, and without plans to support those who are pregnant, will impact the
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poorest in society in a country that for the most part has no universal healthcare or paid family leave. the harm is healthcare or paid family leave. tr: harm is endless. healthcare or paid family leave. tt: harm is endless. what healthcare or paid family leave. "tue: harm is endless. what this healthcare or paid family leave. tue: harm is endless. what this means healthcare or paid family leave. tt2 harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult, it is a slap in the face to women about using their own judgement to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom.- their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. jesus loves the little children... _ reproductive freedom. jesus loves the little children... but _ reproductive freedom. jesus loves the little children... but within - the little children... but within the little children... but within the us, the little children... but within the us, this — the little children... but within the us, this is _ the little children... but within the us, this is only _ the little children... but within the us, this is only the - the little children... but within - the us, this is only the beginning. and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feel justice has finally been served. thejudgement made by the us supreme court has reignited the debate in this decades—long fight over abortion. our correspondent barbara plett—usher has sent this report from a demonstration in washington dc. there have been demonstrations
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around the country, and they continued into the night here in washington, dc. this ruling has really exposed the profound divisions in this country over abortion rights. some states have already started to ban abortions, others will follow. some states are saying they will be safe harbours for women who want abortions. both sides are gearing up for a long and bitter political fight, and security agencies are warning about violence. they say there has been an increase in threats of extremist attacks. this decision to overturn national abortion rights, to overturn roe v wade, was a radical legal move. but it has in no way ended the political fight over abortion. a third day of rail strikes is under way, with just a fifth of train services expected to run today. around 40,000 workers at network rail and 13 train operating companies have walked out in a dispute over pay, jobs and working conditions. our business correspondent
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emma simpson reports. blackpool is a popular place for a summer trip. blackpool is a popular place for a summertrip. but blackpool is a popular place for a summer trip. but today there aren't any trains to get here, and for the owner of this b&b, it comes at a cost. owner of this 3&3, it comes at a cost. ., , owner of this 3&3, it comes at a cost. . , , ., , , ., cost. here at this property i have lost one third _ cost. here at this property i have lost one third of _ cost. here at this property i have lost one third of business - cost. here at this property i have lost one third of business this - lost one third of business this weekend. we have a second property which is larger, that has 1a rooms, and they have lostjust about the same. which means that this is representative of the whole of black bull, what happens to us happens to the rest of the town. fin 3ull, what happens to us happens to the rest of the town.— the rest of the town. on the first two da s the rest of the town. on the first two days of— the rest of the town. on the first two days of strike _ the rest of the town. on the first two days of strike action, - the rest of the town. on the first two days of strike action, many i two days of strike action, many people were able to work from home. but now we have hit the weekend and there are loads of events on. for instance there is a sell—out rolling stones concert here at london's hyde park. but getting to venues by train and home again is no longer an option. ed sheron is at wembley, but one fan in hampshire says he has got to give up his seat. we one fan in hampshire says he has got to give up his seat.— to give up his seat. we spent a lot of money on _ to give up his seat. we spent a lot of money on train _ to give up his seat. we spent a lot of money on train tickets - to give up his seat. we spent a lot of money on train tickets as - to give up his seat. we spent a lot of money on train tickets as it - to give up his seat. we spent a lot of money on train tickets as it is, l of money on train tickets as it is, than to have to go and spend a lot
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of money on fuel and fuel prices are increasing as it is, it's not really, we shouldn't have to kind of do it, really. and it is horrible to have the decision not to go and i am gutted. have the decision not to go and i am tutted. ~ , ., ., ., gutted. the rmt is wanting more rail strikes are extremely _ gutted. the rmt is wanting more rail strikes are extremely likely - gutted. the rmt is wanting more rail strikes are extremely likely if - gutted. the rmt is wanting more rail strikes are extremely likely if a - strikes are extremely likely if a deal cannot be reached. —— warning. some conservative mps are considering fresh attempts to force the prime minister from office in the wake of two damaging by—election defeats. two of borisjohnson�*s critics have said they want to join the executive of the influential 1922 committee, which has the power to change the rules on conservative leadership contests. our political correspondent helen catt reports. the defeats inflicted on the conservatives here by labour in west yorkshire in a seat the tories one in 2019, and here in a formerly tory heartland seat in devon, now lib dem, sent a message. but politicians aren't exactly hearing the same 1.
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this is i think about as compelling a message as it possibly could be. it is time for boris to go, it is time for boris to move on, people don't trust him. the time for 3oris to move on, people don't trust him.— time for 3oris to move on, people don't trust him. the prime minister, awa in don't trust him. the prime minister, away in rwanda. _ don't trust him. the prime minister, away in rwanda, unsurprisingly- away in rwanda, unsurprisingly doesn't quite agree.— away in rwanda, unsurprisingly doesn't quite agree. people will continue to _ doesn't quite agree. people will continue to beat _ doesn't quite agree. people will continue to beat me _ doesn't quite agree. people will continue to beat me up, - doesn't quite agree. people will continue to beat me up, and - doesn't quite agree. people will| continue to beat me up, and say doesn't quite agree. people will - continue to beat me up, and say this or that about to attack me, that is fine, that's quite right, that's the job of politicians. in the end voters, journalists, they have no—one else to make their complaints too. i have to take that. i also have to get on with the job of delivering for the people of this country. that delivering for the people of this count . �* ., ., , country. at home the former party chairman of— country. at home the former party chairman of the _ country. at home the former party chairman of the -- _ country. at home the former party chairman of the -- oliver- country. at home the former party chairman of the -- oliver dowdenl chairman of the —— oliver dowden resigned, saying it could be business as usual. other ministers insist the government is listening. i think this isn't business as usual. we need to reflect, he needs to reflect, and that is exactly what we have all said we're going to do. it is important we are tackling biggest issues of the day. many tory
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mps remain — biggest issues of the day. many tory mps remain deeply _ biggest issues of the day. many tory mps remain deeply unhappy. - biggest issues of the day. many tory mps remain deeply unhappy. some l biggest issues of the day. many tory l mps remain deeply unhappy. some of them preparing to stand to election to the body that runs the influential 1922 committee. it has the power to change the rules to allow another confidence vote to be held in mrjohnson. allow another confidence vote to be held in mrjohnson._ held in mrjohnson. there are a coule held in mrjohnson. there are a couele of _ held in mrjohnson. there are a couple of vacancies _ held in mrjohnson. there are a couple of vacancies for - held in mrjohnson. there are a couple of vacancies for the - couple of vacancies for the executive, and i am minded to put my hat into the ring next week when nominations open, i think the vote would be the week after. on the ticket of, i would be in favour of rule change. and effectively, that would be another vote of confidence. but labour, buoyed by its first again in a by—election in a decade, says it is not all about the man in number ten. says it is not all about the man in numberten. tt says it is not all about the man in number ten-— says it is not all about the man in number ten. it is no problem with 3oris number ten. it is no problem with boris johnson. — number ten. it is no problem with 3oris johnson, it _ number ten. it is no problem with 3oris johnson, it is _ number ten. it is no problem with 3oris johnson, it is a _ number ten. it is no problem with 3oris johnson, it is a problem - number ten. it is no problem with | 3oris johnson, it is a problem with borisjohnson, it is a problem with the tory party. regardless, labour will be ready to beat the tory party, whoever is at the head of it, because that is what we owe the country. because that is what we owe the count . �* ., , a, , because that is what we owe the count .�* ., country. 3ut now it is 3oris johnson because my — country. 3ut now it is 3oris johnson because my future _ country. 3ut now it is 3oris johnson because my future which _ country. 3ut now it is 3oris johnson because my future which remains i country. 3ut now it is 3oris johnson i because my future which remains the topic of much speculation, mostly in his absence. mrjohnson himself is not due back in the country until
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later next week. two people have been killed and 1a injured in a shooting in a nightclub injured in a shooting in a nightclub in nearby streets in the centre of the norwegian capital oslo. the shooting happened in three separate locations, including one gay bar. a suspect has been arrested, oslo's annual pride march is due to be held later today. harry gration, the former presenter of look north in yorkshire, has died suddenly at the age of 71. his career spanned more than a0 years, and saw him front many programmes, including the flagship saturday sports program grandstand. when he left the bbc in october 2020, he said he had "always lived the story". i think ithinki i think i have always enjoyed when we have just got good reaction from people. we always say good programmes are with flashy packages and so on but the truth of the matter is when you talk to the
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people of yorkshire, who i love very much. i am people of yorkshire, who i love very much. iam passionate people of yorkshire, who i love very much. i am passionate about this place, and i have enjoyed straight talking, as i do here in barnsley tonight, well and truly, it isjust great. harry gration, who has died at the age of 71. it is 6:11am. let's have a look at today's papers, and the guardian's front page carries a striking photo of a woman with tape over her mouth which reads "second class citizen". the image was taken during protests in the united states after the constitutional right to abortion was overturned by its supreme court. several of this morning's papers lead with the fallout from the conservatives' two by—election losses. the daily mirror calls it a "humiliating" defeat, quoting an ex—tory leader as saying the nation would be "better off" if the prime minister resigned. the daily express, however, says borisjohnson is convinced he can ride out the political storms and win the next general election
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if the "winds change" in his favour. and the telegraph reports that drivers in london could be fined £160 for veering into cycle lanes under new powers which come into effect next week. got something fascinating from the insides? t got something fascinating from the insides? ., , ., ., ., got something fascinating from the insides? ., ., ., insides? i was going to draw your attention to _ insides? i was going to draw your attention to this _ insides? i was going to draw your attention to this piece, _ insides? i was going to draw your attention to this piece, or - insides? i was going to draw your attention to this piece, or may i insides? i was going to draw yourj attention to this piece, or may be familiar with dr michael mosley, he has unlocks a really interesting hands—on research about how our bodies work basically —— done lots of. this is his column in the daily mail. he has been doing interviews this week discussing a study, you may have heard of this before, about people who can't stand on one leg fought ten seconds, and this new research says they are at much higher risk of premature death. he has been looking into this, and checking out. it is an important predictor of future health because when you are standing on one leg, he says, but only testing your muscles,
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which is fairly obvious, but also the help of your brain, which has to do a lot of hard work to keep you upright. t0 do a lot of hard work to keep you u-iriht. ., ~' ,,, do a lot of hard work to keep you u-iriht. ., ~ , ., . do a lot of hard work to keep you | upright-_ so do a lot of hard work to keep you u-iriht. ., ~ , ., . so if upright. to keep you balanced. so if ou are at upright. to keep you balanced. so if you are at home _ upright. to keep you balanced. so if you are at home right _ upright. to keep you balanced. so if you are at home right now— upright. to keep you balanced. so if| you are at home right now watching, here is how the test works. pretty straightforward. when you shift your plan your foot, tried the best—of—3, and see how it works. you plant one foot... �* , ., , and see how it works. you plant one foot... �* , ., ., foot... are you telling us how to stand on one — foot... are you telling us how to stand on one leg? _ foot... are you telling us how to stand on one leg? i'm _ foot... are you telling us how to stand on one leg? i'mjust - foot... are you telling us how toj stand on one leg? i'm just going stand on one leg? i'm “ust going throu:h stand on one leg? i'm “ust going through it. * stand on one leg? i'm “ust going through it. try h stand on one leg? i'm “ust going through it. try to _ stand on one leg? i'm just going through it. try to best-of-3. - stand on one leg? i'm just going through it. try to best-of-3. if l stand on one leg? i'm just going i through it. try to best-of-3. if you through it. try to best—of—3. if you are 60 or younger you should be able to manage 30 seconds. 70—80, 20 secondsis to manage 30 seconds. 70—80, 20 seconds is a good result. and he says, michael mosley says, you can improve your balance, you just can, and he says he worked on his by standing on one leg while he is doing his teeth. that standing on one leg while he is doing his teeth.— doing his teeth. that is a good thin to doing his teeth. that is a good thing to do- — doing his teeth. that is a good thing to do. just _ doing his teeth. that is a good thing to do. just doing - doing his teeth. that is a good thing to do. just doing it - doing his teeth. that is a good thing to do. just doing it every da . thing to do. just doing it every day- havfever _ thing to do. just doing it every day. hayfever is _ thing to do. just doing it every day. hayfever is bad, - thing to do. just doing it every day. hayfever is bad, isn't - thing to do. just doing it every day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? | thing to do. just doing it every - day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? lots of people- — day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? lots of people- this _ day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? lots of people. this story _ day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? lots of people. this story made - day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? lots of people. this story made me - day. hayfever is bad, isn't it? lots i of people. this story made me laugh. this little boy, 1a years old, when
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he was about four he put a 5p piece up he was about four he put a 5p piece up his nose. and it stayed there. children shove things up their noses all the time, don't they? i remember when i was younger, well, anyway. i remember getting loads of rolled up bits of paper and shoving them up someone's nose until they got a nosebleed! laughs. don't do that. you know we are broadcasting? laughs i “ust found you know we are broadcasting? laughs i just found it — you know we are broadcasting? laughs i just found it really _ you know we are broadcasting? laughs i just found it really funny. _ i just found it really funny. anyway. laughs. this boy of i just found it really funny. anyway. laughs. this boy 01:14, he had this 5p piece shut up his nose when he was four, and he sneezed it out. ., ., ., , when he was four, and he sneezed it out. ., ., . , when he was four, and he sneezed it out. ., ., ., , it out. how long had it been there? it was never spotted _ out. how long had it been there? it was never spotted even _ out. how long had it been there? it was never spotted even though - out. how long had it been there? it was never spotted even though he l out. how long had it been there? it i was never spotted even though he had been to the doctor, the doctor never saw it, he was going for lunch, at home in croydon, south london, and his nose was hurting much more than usual. he said he could feel
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something hard, his mum told him to blow it, he went upstairs, put cotton buds in both ears, blew it out of his right nostril, and it came out. he put it in about four years old and he is 1a. it had been in there for a decade. lstate]!!! years old and he is 14. it had been in there for a decade.— in there for a decade. well there ou to. in there for a decade. well there you go- that _ in there for a decade. well there you go- that is _ in there for a decade. well there you go. that is a _ in there for a decade. well there you go. that is a relief, - in there for a decade. well there you go. that is a relief, matt i you go. that is a relief, matt doesnt you go. that is a relief, matt doesn't know _ you go. that is a relief, matt doesn't know what _ you go. that is a relief, matt doesn't know what to - you go. that is a relief, matt doesn't know what to think. | doesn't know what to think. seriously, everyone chimes things up their nose when a little kid, don't they? i want to see how many i could get up there. they? i want to see how many i could get up there-— get up there. watch your back, charlie. i know you are asked to comment. you don't always have to comment on things. surely this is safer ground because you could, knowing charlie, he asked to do the whole weather forecast standing on one foot. that to do the whole weather forecast standing on one foot.— to do the whole weather forecast standing on one foot. that is very true. get standing on one foot. that is very true- get on _ standing on one foot. that is very true. get on with _ standing on one foot. that is very true. get on with it. _
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standing on one foot. that is very true. get on with it. he _ standing on one foot. that is very true. get on with it. he may i standing on one foot. that is very i true. get on with it. he may well be now. a true. get on with it. he may well be now- a man — true. get on with it. he may well be now- a man of _ true. get on with it. he may well be now. a man of many _ true. get on with it. he may well be now. a man of many talents. - true. get on with it. he may well be now. a man of many talents. i i true. get on with it. he may well be now. a man of many talents. i need to move, now. a man of many talents. i need to move. so — now. a man of many talents. i need to move. so i _ now. a man of many talents. i need to move, so i cannot— now. a man of many talents. i need to move, so i cannot do _ now. a man of many talents. i need to move, so i cannot do it _ now. a man of many talents. i need to move, so i cannot do it on - now. a man of many talents. i need to move, so i cannot do it on one i to move, so i cannot do it on one foot throughout. good morning to you. we are into the weekend, and it is much fresher this weekend after the warmth of the week. you will avoid the bulk of the showers. they are revolving around this swiss role of cloud towards the west. the longer spells of rain for northern ireland today. linked to this area of low pressure which will dominate the charts this weekend. as it moves east, we see the wind picking up on sunday. a bit more blustery than today, especially across the south and the west. longer spells of rain to the west of northern ireland, but we will see sunshine in these areas. further east side largely drive throughout the day. it will be
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brightening up quite nicely. 20 to 22 degrees here, feeling cooler in the west. as we finish the day, the showers working north, could be possible about anywhere, but a few will stay completely dry. a swell of cloud across ireland start to push further eastwards tonight, outbreaks of rain edging to the south—west of scotland, north—west wales and north—west england and it will be a little bit cooler tonight compare to last night. for sunday, a lot more cloudier in western areas, rain coming and going through the day. a few of you will avoid the rain. always driest across the eastern half of the country. the highest of the temperatures, 22, 20 three celsius, we will have strongest of the wins. wins gusting particularly around the irish sea coasts of around the irish sea coasts of around a0 to 50 miles an hour through the afternoon, and as we go
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through the afternoon, and as we go through the afternoon, outbreaks of rain continue across parts of south—west scotland and northern ireland. we finish the day on a dry note with some clear skies. sunday evening, the rain spreads north across scotland, and in the early part of next week, low pressure is never too far away. heavy rain across some western areas, but high—pressure across parts of central europe. not many inroads further east and that means the outlook for next week is looking like a fairly showery one to north of the country. one or two showers further south and it is the start of wimbledon, hopefully not too many interruptions. back to you both. time now for the film review.
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hello and a very warm welcome to the film review on bbc news. i amjane hill, and taking us through this week's cinema release and is jason solomon. , ~ ., solomon. this week we have everything — solomon. this week we have everything between - solomon. this week we have everything between elvis, i solomon. this week we have i everything between elvis, starting with baz luhrmann's in awaited by a elvis, and the man who discovered him, tom hanks. in a prison drama from france, made in a prison where they do have time on their hands. and then, i will not let you down, it is george michael freedom uncut. will it be any good? you have to have faith, jane.— will it be any good? you have to have faith, jane. excellent. plenty more where _ have faith, jane. excellent. plenty more where they _ have faith, jane. excellent. plenty more where they came _ have faith, jane. excellent. plenty more where they came from. i have faith, jane. excellent. plenty| more where they came from. let's start with elvis. i mean, i love —— love a lot of his work, so tell me, what is it like?—
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what is it like? he made moulin rou:e, what is it like? he made moulin rouge. great — what is it like? he made moulin rouge, great gatsby, _ what is it like? he made moulin rouge, great gatsby, he - what is it like? he made moulin rouge, great gatsby, he has. what is it like? he made moulin rouge, great gatsby, he has a| rouge, great gatsby, he has a frenetic style, and here he takes on the mess, the king of rock �*n' roll, elvis, and the man who discovered him, played by tom hanks, colonel tom parker. let's go back right at the beginning of the story where elvis was a country boy around country fairs with gospel and country fairs with gospel and country at his heart. colonel parker discovered him at the fairground and realises he might have a hit act on his hands. ~ ., realises he might have a hit act on his hands. ~ . , ., realises he might have a hit act on his hands. . . , ., ,, n his hands. what were you thinking? i don't know what _ his hands. what were you thinking? i don't know what i _ his hands. what were you thinking? i don't know what i am _ his hands. what were you thinking? i don't know what i am thinking. i don't know what i am thinking. please, — don't know what i am thinking. please, lord. _ don't know what i am thinking. please, lord, don't— don't know what i am thinking. please, lord, don't let- don't know what i am thinking. please, lord, don't let him i don't know what i am thinking. i please, lord, don't let him hurt my baby. please, lord, don't let him hurt my bab . ~ , ., baby. hurt him? looks like they want to... now, — baby. hurt him? looks like they want to. .. now, i— baby. hurt him? looks like they want to... now, i don't— baby. hurt him? looks like they want to... now, i don't know— baby. hurt him? looks like they want to... now, i don't know nothing i to... now, i don't know nothing about music. — to... now, i don't know nothing about music, but _ to... now, i don't know nothing about music, but i _ to... now, i don't know nothing about music, but i could - to... now, i don't know nothing about music, but i could see i to... now, i don't know nothing about music, but i could see in | to... now, i don't know nothing i about music, but i could see in that girl's _ about music, but i could see in that girl's eyes — about music, but i could see in that girl's eyes he — about music, but i could see in that girl's eyes he was _ about music, but i could see in that girl's eyes he was a _ about music, but i could see in that girl's eyes he was a taste _ about music, but i could see in that girl's eyes he was a taste of - girl's eyes he was a taste of forbidden _ girl's eyes he was a taste of forbidden fruit. _ girl's eyes he was a taste of forbidden fruit. she - girl's eyes he was a taste of forbidden fruit. she could .
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girl's eyes he was a taste of i forbidden fruit. she could have eaten— forbidden fruit. she could have eaten him _ forbidden fruit. she could have eaten him alive. _ forbidden fruit. she could have eaten him alive. he _ forbidden fruit. she could have eaten him alive. he was - forbidden fruit. she could have eaten him alive. he was my. forbidden fruit. she could have - eaten him alive. he was my destiny. it eaten him alive. he was my destiny. it already— eaten him alive. he was my destiny. it already looks _ eaten him alive. he was my destiny. it already looks very— eaten him alive. he was my destiny. it already looks very glitzy. - eaten him alive. he was my destiny. it already looks very glitzy. it is i it already looks very glitzy. it is a long film. is it like that all the way through? tt a long film. is it like that all the way through?— way through? it is, it doesn't let u - , the way through? it is, it doesn't let up. the gaze _ way through? it is, it doesn't let up. the gaze of _ way through? it is, it doesn't let up, the gaze of tom _ way through? it is, it doesn't let up, the gaze of tom hanks i way through? it is, it doesn't let i up, the gaze of tom hanks looking at his prey almost, elvis, played by a relative newcomer, austin butler who has a vehicle job on his relative newcomer, austin butler who has a vehiclejob on his hands given everyone has impersonated elvis. he doesn't really build this character. i didn't really understand what it was i was supposed to be watching. the film goes on and on to the purchase of wasteland and it's purchase of wasteland and its single than becoming a bigger star in the world and going to germany and meeting priscilla and then having this glitzy las vegas residency in the movie is in hollywood, all property added by tom parker played by tom hanks. the film
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never stops for breath, as you would expect from baz luhrmann. the cancan can frenetic atmosphere. here, any dividend drama, needs to work out why elvis is caught up in this trap, from suspicious minds. why is he in this trap? why can't he get out? what is he thinking? i don't think i ever really got to know. beautiful as it was, reaction shot, we are about to hit that number, isn't he naughty? about to hit that number, isn't he nau:h ? , ., about to hit that number, isn't he nau:h ? , . , naughty? there is an interesting tale about the _ naughty? there is an interesting tale about the tom _ naughty? there is an interesting tale about the tom hanks i naughty? there is an interesting i tale about the tom hanks character, and by all accounts, not a nice character, and took a huge percentage of all elvis's earnings... percentage of all elvis's earnings. . ._ percentage of all elvis's earnings. . .- you . percentage of all elvis's i earnings. . .- you could percentage of all elvis's - earnings. . .- you could get a earnings... 5096. you could get a lot of drama out — earnings. .. 5096. you could get a lot of drama out of— earnings... 5096. you could get a lot of drama out of that, _ earnings... 5096. you could get a lot of drama out of that, a _ earnings... “5296 you could get a lot of drama out of that, a lot of earnings... l3:296v you could get a lot of drama out of that, a lot of real tension out of that fact.— of drama out of that, a lot of real tension out of that fact. yes, elvis seems to be _ tension out of that fact. yes, elvis seems to be quite _ tension out of that fact. yes, elvis seems to be quite happy - tension out of that fact. yes, elvis seems to be quite happy with - tension out of that fact. yes, elvis seems to be quite happy with the | seems to be quite happy with the relationship. he says, i owed him everywhere — and everything, i
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wouldn't be where i was without him. yes, it could be a film about greed and fame and how that is dangerous and fame and how that is dangerous and it is sort of all there, ijust needed to have a little break at some point and make us think and put us in there. if you don't know elvis, and i presume what a lot of people don't know him you want to find out. there are some brilliant reconstruction that you can see of tv special, but those are actually available to view on dvd so you are better off watching those bits. there is likely to be a little bit of bahamian rhapsody commented billy is staged, but what does it mean is what i couldn't find out. 0k, interesting. _ what i couldn't find out. 0k, interesting. it _ what i couldn't find out. 0k, interesting. it looks - what i couldn't find out. 0k, interesting. it looks lovely but there is clearly some questions there. a lot of talking and some silences in your second choice. yes. silences in your second choice. yes, we went to — silences in your second choice. yes, we went to france _ silences in your second choice. yes, we went to france for _ silences in your second choice. yes, we went to france for the _ silences in your second choice. me: we went to france for the big hit. at one best european comedy at the
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european film awards, this. it is about an out of work actor who put on a workshop with some inmates in a prison and he realises that because theyjust prison and he realises that because they just wait and wait and wait that that is the most absurd and relevant piece they could put on is waiting on, and much of the upset of the local magistrate in the present, and it becomes a triumphant, overhead, taking these criminals and putting them altogether finding meaning in the stage and in the absurdity of the play. find meaning in the stage and in the absurdity of the play.— meaning in the stage and in the absurdity of the play. and how he nets five absurdity of the play. and how he gets five or _ absurdity of the play. and how he gets five or six _ absurdity of the play. and how he gets five or six prisoners - absurdity of the play. and how he gets five or six prisoners and - absurdity of the play. and how he gets five or six prisoners and he l gets five or six prisoners and he deliberately doesn't want to know what crimes have committed and he has several hours a week with them doing rehearsals. iwas has several hours a week with them doing rehearsals. i was struck that you said it was, got some comedy awards, because to me it is more of awards, because to me it is more of a comedy. i enjoyed it, it was quite slow, but i enjoyed it but i wouldn't have done as a comedy, if i was honest. wouldn't have done as a comedy, if i was honest-— was honest. there are moments of comedy where _ was honest. there are moments of comedy where they _ was honest. there are moments of comedy where they clown - was honest. there are moments of comedy where they clown around l was honest. there are moments of i comedy where they clown around and play around,, i suppose it is that
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kind of comedy. i thought that it was very well done and very well performed .my yes, very well acted. all the time you are thinking it will be like the porridge movie where they are going to escape from prison. are they going to do that? is that what they want? can they be changed by low life on the stage? watch and find out on that one. i won't oil it. george michael is the third choice this week. a, won't oil it. george michael is the third choice this week.— third choice this week. a new documentary _ third choice this week. a new documentary called - third choice this week. a new documentary called freedom | third choice this week. a new - documentary called freedom uncut, although i thought it was a new documentary. it has actually been on channel 4 in aversion after he died. i took it very hard, jane. he was a hero of mine, i saw the very first concert of wham, saw at wembley, i
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saw george in concert, he was a real hero to me. i have the shorts, tracksuits, i have been to arbys. —— ibiza, and i wanted to find out what is so special about george and why he does not let this about prejudice at the brilliant video for freedom, directed by david fincher. freedom is kind of like _ directed by david fincher. freedom is kind of like this _ directed by david fincher. freedom is kind of like this fun _ directed by david fincher. freedom is kind of like this fun groove - is kind of like this fun groove masterpiece thatjust is kind of like this fun groove masterpiece that just comes is kind of like this fun groove masterpiece thatjust comes in is kind of like this fun groove masterpiece that just comes in and wraps— masterpiece that just comes in and wraps you — masterpiece that just comes in and wraps you. you are striving to make something _ wraps you. you are striving to make something every time you are in the studia _ something every time you are in the studia it _ something every time you are in the studia it is— something every time you are in the studio. it is the mona lisa. you are iioin to studio. it is the mona lisa. you are going to say _ studio. it is the mona lisa. you are going to say to _ studio. it is the mona lisa. you are going to say to your _ studio. it is the mona lisa. you are going to say to your record - going to say to your record company, i will going to say to your record company, iwiii not _ going to say to your record company, iwiii not be in — going to say to your record company, i will not be in this— going to say to your record company, i will not be in this video, _ going to say to your record company, i will not be in this video, that- going to say to your record company, i will not be in this video, that is- i will not be in this video, that is a fairiy— i will not be in this video, that is a fairly good _ i will not be in this video, that is a fairly good consolation - i will not be in this video, that is a fairly good consolation prize. i a fairly good consolation prize. five _ a fairly good consolation prize. five absolutely _ a fairly good consolation prize. five absolutely gorgeous - a fairly good consolation prize. - five absolutely gorgeous supermodels that people _ five absolutely gorgeous supermodels that peopte stitt— five absolutely gorgeous supermodels that people still want _ five absolutely gorgeous supermodels that people still want to _ five absolutely gorgeous supermodels that people still want to look- five absolutely gorgeous supermodels that people still want to look at - that people still want to look at
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today — that people still want to look at today it — that people still want to look at toda . . . ., today. it changed the whole face of our videos were _ today. it changed the whole face of our videos were done. _ today. it changed the whole face of our videos were done. the - today. it changed the whole face of our videos were done. the video i today. it changed the whole face of. our videos were done. the video said everything _ our videos were done. the video said everything. it was a revolution. george — everything. it was a revolution. george had raised the bar to a whole new tevet _ george had raised the bar to a whole new tevet i— george had raised the bar to a whole new level. . v , george had raised the bar to a whole new level. v v , v v v new level. i mean, what is not a lot about that? — new level. i mean, what is not a lot about that? i _ new level. i mean, what is not a lot about that? i love _ new level. i mean, what is not a lot about that? i love george _ new level. i mean, what is not a lot about that? i love george michael's music as well, but is this strictly for the diehard fans? it is music as well, but is this strictly for the diehard fans?— for the diehard fans? it is really directed by _ for the diehard fans? it is really directed by george _ for the diehard fans? it is really directed by george michael. - for the diehard fans? it is really directed by george michael. it | for the diehard fans? it is really| directed by george michael. it is him getting his famous mates to say how brilliant he is, that she is, let's just keep on coming. review devices very funny, leanne gallagher is actually very funny, but if you are making a documentary about a deceased popstar and leaves a great legacy of work on sexuality and aids, you need to work out what is iconic about him and why it is still important. iconic about him and why it is still im ortant. v v v , important. none of that is in there? it is really shallow. _ important. none of that is in there? it is really shallow. it _ important. none of that is in there? it is really shallow. it raises - important. none of that is in there? it is really shallow. it raises the - it is really shallow. it raises the truth about why so good and why is music is still so appealing image is
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so appealing. i wanted a bit more, i needed them to tell me why i love him so much. needed them to tell me why i love him so much-— needed them to tell me why i love him so much. interesting. best out this week? — him so much. interesting. best out this week? go _ him so much. interesting. best out this week? go to _ him so much. interesting. best out this week? go to the _ him so much. interesting. best out this week? go to the cinema, - him so much. interesting. best out this week? go to the cinema, it - him so much. interesting. best out| this week? go to the cinema, it was nice weather. _ this week? go to the cinema, it was nice weather, but _ this week? go to the cinema, it was nice weather, but emma _ this week? go to the cinema, it was nice weather, but emma thompson | this week? go to the cinema, it was i nice weather, but emma thompson is tremendous in good luck two, u. it is about a six—year—old woman waiting for a sex worker to come and give her herfirst waiting for a sex worker to come and give her her first ever orgasm give her herfirst ever orgasm .my can i say orgasm? i think i dusted. it is very well done, beautifully well acted. she is up for a few awards. she is tremendous in it. yes. interesting. sadly, the one i haven't been able to see yet, but absolutely on my list, absolutely. if you don't want to sit in a cinema in such beautiful weather, what else would you recommend for us? {lin would you recommend for us? on
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video, two birds in 1's own would you recommend for us? q�*i video, two birds in 1's own because it is the wings of desire, 1987 cult classic about the angels, an angel who falls in love with a trapeze artist who wants to become human to make contact with her. it is like city of angels and this is the original and the best. ijudith original and the best. with something _ original and the best. with something like _ original and the best. with something like that - original and the best. with something like that that i original and the best. with something like that that is| original and the best. with something like that that is such a classic, what do you do? what is your choice? do you want it i am or do you go and see that beautiful restoration... it do you go and see that beautiful restoration. . ._ restoration... it will look better in the cinema _ restoration... it will look better in the cinema than _ restoration... it will look better in the cinema than it _ restoration. .. it will look better in the cinema than it ever- restoration... it will look better. in the cinema than it ever looked before. i have seen it and it looked... the photography is magnificent. it has probably been a long time since you have seen it so i would go to the cinema, but then i am a film critic and a film producer so that is what i do. i am a film critic and a film producer so that is what i do.— so that is what i do. i am with you on that. so that is what i do. i am with you on that- one _ so that is what i do. i am with you on that. one quick _ so that is what i do. i am with you on that. one quick final— so that is what i do. i am with you on that. one quick final thought i on that. one quick final thought about emma thompson, because there is all this talk about this is a revolutionary film because it is about... it depends which review you read, a 55 or 60—year—old woman next
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buying services of a young man in his 20s. , , . buying services of a young man in his20s. ,, v , . , buying services of a young man in his20s. ,, v , v , , , his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing _ his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing on _ his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing on it _ his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing on it which _ his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing on it which is - his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing on it which is what - his 20s. ipswich switches the pretty woman thing on it which is what i i woman thing on it which is what i like about it. bm woman thing on it which is what i like about it.— like about it. am i wrong, i am slithtl like about it. am i wrong, i am slightly annoyed _ like about it. am i wrong, i am slightly annoyed i _ like about it. am i wrong, i am slightly annoyed i keep - slightly annoyed i keep talking about her as a much older woman at the age of 55, 60. it is not that old. 55 is definitely not old. i agree with you. it is a lot older than the kid is coming to me the sex worker, that is for sure. think it is about... it is an ageist thing, and we look at the age gap and we recently saw the film with the licorice pizza, a younger boy and an older woman, licorice pizza, a younger boy and an olderwoman, i licorice pizza, a younger boy and an older woman, i think we are seeing it is interesting and it is about an older woman reclaiming her life after a failed marriage and getting her life back and wanting some agency, and silly as it is, we don't see it in up on screen and emma thompson really rests that debate back. v, v, , thompson really rests that debate back. v, v , v, gv
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back. you are spot on there. jason, tood to back. you are spot on there. jason, good to see — back. you are spot on there. jason, good to see you- — back. you are spot on there. jason, good to see you. what _ back. you are spot on there. jason, good to see you. what a _ back. you are spot on there. jason, good to see you. what a mixed - good to see you. what a mixed bag this week but enjoy your cinema going whatever you choose to go and see. see you next time. goodbye. hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the time is 6:31am. since losing his son, ross, to suicide last year, mike mccarthy has been trying to raise awareness for better mental health support. now the former bbc and sky news broadcaster has joined up with steve phillip, whose sonjordan took his own life in 2019. they've been to meet the health secretary, and are now launching their campaign called baton of hope. zoe conway reports. two men brought together through unimaginable suffering. two bereaved dad's keeping each other going. this has been dad's keeping each other going. in 3 has been really nice, just to come
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out and stand in the fresh air by the water. out and stand in the fresh air by the water-— the water. steve philip lost his 34-year-old — the water. steve philip lost his 34-year-old son _ the water. steve philip lost his 34-year-old son jordan - the water. steve philip lost his 34-year-old son jordan to - the water. steve philip lost his i 34-year-old son jordan to suicide the water. steve philip lost his - 34-year-old son jordan to suicide in 34—year—old sonjordan to suicide in december 2019. jordan had suffered from clinical anxiety and depression. he from clinical anxiety and depression.— from clinical anxiety and de - ression. v v depression. he held an excellent “ob, he depression. he held an excellent job. he was _ depression. he held an excellent job. he was a _ depression. he held an excellent job, he was a good-looking - depression. he held an excellent job, he was a good-looking lad, | depression. he held an excellent i job, he was a good-looking lad, he job, he was a good—looking lad, he had a lovely girlfriend, a loving family, he had a network of friends, that was just family, he had a network of friends, that wasjust huge. family, he had a network of friends, that was just huge. just family, he had a network of friends, that was just huge.— that was 'ust huge. just over a year later that wasjust huge. just over a year later mike mccarthy's _ that wasjust huge. just over a year later mike mccarthy's son - that wasjust huge. just over a year later mike mccarthy's son ross - that was just huge. just over a year| later mike mccarthy's son ross took his own life. he was 31 and had also battled depression for many years. ross was an incredible human being. he was kind, he was loving, devoted to his family and actually, was very funny. to his family and actually, was very funn . ,, to his family and actually, was very funn . v, v, v to his family and actually, was very funn . v, v v ~ ~ funny. steve watched mike tv interview about _ funny. steve watched mike tv interview about losing - funny. steve watched mike tv interview about losing ross i funny. steve watched mike tv. interview about losing ross and decided to get in touch with him. that really helped me. the fact that you were that much sought further along, as say. because at that time
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ijust along, as say. because at that time i just wanted to say to somebody, how long does this pain last? because i can't function, i can't. you don't get over it.— because i can't function, i can't. you don't get over it. you never do. the stock phrase _ you don't get over it. you never do. the stock phrase i _ you don't get over it. you never do. the stock phrase i have _ you don't get over it. you never do. the stock phrase i have started - you don't get over it. you never do. the stock phrase i have started to i the stock phrase i have started to use for— the stock phrase i have started to use for some time isjust to say, you move — use for some time isjust to say, you move forward. to endure, and you move _ you move forward. to endure, and you move forward — you move forward. to endure, and you move forward. you never get over it. mike _ move forward. you never get over it. mike and _ move forward. you never get over it. mike and steve now frequently ask themselves what could they have done differently. they go over and over in their minds the last text messages, the last phone calls. speaking to ross, the night before he died. he said, "i'm ok, dad, i'm 0k". and he died. he said, "i'm ok, dad, i'm ok". and he told his mum he would go for a run in the morning and everything would be all right. i realise with hindsight, maybe i could have listened a bit more instead ofjust trying to do the dad thing and just fix him.— instead ofjust trying to do the dad thing and just fix him.
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thing and 'ust fix him. when we did tet thing and just fix him. when we did get together. _ thing and just fix him. when we did get together, and _ thing and just fix him. when we did get together, and jordan _ thing and just fix him. when we did get together, and jordan and - thing and just fix him. when we did get together, and jordan and i - thing and just fix him. when we did| get together, and jordan and i went for a beer— get together, and jordan and i went for a beer or a meal out get together, and jordan and i went fora beer ora meal out or go get together, and jordan and i went for a beer or a meal out or go to a concert, _ for a beer or a meal out or go to a concert, the — for a beer or a meal out or go to a concert, the last thing he kind of wanted _ concert, the last thing he kind of wanted to— concert, the last thing he kind of wanted to do was say "how is your nrental— wanted to do was say "how is your mental health? " hejust wanted to do was say "how is your mental health? " he just wanted to be dad _ mental health? " he just wanted to be dad — mental health? " he just wanted to be dad. so wejust mental health? " he just wanted to be dad. so we just didn't have those _ be dad. so we just didn't have those conversations, that i look back— those conversations, that i look back now — those conversations, that i look back now and see the signs. i see those _ back now and see the signs. i see those moments clear as day now. but the those moments clear as day now. they don'tjust those moments clear as day now. emit they don'tjust want those moments clear as day now. emit they don't just want to look backwards. they are campaigning for better suicide prevention strategies.— better suicide prevention strateties. ,, v, , v, strategies. should we sit down? good. it strategies. should we sit down? good- it is _ strategies. should we sit down? good. it is why _ strategies. should we sit down? good. it is why they _ strategies. should we sit down? good. it is why they are - strategies. should we sit down? | good. it is why they are meeting sergeant java, good. it is why they are meeting sergeantjava, the good. it is why they are meeting sergeant java, the secretary of state for health. also in the room are philip perry and alex biggs davidson. they also lost their sons to suicide. 75% of people who take their own lives amen. to suicide. 7596 of people who take their own lives amen.— to suicide. 7596 of people who take their own lives amen. when you were talkint 'ust their own lives amen. when you were talking just a — their own lives amen. when you were talking just a moment _ their own lives amen. when you were talking just a moment ago _ their own lives amen. when you were talking just a moment ago about - their own lives amen. when you were talking just a moment ago about your| talking just a moment ago about your own experience, and i completely
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understand when you said you have always will think what could i have done, what could i have done differently for patrick? sajid done, what could i have done differently for patrick? sa'id javid understands * differently for patrick? sa'id javid understands because _ differently for patrick? sajid javid understands because four - differently for patrick? sajid javid understands because four years l differently for patrick? sajid javid i understands because four years ago his brother took his own life. this is the first time he has talked about it publicly.— is the first time he has talked about it publicly. is the first time he has talked about it ublicl . v, ~v, v, about it publicly. last monday would have been my _ about it publicly. last monday would have been my brother's _ about it publicly. last monday would have been my brother's birthday. . about it publicly. last monday would have been my brother's birthday. i l have been my brother's birthday. i say would have been, because he is no longer with us. he took his own life. and on that monday... it was the first thing that i thought about when i opened my eyes, and the last thing i talked about when i close my eyes. nothing can prepare you for the loss of a loved one. but i want to use this privilege role that i have as the secretary of state to do right by his memory. iie
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have as the secretary of state to do right by his memory.— have as the secretary of state to do right by his memory. he is launching a ten ear right by his memory. he is launching a ten year suicide _ right by his memory. he is launching a ten year suicide prevention - a ten year suicide prevention strategy. he says he wants to see a cross government approach, treating suicide with the same urgency of any other major killer. i suicide with the same urgency of any other major killer.— other ma'or killer. i was encouraged b what other major killer. i was encouraged by what the — other major killer. i was encouraged by what the secretary _ other major killer. i was encouraged by what the secretary of _ other major killer. i was encouraged by what the secretary of state - other major killer. i was encouraged by what the secretary of state said, | by what the secretary of state said, i will wait and see the evidence of this ten year suicide prevention plan, but i think that his heart is in the right place, i think it was important that he mentioned his own life experience and the fact that his own brother had taken his life. steve and mike talk to their sons all the time, especially on days like this. i all the time, especially on days like this. , v, v like this. i 'ust told him that we were, like this. i just told him that we were. that _ like this. i just told him that we were. that i _ like this. i just told him that we were, that i wanted _ like this. i just told him that we were, that i wanted him - like this. i just told him that we were, that i wanted him with i like this. i just told him that we i were, that i wanted him with me, that he _ were, that i wanted him with me, that he was— were, that i wanted him with me, that he was going to be alongside me today and _ that he was going to be alongside me today and i_ that he was going to be alongside me today and i wanted him to be there because _ today and i wanted him to be there because we were going down to meet with the _ because we were going down to meet with the health secretary. ross, because we were going down to meet with the health secretary.— with the health secretary. ross, in his farewell — with the health secretary. ross, in his farewell letter, _ with the health secretary. ross, in his farewell letter, said _ with the health secretary. ross, in his farewell letter, said "please - his farewell letter, said "please fight for mental health". and i said to ross during the speech... can you
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see us, ross? i'm doing it, i'm trying. i'm trying my best. and part of me believes that... he can see, he knows what is going on. in his name, and his honour, and in the honour of all the hundreds of thousands of people like him who we lose to suicide in this country. that report was by zoe conway. i'm very pleased to say actually that both mike and steve will be here with us on the sofa, i think at around 8:20am this morning, a little later on. it is so brave what they are doing and they will be with us later on. and if you've been affected by any of the issues raised, you can find links to help and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline. that will have a list of
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organisations which can offer advice. saturday morning, it is 6:37am. it is that time of year, isn't it, there is a lot going on. i know wimbledon isjust around there is a lot going on. i know wimbledon is just around the corner, some all—time... iotute wimbledon isjust around the corner, some all-time. . ._ wimbledon isjust around the corner, some all-time. .. we have wimbledon and euros coming _ some all-time. .. we have wimbledon and euros coming up, _ some all-time. .. we have wimbledon and euros coming up, athletics, - some all-time. .. we have wimbledon and euros coming up, athletics, the i and euros coming up, athletics, the commonwealth games, and we have a whole summer of cricket as well. and i really interesting time for english test cricket in the men's game, because they are going through this rejuvenation process. is it working? _ this rejuvenation process. is it working? it — this rejuvenation process. is it working? it looks _ this rejuvenation process. is it working? it looks to _ this rejuvenation process. is it working? it looks to be. - this rejuvenation process. is it working? it looks to be. there this rejuvenation process. is it - working? it looks to be. there was a oint working? it looks to be. there was a point yesterday _ working? it looks to be. there was a point yesterday where _ working? it looks to be. there was a point yesterday where everyone - working? it looks to be. there was a point yesterday where everyone was| point yesterday where everyone was going back and saying here we go again, another batting collapse and then jonny again, another batting collapse and thenjonny bairstow, rolex again, rolex last week at trent bridge and he just rolex last week at trent bridge and hejust did it... heroics. extraordinary day of cricket. at headingley, england fought back from a batting collapse to keep the third test with new zealand in the balance. england were 55/5 in their first innings, chasing the tourists' 329
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whenjonny bairstow, on his yorkshire home ground, came to the crease and finished the day with a century. joe wilson reports. what you get at headingley, four seasons of cricket in one day. in all a frantic friday jack leach's performance should be remembered, whenjonny bairstow held his catch and gave england's speed bowlerfive wickets on home soil. a landmark performance. new zealand, 329 all out. now for england's nx and had to be flattened. trent boult�*s time. —— innings. look how he got rid of england's top 3. then pope, and then crawley cleaned up completely, too good for england and there was more. joe root could do nothing but edge this ball into the wicket—keeper and england were 21—a. ben stokes tried to blast his way free of the pressure, and lasted 13 balls. remember how that aggressive dominant approach to batting what such a memorable victory in the last test match? you now at headingley,
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england were 91—6 t. but there was no backward step, justjonny bairstow doing lots of that, and with himjamie bairstow doing lots of that, and with him jamie overton on debut, now batting quick. overton is a strong man, all of this commitment to attack meant these two were rapidly, remarkably, turning the match back towards england. headingley could barely believe it's early evening eyes, yorkshire'sjonny bairstow had made another hundred. yes, this was happening. and england somehow will resumejust 65 runs happening. and england somehow will resume just 65 runs behind. remarkable. elsewhere, england's women stepped up their preparations for the euros with an empathic 5—1win over the nation who won the competition last time out. the netherlands were european champions back in 2017 when they were coached by england's current boss serina wiegman, and though the lionesses needed a bit of luck to draw level, once they went ahead they were in control. two goals for beth mead made it a comfortable night at elland road, with 11 days now
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until the finals start. and scotland were in world cup qualifying action, they beat ukraine 4—0 to close in on the second place spot in group b, which would earn them a play—off place. wayne rooney has quit his firstjob in management. he's left league one's derby county, saying they need to led by someone with "fresh energy." despite relegation from the championship, rooney's been a popularfigure — staying with the club through huge financial uncertainty. derby do look to have found a new local buyer now, and the administrators said they asked rooney to stay, but he has left pride park with immediate effect. and britain's ben proud is officially the fastest man on the planet, after he stormed to gold in the men's 50m freestyle at the world championships. the 2017 bronze medallist led off
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the blocks and held his form in the closing stages, to pip american michael andrew to the title. it's proud's second individual world crown after winning gold in the 50m butterfly five years ago. amazing scenes, well done to him. so amazing scenes, well done to him. ’ir much amazing scenes, well done to him. 5r much going on. amazing scenes, well done to him. so much going on. such _ amazing scenes, well done to him. so much going on. such a _ amazing scenes, well done to him. so much going on. such a busy _ amazing scenes, well done to him. so much going on. such a busy summer, | much going on. such a busy summer, we are still— much going on. such a busy summer, we are still catching _ much going on. such a busy summer, we are still catching up, _ much going on. such a busy summer, we are still catching up, and - we are still catching up, and wherever you look at is sport. yes. wherever you look at is sport. yes, what's going _ wherever you look at is sport. yes, what's going on — wherever you look at is sport. ieis what's going on elsewhere in wherever you look at is sport. iei3 what's going on elsewhere in terms of festivals as well, you would be aware, after that three year wait to return to glastonbury, fans have been making the most of all the festival has to offer. and the fun doesn't stop when the headline acts finish their encores. if anything, it's after dark when the magic really begins, as fiona lamdin has been finding out. we had everything going on, but at the end of the day it is about enjoying yourself. for me it is like christmas but better, you see all this people but once a year, and has
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great to catch up and start living your life again. fibre great to catch up and start living your life again.— great to catch up and start living your life again. are you going back for it? you — your life again. are you going back for it? you have _ your life again. are you going back for it? you have caught— your life again. are you going back for it? you have caught me - your life again. are you going back for it? you have caught me after l your life again. are you going back for it? you have caught me after a j for it? you have caught me after a few whiskeys _ for it? you have caught me after a few whiskeys as _ for it? you have caught me after a few whiskeys as well, _ for it? you have caught me after a few whiskeys as well, so - for it? you have caught me after a few whiskeys as well, so i - for it? you have caught me after a few whiskeys as well, so i am - few whiskeys as well, so i am talking rubbish! this is my creation. it is a flamingo _ this is my creation. it is a flamingo. and it helps us find each other— flamingo. and it helps us find each other in— flamingo. and it helps us find each other in the — flamingo. and it helps us find each other in the middle of the night! woo! _ other in the middle of the night! woo! do — other in the middle of the night! woo! , v, other in the middle of the night! woo! m v v, other in the middle of the night! woo! iv, v v, v, woo! do you mind me asking how old ou both woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? — woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i— woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i am _ woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i am 65. _ woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i am 65. i— woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i am 65. i am - woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i am 65. i am 68- woo! do you mind me asking how old you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in - you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in september- _ you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and _ you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and you _ you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and you might - you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and you might say i you both are? i am 65. i am 68 in| september. and you might say up until four in _ september. and you might say up until four in the _ september. and you might say up until four in the morning? - september. and you might say up| untilfour in the morning? probably well. untilfour in the morning? probably well- nothing _ untilfour in the morning? probably well. nothing but— untilfour in the morning? probably well. nothing but water, _ untilfour in the morning? probably well. nothing but water, nothing i until four in the morning? probably. well. nothing but water, nothing but water. the well. nothing but water, nothing but water- the only _ well. nothing but water, nothing but water. the only way! _ well. nothing but water, nothing but water. the only way! the _ well. nothing but water, nothing but water. the only way! the only - well. nothing but water, nothing but water. the only way! the only way. i water. the only way! the only way. how are you _ water. the only way! the only way. how are you finding _ water. the only way! the only way.
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how are you finding it _ water. the only way! the only way. how are you finding it being - water. the only way! the only way. how are you finding it being here, | how are you finding it being here, nice and chill, bit of space?- nice and chill, bit of space? busy. it is beautiful, _ nice and chill, bit of space? busy. it is beautiful, lovely. _ nice and chill, bit of space? busy. it is beautiful, lovely. a _ nice and chill, bit of space? busy. it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful| it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful sace, it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful space. among — it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful space. among a _ it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful space, among a lot _ it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful space, among a lot of— it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful space, among a lot of chaos. - it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful| space, among a lot of chaos. this it is beautiful, lovely. a beautiful i space, among a lot of chaos. this is a kind of... space, among a lot of chaos. this is a kind of- - -— space, among a lot of chaos. this is a kind of...- you _ space, among a lot of chaos. this is a kind of. . .- you could - space, among a lot of chaos. this is a kind of. . .- you could say i space, among a lot of chaos. this is a kind of...- you could say i | a kind of... haven? you could say i haven. a kind of... haven? you could say i haven- 2am — a kind of... haven? you could say i haven. 2am and _ a kind of... haven? you could say i haven. 2am and you _ a kind of... haven? you could say i haven. 2am and you are _ a kind of... haven? you could say i haven. 2am and you are eating - a kind of... haven? you could say i haven. 2am and you are eating mr| haven. 2am and you are eating mr webb . haven. 2am and you are eating mr webby- this _ haven. 2am and you are eating mr webby- this is _ haven. 2am and you are eating mr webby. this is our— haven. 2am and you are eating mr webby. this is our seventh - haven. 2am and you are eating mr webby. this is our seventh mr - haven. 2am and you are eating mr i webby. this is our seventh mr would be a festival- _ webby. this is our seventh mr would be a festival. what _ webby. this is our seventh mr would be a festival. what time _ webby. this is our seventh mr would be a festival. what time do - webby. this is our seventh mr would be a festival. what time do you - webby. this is our seventh mr would be a festival. what time do you go l be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do — be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do you _ be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do you go _ be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do you go to _ be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do you go to bed? - be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do you go to bed? this . be a festival. what time do you go to bed? do you go to bed? this is| be a festival. what time do you go i to bed? do you go to bed? this is my summer holiday _ to bed? do you go to bed? this is my summer holiday and _ to bed? do you go to bed? this is my summer holiday and i _ to bed? do you go to bed? this is my summer holiday and i am _ to bed? do you go to bed? this is my summer holiday and i am looking i summer holiday and i am looking forward _ summer holiday and i am looking forward to— summer holiday and i am looking forward to being with my best friend. — forward to being with my best friend, having a nice time, dancing and just— friend, having a nice time, dancing and just enjoying the good vibes of it alt _ and just enjoying the good vibes of it all. is_ and just en'oying the good vibes of it all. , v , v, v, it all. is there any other time of ear it all. is there any other time of year where _ it all. is there any other time of year where you _ it all. is there any other time of year where you wear _ it all. is there any other time of year where you wear this? - it all. is there any other time of year where you wear this? no, | it all. is there any other time of. year where you wear this? no, this is special. — year where you wear this? no, this is special. i — year where you wear this? no, this is special, i bring _ year where you wear this? no, this is special, i bring it _ year where you wear this? no, this is special, i bring it out _ year where you wear this? no, this is special, i bring it out every - is special, i bring it out every summer. is special, i bring it out every summer-— is special, i bring it out every summer._ they l is special, i bring it out every i summer._ they are is special, i bring it out every - summer._ they are fast summer. fast asleep? they are fast aslee -. summer. fast asleep? they are fast asleep- they — summer. fast asleep? they are fast asleep. they have _ summer. fast asleep? they are fast asleep. they have ear _ summer. fast asleep? they are fast asleep. they have ear protectors i summer. fast asleep? they are fast| asleep. they have ear protectors and blankets, and they are in their pyjamas.
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blankets, and they are in their - 'amas. v, v , , pyjamas. the queue to the rabbit hole is really _ pyjamas. the queue to the rabbit hole is really long, _ pyjamas. the queue to the rabbit hole is really long, but _ pyjamas. the queue to the rabbit hole is really long, but i've - pyjamas. the queue to the rabbit hole is really long, but i've got i hole is really long, but i've got the key to get in. let's go. welcome little bunnies! _ the key to get in. let's go. welcome little bunnies! welcome! _ the key to get in. let's go. welcome little bunnies! welcome! i— the key to get in. let's go. welcome little bunnies! welcome! i don't- little bunnies! welcome! i don't know how _ little bunnies! welcome! i don't know how you've _ little bunnies! welcome! i don't know how you've got _ little bunnies! welcome! i don't know how you've got in - little bunnies! welcome! i don't know how you've got in here, i little bunnies! welcome! i don't. know how you've got in here, but welcome, — know how you've got in here, but welcome, you're late, you know you're _ welcome, you're late, you know you're late? _ welcome, you're late, you know you're late? you are, it's a very important — you're late? you are, it's a very important date.— important date. come through, lease! important date. come through, please! look — important date. come through, please! look at _ important date. come through, please! look at yourself - important date. come through, please! look at yourself in - important date. come through, please! look at yourself in the | please! look at yourself in the reflection. please! look at yourself in the reflection-— please! look at yourself in the reflection._ come i please! look at yourself in the - reflection._ come through. reflection. stunning. come through. i am 'ust reflection. stunning. come through. i am just going to squeeze - i am just going to squeeze the life out of you — i am just going to squeeze the life out of you. now your adventure begins — out of you. now your adventure begins. you must lead on. ok, let's to. this begins. you must lead on. ok, let's go- this would _ begins. you must lead on. ok, let's go. this would only _ begins. you must lead on. ok, let's go. this would only happen - begins. you must lead on. ok, let's go. this would only happen at - go. this would only happen at glastonbury. i have no idea where we are. what am i wearing? some wedding dress that is far too small, a barre, some feathers and there is literally a crowd of people... we have escaped, quick, get out while
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we can! where are you off to? going to bed! laughs _ we can! where are you off to? going to bed! laughs. — we can! where are you off to? going to bed! laughs. this _ we can! where are you off to? going to bed! laughs. this view _ we can! where are you off to? going to bed! laughs. this view is - to bed! laughs. this view is absolutely — to bed! laughs. this view is absolutely stunning. - to bed! laughs. this view is absolutely stunning. can't i to bed! laughs. this view is| absolutely stunning. can't get to bed! laughs. this view is - absolutely stunning. can't get bored of it. it is absolutely _ absolutely stunning. can't get bored of it. it is absolutely magical. - absolutely stunning. can't get bored of it. it is absolutely magical. a - of it. it is absolutely magical. a magical feeling, of it. it is absolutely magical. a magicalfeeling, best place in of it. it is absolutely magical. a magical feeling, best place in the world. and when you are sat here looking out, it's the best. just give you a little sense of what it is like a plaid cymru later on after dark. —— glastonbury. is at a library picture. this was last night, there have been umbrellas up there and they may do at times today. the forecast is a fairly showery one towards the south—west of england. this is a short while ago, as usual i was downwind of
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glastonbury as i speak. those showers across some other western areas as well, heavier bursts of rain across scotland, northern ireland, wet start to saturday. the vast majority is dry at the moment, more showers will develop across england and wales especially on the western half and also in central and southern scotland in the afternoon but northern ireland should brighten up but northern ireland should brighten up a little bit. lots of sunshine this afternoon, feeling warm, 22 degrees around the murray firth. a few showers dotted around, big gaps between them. bright skies to the ease of northern ireland later. nor more showers across the western half of england, good but close to glastonbury and the cricket at leeds and more cloud later on across east anglia and the south—east is a little frontal wave pushes very close to our shores. almost across eastern areas, 22 today. two high teens. a wind will get stronger
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tonight with longer spell the rain putting into northern ireland, part of south—west scotland, just fringing england and wales. a little bit fresher tonight into tomorrow morning, but fortomorrow, bit fresher tonight into tomorrow morning, but for tomorrow, we see more cloud and further outbreaks of rain to the north and west, the further south and east, you will stay dry. full forecast later. back to you both. look forward to it. thank you. time now for the latest technology news, with click. hello and welcome to this big, green open space. never before have we appreciated outdoor spaces and parks like we have
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since lockdown. yeah, unfortunately, though, lockdown also saw an increase in something that's threatening to turn some of our green and pleasant lands into brown and unpleasant landfill, and that is the illegal dumping of rubbish. there've been well over a million fly—tipping incidents in the uk over the past year, and paul carter's been to see how ai is hoping to help us find the fly—tippers. like many countries, england's seen a surge in the illegal dumping of rubbish during the pandemic. some people pull up and dispose of their waste while others, well, they literally do it on the fly. here on the outskirts of london, a number of councils have turned to tech to combat the issue. cameras, but not as you know them. these use a! to catch fly—tippers.
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since february, over 80 smart cameras been installed at known dumping hot spots across a number of councils, including kingston upon thames and sutton. they're just one of the initiatives of the south london partnership's innovate programme. it aims to harness the internet of things, or iot, to manage new challenges that have arisen during the pandemic and to pilot solutions to help people live better and healthier lives. so, i decided to put the cameras through their paces. unlike regular cctv, these cameras don't record continuously and are only triggered when they detect movement. that means it not only limits the amount of footage someone has to look at, it also reduces the carbon footprint of the solution. the footage is then transmitted wirelessly to a secure cloud—based platform and an alert sent out to the council's enforcement team. so, i'vejust dumped
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the rubbish that we've seen behind me and you've had that come through to your phone as an alert. yep. can i have a — can i have a look? yes. so, we get a notification on our desktop, laptop, whatever device we've got. so, you'll be able to see pretty much in real time almost someone dumping something? yes, 100%. oh, there i am! oh, look at that — bang to rights! and it's very clear, crystal clear. so, actually, we can see the person, we actually can see what the items are on that trolley. is that important sometimes to actually be able to identify what it is that they're dumping as well? very important, because our crew really we want to know what they're going for. if it's got asbestos—related, if it's got anything that is also a health and safety concern. given these cameras are operating in busy urban environments, they're often triggered over 100,000 times a day. the captured footage could just show a passing car or pedestrian. so why, then, aren't the councils getting thousands of alerts a day? how is the camera able to spot a legitimate fly—tipping event amidst all that noise?
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well, the magic isn't actually happening in the camera itself but, rather, behind the scenes in the cloud. there's an aland machine learning element to this process. how does that work and what are the cameras doing and what are they looking for? detection of people and that sort of thing is reasonably straightforward and the cameras will do that themselves. what is the tricky bit is — what is rubbish? it's quite an objective thing, isn't it? yeah. rubbish in one environment is not rubbish in another environment. the cameras are installed, they collect a log of data of movement in that environment and then, our data scientists will then look at that and make sure we tag and we actively review the footage and make sure the tagging is correct. so is the right thing being tagged as rubbish and not rubbish? are we getting false positives, false negatives? and trying to minimise those elements so that what the customer sees is really accurate. so, that's really interesting. so, you're actually using a little bit of a human element to teach them context? that's right. which is quite a difficult thing
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for an al to learn on its own. and i think that's a really good way of putting it because vision technologies can identify what a box is or a mattress is but it doesn't know whether that's good or bad. so, we've got some images on the screen here of some shadowy figures dropping off some rubbish. i can see that it's got a green box marked around there, so what has it identified? so, what we're seeing here is this is part of one of the automatic a! computer vision models that we're using. this is detecting that there's some rubbish that's come into the scene of the camera, and there's a person pushing that rubbish along — you may recognise him! chuckles and you can see down the bottom here, so, the model he has detected at a level of 68% accuracy and its opinion that that is rubbish. i'd say that's pretty accurate, yeah. yep, yep. and if we look at other instances, there's one here which hasn't been matchy—matched. so now, this is the same trolley, so in theory, this should've actually been tagged. now, in this case, it had a person in front of the trolley, which is probably why it thought, "well, maybe that's not actually rubbish." maybe that's someone doing their shopping? maybe it's someone doing the shopping in front of a rubbish bin.
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laughter and so here, we canjust draw a box over this and add it. the model will then improve itself based upon all of additional feedback that we give it. and it seems that feedback loop is working with significant drops in the number of reported incidents at former hot spots. the real challenge for councils, like the one here, is preventing fly—tipping from happening in the first place, and notjust potentially moving the problem into other areas. but it's clear to see that technology like the one being used here does have real potential to change the area and improve it for people that live and work here. paul there. now, can we see that picture of the trolley again? yes, please! i think that was the teddy i gave him for his birthday! spencer cackles i think it is! and what's that old chair? what on earth is there? that's definitely the shot of the show, definitely. so, we've have seen how a! can track fly—tippers. i know what you're thinking — can this technology also be used to track puffins? what?! trust me, that's what they're thinking. so, you know in the past, we've talked about how putting up
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wind turbines might affect the local wildlife? mm. well, nick kwek has been out into the north sea to find out how one energy company is trying to prevent problems for a population of puffins. nine miles off the coast of wick at the far north of scotland, it's wavy and it's windy. you see them there on the horizon! i've come to visit the 84 turbines that make up sse renewables' beatrice site. this is one of the uk's largest offshore wind farms with enough capacity to power almost 500,000 homes. the uk government, though, wants enough wind energy to be generated to power all of british homes by 2030 and it's cut approval times for new offshore farms from four years to just one. of course, it's not as simple as just sticking these things into the seabed.
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right now, with offshore wind and the really — the scale of development that we're going to see, we just don't yet know how that's going to impact the ocean, so we always need to think about what's the impact on habitats and wildlife and, you know, especially when we're harnessing nature's resources, then we need to make sure that we're protecting the natural environment too. they've been conducting a study with microsoft and avanade on the isle of may in fife, home to fauna such as seals, ducklings and the much—loved puffin. this is a sanctuary for puffins with around 80,000 nesting here each year. it's estimated because traditional counting has been done by eye, so researchers have engineered a way to keep better tabs on them. the effects that we see from building offshore wind farms isn't seen immediately within the local ecology — it's obviously an effect that takes time — and what's really important is that we start
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monitoring the local ecology to our wind farms so that we understand the impacts we have, so that we can implement corrective actions and potentially have a positive impact. they've installed four artificially intelligent camera systems to count puffins and monitor theirflight, each equipped with their own custom—made marine—grade jackets. you cannot buy this off the shelf. right, ok. and we've had these created specifically for these four cameras, which are on this islet. and so, the puffins are under cctv surveillance? they are, 21! hours a day. are they happy with that? laughs is a wee windscreen wiper? that is, indeed, yes, and that allows us to perform periodic maintenance, ensuring that that we can clean the lens of any salty deposits which are picked up from the harsh sea air. puffins generally, when they're congregating around their burrows, tend to face out, looking down this hill. so, we have one camera positioned further down the hill, looking straight on to the puffin, giving a good view of the portrait, whereas this gives a good side—on —
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a good side—on view of the profile of the puffin. you're quite right — i can see one right there, actually... exactly, yeah. ..looking side—on. so, as part of the trial, we really wanted to understand what would give the a! the best opportunity to recognise a puffin. in february, this was just a barren ground. there was no grass, let alone flowers. and you can see here now all these white flowers that have bloomed, so the white flowers actually merge with the breast of the puffins in terms of the pixels for the alto pick up, so it was actually tricking the ai. oh, right, ok! yeah, and actually resulted in slight inaccuracies until we've retrained the model. this is chiefly a data—gathering exercise — the initial entries for a long—term puffin digital database. already, we're building up quite a strong picture of how the puffins behave during certain times of day. understanding, you know, when there's peak puffin activity versus low puffin activity. so, very soon, we should start to be able to understand when there's any anomalies in this behaviour. but at the moment, it is still very early and we are still trying to understand the data and really start pulling it together.
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we've got a very narrow window of time in order to ensure that we can protect a lot of ecosystems that are in huge danger, and so, it's something that's incredibly close to microsoft's heart. is there a bit of responsibility or a bit of maybe even guilt sometimes when it comes to addressing the climate change issues surrounding technology companies, having such a carbon footprint? well, we know that, you know, the carbon emissions that microsoft have represents less than 1% of the global carbon emissions. but you're right, you know, the data centre footprint is one that we're really focused on, and i think in the world that we live today, the demand for data and technology is one that's growing. and to satisfy that demand, we'll need more electricity. the thing is, if we're to reach government targets and lessen our dependence on burning fossilfuels, then we're going to have to embrace renewable energy. let's just hope the rollout
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is a harmonious one, for everyone's sake. what an absolutely stunning view! and there was nick kwek in there too! anyway, that's it for the shortcut of click for this week. the full—length version is waiting for you right now on iplayer. thanks for watching and we'll be back next week! good morning, welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today: protests in cities across the us, as the supreme court removes the constitutional right to abortion. in several states the
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ban becomes instant, and clinics begin to close, arkansas's almost total ban on abortion into law. backbench conservative mps consider fresh attempts to force borisjohnson from power, after two damaging by—election defeats. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network begins, with only a fifth of train services expected to run. # you can give them my best butjust know, # i'm not yourfriend...# the american singer billie eilish becomes the youngest ever headliner at glastonbury, as music fills the festival for the first time in three years. good morning, ken day three eight frantic friday at headingley, where a brutal century from jonny bairstow represent —— rescued england from collapse in the third test against new zealand? bind collapse in the third test against new zealand?— collapse in the third test against new zealand? and it is windy and fresh out there, _ new zealand? and it is windy and
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fresh out there, but _ new zealand? and it is windy and fresh out there, but while - new zealand? and it is windy and fresh out there, but while they i new zealand? and it is windy and l fresh out there, but while they will be showers in the west, some places in the east will stay dry, the full forecast here on breakfast. it's saturday 25 june. our top story: protests have taken place in the us overnight after a supreme court ruling removed american women's constitutional right to abortion. clinics have already started closing in some parts of the country, with 13 states triggering bans on abortions immediately, as frances reed reports. protests from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe vs wade is seismic. legal abortion on demand! pro—choice demonstrators say they are horrified that millions will lose their legal right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment.
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and this is a heady responsibility. to make abortion unthinkable and illegal throughout our nation, to ensure no woman stands alone in a post—roe america, to be the post—roe generation! cheering and applause. elizabeth keifer—kraus made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states already where, as of this minute, abortion access is denied and illegal, ifeel pretty numb and pretty angry about that. and truly, ifeel a little bit helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws that mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life was at risk.
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others are expected to either introduce new restrictions or resurrect pre—roe bans. and in states where opinions on abortion are closely split, the legality of the procedure could be determined on an election—by—election basis or via legal battles. critics of the decision say it is an injustice, and without plans to support those who are pregnant, will impact the poorest in society in a country that for the most part has no universal healthcare or paid family leave. the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult, it is a slap in the face to women about using their ownjudgement to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. # jesus loves the little children...# but within the us, this is only the beginning.
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and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feeljustice has finally been served. frances read, bbc news. thejudgement made by the us supreme court has reignited the debate in this decades—long fight over abortion. our correspondent barbara plett—usher has sent this report from a demonstration in washington dc. there have been demonstrations around the country, and they continued into the night here in washington dc. this ruling has really exposed the profound divisions in this country over abortion rights. some states have already started to ban abortions, others will follow. some states are saying they will be safe harbours for women who want abortions. both sides are gearing up for a long and bitter political fight, and security agencies are warning about violence. they say there has been an increase in threats of extremist attacks. this decision to overturn national abortion rights, to overturn roe v wade,
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was a radical legal move. but it has in no way ended the political fight over abortion. some conservative mps are considering fresh attempts to force the prime minister from office in the wake of two damaging by—election defeats. two of borisjohnson's critics have said they want to join the executive of the influential 1922 committee, which has the power to change the rules on conservative leadership contests. our political correspondent helen catt has more. the defeats inflicted on the conservatives, here by labour in west yorkshire in a seat the tories won in 2019, and here in a formerly tory heartland seat in devon, now lib dem, sent a message. but politicians aren't exactly hearing the same one. this is, i think, about as compelling a message as it possibly could be. it is time for boris to go, it is time for boris to move on,
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people don't trust him. the prime minister, away in rwanda, unsurprisingly doesn't quite agree. people, you know, will continue to beat me up, and say this or that about, and to attack me — that is fine, that's quite right, that's the job of politicians. in the end voters, journalists, they have no—one else to make their complaints to. i have to take that. i also have to get on with the job of delivering for the people of this country. at home, the former party chairman oliver dowden resigned, saying it couldn't be business as usual. other ministers insist the government is listening. i think this isn't business as usual. he needs to reflect, we need to reflect, and that is exactly what we have all said we're going to do. because it is important that we are tackling the biggest issues of the day. many tory mps remain deeply unhappy. some of them preparing to stand for election to the body which runs the influential 1922 committee.
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it has the power to change the rules to allow another confidence vote to be held in mrjohnson. there are a couple of vacancies for the executive, and i am minded to put my hat into the ring next week when nominations open, i think the vote will probably be the week after. on a ticket of, i would be in favour of rule change. and effectively, that would be another vote of confidence. but labour, buoyed by its first gain in a by—election in a decade, says it is not all about the man in number ten. it is not a problem with borisjohnson, it is a problem with the tory party. regardless, labour will be ready to beat the tory party, whoever is at the head of it, because that is what we owe the country. but now it is borisjohnson's future which remains the topic of much speculation, mostly in his absence. mrjohnson himself is not due back in the country until later next week. helen catt, bbc news. a third day of rail strikes is under way — with only a fifth of train
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services expected to run. around 40,000 workers at network rail and 13 train operating companies have walked out in a dispute over pay, jobs and working conditions. here's our business correspondent emma simpson. blackpool is a popular place for a summer trip. but today there aren't any trains to get here, and for the owner of this b&b, it comes at a cost. so here at this property i have lost a third of business this weekend. we have a second property which is larger, that has 11! rooms, and they have lost just about the same. which means that this is representative of the whole of blackpool, what happens to us happens to the rest of the town. on the first two days of strike action, many people were able to work from home. but now we have hit the weekend, and there are loads of events on. for instance there is a sell—out rolling stones concert here at london's hyde park.
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but getting to venues by train and home again is no longer an option. ed sheeran is at wembley, but one fan in hampshire says he has got to give up his seat. we've spent a lot of money on train tickets as it is, to then go and have to spend a lot of money on fuel when fuel prices are increasing as it is, it's not really, we shouldn't have to kind of do it, really. and it is horrible to make the decision not to go, and i am gutted. the rmt is warning more rail strikes are extremely likely if a deal cannot be reached. emma simpson, bbc news. the taliban's health minister has told the bbc that afghanistan urgently needs international support to deal with the aftermath of a devastating earthquake that's killed more than 1,000 people. many survivors have lost their homes and hospitals are struggling to treat the injured. our correspondent secunder kermani joins us now from sharana in the worst affected province of paktika. good morning to you secunder. i know
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you and your team have witnessed the devastation there and clearly the situation is bleakfor devastation there and clearly the situation is bleak for those devastation there and clearly the situation is bleakfor those people affected. situation is bleak for those people affected. v, �* , situation is bleak for those people affected. v �* v situation is bleak for those people affected. vv �* , v, , affected. that's right, the worst affected. that's right, the worst affected villages _ affected. that's right, the worst affected villages are _ affected. that's right, the worst affected villages are around i affected. that's right, the worst affected villages are around a i affected villages are around a three—hour drive away from the city of sharana where i am now, that is largely along dirt, bumpy mountain roads, and the remote location of this disaster has made the response to it all the more challenging. the search and rescue operation is over, the focus now is firmly on looking after those who survived the earthquake, getting them adequate food, shelter, preventing diseases from spreading. many of them have lost their homes, their livelihoods, their possessions, and many of them sleeping in tents that have been distributed, or had been distributed over the past few days. that is because their homes are obviously too badly damaged, many others also worried about the possibility of after—shocks, we had one yesterday
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in which an additional five people were killed. the aid is coming through, the un is on the ground, international charities are here, as our local ones, the taliban government has also been distributing aid, but this is a country that was already struggling with an economic and humanitarian crisis, with around half the population going hungry. and there are some really tragic, as you can imagine, human, personalstories imagine, human, personal stories behind imagine, human, personalstories behind this disaster. i spoke to one man yesterday who said three of his aduu man yesterday who said three of his adult daughters and four of his grandchildren have been killed, the day before that i was speaking to a man who is 18 members of one extended family, or living in one house, were killed. so this is a crisis that is really adding onto a crisis that is really adding onto a crisis that is really adding onto a crisis that was existing here in afghanistan. crisis that was existing here in afghanistan-— crisis that was existing here in afthanistan. v, v v ~ i v, afghanistan. secunder, thank you ve much afghanistan. secunder, thank you very much for— afghanistan. secunder, thank you very much for that. _ afghanistan. secunder, thank you very much for that. two _
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afghanistan. secunder, thank you very much for that. two people i afghanistan. secunder, thank you i very much for that. two people have been killed and 11! injured in a shooting at a nightclub and nearby streets in the centre of the norwegian capital oslo. the shooting happened in three separate locations, including a gay bar. a suspect has been arrested. oslo's annual pride marches due to be held later today. the time now is 7:13am. american singer billie eilish made history last night, becoming the youngest person to headline glastonbury festival. the 20—year—old from los angeles was also the first artist to headline the festival's pyramid stage since it returned after its three—year break. a warning — there are some flashing images coming up. # what do you want from me, what are you wondering, what do you know? # why aren't you scared of me, why do you care for me? # when we all fall asleep, where do
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we go? # when we all fall asleep, where do we to? v v # when we all fall asleep, where do we go?_ top _ # when we all fall asleep, where do we go?_ top tier. - # when we all fall asleep, where do we go?_ top tier, top i we go? incredible! top tier, top notch! youngest _ we go? incredible! top tier, top notch! youngest headliner - we go? incredible! top tier, top| notch! youngest headliner ever! # today— notch! youngest headliner ever! # today in! _ notch! youngest headliner ever! # today i'm picking _ notch! youngest headliner ever! # today i'm picking apart - notch! youngest headliner ever! # today i'm picking apart the i notch! youngest headliner ever! - # today i'm picking apart the things that... the way i'm taking you down... it that... the way i'm taking you down... v v v v that... the way i'm taking you down... v v ~ vv that... the way i'm taking you down... v , v v down... it was incredible. what was so tood down... it was incredible. what was so good about _ down... it was incredible. what was so good about it? _ down... it was incredible. what was so good about it? it _ down... it was incredible. what was so good about it? it was _ down... it was incredible. what was so good about it? it wasjust - down... it was incredible. what was so good about it? it was just the i so good about it? it was 'ust the atmosphere * so good about it? it was 'ust the atmosphere in h so good about it? it wasjust the atmosphere in everything, - so good about it? it wasjust the atmosphere in everything, she l so good about it? it wasjust the| atmosphere in everything, she is 'ust atmosphere in everything, she is just so— atmosphere in everything, she is just so good with interacting with the crowd. v, , just so good with interacting with the crowd. v, v v, just so good with interacting with the crowd. v, , v, , the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional- _ the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional. yeah, _ the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional. yeah, i— the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional. yeah, i was - the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional. yeah, i wasjust - emotional. yeah, i was 'ust screamingi emotional. yeah, i was 'ust screaming my fl emotional. yeah, i was 'ust screaming my heart i emotional. yeah, iwasjust screaming my heart out. i screaming my heart out. # step _ screaming my heart out. # step on the glass, stable your tongue... # step on the glass, stable your tontue. .. vv # step on the glass, stable your tontue... vv v, v v tongue... came to see robert plant hours ato tongue... came to see robert plant hours ago and _ tongue... came to see robert plant hours ago and i _ tongue... came to see robert plant hours ago and i got _ tongue... came to see robert plant hours ago and i got stuck _ tongue... came to see robert plant hours ago and i got stuck and - hours ago and i got stuck and couldn't— hours ago and i got stuck and couldn't get out, that is what happened. couldn't get out, that is what happened-— couldn't get out, that is what hat-ened. �* , , happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. — happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. and _ happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. and loving _ happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. and loving her, - happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. and loving her, i i happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. and loving her, i am| billie eilish. and loving her, i am in love. converted. _ in love. converted. # _ in love. converted. # i_ in love. converted. # i want to end me! v ~ , # i want to end me! cheering and applause 20 years old. brilliant. absolutely
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fabulous. what _ 20 years old. brilliant. absolutely fabulous. what is _ 20 years old. brilliant. absolutely fabulous. what is the _ 20 years old. brilliant. absolutely fabulous. what is the weather i 20 years old. brilliant. absolutely| fabulous. what is the weather like fellows there and in the rest of the country? sometimes the weather doesn't matter when the music is so good. one or two showers yesterday, more sunshine around today for glastonbury, but as the forecast suggests, a greater chance of passing showers. quite a strong breeze, as there is for those heading to headingley for the cricket, much windier than yesterday. a chance of staying dry. showers got very close by. a small chance because a showers closing in today because of the presence of this low pressure revolving to the west of the uk throughout this weekend, getting closer, bringing a greater chance of rain especially tomorrow. today across scotland, england and wales, showers across central and western areas. northern ireland has some wet weather at the moment. outbreaks of rain in the
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west always a bit brighter for the east. many of you stay completely dry throughout the day, much of eastern england, and after a damp start for some in northern scotland, it should be higher. fresher than we have been used to to the west especially the strength of that wind. the wind strengthens further tonight, a few showers this evening, sticker cloud and outbreaks of rain in northern ireland, spreading to south—west scotland, as we go into tomorrow morning and temperatures around nine to 12 degrees as we start tomorrow. tomorrow, brighter starting eastern england, northern scotland, more around generally through tomorrow and the cloud will bring greater chance of rain at times. a few showers elsewhere, not as warm tomorrow in the north of scotland but could be a little warmer to the south—east, 2123 here for the western areas will feel
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cooler because the strongest of the winds will be focused here. outbreaks of rain through the north channel down to the irish sea and towards the south—west, 40 to 50 mile an hour gust. big waves towards the south—west as well. the evening, east anglia and south—east will stay dry, a fine end here. next week this will be the place to be for the drier weather, outbreaks of rain, areas of low pressure pushing in. they stalled because there is higher pressure to the east, and the low pressure to the east, and the low pressure does not move. the northern and western areas as you can see in the forecast chart always prone to some showers, longer spell the rain at times, when you during the first half of the week. the forecast for london as a flavour of what to expect in the south and east, west, the odd show on thursday, but dry weather, warmest during the middle part of the week. not looking too bad for the start of wimbledon. back to you.
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see you later on. medals have been presented to the service personnel who helped evacuate thousands of people from afghanistan following the taliban's takeover of the country last summer. the presentation was to mark armed forces day, and there will be a number of events taking place around the uk today. our reporter matt graveling is at raf brize norton. you have got those amazing blue skies, and myi you have got those amazing blue skies, and my i assume it is one of the aircraft that was used in the evacuation?— the aircraft that was used in the evacuation? ., ., , . evacuation? you would be correct. good morning- _ evacuation? you would be correct. good morning. this _ evacuation? you would be correct. good morning. this is _ evacuation? you would be correct. good morning. this is an - evacuation? you would be correct. good morning. this is an a400m i good morning. this is an aaoom aircraft, it was used as part of the evacuation of afghanistan back in august last year, in total i believe there are about 165 round trips from there are about 165 round trips from the airport to take people from the airport to the uk as part of the evacuation. today is national armed
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forces today, people can buy their appreciation to the military in a number of events. we have been talking about this plane. how about we meet one of the men who fly these plans. i will say, we meet one of the men who fly these plans. iwill say, george, you fly something a bit bigger than this one. i something a bit bigger than this one. ., y something a bit bigger than this one. ., , ' , ., , something a bit bigger than this one. ., , ' , ., ., one. i do. i fly c17s. i was one of the peeple _ one. i do. i fly c17s. i was one of the people working _ one. i do. i fly c17s. i was one of the people working last - one. i do. i fly c17s. i was one of| the people working last summer. one. i do. i fly c17s. i was one of- the people working last summer. when ou were the people working last summer. when you were flying — the people working last summer. when you were flying into _ the people working last summer. ewen you were flying into kabul, with a lot of images in the television with white shopping. what was it like landing there for you as a person —— quite shocking. landing there for you as a person -- quite shocking-— quite shocking. there was a lot of talkin: quite shocking. there was a lot of talking between _ quite shocking. there was a lot of talking between aircraft _ quite shocking. there was a lot of talking between aircraft in - quite shocking. there was a lot of talking between aircraft in the - quite shocking. there was a lot of talking between aircraft in the air| talking between aircraft in the air to ensure — talking between aircraft in the air to ensure some separation, in terms of being _ to ensure some separation, in terms of being on_ to ensure some separation, in terms of being on the ground, it was quite humbling, _ of being on the ground, it was quite humbling, as we flew in, the crowds
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and crowds — humbling, as we flew in, the crowds and crowds of thousands of people trying _ and crowds of thousands of people trying to _ and crowds of thousands of people trying to get onto an aircraft and -et trying to get onto an aircraft and get out — trying to get onto an aircraft and get out of— trying to get onto an aircraft and get out of there. you trying to get onto an aircraft and get out of there.— trying to get onto an aircraft and get out of there. you told me before ou came get out of there. you told me before you came on — get out of there. you told me before you came on air. _ get out of there. you told me before you came on air, you _ get out of there. you told me before you came on air, you are _ get out of there. you told me before you came on air, you are also - get out of there. you told me before you came on air, you are also doing | you came on air, you are also doing flats to help with humanitarian effort in ukraine.— flats to help with humanitarian effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different. _ effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different. a _ effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different, a little _ effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different, a little bit— effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different, a little bit more - effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different, a little bit more of. effort in ukraine. yes, it is a bit different, a little bit more of a i different, a little bit more of a normal— different, a little bit more of a normal routine for us, we fly every single _ normal routine for us, we fly every single day— normal routine for us, we fly every single day over that poland area to support _ single day over that poland area to support ukraine and make sure they have what _ support ukraine and make sure they have what they need. a bit of a variation— have what they need. a bit of a variation but largely again humanitarian stuff, russians, blankets, _ humanitarian stuff, russians, blankets, anything really that people — blankets, anything really that people need that i don't have access to other— people need that i don't have access to other minute.— to other minute. thank you very much. to other minute. thank you very much- he _ to other minute. thank you very much- he was — to other minute. thank you very much. he was one _ to other minute. thank you very much. he was one of— to other minute. thank you very much. he was one of those - to other minute. thank you very| much. he was one of those who, on this very airbase yesterday, was given an award for recognition of the great work that they did in operation pitting as part of the operation —— evacuation of afghanistan. two other gentlemen join me now, you had the very
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importantjob of the engines in this plane still running, getting paid off, getting people on. what was your memories of the mission which was a two—week mission? your memories of the mission which was a two-week mission?— your memories of the mission which was a two-week mission? there is a clean-shaven _ was a two-week mission? there is a clean-shaven war _ was a two-week mission? there is a clean-shaven war film, _ was a two-week mission? there is a clean-shaven war film, it _ was a two-week mission? there is a clean-shaven war film, it felt - was a two-week mission? there is a clean-shaven war film, it felt like i clean—shaven war film, it felt like we landed. — clean—shaven war film, it felt like we landed, —— cliche. it was not your— we landed, —— cliche. it was not your standard traffic, lots of vehicles _ your standard traffic, lots of vehicles on the ground, they are not really— vehicles on the ground, they are not really knowing what we were bringing out, people, freight, aid, that was how it _ out, people, freight, aid, that was how it was — out, people, freight, aid, that was how it was for us. like out, people, freight, aid, that was how it was for us.— out, people, freight, aid, that was how it was for us. like we said, you didn't know — how it was for us. like we said, you didn't know what _ how it was for us. like we said, you didn't know what you _ how it was for us. like we said, you didn't know what you would - how it was for us. like we said, you didn't know what you would be - didn't know what you would be bringing back when you landed. can you tell me about some of the families that stick with you that you did pick up?— families that stick with you that you did pick up? generally the plan chanced you did pick up? generally the plan changed while _ you did pick up? generally the plan changed while we _ you did pick up? generally the plan changed while we were _ you did pick up? generally the plan changed while we were en - you did pick up? generally the plan changed while we were en route. i you did pick up? generally the plan i changed while we were en route. we believed _ changed while we were en route. we believed to _ changed while we were en route. we believed to try— changed while we were en route. we believed to by thinking _ changed while we were en route. we believed to by thinking we _ changed while we were en route. we believed to by thinking we were - believed to by thinking we were picking — believed to by thinking we were picking up— believed to by thinking we were picking up one _ believed to by thinking we were picking up one group _ believed to by thinking we were picking up one group and - believed to by thinking we were - picking up one group and recovered completely— picking up one group and recovered completely different _ picking up one group and recovered
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completely different group. - picking up one group and recovered completely different group. for - picking up one group and recoveredl completely different group. for me, bringing _ completely different group. for me, bringing back— completely different group. for me, bringing back the _ completely different group. for me, bringing back the afghan _ completely different group. for me, bringing back the afghan children, l bringing back the afghan children, it was— bringing back the afghan children, it was the — bringing back the afghan children, it was the afghan _ bringing back the afghan children, it was the afghan equivalent - bringing back the afghan children, it was the afghan equivalent of. it was the afghan equivalent of their— it was the afghan equivalent of their sunday _ it was the afghan equivalent of their sunday best— it was the afghan equivalent of their sunday best and - it was the afghan equivalent of their sunday best and they - it was the afghan equivalent of their sunday best and they had hlackhean _ their sunday best and they had blackbean lines _ their sunday best and they had blackbean lines of _ their sunday best and they had blackbean lines of clothes. - their sunday best and they had blackbean lines of clothes. today, ou have blackbean lines of clothes. today, you have your— blackbean lines of clothes. today, you have your award _ blackbean lines of clothes. today, you have your award yesterday - you have your award yesterday and what does it mean to you? it is likel to what does it mean to you? it is likely to be _ what does it mean to you? it is likely to be recognised for our efforts — likely to be recognised for our efforts. likejohn likely to be recognised for our efforts. like john said, likely to be recognised for our efforts. likejohn said, it likely to be recognised for our efforts. like john said, it means more _ efforts. like john said, it means more than — efforts. like john said, it means more than the people we brought back, _ more than the people we brought back, it _ more than the people we brought back, it is — more than the people we brought back, it is quite alarming how many people _ back, it is quite alarming how many people came on with such little positions, _ people came on with such little positions, and you know that we help them _ positions, and you know that we help them get _ positions, and you know that we help them get a _ positions, and you know that we help them get a much better life here, it is probably— them get a much better life here, it is probably the biggest part for me. thank— is probably the biggest part for me. thank you _ is probably the biggest part for me. thank you very much, gentlemen. over 150 will be going on as part of the day, which is what has been part of armed forces a week, they will fly to scarborough and they will be a great parity display for anyone in an area of the uk, a little bit
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later on today.— an area of the uk, a little bit later on today. an area of the uk, a little bit later on toda . ., ~ i. , . later on today. thank you very much. it looks stunning _ later on today. thank you very much. it looks stunning over— later on today. thank you very much. it looks stunning over there. - it looks stunning over there. it looks stunning over there. it really does. matt will keep us up—to—date with the weather. the mother of martyn hett, one of the victims of the manchester arena bombing, has received an obe for her counter—terrorism campaigning. figen murray now dedicates her life to educating young people about radicalisation, and working with the government to finalise martyn's law, which would help make venues safer. figenjoins us now. lovely to see you this morning. the first thing i should say is congratulations.- first thing i should say is congratulations. first thing i should say is conuratulations. ., ~ ., ~ congratulations. thank you, thank ou ve congratulations. thank you, thank you very much- — congratulations. thank you, thank you very much- i— congratulations. thank you, thank you very much. i know _ congratulations. thank you, thank you very much. i know this - congratulations. thank you, thank you very much. i know this is - congratulations. thank you, thank you very much. i know this is an i you very much. i know this is an important _ you very much. i know this is an important moment _ you very much. i know this is an important moment for - you very much. i know this is an important moment for you. - you very much. i know this is an important moment for you. just| you very much. i know this is an - important moment for you. just tell me a little bit about your day before we talk about the work you are doing and everything involved in. how was the day for you? i imagine it would have been a lot going through your mind as you were given your obe.
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going through your mind as you were given your obe-— given your obe. yes, obviously, it is a combination _ given your obe. yes, obviously, it is a combination of— given your obe. yes, obviously, it is a combination of five _ given your obe. yes, obviously, it is a combination of five years - given your obe. yes, obviously, it is a combination of five years of i is a combination of five years of hard _ is a combination of five years of hard work— is a combination of five years of hard work and it has been a lovely, lovely— hard work and it has been a lovely, lovely recognition. i have no idea who nominated me and i am really grateful— who nominated me and i am really grateful to— who nominated me and i am really grateful to everybody who did so, but i _ grateful to everybody who did so, but i am — grateful to everybody who did so, but i am also grateful to my family, my husband, my children who have supported — my husband, my children who have supported me because i have not been easy to _ supported me because i have not been easy to live _ supported me because i have not been easy to live with because i am here, there. _ easy to live with because i am here, there, everywhere, trying to do the work— there, everywhere, trying to do the work to— there, everywhere, trying to do the work to do— there, everywhere, trying to do the work to do with martyn's law, the school _ work to do with martyn's law, the school work. | work to do with martyn's law, the school work-— work to do with martyn's law, the school work. ., ., ., schoolwork. i imagine he would have been looming — schoolwork. i imagine he would have been looming large _ schoolwork. i imagine he would have been looming large in _ schoolwork. i imagine he would have been looming large in your _ schoolwork. i imagine he would have been looming large in your mind - schoolwork. i imagine he would have been looming large in your mind as i been looming large in your mind as well. �* , , ~' ., been looming large in your mind as well. �* , , ~ ., .,, well. absolutely. i know i was the one receiving _ well. absolutely. i know i was the one receiving the _ well. absolutely. i know i was the one receiving the award, - well. absolutely. i know i was the one receiving the award, but - well. absolutely. i know i was the | one receiving the award, but really it is his _ one receiving the award, but really it is his award, to be honest. tell us a bit more _ it is his award, to be honest. tell us a bit more about the work you are doing, the caldera work. what in practice, what does that involve and obviously for you, i am sure knowing the work you have done in the past, you are hoping you will get an award means there will be more emphasis,
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more attention paid to educating people more. more attention paid to educating people more-— more attention paid to educating --eole more. . ., , people more. yeah, i mean, my day today running _ people more. yeah, i mean, my day today running sort _ people more. yeah, i mean, my day today running sort of— people more. yeah, i mean, my day today running sort of his _ today running sort of his basically i am _ today running sort of his basically i am up _ today running sort of his basically i am up and down the country attending _ i am up and down the country attending conferences, talking conferences, doing lots of work, having _ conferences, doing lots of work, having meetings with government about— having meetings with government about protecting and there is lots of still, _ about protecting and there is lots of still, but it is moving forward in a good — of still, but it is moving forward in a good way. it is a lot of hard work— in a good way. it is a lot of hard work behind the scenes, though, and obviously— work behind the scenes, though, and obviously i _ work behind the scenes, though, and obviously i do a lot of school talks and down — obviously i do a lot of school talks and down the country as well. emma, both sides _ and down the country as well. emma, both sides are progressing nicely. it is really— both sides are progressing nicely. it is really good that you sense that things are progressing because sometimes you do hearfrom people who are trying to work in the sector, all—around education more generally that it can be frustrating, sometimes things i move quickly enough.
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frustrating, sometimes things i move quickly enough-— quickly enough. yeah, certainly the legislation. — quickly enough. yeah, certainly the legislation. it _ quickly enough. yeah, certainly the legislation, it does _ quickly enough. yeah, certainly the legislation, it does take _ quickly enough. yeah, certainly the legislation, it does take a - quickly enough. yeah, certainly the legislation, it does take a while, i legislation, it does take a while, but i _ legislation, it does take a while, but i have — legislation, it does take a while, but i have learned that putting legislation together isn't a simple thing. _ legislation together isn't a simple thing, and is does take time, but i would _ thing, and is does take time, but i would rather, martyn's law is a complicated piece of legislation, i would _ complicated piece of legislation, i would rather the government really take the _ would rather the government really take the time and get it right rather— take the time and get it right rather than later on, having a hurried — rather than later on, having a hurried law that has to be amended constantly~ — hurried law that has to be amended constantly. so i am sure they are working — constantly. so i am sure they are working really hard to get it right. as for— working really hard to get it right. as for the — working really hard to get it right. as for the school work, that is a project — as for the school work, that is a project that is ongoing all the time anyway. _ project that is ongoing all the time anyway. so — project that is ongoing all the time anyway, so ijust keep... my diary is full— anyway, so ijust keep... my diary is full of— anyway, so ijust keep... my diary is full of appointments with schools. _ is full of appointments with schools, so that is good. where our wa with schools, so that is good. where our way with martyn's _ schools, so that is good. where our way with martyn's law? _ schools, so that is good. where our way with martyn's law? you - schools, so that is good. where our way with martyn's law? you said i schools, so that is good. where our way with martyn's law? you said it| way with martyn's law? you said it is right to get it done correctly and not rushed. where are we in the process? i and not rushed. where are we in the rocess? .., �* and not rushed. where are we in the rocess? �* ., , and not rushed. where are we in the rocess? ., , , process? i can't really say very much obviously _ process? i can't really say very much obviously because i process? i can't really say very much obviously because there | process? i can't really say very i much obviously because there are discussions behind closed doors so to speak— discussions behind closed doors so to speak for now. but things are
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progressing nicely, i can't give progressing nicely, ican't give timings— progressing nicely, i can't give timings i— progressing nicely, i can't give timings i am afraid either. all i can say— timings i am afraid either. all i can say that the finer details being worked _ can say that the finer details being worked on — can say that the finer details being worked on and that finer detail is really— worked on and that finer detail is really what is important to get right. — really what is important to get right. so — really what is important to get right. so that is where we are. so right. so that is where we are. sc people right. so that is where we are. people get right. so that is where we are. ’ir people get an right. so that is where we are. 5r people get an understanding of the kind of work you are doing, you mentioned going to schools and probably young people. have there been occasions, and what you are talking about is writing radicalisation. have there been times when you can see almost certainly that the message you have and others like you have has made a difference? you have seen someone you think you genuinely help? well. you think you genuinely help? well, i think what — you think you genuinely help? well, i think what i _ you think you genuinely help? well, i think what i am _ you think you genuinely help? well, i think what i am making _ you think you genuinely help? well, i think what i am making young people — i think what i am making young people aware of is to be super careful— people aware of is to be super careful online when they often, you know. _ careful online when they often, you know. they — careful online when they often, you know, they are sat with headphones talking _ know, they are sat with headphones talking to _ know, they are sat with headphones talking to total strangers, thinking they is— talking to total strangers, thinking they is somebody their own age and want children not to give private information of themselves. but children— information of themselves. but children tell me things like, you
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know. _ children tell me things like, you know, they go on some of the social media _ know, they go on some of the social media platforms thinking it is a computer— media platforms thinking it is a computer game they are watching and they are actually watching live streaming of terrorists shooting people — streaming of terrorists shooting people and it scares them, or beheadings. that is the reality of the internet, i beheadings. that is the reality of the internet, lam beheadings. that is the reality of the internet, i am afraid. beheadings. that is the reality of the internet, lam afraid. ijust want _ the internet, lam afraid. ijust want children to be super, extra careful— want children to be super, extra careful of— want children to be super, extra careful of who they speak to and watch _ careful of who they speak to and watch where they go and what information they give of themselves, really. _ information they give of themselves, really. it— information they give of themselves, reall . . . , , information they give of themselves, reall. ,., , , ., really. it is a very, very important message- — really. it is a very, very important message- i _ really. it is a very, very important message- i am — really. it is a very, very important message. i am so _ really. it is a very, very important message. i am so glad _ really. it is a very, very important message. i am so glad that i really. it is a very, very important message. i am so glad that your. really. it is a very, very important i message. i am so glad that your day yesterday picking up your obe was an enjoyable, but i understand there was at least one moment during the ceremony where music as it often is with people where it gave you a particular moment in time. do you mind telling us about that? yes. particular moment in time. do you mind telling us about that? yes, we were civen mind telling us about that? yes, we were given a — mind telling us about that? yes, we were given a programme _ mind telling us about that? yes, we were given a programme with i mind telling us about that? yes, we were given a programme with who i were given a programme with who is receiving _ were given a programme with who is receiving what and also the running order— receiving what and also the running order and _ receiving what and also the running order and the music that is going to
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be order and the music that is going to he played _ order and the music that is going to be played in the background. just as we were _ be played in the background. just as we were queueing to see the prince, we were queueing to see the prince, we were _ we were queueing to see the prince, we were about two or three people in, we were about two or three people in. it— we were about two or three people in. it was— we were about two or three people in. it was a — we were about two or three people in, it was a song we played at the funeral. _ in, it was a song we played at the funeral. and _ in, it was a song we played at the funeral, and when we looked afterwards, it was love on the programme, which was really odd, so that was— programme, which was really odd, so that was not— programme, which was really odd, so that was not like it felt like martyn _ that was not like it felt like martyn was there. that was not like it felt like ma nwasthere. ., ., ., martyn was there. congratulations once aaain martyn was there. congratulations once again on _ martyn was there. congratulations once again on your— martyn was there. congratulations once again on your award - martyn was there. congratulations once again on your award and i i martyn was there. congratulations i once again on your award and i know you are going to continue working as you are going to continue working as you say all day, every day with a very important message. thank you very important message. thank you very much for your time this morning. very much for your time this morning-— very much for your time this morninu. . ~ i. ., ~ i. she has spoken to us about martin and has been absolutely determined that his death would not be a purely negative thing, and something positive would come out of it. stand positive would come out of it. and when ou positive would come out of it. and when you hear— positive would come out of it. jim. when you hear those conversations that come out of it, it is notjust
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the radicalisation, it is safety and security on the internet as well, and what young people in particular have access to stop so congratulations to her. it have access to stop so congratulations to her. it is 'ust cominu congratulations to her. it is 'ust coming up �* congratulations to her. it is 'ust coming up to i congratulations to her. it is 'ust coming up to 7:30. i congratulations to her. it is 'ust coming up to 7:30. we i congratulations to her. it isjust coming up to 7:30. we need i congratulations to her. it isjust coming up to 7:30. we need to| congratulations to her. it isjust i coming up to 7:30. we need to talk about the sport. i don't know how you and your production team, your producers are getting everything into, what, forfive minutes to get all the sport out. into, what, for five minutes to get all the sport out.— into, what, for five minutes to get all the sport out. cramming in, even esterda all the sport out. cramming in, even yesterday with _ all the sport out. cramming in, even yesterday with the _ all the sport out. cramming in, even yesterday with the cricket. _ all the sport out. cramming in, even yesterday with the cricket. i - all the sport out. cramming in, even yesterday with the cricket. i was i yesterday with the cricket. i was going to the athletics in the evening, i left the house and it was something like 60—6, he we go again, another batting collapse and a few hours later i checked in and what was happening! it was here, this guy behind us, jonny bairstow. test cricket for england is fascinating at this moment in time, and the heroics they have been pulling off in this series against new zealand, the new era with ben stokes as new captain. the third test at headingley is finely poised after a dramatic fightback from england with the baton day two. england found themselves in all manner of trouble early in their innings
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as a brilliant spell of bowling from trent boult and tim southee ripped their top order to pieces. but debutant jamie overton struck a brilliant half century as he ended the day unbeaten just 11 shy of a maiden test hundred. the star of the day, however, was jonny bairstow who struck a second successive test century. england will start day three on 261i/6 — 65 runs behind the kiwis. it is something that yeah, i enjoy doing. _ it is something that yeah, i enjoy doing. it — it is something that yeah, i enjoy doing. it is — it is something that yeah, i enjoy doing. it is something that i enjoy being _ doing. it is something that i enjoy being out— doing. it is something that i enjoy being out there when the chips are down. _ being out there when the chips are down. and — being out there when the chips are down, and being able to hopefully -et down, and being able to hopefully get us _ down, and being able to hopefully get us back up to parity, we are 65 behind _ get us back up to parity, we are 65 behind at — get us back up to parity, we are 65 behind at the moment but another morning _ behind at the moment but another morning session hopefully we will -ain morning session hopefully we will gain parity. it was an emphatic night of euros preparation for england, as they beat the netherlands, the defending champions in the competition, 5—1 in their penultimate friendly before the tournament starts.
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jo currie was at elland road. don't be confused by the colours. but is _ don't be confused by the colours. but is england playing in orange and the dutch— but is england playing in orange and the dutch in white. in 2017 the netherlands won the european championships on home soil. in less than two weeks. _ championships on home soil. in less than two weeks, the _ championships on home soil. in less than two weeks, the lionesses i championships on home soil. in less than two weeks, the lionesses will i than two weeks, the lionesses will try and do the same. but they need to start games better than this. this bullet headed just out of reach put the dutch ahead. england responded quickly, was it across or was it a shot? they won't care. the second half started badly, alex greenwood with a reckless challenge, shona spitler unable to mark the 200th with a goal. but that this was a lips that my catalyst, even putting their foot down. first up was beth mead. then this shot got away, let's not mention the goalkeeping. before this ambitious volley. leaving beth mead to wrap up the night. england has made preparations well on track, the
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european champions well and truly beaten. in the end a very impressive victory, and now there isjust one game to go. the lionesses fly out to zurich and they were placed —— play switzerland next thursday. then it is down to business. meanwhile, scotland were in world cup qualifying action. they beat ukraine 4—0 to close in on the second place spot in group b, which would earn them a play—off place. wayne rooney has quit his firstjob in management. he's left league one's derby county, saying they need to led by someone with fresh energy. despite relegation from the championship, rooney's been a popularfigure, staying with the club through huge financial uncertainty. derby do look to have found a new local buyer now, and the administrators said they asked rooney to stay, but he has left pride park with immediate effect. and britain's ben proud is officially the fastest man
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on the planet after he stormed to gold in the men's 50m freestyle. that was at the world championships. the 2017 bronze medallist led off the blocks and held his form in the closing stages to pip american michael andrew to the title. it's proud's second individual world crown after winning gold in the 50m butterfly five years ago. and finally to golf as the women are in major action at the pga championship. south korea's in—gee chun is the runaway leader at congressional, six shots clear of the field on 11 under. easy for her. less so for rory mcilroy however. this, a quadruple bogey in his second round at the travellers championship. the world number two's first tee shot went out of bounds. his second found the rough. from there, he skewed the next shot into the bunker by the green. he went over the green, then duffed his chip, rolled his seventh shot past
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the hole before tapping inforan eight. he chipped into the water a few holes later as well, and despite all that, still finished the round level par, six off the lead! that is something you very rarely see, that agony, if you are not out playing golf with your friends. (crosstalk). he had been leading overnight, he had been going so well. what he had been leading overnight, he had been going so well. what about the mental resilience _ had been going so well. what about the mental resilience to _ had been going so well. what about the mental resilience to continue i the mental resilience to continue and finish around level path. what's more coming up, we will see you shortly.
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hello, this is breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. the time now is 7:36am. massive protests have swept across the us in response to the supreme court decision to overturn the constitutional right to abortion. thirteen states had trigger laws in place, meaning they could ban abortion straight away once the ruling was made. tennessee is one of those states, and our correspondent rianna croxford reports from the city of nashville. it isa it is a hen party capital of america. women celebrating their final night of freedom as they lose the right to another. how did you feel when you heard about it? sick
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to my stomach- — feel when you heard about it? sick to my stomach. i _ feel when you heard about it? 5 ca; to my stomach. i hate to hear it. it is disturbing, and really unfortunate. because it impacts everybody more than they know. i personally believe that... human life begins— personally believe that... human life begins at conception. you personally believe that. .. human life begins at conception.- life begins at conception. you do not aet life begins at conception. you do not net to life begins at conception. you do not get to have _ life begins at conception. you do not get to have a _ life begins at conception. you do not get to have a right _ life begins at conception. you do not get to have a right over i life begins at conception. you doj not get to have a right over a.m. and "— not get to have a right over a.m. and -- woman's _ not get to have a right over a.m. and —— woman's body. _ not get to have a right over a.m. and —— woman's body. they- not get to have a right over a.m. i and —— woman's body. they don't get to decide _ and —— woman's body. they don't get to decide that — and —— woman's body. they don't get to decide that for— and —— woman's body. they don't get to decide that for us. _ and —— woman's body. they don't get to decide that for us. is _ and -- woman's body. they don't get to decide that for us.— to decide that for us. as one part ofthe to decide that for us. as one part of the city _ to decide that for us. as one part of the city continues _ to decide that for us. as one part of the city continues to _ to decide that for us. as one part of the city continues to party, i to decide that for us. as one part | of the city continues to party, the other continues to protest. lode of the city continues to party, the other continues to protest. we do not need women _ other continues to protest. we do not need women in _ other continues to protest. we do not need women in jail _ other continues to protest. we do not need women in jail for, i other continues to protest. we do not need women in jail for, you i other continues to protest. we do i not need women injailfor, you know what i mean? abortion. i mean, it has set us back 50 years.- what i mean? abortion. i mean, it has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! — has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! and _ has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! and they _ has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! and they are _ has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! and they are scenes i has set us back 50 years. hands off. our bodies! and they are scenes that will echo through _ our bodies! and they are scenes that will echo through more _ our bodies! and they are scenes that will echo through more than - our bodies! and they are scenes that will echo through more than 100 i will echo through more than 100 cities across the us. as abortion is no longer a constitutional right, but in the power of individual states. . . but in the power of individual states. , , , ., states. here in tennessee it is one of 13 states — states. here in tennessee it is one of 13 states that _ states. here in tennessee it is one of 13 states that will _ states. here in tennessee it is one of 13 states that will make - states. here in tennessee it is one of 13 states that will make it i of 13 states that will make it nearly impossible for women to have abortions. ., , nearly impossible for women to have abortions. .,, , abortions. even in the most severe of circumstances. _ abortions. even in the most severe of circumstances. a _ abortions. even in the most severe of circumstances. a battle - abortions. even in the most severe of circumstances. a battle that i abortions. even in the most severe
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of circumstances. a battle that hasj of circumstances. a battle that has been decades dividing america has now been forced out across state lines. dr katrina green works in emergency care in nashville and says ending abortion here will lead to heartache. the ending abortion here will lead to heartache. ., , . , ., heartache. the only exception we have in this _ heartache. the only exception we have in this state, _ heartache. the only exception we have in this state, when - heartache. the only exception we have in this state, when our i heartache. the only exception we have in this state, when our law. have in this state, when our law takes effect, is the life of the mother. there is no exceptions for fatal abnormalities, mother. there is no exceptions for fatalabnormalities, or mother. there is no exceptions for fatal abnormalities, or rape of a incest. �* . , incest. and the impact will be felt across the country. _ incest. and the impact will be felt across the country. millions i incest. and the impact will be felt across the country. millions of i across the country. millions of women in _ across the country. millions of women in america _ across the country. millions of women in america will- across the country. millions of women in america will go i across the country. millions of women in america will go to i across the country. millions of i women in america will go to bed tonight without access to the healthcare and reproductive care that they had this morning. i am personally _ that they had this morning. i am personally thrilled, _ that they had this morning. i am personally thrilled, and - that they had this morning. i am personally thrilled, and i - that they had this morning. i am personally thrilled, and i do feel like what — personally thrilled, and i do feel like what this really is is a moment for us _ like what this really is is a moment for us to— like what this really is is a moment for us to get— like what this really is is a moment for us to get behind women and to start really — for us to get behind women and to start really in those states now, some _ start really in those states now, some states have trigger laws and abortion— some states have trigger laws and abortion will be outlawed, some states— abortion will be outlawed, some states will still have abortions through— states will still have abortions through nine months. as states will still have abortions through nine months.- states will still have abortions through nine months. as one side of the abortion — through nine months. as one side of the abortion debate _ through nine months. as one side of
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the abortion debate went _ through nine months. as one side of the abortion debate went to - through nine months. as one side of the abortion debate went to sleep i the abortion debate went to sleep rejoicing... the abortion debate went to sleep re'oicin: . .. . . the abortion debate went to sleep rejoicing- - -— rejoicing... this is what pro-life america looks _ rejoicing... this is what pro-life america looks like! _ rejoicing... this is what pro-life america looks like! our - rejoicing... this is what pro-life america looks like! our bodies! j rejoicing... this is what pro-life i america looks like! our bodies! many and tennessee _ america looks like! our bodies! many and tennessee mourned _ america looks like! our bodies! many and tennessee mourned the - america looks like! our bodies! many and tennessee mourned the end i america looks like! our bodies! many and tennessee mourned the end of i america looks like! our bodies! many| and tennessee mourned the end of 50 years of reproductive rights, and a march towards an uncertain future. that is the picture in nashville. we're joined now by julia manchester, political reporter at the hill in washington. good morning to you, thank you for talking to us. what was your reaction when this came? this was somethin: reaction when this came? this was something we _ reaction when this came? this was something we knew _ reaction when this came? this was something we knew was _ reaction when this came? this was something we knew was coming, i something we knew was coming, especially due to the leak of the draft decision that was released just a few months ago, just over a month ago i should say. so we knew it was coming however this is such an historic moment in the united states that it was a gut punch for so many, and as we saw in that video there, it was a celebration for so many. i am 29 years old, i do not know until now as we are speaking
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now, a post roe vs wade world. so we are really headed into unprecedented territory, and i know that is a very cliched phrase, butl territory, and i know that is a very cliched phrase, but i think there is a lot of questions as to what comes next, especially in those states where we are seeing abortion restrictions already rolled back and i think that is something we will have to watch out for. not only these states with these trigger laws that have automatically gone into effect without roe vs wade, also in other states where in the next couple of months, we could see more abortion restrictions put into place. abortion restrictions put into lace. . . abortion restrictions put into lace. , , ., abortion restrictions put into lace. . . ., ., abortion restrictions put into lace. , , ., ., , ., place. this is going to play out oliticall place. this is going to play out politically as — place. this is going to play out politically as campaigning i place. this is going to play out politically as campaigning gets under way, politically as campaigning gets underway, isn't politically as campaigning gets under way, isn't it, politically as campaigning gets underway, isn't it, but politically as campaigning gets under way, isn't it, but the elections?— under way, isn't it, but the elections? ~ , ., ., elections? absolutely and you are auoin to elections? absolutely and you are going to see _ elections? absolutely and you are going to see this _ elections? absolutely and you are going to see this play _ elections? absolutely and you are going to see this play out - going to see this play out politically up and down the ballot. so starting with the senate, we know that senators are going to confirm united —— appoint and confirm us supreme courtjustices as well as judges, so they are going to talk about the need to elect democratic
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senators in order to ensure there is that voice if there is a vacancy on the supreme court. and further down the supreme court. and further down the ballot has a governor's races, lieutenant governor races, attorney general races for state legislators —— legislature races, we're going to see this issue become a major issue for democrats in particular, who will be talking about the importance to elect pro—choice or abortion rights candidates to these seats in these states where we could see abortion restrictions really come into play. however i will say this. inflation is a huge issue here in the united states right now. gas prices, rising crime, rising violent crime. situation at the southern border migrants flowing over. i think there are a lot of questions as to whether abortion and although abortion is a very big issue in this moment, whether that will ultimately be an issue for a lot of swing state voters or independent voters, who are upset with how much they are
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paying at the pump, at the gas pump, and the goods and services. i paying at the pump, at the gas pump, and the goods and services.— and the goods and services. i mean, around the — and the goods and services. i mean, around the world, _ and the goods and services. i mean, around the world, here _ and the goods and services. i mean, around the world, here in _ and the goods and services. i mean, around the world, here in the i and the goods and services. i mean, around the world, here in the uk i and the goods and services. i mean, around the world, here in the uk we j around the world, here in the uk we are struggling with the same inflationary pressures as well. just to kind of get some context about how this has come about in the influences of president biden who has called this a tragic error, called it a tragic error, there is also the legacy of president drum, because the justices who were nominated by him in the supreme court. it nominated by him in the supreme court. . . . nominated by him in the supreme court. , ., ., , , court. it is that and the republican senators that _ court. it is that and the republican senators that were _ court. it is that and the republican senators that were elected - court. it is that and the republican senators that were elected and i court. it is that and the republican | senators that were elected and who stayed in office during the trump administration. one thing republicans and president trump were very good at is talking about the importance to them of electing conservative judges and justices across the country and in the supreme court. and obviously having a republican majority senate in order to confirm those judges and justices on the high court as well
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as lower courts. so you are seeing the impact and the result of that campaigning and that effort that has been put into by republicans going back to 2015, 2016, and even earlier than that. i think right now you are probably going to see democrats doing a bit of recalibrating going forward, because right now if you look at the supreme court and its make up, i'm not really sure when there is going to be a vacancy in there is going to be a vacancy in the nearfuture. so there is going to be talk about co— defying roe vs wade at the state level, or in states, maybe at congress —— codifying. but you could also be hearing a debate, and this is premature, but it is possible we could be hearing more about whether progressives in particular will be calling for expanding the number of seats on the supreme court. stand calling for expanding the number of seats on the supreme court. and 'ust to no seats on the supreme court. and 'ust to to into seats on the supreme court. and 'ust to go into the — seats on the supreme court. and 'ust to go into the detail, i seats on the supreme court. and 'ust to go into the detail, julia, i seats on the supreme court. and 'ust to go into the detail, julia, ofi to go into the detail, julia, of these trigger states, when these trigger states, when they do trigger
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the law, is there any negotiation in the law, is there any negotiation in the sense that before they used to be a consideration of the trimesters, various stages, is there going to be any consideration, any debate about this, or is itjust going to be a straight ban on abortions regardless of the duration of the gestation? it is abortions regardless of the duration of the gestation?— of the gestation? it is going to be a straiaht of the gestation? it is going to be a straight ban. — of the gestation? it is going to be a straight ban, and _ of the gestation? it is going to be a straight ban, and we're - of the gestation? it is going to be a straight ban, and we're already| a straight ban, and we're already seeing that playing out. for example south arkansas, louisiana, abortion is now illegal and there are some exceptions. then of course in texas, texas, in 30 days, a ban will go into effect. so we are already seeing that playing out. however there are other states like arizona, michigan, georgia, where there are laws on the books that ban abortion in some cases, in most cases, with a number of restrictions on the procedure. howeveryou number of restrictions on the procedure. however you have in michigan for example, a democratic
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governor, i democratic attorney general, but a republican—controlled state legislature. so you are about to see a battle playing out in state where there are laws on the books that ban abortion but they are not technically trigger laws. i}i(. that ban abortion but they are not technically trigger laws. ok, thanks for takin: technically trigger laws. ok, thanks for taking us _ technically trigger laws. ok, thanks for taking us through _ technically trigger laws. ok, thanks for taking us through all _ technically trigger laws. ok, thanks for taking us through all about, i for taking us through all about, julia manchester, talking to us from washington, dc. not sure what the weather is like where you are, but if you are waking up in a tent, this is what you are dealing with. which i do that piece early on of how busy it is later night and what people are doing at glastonbury, and then you see that scene, look so tranquil. it looks very neat as well. there is no litter or anything. they did have an army cleaning up. it looks rather nice. cloudy may be. a bit of sunshine, but there have been showers this morning and a few more to come today. a very good
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morning to you. this is the view across many eastern areas, not much cloud in the sky, blue skies overhead in east yorkshire, recover a fresh breeze. a big difference to some of the temperatures have had the past few mornings. let me take you to south—west, not1 million miles from glastonbury. some sunshine in penzance, it is raining, though, these clouds are cumulonimbus clouds. they produce heavy showers. many western areas will see them at times today. it is closer to this area of low pressure, a big breeding ground for showers. with a longer spell the rain and i will edge closer to us as we had into tomorrow, strengthening the winds further. it has been producing persistent rain in northern ireland. that will ease off. dry for the vast majority and many will stay dry overnight. showers were frequent in the west, passing through quite
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quickly because we have a risk wind today coming in from a southerly direction. that will clear the cloud from northern scotland. the wind coming over the mountains, coverages on the murray first around 22 degrees. — nick murray first. down a little bit from what we would expect at this stage injune. a few showers around this evening. it is a case of hit and miss. they will not last too long. tonight we will see the cloud and longer spell the rain pushing through northern ireland and parts of south—west scotland, north—west england and north—west wales. many other areas stay dry, coverages like last night around nine to 12 degrees. for sunday, a bright start across eastern parts of scotland, sunny all day long. the far north—east of scotland will be reasonably fine as well. a lot more cloud generally across the country, scotland, northern ireland, a
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greater chance of rain and temperatures more suppressed. a touch warmer than today in some eastern parts of england. in the western will feel cooler because outbreaks of rain as you can see in the afternoon, strongest of the wins. it will be quite wild around suncoast. down towards the south—west. we will see waves pick up south—west. we will see waves pick up across the south—west of england as we go through the weekend. we finished sunday, at least in glastonbury should finish with a beautiful sunset, a few outbreaks of rain in the north and driest in southern estimates at the next week as i eastern areas are dry. your capital city augusta. dominant weather pattern through the week and the temperatures warmest to the south—east on wednesday, chance of showers here on thursday. for the north and west as you can see it will be a fairly changeable week with fellow outbreaks of rain at times, and blustery, not especially warm either. back to you both. good for the garden, though. indeed.
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we desperately need some water, but not much in the forecast down here this week. we will see you later. now it's time for newswatch. hello and welcome to newswatch with me, samira ahmed. how should bbcjournalists describe people crossing the english channel in small boats? asylum seekers, refugees, illegal migrants? and by showing pictures of the prime minister addressing the cabinet, is the bbc giving him free publicity? first, it's been a difficult week for anyone using public transport, and a busy week for travel journalists. here's the bbc�*s katy austin reporting on tuesday's news at six. hull, bournemouth and much of scotland and wales were among the places which turned into train deserts as thousands of workers walked out in the biggest rail strike in three decades.
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this is one of the stations where some trains are running today, but across the country, only about 20% of the usual services are operating. polls show the country was divided over whether the strikes were justified, and that split was reflected in what the audience thought of the bbc�*s coverage of the dispute. lynn owen was: in contrast, tony petrie thought that: one element of the bbc�*s coverage which attracted some attention was the use of footage shot from the air such as this
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on tuesday morning. well, we are out and about this morning, we've got nina at london euston for us this morning, but let's just take you live to our shot from the helicopter this morning to give you an indication of what the situation is in london. of course, asjohn was saying earlier, it's notjust the rail strike, it's the underground strike that's happening there this morning — lots of people choosing to stay at home, and this is the queue for the buses. steve scott was one of a number of viewers to query the expense of using that helicopter footage. here's his video. the helicopter photo and hovered over euston station to report how quiet it was there. there were no people, no trains at the station. what on earth did the bbc expect to see at euston station on the first day of a national rail strike, i wonder? surely this is a total waste of licence payers' money, let alone the environmental impact of this needless flight. well, we put those points to bbc news, and they told us
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that costs for using the helicopter are shared with another broadcaster, and added: the government's case in this industrial dispute was put, on tuesday's news at one, by the prime minister in a part of that morning's cabinet meeting for which the cameras were let in. but the mood music from the cabinet this morning shows little hope of a deal soon. we need to get ready to stay the course — because these reforms, these improvements in the way we run our railways are in the interests of the travelling public. this practice of inviting television crews into the start of cabinet meetings has happened weekly for the last three weeks, and it's raised
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some questions in the minds of viewers such as jamie newell. in recent months, a trend appears to have developed showing clips of cabinet meetings on the main bbc one six o'clock news. we see mrjohnson surrounded by nodding members of his cabinet, promoting what they claim to be doing. these are no more than party political broadcasts. we don't see shadow cabinet meetings on the news, do we? the bbc is supposed to be impartial. this is not impartial news coverage. we asked bbc news for a response to that. here's the statement they gave us: when news of thursday's two by—election results came in,
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borisjohnson was in rwanda, and hanging over his trip, there was the government's controversial plan to send asylum seekers to that country. that term 'asylum seekers', along with 'refugees' is the most common one being used around this issue on the bbc, as you can hear in these two recent reports. it's a hotel in kigali like many others. inside, one of the rooms made up and ready to receive their unwilling guests — refugees forcibly removed from the uk. the government's policy to remove asylum seekers to east africa is on hold, but the home secretary this lunchtime insisted it will happen. but some newswatch viewers aren't happy with the use of those terms. sue crooks wrote:
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meanwhile, astridjillings had a different point to make: well, someone who's been thinking about the use of language in this context is dominic casciani, who's the bbc�*s home and legal correspondent. thank you for coming on newswatch. how should we describe these
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people crossing the channel? well, samira, this is really complicated because the law is about to change, which is going to, to be frank, completely muddy the waters here about the language. now, the basic facts is claiming asylum when you're saying you're a refugee in need of protection is not a crime. that's slightly complicated by what's happening at the channel at the moment where you can have a situation where somebody is crossing because they're an economic migrant — they're effectively seeking to better themselves, you know, they basically want to improve their life in some shape or form — they haven't necessarily got a claim on asylum. now, in that context, if they haven't already got a visa or permission to enter the uk, technically speaking, you could say they're an illegal migrant because they're arriving without authorisation. to complicate matters further, you can then have an asylum seeker, someone who sourced asylum elsewhere in europe on their way to the uk. i've spoken to people in the past who've claimed asylum in germany, in sweden, in places like this,
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and then decided to come to the uk. so they have some kind of refugee claim — or say they do — but then they've decided to come to the uk to claim asylum here. now, in that context, are they an asylum seeker or someone who's basically, effectively, 'asylum shopping', to use language which is deployed by some, looking for a better life. that's quite a complicated mix to start getting your head around, so i can understand how the audience can be a little bit confused by some of this. so, given that some people, certainly viewers are saying this, who didn't claim asylum in the first safe country or did, and then have chosen to move, some viewers are saying they're illegal migrants. does the bbc ever use that term? well, not necessarily in that context. but let me talk to you about something which is about to happen. this coming tuesday, the law changes, and technically speaking, there could be people after tuesday who cross the channel who could be classed as an illegal asylum seeker because they didn't already have entry clearance, to use the jargon — didn't have permission
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from the home secretary to arrive in the uk. now, what that means is from the middle of next week, if ministers start using phrases like 'illegal asylum seeker�*, well, it will depend on the context, because technically, you can have people who are coming in, seeking asylum, and then they're taken to court for basically breaking the criminal law there because the accusation would be that they didn't have any good reason to come because they could have claimed asylum elsewhere or there may be some other reason. so, it's getting more and more complicated, this area of law here. how far, then, is it appropriate to use the term 'refugee' for the people we're talking about coming across the channel? i think the term 'refugee' has to be used in very, very specific circumstances. now, from my perspective, i see this as a legal definition in as much as somebody is not a refugee in my reporting until they have refugee status, and what that means is they've claimed asylum, they've been given some kind of — they've been given status by the home office that's recognised they have a need for protection, and, therefore, they are protected by the uk and settled in the uk with that status.
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at that point, in law, they are a refugee, they have a right to remain in the uk. so, when i'm reporting this issue, i will talk about asylum seekers, i will talk about migrants, but the word 'refugee', i'll try to reserve that for that very, very specific category of people who've got status. when we're interviewing people, so, for instance, you can be talking to refugee charities or, for instance, like, campaigners or people who, for instance, are working with asylum seekers and migrants along the english channel on the french side of the coast, they will very often say in quotes to us in clips, "we're supporting "these refugees, don't criminalise these refugees." we have to accept that that's their opinion, that all these people are refugees and we have to obviously, you know, reflect what they're saying, but we have to be very, very careful to make sure that that language is their language rather than ours, so there's that difference there. now, one of the viewers we heard from was saying we should use the term 'people' with an add—on description, people claiming asylum, for example. what do you think? yeah, look, it's not unreasonable, but it'sjust
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that some of this is about terminology, around snappy language in news, you know. news is supposed to be digested fairly quickly, so very often we will go to shorthand. so i take the point, there is this issue about whether or not you just basically categorise people in one particular way forever. i mean, we've had this thing around the disabled. we very, very rarely see that kind of language now, the disabled. we talk about people with disabilities. or people using wheelchairs. so, yeah, you've got to be careful not to dehumanise people, you know, because if you dehumanise people, then you're actually making it very — a lot harder actually for the audience to understand the motivation of the person behind it. dominic casciani, thank you so much. thanks. thank you for all your comments this week. if you want to share your opinions about what you see or hear on bbc news on tv, radio, online or social media, e—mail: or you can find us on twitter. you can call us:
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and do have a look at previous interviews on our website. that's all from us. we'll be back to hear your thoughts about bbc news coverage again next week. goodbye. good morning welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. protests in cities across the us, as the supreme court removes the constitutional right to abortion. in several states the ban becomes instant, and clinics begin to close. backbench conservative mp's consider fresh attempts to force boris johnson from power, after two damaging by—election defeats. a third day of strike
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action on the uk's rail network begins, with only a fifth of train services expected to run. and we are live at glastonbury where tonight here on the pyramid stage poll mccartney will become the oldest person to ever headline the festival. you can hear the preparation behind us. this is paul mccartney's piano. he will play let it be on that and you know what i'm going to do now!— it be on that and you know what i'm going to do now! can day three beat frantic friday at headingley, where a battling, brutal century from johnny bairstow rescued england from collapse in the third test against new zealand. and it's windy and fresher for us this weekend. the full forecast details here on breakfast.
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it's saturday 25th june. our top story. protests have taken place in the us overnight after a supreme court ruling removed american women's constitutional right to abortion. clinics have already started closing in some parts of the country, with 13 states triggering bans on abortions immediately, as frances reed reports. protest, from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe v wade is seismic. pro—choice demonstrators say they are horrified that millions will lose their legal right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we have called for this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility, to make abortion unthinkable and illegal
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throughout our nation. to ensure no woman stands alone in a post—roe america to be the post—roe generation. cheering elizabeth made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states are ready as of this minute that abortion access is denied and is illegal, ifeel— pretty numb and pretty angry about that and, truly, i feel a little bit helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws which mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although, the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life is at risk. others are expected to either introduce these
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new restrictions or resurrect pre—roe bans. and in states where opinions on abortion is a closely split, the legality of the procedure could be determined on an election by election basis or via legal battles. critics of the decision say it's an injustice and, without plans to support those who are pregnant will impact the poorest in society in a country, that, for the most part, has no universal health care or paid family leave. the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult. it's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment, to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. singing # jesus loves the| little children...# but, within the us, this is only the beginning and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feeljustice has finally been served. francis read, bbc news.
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thejudgement made by the us supreme court has reignited the debate in this decades—long fight over abortion. our correspondent barbara plett—usher has sent this report from a demonstration in washington dc. there have been demonstrations around the country, and they continued into the night here in washington dc. this ruling has really exposed the profound divisions in this country over abortion rights. some states have already started to ban abortions, others will follow. some states are saying they will be safe harbours for women who want abortions. both sides are gearing up for a long and bitter political fight, and security agencies are warning about violence. they say there has been an increase in threats of extremist attacks. this decision to overturn national abortion rights, to overturn roe v wade, was a radical legal move. but it has in no way ended the political fight over abortion.
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that was barbara plett—usher with that report from washington. two people have been killed and 1a injured in a shooting at a nightclub and nearby streets in the centre of the norwegian it is now being treated as an act of terrorism. the shooting happened in three separate locations, including a gay bar. a suspect has been arrested. oslo's annual pride march is due to be held later today. but all events have now been cancelled. some conservative mps are considering fresh attempts to force the prime minister from office in the wake of two damaging by—election defeats. two of borisjohnson's critics have said they want to join the executive of the influential 1922 committee, which has the power to change the rules on conservative leadership contests. our political correspondent helen catt has more. cheering the defeats inflicted on the conservatives,
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here by labour in west yorkshire in a seat the tories won in 2019, and here in a formerly tory heartland seat in devon, now lib dem, sent a message. but politicians aren't exactly hearing the same one. this is, i think, about as compelling a message as it possibly could be. it is time for boris to go, it is time for boris to move on, people don't trust him. the prime minister, away in rwanda, unsurprisingly doesn't quite agree. people, you know, will continue to beat me up, and say this or that about, and to attack me — that is fine, that's quite right, that's the job of politicians. in the end voters, journalists, they have no—one else to make their complaints to. i have to take that. but i also have to get on with the job of delivering for the people of this country. at home, the former party chairman oliver dowden resigned, saying it couldn't be business as usual. other ministers insist the government is listening. i think this isn't
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business as usual. he needs to reflect, we need to reflect, and that is exactly what we have all said we're going to do. because it is important that we are tackling the biggest issues of the day. many tory mps remain deeply unhappy. some of them preparing to stand for election to the body which runs the influential 1922 committee. it has the power to change the rules to allow another confidence vote to be held in mrjohnson. there are a couple of vacancies for the executive, and i am minded to put my hat into the ring next week when nominations open, i think the vote will probably be the week after. on a ticket of, i would be in favour of rule change. and effectively, that would be another vote of confidence. but labour, buoyed by its first gain in a by—election in a decade, says it is not all about the man in number ten. it is not a problem with borisjohnson, it is a problem with the tory party. regardless, labour will be ready to beat the tory party, whoever is at the head of it, because that is what we owe the country.
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for now it is borisjohnson's future which remains the topic of much speculation, mostly in his absence. mrjohnson himself is not due back in the country until later next week. helen catt, bbc news. harry gration, the former presenter of look north in yorkshire has died suddenly at the age of 71. his career spanned more than a0 years, and saw him front many programmes, including the flagship saturday sports programme, grandstand. when he left the bbc in october 2020 he talked about what the job had meant to him. i think i've always enjoyed when you got a good reaction from people. programmes can be considered good when they are flat cheap packages but i'm passionate about this place and i've enjoyed straight talking as
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i do here in barnsley tonight. it's just great. harry gration, who has died at the age of 71. explorers have found the deepest shipwreck ever identified, a us navy destroyer escort sunk during the second world war. the navy destroyer uss samuel b roberts, better known as sammy b, went down in the philippine sea in 1944. the wreck was found four and a half miles under the surface. i tell you, the technology that is around, you have to go for an half miles under the sea, down to that sea bed to find out. can you imagine? and whenever you see those underwater exploration shots, you can imagine the teams when they've been searching, it comes from the gloom, the first sight of a whole or
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whatever. it's the deepest shipwreck ever identified. it's 11 minutes past eight. as the national rail strikes enter another day, passengers across britain are being told to prepare for travel disruption this weekend. this is the third and final day of planned strike action, with thousands of rmt union workers walking out to protest pay and work conditions, with no agreement yet in place to stop further action later in the year. only a fifth of services are operating and passengers are being urged not to travel unless it is absolutely necessary. services that are running will be restricted, and will finish at 6.30 this evening. there will be no trains running to smaller stations and in coastal areas, and sporting and music events are expected to be
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impacted. our reporter katie barnfield is in blackpool for us this morning, looking at how tourism is being affected by the strikes this weekend. good morning, katie. good morning both. a beautiful— good morning, katie. good morning both. a beautiful day _ good morning, katie. good morning both. a beautiful day on _ good morning, katie. good morning both. a beautiful day on blackpool. both. a beautiful day on blackpool promenade this morning. but, of course, it's the third day of strikes today. days out to the seaside will be impacted by people coming here today. i know it's early in the morning butjust take a look around, it's very quiet here and, of course, the strikes will impact that. across the country, we are expecting one in five services to run today. severely reduced. that's going to impact major events around the country. we got edinburgh pride, armed forces day and the cricket. earlier in the week perhaps the
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impact wasn't felt as badly because people can work from home quite easily but that doesn't apply when we are talking about the weekend and the tourist trade in places like this. those businesses that rely on travellers, the fish and chip shops, cafe is, arcades, these could be affected today and to talk a little bit more about that i'm joined by allen, the head of tourism in blackpool. how bad are you expecting it to be today with the strikes? more than 15% of tourists arrive by train _ more than 15% of tourists arrive by train and _ more than 15% of tourists arrive by train and because we have been cut off effectively the strike has been three _ off effectively the strike has been three days, so there was no trains yesterday— three days, so there was no trains yesterday either, we were expecting maybe _ yesterday either, we were expecting maybe 25,000 people to come by train today and _ maybe 25,000 people to come by train today and they are not going to be able to— today and they are not going to be able to do— today and they are not going to be able to do that sol today and they are not going to be able to do that so i think they will find either— able to do that so i think they will find either a different way or they won't _ find either a different way or they won't come. will find either a different way or they won't come-— won't come. will people not 'ust nettina won't come. will people not 'ust getting theirfi won't come. will people not 'ust getting their cars? i i won't come. will people not 'ust getting their cars? i don't i won't come. will people notjust getting their cars? i don't think| getting their cars? i don't think that's an for — getting their cars? i don't think that's an for everybody. - getting their cars? i don't think that's an for everybody. we've | getting their cars? i don't think i that's an for everybody. we've seen
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a 20% _ that's an for everybody. we've seen a 20% growth on training uses and that's— a 20% growth on training uses and that's because people don't want to use their— that's because people don't want to use their card because of the cost of fuel. _ use their card because of the cost of fuel. or— use their card because of the cost of fuel, or maybe they can't afford it. many— of fuel, or maybe they can't afford it. many people travelling here are those _ it. many people travelling here are those affected by the cost of living crisis _ those affected by the cost of living crisis so _ those affected by the cost of living crisis so probably not, because they don't _ crisis so probably not, because they don't have _ crisis so probably not, because they don't have the opportunity to change transport _ don't have the opportunity to change transport forms.— transport forms. which businesses will be affected _ transport forms. which businesses will be affected most? _ transport forms. which businesses will be affected most? will- transport forms. which businesses will be affected most? will it i transport forms. which businesses will be affected most? will it be i will be affected most? will it be hotels, or day businesses such the —— such as the fish and chip shops? it will be those who rely on day—to—day trade, chip shops, ice cream _ day—to—day trade, chip shops, ice cream parlours, the arcades, street food vendor— cream parlours, the arcades, street food vendor is who would traditionally do well in weekends in june~ _ traditionally do well in weekends in june. they've had two bad years prior— june. they've had two bad years prior to — june. they've had two bad years prior to this so this was a real opportunity to start to make a recovery— opportunity to start to make a recovery for them and their businesses. 50 recovery for them and their businesses.— recovery for them and their businesses. o, , o o, businesses. so a difficult time for businesses _ businesses. so a difficult time for businesses potentially. _ businesses. so a difficult time for businesses potentially. thank- businesses. so a difficult time for| businesses potentially. thank you
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forjoining me. what can you do if you bought a ticket to travel today? well, the services will finish today by the latest at 6:30pm. make sure you check before you travel. you are able to use your ticket if you don't want to travel today, tomorrow or monday or tuesday. there's still no agreement between the rmt and the train operation companies. they are not ruling out future strikes later in the summer. flan not ruling out future strikes later in the summer._ not ruling out future strikes later in the summer. can i ask a favour of ou and in the summer. can i ask a favour of you and your — in the summer. can i ask a favour of you and your camera _ in the summer. can i ask a favour of you and your camera operator? - in the summer. can i ask a favour of you and your camera operator? can | you and your camera operator? can you and your camera operator? can you indulge us who aren't by the seaside with your camera glancing out across the and looking at the waves for a moment? at out across the and looking at the waves for a moment?— out across the and looking at the waves for a moment? of course we can? isn't — waves for a moment? of course we can? isn't it — waves for a moment? of course we can? isn't it beautiful— waves for a moment? of course we can? isn't it beautiful in _ waves for a moment? of course we can? isn't it beautiful in the - can? isn't it beautiful in the sunshine. can? isn't it beautiful in the sunshine-— can? isn't it beautiful in the sunshine. ., ~ , ., sunshine. there we go. a bit of eace. sunshine. there we go. a bit of peace- is _ sunshine. there we go. a bit of peace- is it _ sunshine. there we go. a bit of peace. is itjust _ sunshine. there we go. a bit of peace. is itjust me? _ sunshine. there we go. a bit of peace. is itjust me? i-
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sunshine. there we go. a bit of peace. is itjust me? i like - peace. is itjust me? i like watching waves. unfortunately, we have lots of other stuff to talk about otherwise we would just stick with the waifs. there you go. waves, cloudy a little bit of sunshine in blackpool? what's it like the rest of the country? there's one man who can tell us! matt, good morning to you. what's that graph you've got? you asking about rainfall saying we could do with some for the gardens but let me show you this animation which shows you how much rain wilful during the next five days. very little rainfall for some, but in east anglia and millom or two. —— a millimetre or two. rain across the hills in the west and that's because in western areas there are two areas
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of low pressure. one is around this weekend which is going to slowly closing bringing something wetter for tomorrow, a mix of sunshine and showers in western areas. showers around which you can see in somerset and you see that in other western parts as well. taking you through the day, low cloud, that's in the north—east of scotland. northern ireland will have rain which will get lighter and patchy. showers developing through the western half of england and wales and into central and southern scotland. sunny spells around and if a shower comes your way and that's because there's more of a breeze, strongest in the west. later, cloud developing, 21—22 celsius. warmest areas are in the murray firth. this evening and overnight, showers around but they
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will fade away. longer spells of rain overnight. the wins starting to get gale force here. try and clear, temperatures 9—12 c to start sunday morning. a bright start.. northern scotland should stay fine throughout the day. a bit more cloud generally tomorrow, outbreaks of rain in northern ireland and wet for some today in parts of scotland, northern england and parts of wales. but here, temperatures we may see climb a bit more, 22—23 c. even cooler towards western areas tomorrow. that's because there's more clout unless sunshine and a few showers, but stronger winds as well which may touch gale force, 45—50 mph. it may whip up some of the seas to the
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north west of england. sunday evening, when it should be fine at glastonbury with a beautiful sunset weight there tomorrow night. overall, a fairly cool spell of weather here but let me take you to the other side of the world to japan where they recorded a0 degrees, it's been unusually dry and that's their highest temperature on record. a0 celsius there to the afternoon. back to you both. i've never seen that's rainfall. 20 minutes past eight. a toymakerfrom leeds has been trying to help thousands of children with complex medical needs — through special teddy bears that share their health conditions. nick hardman has made stuffed toys with feeding tubes, pacemakers, and even dialysis machines,
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and now they're being sent to children all across the uk, as nicola rees reports. i really like this gorilla, because he has got little foot splints, he has got hearing aids, and he has got glasses, and a big scar across the belly, to help the little one understand. every toy that nick hartman creates is special. from crocodiles on crutches to teddies with pacemakers, heart surgery scars and dialysis machines. this is an enormous amount of time. i have got a job three days a week. i am a single dad with two kids and i give up the rest of my time making toys. it is a too important not to do. if we turn it on for you, go on... you know what to do, don't you? what started as a hobby has become a mission for the whole family. in the last 12 months nick has used his 3d printing skills to create medical devices
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or thousands of teddies. on this machine here, we have got pacemakers, and on this, we have got anatomical hearts. a pacemaker can be quite scary, but if you put a little penguin on it it is not scary, it is a toy. and nick's toys are changing lives. in the last 12 months, he sent out hundreds, each one perfectly matched to a child with a complex medical condition. i'm patrick and this is pikachu. in leeds, patrick is waiting for a transplant of his liver, bowels and stomach. sometimes he finds it hard to cope with the medical procedures that are keeping him alive, and that is where his pokemon friend comes in. pikachu, we are going to need a little bit of a blood sample for birmingham.
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it might hurt a bit but please be breave, pikachu. he was too embarrassed about himself. butjust to have something that he now can look at and say i am not on my own. it is only a teddy, but to him, it is who he is. patrick's toy has a catheter and feeding tubes, just like him and glasses and a bag to match, too. it has helped him normalise his condition. there is pikachu, with the exact same spot as mine, going in the heart like me. mind. there is the fistula, gastrostomy. i have got children myself, and i know how hard it would be to have all of these disabilities, medical implants, horrible, scary surgical procedures. so to give them a teddy that has had the same surgery as them stops them being afraid. nick's toys are safety tested, and he has now been distributing to hospitals. he doesn't make a profit, but their award, he says, is priceless, he doesn't make a profit, but the reaward, he says, is priceless, helping families like patrick's to cope. it is hard. we understand that he is life limited, but that is not life ending. he is just amazing. he is an absolute real—life superhero. patrick giggles nicola rees, bbc news.
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that is a very clever idea. sometimes it's the most simple ideas. it's so obvious. why not do that? is a comfort. everyone remembers a teddy bear that? is a comfort. everyone remembers a teddy hear they had, a comfort to cover up to and one that reflects you must mean the world. it's 25 past eight. since losing his son, ross, to suicide last year, mike mccarthy has been trying to raise awareness for better mental health support. now the former bbc and sky news broadcaster has joined up with steve phillip, whose son, jordan, took his own life in 2019. they've been to meet the health secretary, and are now launching their campaign called "baton of hope". zoe conway has been to meet them. two men brought together through unimaginable suffering. two bereaved dads keeping each other going.
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this has been really nice, just to come out and stand in the fresh air by the water. steve phillip lost his 3a—year—old sonjordan to suicide in december 2019. jordan had suffered from clinical anxiety and depression. he held an excellentjob, he was a good—looking lad, he had a lovely girlfriend, a loving family, he had a network of friends, that was just huge. just over a year later mike mccarthy's son ross took his own life. he was 31 and had also battled depression for many years. ross was an incredible human being. he was kind, he was loving, devoted to his family and actually, was very funny. steve watched mike give a tv interview about losing ross, and decided to get in touch with him. that really helped me. the fact that you were that much sort of further
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along, as say. because at that time i just wanted to say to somebody, how long does this pain last? because i can't function, i can't. you don't get over it. you never do. the stock phrase i have started to use for some time isjust to say, you move forward. you endure, and you move forward. but you never get over it, you can't. mike and steve now frequently ask themselves what could they have done differently. they go over and over in their minds the last text messages, the last phone calls. speaking to ross the night before he died. he said, you know, "i'm 0k, dad, i'm 0k". and he told his mum he would go for a run in the morning and everything would be all right. i realise with hindsight, that you know, maybe i could have listened a bit more instead ofjust trying to do the dad thing and just fix him.
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so when we did get together, and maybe jordan and i went for a beer or a meal out or go to a concert, the last thing you kind of wanted to do was say, "how is your mental health?" you just wanted to be dad... so we just didn't have those conversations. i look back now and see the signs, i see those moments clear as day now. but they don't just want to look backwards. they are campaigning for better suicide prevention strategies. should we sit down? good. it is why they are meeting the secretary of state for health, sajid javid. also in the room are philip perry and harry biggs davidson. they also lost their sons to suicide. 75% of people who take their own lives are men. when you were talking just a moment ago about your
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own experience, and i completely understand when you said you always will think what could i have done, what could i have done differently for patrick? sajid javid understands, because four years ago his 52—year—old brother tariq took his own life. this is the first time he has talked about it publicly. last monday would have been my brother tariq's birthday. i say would have been, because he is no longer with us. he took his own life. and on that monday, it was the first thing that i thought about when i opened my eyes, and the last thing i talked about when i close my eyes. about when i closed my eyes. nothing can prepare you for the loss of a loved one. but i want to use this privileged role that i have as the secretary of state to do right by his memory.
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he is launching a ten year suicide prevention strategy. he says he wants to see a cross government approach, treating suicide with the same urgency of any other major killer. i was encouraged by what the secretary of state said, i'll wait and see the evidence of this ten year suicide prevention plan, but i think that his heart is in the right place, i think it was important that he mentioned his own life experience, and the fact that his own brother had taken his life. steve and mike talk to their sons all the time, especially on days like this. i just told him that we were, that i wanted him with me, that he was going to be alongside me today and i wanted him to be there, because we were going down to meet with the health secretary. ross, in his farewell letter, said "please fight for mental health".
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and i said to ross during the speech... "can you see us, ross? i'm doing it, i'm trying. "i'm trying my best." and part of me believes that... he can see, he knows what's going on. in his name, and his honour, and in the honour of all the hundreds of thousands of people like him who we lose to suicide in this country. we're joined now by mike mccarthy and steve phillip. it's and steve phillip. worth saying that i know eve ryo ne it's worth saying that i know everyone who's watched this film this morning, all our production team, mike, you are a correspondence, you know they can be a cynical bunch. everyone has stopped in their tracks and the thing i wanted to pick up on first, we'll get into lots of things, but
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it's the friendship, the rapport you have. i know it's a big part of your message, having someone to talk to. this is something that makes a big difference to both of you? absolutely. i was well into my journey, having lostjohn, and mike appeared. a very emotional piece talking about the loss of ross, and i felt like i talking about the loss of ross, and ifelt like i had to reach out talking about the loss of ross, and i felt like i had to reach out and contact mike, and we did, and be pulled together and formed this bond of friendship. when you go through something like we have, and you hear of other people who have gone through the same, your instinct is to want to reach out, and kind of offer any kind of help that you can. you're almost thrust into this role that you never want to be in. it is kind of how our friendship came together. figs
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kind of how our friendship came touether. �* , ,, kind of how our friendship came touether. ~ , i. . kind of how our friendship came touether. �* , ,, . , kind of how our friendship came touether. a . , . . together. as you made it very clear about what — together. as you made it very clear about what that _ together. as you made it very clear about what that friendship - together. as you made it very clear about what that friendship means l together. as you made it very clear| about what that friendship means to you, i can only imagine that it felt relentless and endless, deep grief, and you having no idea. i relentless and endless, deep grief, and you having no idea. melt relentless and endless, deep grief, and you having no idea.— and you having no idea. i felt like and you having no idea. i felt like a iece and you having no idea. i felt like a piece of — and you having no idea. i felt like a piece of driftwood. _ and you having no idea. i felt like a piece of driftwood. i _ and you having no idea. i felt like a piece of driftwood. i didn't - and you having no idea. i felt like| a piece of driftwood. i didn't know where _ a piece of driftwood. i didn't know where i_ a piece of driftwood. i didn't know where i was — a piece of driftwood. i didn't know where i was going or what i had been doing _ where i was going or what i had been doing i_ where i was going or what i had been doing ijust— where i was going or what i had been doing. ijust wanted to know that, someday, — doing. ijust wanted to know that, someday, that would be ok, that i would _ someday, that would be ok, that i would be _ someday, that would be ok, that i would be able to function normally, because _ would be able to function normally, because i_ would be able to function normally, because i didn't feel anything like normal— because i didn't feel anything like normal at — because i didn't feel anything like normal at the time, and when i spoke to steve, _ normal at the time, and when i spoke to steve, he _ normal at the time, and when i spoke to steve, he was able to give me that hope — to steve, he was able to give me that hope. it never goes away, and you have _ that hope. it never goes away, and you have to— that hope. it never goes away, and you have to accept that this is something for the rest our lives, that we — something for the rest our lives, that we have to live with. you do not move — that we have to live with. you do not move on. it is always there. but i remember— not move on. it is always there. but i rememberthe not move on. it is always there. but i remember the conversation i had with steve — i remember the conversation i had with steve. he said that your life goes _ with steve. he said that your life goes around it, and i am finding as time— goes around it, and i am finding as time goes— goes around it, and i am finding as time goes on that he was absolutely right _ time goes on that he was absolutely right amt _ time goes on that he was absolutely right. and he gave me a reason to
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hope _ right. and he gave me a reason to hope and — right. and he gave me a reason to hope and he — right. and he gave me a reason to hope and he helped pick me off the floor~ _ hope and he helped pick me off the floor. ., , ., _, , floor. how did you come up with the lan? floor. how did you come up with the ian? m floor. how did you come up with the plan? my fault _ floor. how did you come up with the plan? my fault entirely. _ floor. how did you come up with the plan? my fault entirely. you - floor. how did you come up with the plan? my fault entirely. you are - plan? my fault entirely. you are have already — plan? my fault entirely. you are have already got _ plan? my fault entirely. you are have already got the _ plan? my fault entirely. you are | have already got the relationship where you are blaming each other! from the word go! i ran a conference through thejordan legacy, and we had a conversation about what we do next, and he suggested we do a march on downing street, and we were a little nervous on that, but i cannot remember who came up with the idea but they said do you remember the olympic torch bearing processions in 2012, and how people would build meaningful stories, 2012, and how people would build meaningfulstories, come 2012, and how people would build meaningful stories, come out on the streets, and hundreds of thousands of people came out. could we do something like that? he probably thought it was a wild id at the time. it is essentially what we are doing. time. it is essentially what we are doinu. ~ ., time. it is essentially what we are doinu. ~ . ., time. it is essentially what we are doinu. ~ . . . , doing. we have had the three dads in defoe, doing. we have had the three dads in
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defoe. who — doing. we have had the three dads in defoe. who had _ doing. we have had the three dads in defoe, who had lost _ doing. we have had the three dads in defoe, who had lost children, - doing. we have had the three dads in defoe, who had lost children, their . defoe, who had lost children, their daughters, to suicide. and i remember that they had been doing their walk, and they said one way or another they are getting through their days, all in different moments of time and one thing they said was that on the walk, constantly, people, strangers, would come up to them and start telling them stories and they knew, for sure, it was maybe the first time that they had spoken. and that is part of what i imagine, when you are out doing this you have to brace yourselves, in the best possible way, they cause, hopefully, that will happen. the - ur - ose hopefully, that will happen. the purpose of _ hopefully, that will happen. tue: purpose of hope is hopefully, that will happen. iua: purpose of hope is to hopefully, that will happen. i“ia: purpose of hope is to bring everyone together in unity.— together in unity. there are people out there like _ together in unity. there are people out there like the _ together in unity. there are people out there like the three _ together in unity. there are people out there like the three dads - together in unity. there are people| out there like the three dads doing fantastic— out there like the three dads doing fantastic work but suicide the prevention area is quite fragmented in some _ prevention area is quite fragmented in some ways and we wanted to come together— in some ways and we wanted to come together and speak with one voice, and be _ together and speak with one voice, and be able to tell people, we all have _ and be able to tell people, we all have a _ and be able to tell people, we all have a responsibility. suicide does not discriminate. it is the biggest
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killer— not discriminate. it is the biggest killer of— not discriminate. it is the biggest killer of young adults in this country— killer of young adults in this country under 35. the biggest killer~ — country under 35. the biggest killer. not covid, not cancer, not drugs, _ killer. not covid, not cancer, not drugs, not— killer. not covid, not cancer, not drugs, not road accidents, suicide. so why— drugs, not road accidents, suicide. so why are — drugs, not road accidents, suicide. so why are we not talking about it? why is _ so why are we not talking about it? why is there the stigma 's and we want _ why is there the stigma 's and we want to— why is there the stigma 's and we want to send out the message, if we can, certainly do our bit to send out the — can, certainly do our bit to send out the message that we have got a role to— out the message that we have got a role to play, whether you are at the top of _ role to play, whether you are at the top of power and government, or whoever— top of power and government, or whoever you are, even if it isjust a hand _ whoever you are, even if it isjust a hand on— whoever you are, even if it isjust a hand on the shoulder and sending that extra _ a hand on the shoulder and sending that extra text to your mate and saying _ that extra text to your mate and saying are — that extra text to your mate and saying are you 0k? that extra text to your mate and saying are you ok? we are all involved _ saying are you ok? we are all involved. you are not ready house equity— involved. you are not ready house equity sajid — involved. you are not ready house equity sajid javid was at the event, and has _ equity sajid javid was at the event, and has very rarely spoken about the suicide _ and has very rarely spoken about the suicide of— and has very rarely spoken about the suicide of his brother and the impact — suicide of his brother and the impact that had. i suicide of his brother and the impact that had.— suicide of his brother and the imactthat had. , , , , impact that had. i suppose because he offered that _ impact that had. i suppose because he offered that personal _ he offered that personal perspective, does that make you feel that there is, he described it as a
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sea change, because the charity has that intention but one voice is obviously so much stronger. ira;r that intention but one voice is obviously so much stronger. try to think of the _ obviously so much stronger. try to think of the last _ obviously so much stronger. try to think of the last time _ obviously so much stronger. try to think of the last time you - obviously so much stronger. try to think of the last time you heard i think of the last time you heard government minister mentioned suicide, never mind using personal experience so yesterday was huge and to have a minister is not only the secretary of state for health but has had that personal experience to be leading this, is massive. what be leading this, is massive. what racticall be leading this, is massive. what practically is _ be leading this, is massive. what practically is going _ be leading this, is massive. what practically is going to _ be leading this, is massive. what practically is going to be - be leading this, is massive. what practically is going to be done? be leading this, is massive. what l practically is going to be done? the baton of practically is going to be done? i“ia: baton of hope practically is going to be done? i“i2 baton of hope is a physical battle, we have the silversmith to the queen designing it, we have seen the first concept and it is really exciting and it will set off injune 25, 2023, from edinburgh, making its way through northern ireland, wales, england, and come to a resting place in london, hopefully the houses of parliament. there are discussions at the moment going on around that. there will be events taking place nationwide. and imagine the london
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2012, that everyone can put on their own workshops, talks, schools can put on events. the own workshops, talks, schools can put on events-— put on events. the idea is that you don't aet put on events. the idea is that you don't get away _ put on events. the idea is that you don't get away from _ put on events. the idea is that you don't get away from it. _ put on events. the idea is that you don't get away from it. we - put on events. the idea is that you don't get away from it. we will - put on events. the idea is that you i don't get away from it. we will open u . don't get away from it. we will open u- this don't get away from it. we will open up this conversation _ don't get away from it. we will open up this conversation in _ don't get away from it. we will open up this conversation in every - up this conversation in every hopeful way. what we didn't want this to be was a march of very depressed and sad people. there is hope. there was a message out there are constantly shared by experts that says, most suicides are preventable. and we really do believe that. the research and evidence is there, for those who have attempted to take their own lives and survived. you mentioned the statistics _ lives and survived. you mentioned the statistics a _ lives and survived. you mentioned the statistics a moment _ lives and survived. you mentioned the statistics a moment ago. - lives and survived. you mentioned| the statistics a moment ago. there will be families right now, some of them could be watching as we are speaking, who could hopefully not be affected by this. it might well be a family member orfriend. affected by this. it might well be a family member or friend. someone you know, vaguely, is in that place. it is a possibility. and you are both
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that one place at one point in time before this terrible thing happened to you and your families. what advice would you, if you like, giving what you know now and how you have been able to talk, what would you say to yourselves and other people? we you say to yourselves and other --eole? ~ ., you say to yourselves and other neale? 2 ., , you say to yourselves and other --eole?~ ., , ., you say to yourselves and other --eole?~ . ., , people? we have spoken to hundreds of bereaved mums, _ people? we have spoken to hundreds of bereaved mums, dads, _ people? we have spoken to hundreds of bereaved mums, dads, brothers, l of bereaved mums, dads, brothers, sisters, _ of bereaved mums, dads, brothers, sisters, you — of bereaved mums, dads, brothers, sisters, you name it and i can only speak— sisters, you name it and i can only speak for— sisters, you name it and i can only speak for myself. we all have different _ speak for myself. we all have different experiences of suicide. i think. _ different experiences of suicide. i think, looking back, iwas a different experiences of suicide. i think, looking back, i was a dad who tried to _ think, looking back, i was a dad who tried to fix _ think, looking back, i was a dad who tried to fix his son, because that is what _ tried to fix his son, because that is what dads do, you fix your kids, you do— is what dads do, you fix your kids, you do whatever you need to do to fix your— you do whatever you need to do to fix your kids. and i would just say, listen, _ fix your kids. and i would just say, listen, it— fix your kids. and i would just say, listen, it is— fix your kids. and i would just say, listen, it is about talking but it is also — listen, it is about talking but it is also about listening. and to anybody— is also about listening. and to anybody out there who feels in the same _ anybody out there who feels in the same dark— anybody out there who feels in the same dark place, please believe that there is— same dark place, please believe that there is a _ same dark place, please believe that there is a reason to stay. please believe — there is a reason to stay. please believe that there is hope, and this
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is what _ believe that there is hope, and this is what the — believe that there is hope, and this is what the baton of hope is all about — is what the baton of hope is all about it — is what the baton of hope is all about. it is time to talk about suicide — about. it is time to talk about suicide it— about. it is time to talk about suicide. it is time to talk about it openly, — suicide. it is time to talk about it openly, and _ suicide. it is time to talk about it openly, and have a healthy conversation about it. the days of brushing — conversation about it. the days of brushing it — conversation about it. the days of brushing it under the carpet are gone _ brushing it under the carpet are gone and _ brushing it under the carpet are gone. and we are going to make sure that it _ gone. and we are going to make sure that it is _ gone. and we are going to make sure that it is top — gone. and we are going to make sure that it is top of the agenda, because _ that it is top of the agenda, because, if, and as we said earlier this is— because, if, and as we said earlier this is the — because, if, and as we said earlier this is the biggest killer of young people. — this is the biggest killer of young people, and it doesn'tjust affect young _ people, and it doesn'tjust affect young people, it is everybody, then, surely— young people, it is everybody, then, surely we _ young people, it is everybody, then, surely we need to act. we need to hear— surely we need to act. we need to hear those — surely we need to act. we need to hear those conversations. | surely we need to act. we need to hear those conversations.- hear those conversations. i don't think i have _ hear those conversations. i don't think i have seen _ hear those conversations. i don't think i have seen anyone - hear those conversations. i don't think i have seen anyone nod - hear those conversations. i don't l think i have seen anyone nod quite as often! that was a lot of nodding! you said, you went out for dinner, withjordan, he would be chatting, but it is dropping that line of how is your mental health? you but it is dropping that line of how is your mental health?— but it is dropping that line of how is your mental health? you want to be dad, and _ is your mental health? you want to be dad. and he _ is your mental health? you want to be dad, and he is _ is your mental health? you want to be dad, and he is a _ is your mental health? you want to be dad, and he is a 34-year-old i is your mental health? you want to | be dad, and he is a 34-year-old lad be dad, and he is a 3a—year—old [ad with his life, his own house, so you don't get to see him every week or every day. the last thing that you
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want to feel when you're going out for a nice beer is to bring the mood down. i kind of look back and think what was my knowledge of mental health and suicide, to half years ago, and it was poor. if one in four people experience mental health problems in the uk right now, we owe it to ourselves as parents, families, to get better educated. now, i had a pretty rubbish toolkit of knowledge 31 months ago. ourjob is to go out and educate and say, there are basic, simple skills that will allow you to have this difficult conversation. learn them. because you never know when you might need them. i’m because you never know when you might need them.— because you never know when you might need them. i'm going to need a bi class of might need them. i'm going to need a big glass of water. _ might need them. i'm going to need a big glass of water. i _ might need them. i'm going to need a big glass of water. i thought - might need them. i'm going to need a big glass of water. i thought you - big glass of water. i thought you were going _ big glass of water. i thought you were going to — big glass of water. i thought you were going to say _ big glass of water. i thought you were going to say a _ big glass of water. i thought you were going to say a glass - big glass of water. i thought you were going to say a glass of - big glass of water. i thought you l were going to say a glass of wine! know that you will be busy planning
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at of next year, but if it hits the mark and gets people talking, and you cannot get away from it, it will be a good thing. you cannot get away from it, it will be a good thing-— if you've been affected by any of the issues raised, you can find links to help and support at bbc.co.uk/actionline it is 90 minutes to nine. —— i9 it is 90 minutes to nine. —— 19 minutes. medals have been presented to the service personnel who helped evacuate thousands of people from afghanistan following the taliban's takeover of the country last summer. the presentation was to mark armed forces day — and there will be a number of other events taking place around the uk today. our reporter matt graveling is at raf brize norton. what is happening there? i have been well informed — what is happening there? i have been well informed that _ what is happening there? i have been well informed that this _ what is happening there? i have been well informed that this is _ what is happening there? i have been well informed that this is a _ what is happening there? i have been well informed that this is a dornier. well informed that this is a dornier plane that will be taking the raf display team to scarborough, and they will bejumping display team to scarborough, and they will be jumping out of it. this is part of armed forces day. more
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than 150 events around the uk for the public to show their appreciation to the navy, the army and of course that the raf as well. a couple of the gentleman who will bejumping out of a couple of the gentleman who will be jumping out of this plane are joining me now, flight sergeant james bruce, or brucie as i am allowed to call you. what are the guys behind you doing ahead of this jump? fir guys behind you doing ahead of this 'um - ? .. , guys behind you doing ahead of this 'um? jump? or the parachuting, it is all about safety _ jump? or the parachuting, it is all about safety so — jump? or the parachuting, it is all about safety so they _ jump? or the parachuting, it is all about safety so they are _ jump? or the parachuting, it is all about safety so they are doing - jump? or the parachuting, it is all| about safety so they are doing final checks _ about safety so they are doing final checks for— about safety so they are doing final checks for each other before doing this armed forces dayjump into scarborough. this armed forces day 'ump into scarborough-h this armed forces day 'ump into scarborough. this armed forces day 'ump into scarborouuh. ., . , ., scarborough. how important is it for ou? i scarborough. how important is it for you? i have — scarborough. how important is it for you? i have been _ scarborough. how important is it for you? i have been chatting _ scarborough. how important is it for you? i have been chatting to - scarborough. how important is it for you? i have been chatting to the - you? i have been chatting to the guys. they say that your front facing between the military and public, putting on displays, but there is a bigger message. what do you want people to find out about you want people to find out about you guys? it you want people to find out about ou au s? , ., , you want people to find out about ouaus? , you guys? it is not 'ust the lads who are you guys? it is not 'ust the lads who part _ you guys? it is not 'ust the lads who are part of— you guys? it is notjust the lads who are part of the _ you guys? it is notjust the lads who are part of the raf, - you guys? it is notjust the lads who are part of the raf, there | you guys? it is notjust the lads. who are part of the raf, there is you guys? it is notjust the lads i who are part of the raf, there is a bil who are part of the raf, there is a big team _ who are part of the raf, there is a big team of— who are part of the raf, there is a big team of people you enable this to happen — big team of people you enable this to happen comedy pilots, engineers, all over— to happen comedy pilots, engineers, all over the _ to happen comedy pilots, engineers, all over the air force who allow us to go—
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all over the air force who allow us to go and — all over the air force who allow us to go and do— all over the air force who allow us to go and do displays. you all over the air force who allow us to go and do displays.— to go and do displays. you do the 'ob for to go and do displays. you do the job for some _ to go and do displays. you do the job for some months _ to go and do displays. you do the job for some months of _ to go and do displays. you do the job for some months of the - to go and do displays. you do the job for some months of the year. to go and do displays. you do the i job for some months of the year but also serve in the military as well, is that correct? saint—maximin we are not doing displays we train airborne forces imparted techniques. corporaljoe finch, or finchy, everyone has a nickname, this is your first year with the falcons, how has it been? it your first year with the falcons, how has it been?— your first year with the falcons, how has it been? . , , . , , how has it been? it has been a steep learnina how has it been? it has been a steep learning curve. _ how has it been? it has been a steep learning curve, the _ how has it been? it has been a steep learning curve, the amount - how has it been? it has been a steep learning curve, the amount of- how has it been? it has been a steep learning curve, the amount ofjumps| learning curve, the amount ofjumps that i_ learning curve, the amount ofjumps that l have _ learning curve, the amount ofjumps that i have done _ learning curve, the amount ofjumps that i have done i— learning curve, the amount ofjumps that i have done i have _ learning curve, the amount ofjumps that i have done i have learned - learning curve, the amount ofjumps that i have done i have learned a - that i have done i have learned a lot. that i have done i have learned a lot and — that i have done i have learned a lot and now _ that i have done i have learned a lot. and now we _ that i have done i have learned a lot. and now we start— that i have done i have learned a lot. and now we start to - that i have done i have learned a lot. and now we start to put - that i have done i have learned a lot. and now we start to put all. lot. and now we start to put all that practice _ lot. and now we start to put all that practice into— lot. and now we start to put all that practice into place. - lot. and now we start to put all that practice into place. we - lot. and now we start to put all that practice into place. we heard from ltrucie _ that practice into place. we heard from brucie what _ that practice into place. we heard from brucie what you _ that practice into place. we heard from brucie what you want - that practice into place. we heard from brucie what you want the . that practice into place. we heard i from brucie what you want the public to gain from knowledge wise. armed forces day is about all areas of the military and what it brings to people's lives. this is your first year. what is it giving you personally?— year. what is it giving you ersonall ? , , , ., personally? firstly, it has brought in a lot of confidence, _ personally? firstly, it has brought in a lot of confidence, with - personally? firstly, it has brought in a lot of confidence, with all - in a lot of confidence, with all sorts—
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in a lot of confidence, with all sorts of— in a lot of confidence, with all sorts of people, especially from all sorts _ sorts of people, especially from all sorts of— sorts of people, especially from all sorts of services as well, all sorts of age _ sorts of services as well, all sorts of age groups. to work with a lot of people. _ of age groups. to work with a lot of people, definitely improves myself as a person, yes. people, definitely improves myself as a person. yes-— as a person, yes. final question to ou, as a person, yes. final question to you. brucie. _ as a person, yes. final question to you, brucie, looking _ as a person, yes. final question to you, brucie, looking at _ as a person, yes. final question to you, brucie, looking at this, - as a person, yes. final question to you, brucie, looking at this, i'm i you, brucie, looking at this, i'm terrified. does it get easier to jump terrified. does it get easier to jump out of a plane or is that human emotion going, don't do it? remarkably do so much training that all this becomes routine. this is our dayjob. we do this almost every day of the week. that our day job. we do this almost every day of the week.— day of the week. that part leaves ou day of the week. that part leaves you relatively _ day of the week. that part leaves you relatively early _ day of the week. that part leaves you relatively early on, _ day of the week. that part leaves you relatively early on, we - day of the week. that part leaves you relatively early on, we try - day of the week. that part leaves you relatively early on, we try to | you relatively early on, we try to do the _ you relatively early on, we try to do the best— you relatively early on, we try to do the best and _ you relatively early on, we try to do the best and safest _ you relatively early on, we try to do the best and safest show- you relatively early on, we try toj do the best and safest show that you relatively early on, we try to - do the best and safest show that we can for— do the best and safest show that we can for the _ do the best and safest show that we can for the public. _ do the best and safest show that we can for the public.— can for the public. will, magatti will be heading _ can for the public. will, magatti will be heading to _ can for the public. will, magatti will be heading to scarborough | can for the public. will, magatti - will be heading to scarborough today jump will be heading to scarborough today jump as part of armed forces day. and it is notjust about serving servicemen and women and cadets and all of theirfamily servicemen and women and cadets and all of their family members. servicemen and women and cadets and all of theirfamily members. it is also about veterans. earlier i
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turned up and i was chatting to my cameraman bernard who is filming this and he said, you know what? i used to be in the parachute regiment as well between 6a—72, i believe. and we may actually have a picture of bernard in his regiment days. he has been chatting to the guys here about his days in the regiment. that is a lovely thing. the little picture to leave you with. a bit of past and present, here.— picture to leave you with. a bit of past and present, here. matt, you are surrounded _ past and present, here. matt, you are surrounded by _ past and present, here. matt, you are surrounded by some _ past and present, here. matt, you are surrounded by some brilliant l are surrounded by some brilliant people. and doubly professionally qualified camera person as well. you are very lucky. thank you for showing us round. bernard, in his heyday! you probably saw the blue skies at raf brize norton, how does it not for everyone else across the weekend? ,., ., ., , , weekend? good morning. this is in northamptonshire, _ weekend? good morning. this is in northamptonshire, there _ weekend? good morning. this is in northamptonshire, there will- weekend? good morning. this is in northamptonshire, there will be i weekend? good morning. this is in i northamptonshire, there will be some dry weather there. breezy compared with the past few days. for the
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rest, sunshine at times but we have seen some showers. this was the view a short time ago in the coast in south—west scotland. and here's where the rain has been so far. there are some more rain very close by. moving away from the highlands, some showers dotted around the west. most seeing a lovely start at the weekend. some more clad bubbling up through the day across central and western areas with more an array of showers developing. central and southern scotland, too, but the far north of scotland, where he started with a lot of low cloud, that will clear. a better day to come in shetland. and around sutherland and the moray coast it could get up to 22 celsius. shara scattered but many will stay dry. a fair number of showers across the western half of england and wales. further east, a bit drier, it will be across east anglia and the south—east corner. 22 degrees at best around the
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scarborough area. 22 around the moray firth. in the west that reasonably notable. it will strengthen tonight. cloud and rain becoming more extensive around the irish sea and south—west scotland. north and eastern areas should stay largely dry and a fresh enough start to sunday but away from east anglia and the south—east, a greater chance of those showers, but dry, for most, for monday. back to you now, charlie and naga. sarah is here with the sport. jonny bairstow has been hitting it likely that the t20. he has rescuing england. it was an extraordinary day of cricket at headingley, as england fought back from a batting collapse to keep the third test
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with new zealand alive. england were 55 for 6 in their first innings chasing the tourists' 329 whenjonny bairstow, on his yorkshire home ground, came to the crease, and finished the day with a century. joe wilson reports. what you get at headingley. four seasons of cricket in one day. in all of frantic friday, jack leach's performance should be remembered. whenjonny bairstow held this catch, it gave england's spin bowler five a wickets on home soil a landmark performance. new zealand 329 all out. now for england's innings and prepare to be flattened. trent boult time. oh, wow. look how we got rid of england's top three after lee's pope. and then crawley cleaned up completely. too good for england. and there was more — joe root could do nothing but edge this ball from tim southee to the wicketkeeper and england were 21 for four. ben stokes tried to blast his way free of the pressure and lasted 13 balls. well, remember how that aggressive,
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dominant approach to batting brought such a memorable victory in the last test match. here now at headingley england were 91 for six at tea. but there was no backward step. justjonny bairstow doing lots of that. and with him jamie overton on debut picked a ball fast. now batting quick. overton is a strong man. all this commitment to attack meant these two were rapidly, remarkably, turning the match back towards england. headingley could barely believe its early evening eyes. yorkshire's jonny bairstow had made another 100. yeah, this was happening and england somehow will resume just 65 runs behind. joe wilson, bbc news, headingley. england's women stepped up their preparations for the euros with an empathic 5—1 win over the nation who won the competition last time out. the netherlands were european champions back in 2017 when they were coached by england's current boss serina wiegman, and though the lionesses needed a bit of luck to draw level,
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once they went ahead they were in control. two goals for beth mead made it a comfortable night at elland road, with 11 days now until the finals start. meanwhile scotland were in world cup qualifying action, and they beat ukraine a—0 to close in on the 2nd place spot in group b, which would earn them a play—off place. cricket, football, commonwealth games, road championships, wimbledon starting on monday. when will you get time to unpack the suitcases, ? nun, just go on at whim, go to the shops. it is all good summer stuff. like glastonbury, for example. see what i did there? very smooth link!
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and it is after dark when the magic begins. right now, this is the scene. you can imagine people have been getting up, emerging from their tents or caravans. kind ofjust remembering the night before, getting ready for the day ahead. lovely scenes. fiona has been finding out what happens after dark. hate fiona has been finding out what happens after dark.— fiona has been finding out what happens after dark. we had every been going _ happens after dark. we had every been going up _ happens after dark. we had every been going up but _ happens after dark. we had every been going up but at _ happens after dark. we had every been going up but at the - happens after dark. we had every been going up but at the end - happens after dark. we had every been going up but at the end of i happens after dark. we had every i been going up but at the end of the day it is about enjoying yourself, do you know what i mean? it is like christmas. you see all of these people once a year. it has been great to catch up and start living your life. you have caught me after a few whiskeys as well.
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it helps us to find each other in the middle of the night, this pink flamingo. d0 the middle of the night, this pink flaminuo. ,, the middle of the night, this pink flaminuo. i. . ., flamingo. do you mind me asking how old ou flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? — flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? l— flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am _ flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am 65. _ flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am 65. i _ flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am 65. i am _ flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am 65. i am 68 - flamingo. do you mind me asking how old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in - old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in september- _ old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and _ old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and you _ old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and you might - old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in september. and you might stay| old you are? i am 65. i am 68 in i september. and you might stay up until four in _ september. and you might stay up until four in the _ september. and you might stay up until four in the morning? - september. and you might stay up until four in the morning? we - september. and you might stay up until four in the morning? we will| until four in the morning? we will not be getting _ until four in the morning? we will not be getting any _ until four in the morning? we will not be getting any sleep. - until four in the morning? we will not be getting any sleep. how - until four in the morning? we willj not be getting any sleep. how are you finding — not be getting any sleep. how are you finding it— not be getting any sleep. how are you finding it being _ not be getting any sleep. how are you finding it being here, - not be getting any sleep. how are you finding it being here, nice - not be getting any sleep. how are| you finding it being here, nice and chilled? _ you finding it being here, nice and chilled? lt— you finding it being here, nice and chilled? , , ., you finding it being here, nice and chilled? , , . ., , chilled? it is beautiful, lovely. this is a beautiful— chilled? it is beautiful, lovely. this is a beautiful space. - chilled? it is beautiful, lovely. - this is a beautiful space. amongst a lot of chaos, this is kind of a little bit of... amazing. during the mornin: little bit of... amazing. during the
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morning and _ little bit of... amazing. during the morning and you _ little bit of... amazing. during the morning and you are _ little bit of... amazing. during the morning and you are eating - little bit of... amazing. during the morning and you are eating mr - morning and you are eating mr whippys. morning and you are eating mr whi - s. . . morning and you are eating mr whi - s. , , , morning and you are eating mr whi - s. . . . ~ whippys. this is the seventh mr whi - of whippys. this is the seventh mr whippy of the — whippys. this is the seventh mr whippy of the glastonbury - whippys. this is the seventh mr - whippy of the glastonbury festival. going to bed! serie ajust been whippy of the glastonbury festival. going to bed! serie a just been with going to bed! serie ajust been with my best _ going to bed! serie ajust been with my best friends, being outside, dancing — my best friends, being outside, dancing and just really enjoying a really _ dancing and just really enjoying a really good vibe. this dancing and just really en'oying a really good vibefi dancing and just really en'oying a really good vibe. this is special. i wear this every _ really good vibe. this is special. i wear this every time. _ really good vibe. this is special. i wear this every time. they - really good vibe. this is special. i wear this every time. they have i really good vibe. this is special. i i wear this every time. they have got ear protectors _ wear this every time. they have got ear protectors and _ wear this every time. they have got ear protectors and they _ wear this every time. they have got ear protectors and they are - wear this every time. they have got ear protectors and they are in - wear this every time. they have got ear protectors and they are in their| ear protectors and they are in their pyjamas, like, asleep. i ear protectors and they are in their pyjamas, like, asleep.— pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got the key to _ pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got the key to get — pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got the key to get in, _ pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got the key to get in, let's _ pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got the key to get in, let's go. - pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got the key to get in, let's go. i - pyjamas, like, asleep. i have got| the key to get in, let's go. i don't know how — the key to get in, let's go. i don't know how you — the key to get in, let's go. i don't know how you got _ the key to get in, let's go. i don't know how you got in _ the key to get in, let's go. i don't know how you got in here, - the key to get in, let's go. i don't know how you got in here, but i know how you got in here, but welcome _ know how you got in here, but welcome you _ know how you got in here, but welcome, you are _ know how you got in here, but welcome, you are late, - know how you got in here, but welcome, you are late, you i know how you got in here, but i welcome, you are late, you know know how you got in here, but - welcome, you are late, you know that you are _ welcome, you are late, you know that you are late — welcome, you are late, you know that you are late and _ welcome, you are late, you know that you are late. and it _
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welcome, you are late, you know that you are late. and it is _ welcome, you are late, you know that you are late. and it is a _ welcome, you are late, you know that you are late. and it is a very- you are late. and it is a very important _ you are late. and it is a very important date. _ you are late. and it is a very important date.— you are late. and it is a very important date. you are late. and it is a very imortant date. . i. , important date. look at yourself in the reflections. _ important date. look at yourself in the reflections. stunning! - important date. look at yourself in the reflections. stunning! just - the reflections. stunning! just auoin to the reflections. stunning! just going to squeeze _ the reflections. stunning! just going to squeeze the - the reflections. stunning! just going to squeeze the life - the reflections. stunning! just going to squeeze the life out i the reflections. stunning! just| going to squeeze the life out of you. _ going to squeeze the life out of you. dear~ _ going to squeeze the life out of you, dear. nicely done. i going to squeeze the life out of you, dear. nicely done.- going to squeeze the life out of you, dear. nicely done. i have no idea where _ you, dear. nicely done. i have no idea where we _ you, dear. nicely done. i have no idea where we are. _ you, dear. nicely done. i have no idea where we are. and - you, dear. nicely done. i have no idea where we are. and there - you, dear. nicely done. i have no idea where we are. and there is i idea where we are. and there is literally a crowd of people. escape, ruick, aet literally a crowd of people. escape, quick. get out _ literally a crowd of people. escape, quick, get out while _ literally a crowd of people. escape, quick, get out while we _ literally a crowd of people. escape, quick, get out while we can. - literally a crowd of people. escape, quick, get out while we can. this i quick, get out while we can. this view is absolutely _ quick, get out while we can. this view is absolutely stunning. you cannot get bored of it. it is actually magical.—
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cannot get bored of it. it is actuall mauical. actually magical. magical feeling. best lace actually magical. magical feeling. ltest place in _ actually magical. magical feeling. best place in the _ actually magical. magical feeling. best place in the world. - actually magical. magical feeling. best place in the world. when - actually magical. magical feeling. | best place in the world. when you are sat here looking out, it is the best. ., . . . best. fiona lamdin reporting, and en'o inc best. fiona lamdin reporting, and enjoying it- _ best. fiona lamdin reporting, and enjoying it. there _ best. fiona lamdin reporting, and enjoying it. there is _ best. fiona lamdin reporting, and enjoying it. there is a _ best. fiona lamdin reporting, and enjoying it. there is a slightly - enjoying it. there is a slightly different vibe. it is five to nine, saturday morning, that is what it looks like at glastonbury. colin is there for us right now, with the camera teams wandering around. give us a sense of what it is like, looking ahead to a very big night tonight. hate looking ahead to a very big night toniaht. ~ . ., ., ~ looking ahead to a very big night toniaht. 2 . . tonight. we are looking at the ' ramid tonight. we are looking at the pyramid stage. _ tonight. we are looking at the pyramid stage, and _ tonight. we are looking at the pyramid stage, and that - tonight. we are looking at the pyramid stage, and that is - tonight. we are looking at the i pyramid stage, and that is where tonight. we are looking at the - pyramid stage, and that is where we were earlier seeing paul mccartney 's setting up for the set tonight making him the oldest person ever to headline the glastonbury festival, at the age of 80. he turned 80 exactly a week ago and to discuss this i have beenjoined by neil mccormick, the music critic for the daily telegraph. thank you for getting out of your tent. it was
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uuite getting out of your tent. it was quite difficult! _ getting out of your tent. it was quite difficult! this _ getting out of your tent. it was quite difficult! this feels - getting out of your tent. it was quite difficult! this feels like i getting out of your tent. it was quite difficult! this feels like a | quite difficult! this feels like a momentous — quite difficult! this feels like a momentous headline - quite difficult! this feels like a momentous headline set - quite difficult! this feels like a momentous headline set by i quite difficult! this feels like a i momentous headline set by paul mccartney. he momentous headline set by paul mccartney-— momentous headline set by paul mccartne . . , ., ., ., ., , mccartney. he has got more momentous and glastonbury— mccartney. he has got more momentous and glastonbury has _ mccartney. he has got more momentous and glastonbury has got _ mccartney. he has got more momentous and glastonbury has got momentous - and glastonbury has got momentous over the _ and glastonbury has got momentous over the years. he headlined in 2000 ford, _ over the years. he headlined in 2000 ford. but _ over the years. he headlined in 2000 ford. but he — over the years. he headlined in 2000 ford, but he had not become this absolute — ford, but he had not become this absolute carrier of british pop heritage — absolute carrier of british pop heritage that he is now. it is going to be _ heritage that he is now. it is going to be fantastic.— heritage that he is now. it is going to be fantastic. what kind of things they expect — to be fantastic. what kind of things they expect from — to be fantastic. what kind of things they expect from him _ to be fantastic. what kind of things they expect from him 's _ to be fantastic. what kind of things they expect from him 's i _ to be fantastic. what kind of things they expect from him 's i expect i they expect from him 's i expect him, he will _ they expect from him 's i expect him, he will not _ they expect from him 's i expect him, he will not do _ they expect from him 's i expect him, he will not do all _ they expect from him 's i expect him, he will not do all of - they expect from him 's i expect him, he will not do all of the - they expect from him 's i expect i him, he will not do all of the super bil him, he will not do all of the super big hits _ him, he will not do all of the super big hits because if he did all of them — big hits because if he did all of them he — big hits because if he did all of them he would be playing all night and we _ them he would be playing all night and we would still be here at eight the following morning. he is going to do— the following morning. he is going to do at— the following morning. he is going to do at least a 10—15 songs, that all 200,000 people will know and sin- all 200,000 people will know and sing along to. he will throw in some quirky— sing along to. he will throw in some quirky ones~ — sing along to. he will throw in some quirky ones. plenty of the beatles, plenty _ quirky ones. plenty of the beatles, plenty of _ quirky ones. plenty of the beatles, plenty of wings, plenty of absolute bangers _ plenty of wings, plenty of absolute hangers and singalong moments when the whole _ hangers and singalong moments when the whole field turns into acquire, and that— the whole field turns into acquire, and that is— the whole field turns into acquire, and that is about the most moving thing _ and that is about the most moving thing in _ and that is about the most moving thing in british pop.— thing in british pop. which will be the one song _ thing in british pop. which will be the one song that _ thing in british pop. which will be the one song that people - thing in british pop. which will be the one song that people look- thing in british pop. which will be the one song that people look on| the one song that people look on tonight and think that was the
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glastonbury limit? i tonight and think that was the glastonbury limit?— tonight and think that was the glastonbury limit? i cannot predict that. in america, _ glastonbury limit? i cannot predict that. in america, he _ glastonbury limit? i cannot predict that. in america, he has _ glastonbury limit? i cannot predict that. in america, he has been - that. in america, he has been playing — that. in america, he has been playing with a hologram ofjohn lennon — playing with a hologram ofjohn lennon i— playing with a hologram ofjohn lennon. i cannot tell how glastonbury would respond to that. they played john lennon's original vocals in the get back film and paul mccartney duets with john vocals in the get back film and paul mccartney duets withjohn lennon. because we are british i don't know if you _ because we are british i don't know if you like _ because we are british i don't know if you like stirring up a pass like that but— if you like stirring up a pass like that but we will see. live and let die, that but we will see. live and let die those — that but we will see. live and let die, those songs are so big, hey jude, _ die, those songs are so big, hey jude can — die, those songs are so big, hey jude, can you imagine aged, at glastonbury, singing na na na? you have glastonbury, singing na na na? gm. have interviewed paul mccartney many times, and i believe you met him before you went into journalism. i before you went intojournalism. i was a young musician at a wedding because _ was a young musician at a wedding because i_ was a young musician at a wedding because i musician that i knew married — because i musician that i knew married one of his band, and i thought— married one of his band, and i
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thought is— married one of his band, and i thought is that paul mccartney from the beatles 's i went up to him, i had to, _ the beatles 's i went up to him, i had to, and— the beatles 's i went up to him, i had to, and shook his hand and said, i love _ had to, and shook his hand and said, i love the _ had to, and shook his hand and said, i love the beatles! and then i sort of made _ i love the beatles! and then i sort of made my move to go away and he held my— of made my move to go away and he held my elbow and he said you don't have to _ held my elbow and he said you don't have to rush— held my elbow and he said you don't have to rush off, we can talk about the beatles. we store and at the bar, the beatles. we store and at the bar. and — the beatles. we store and at the bar, and we spoke about the beatles and i peppered him with questions. i have met _ and i peppered him with questions. i have met him again and again over the decades. i have to say that he the decades. i have to say that he the nicest — the decades. i have to say that he the nicest man in popular music and the nicest man in popular music and the most _ the nicest man in popular music and the most well—adjusted superstar. the extent of his fame, and the lovely— the extent of his fame, and the lovely way— the extent of his fame, and the lovely way that he conducts himself in the _ lovely way that he conducts himself in the world, is incredible. he is a beautiful— in the world, is incredible. he is a beautiful man.— in the world, is incredible. he is a beautiful man. there is talk about his voice, and _ beautiful man. there is talk about his voice, and will— beautiful man. there is talk about his voice, and will it _ beautiful man. there is talk about his voice, and will it be _ beautiful man. there is talk about his voice, and will it be strong - his voice, and will it be strong enough, and people were very surprised when he announced that he was doing a surprise warm up show which happened yesterday afternoon, five bm, 15 miles up the road in frome and played an 800 capacity venue, what was he doing that for?
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sign that he does a lot of those to stay in touch with the audience and give a little thought to the locals is another thing. i give a little thought to the locals is another thing.— give a little thought to the locals is another thing. i have seen him in those small— is another thing. i have seen him in those small spaces. _ is another thing. i have seen him in those small spaces. it _ is another thing. i have seen him in those small spaces. it is _ is another thing. i have seen him in those small spaces. it is exciting. i those small spaces. it is exciting. it is better— those small spaces. it is exciting. it is better in the big spaces because _ it is better in the big spaces because the bigger the crowd emotion there is, _ because the bigger the crowd emotion there is, and his voice has changed with age _ there is, and his voice has changed with age, voices do change with age, many— with age, voices do change with age, many singers drop their keys, he refuses _ many singers drop their keys, he refuses to, — many singers drop their keys, he refuses to, still singing up high, but he _ refuses to, still singing up high, but he is — refuses to, still singing up high, but he is such a great musician with such a _ but he is such a great musician with such a great— but he is such a great musician with such a great ban, he arranges the harmonies — such a great ban, he arranges the harmonies around him, so the boys, the melody. — harmonies around him, so the boys, the melody, is always there. sometimes you might see it on the bbc -- _ sometimes you might see it on the bbc -- the — sometimes you might see it on the bbc —— the voice, the melody for you will be _ bbc —— the voice, the melody for you will be in _ bbc —— the voice, the melody for you will be in this— bbc —— the voice, the melody for you will be in this field and you will hear— will be in this field and you will hear this— will be in this field and you will hear this melody coming forth. he wrote _ hear this melody coming forth. he wrote the — hear this melody coming forth. he wrote the songs, he is singing them, he can— wrote the songs, he is singing them, he can sing _ wrote the songs, he is singing them, he can sing them anyway he wants. i wish he can sing them anyway he wants. wish that he he can sing them anyway he wants. i wish that he would just bite the bullet and do the frog chorus. it
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has been a bit of a blot on his copybook _ has been a bit of a blot on his copybook-— has been a bit of a blot on his copybook. has been a bit of a blot on his co book. ., ., . copybook. nothing wrong with that son. he copybook. nothing wrong with that song- he does _ copybook. nothing wrong with that song. he does not _ copybook. nothing wrong with that song. he does not play _ copybook. nothing wrong with that song. he does not play at - copybook. nothing wrong with that song. he does not play at mull - copybook. nothing wrong with that song. he does not play at mull of i song. he does not play at mull of kin re song. he does not play at mull of kintyre are _ song. he does not play at mull of kintyre are very _ song. he does not play at mull of kintyre are very often _ song. he does not play at mull of kintyre are very often either. - song. he does not play at mull of i kintyre are very often either. there are songs _ kintyre are very often either. there are songs that he has swept away but he has _ are songs that he has swept away but he has plenty of other songs to choose — he has plenty of other songs to choose from.— he has plenty of other songs to choose from. . , ., , . . , choose from. are you expecting any ruests choose from. are you expecting any guests with — choose from. are you expecting any guests with paul— choose from. are you expecting any guests with paul mccartney? - choose from. are you expecting any guests with paul mccartney? i- choose from. are you expecting any guests with paul mccartney? i don't exect guests with paul mccartney? i don't expect any. — guests with paul mccartney? i don't expect any. he _ guests with paul mccartney? i don't expect any, he doesn't _ guests with paul mccartney? i don't expect any, he doesn't need - guests with paul mccartney? i don't expect any, he doesn't need any. it| expect any, he doesn't need any. it would _ expect any, he doesn't need any. it would have — expect any, he doesn't need any. it would have been nice if he had gone on with— would have been nice if he had gone on with billy eilish, that would be the biggest age gap duet in pop history — the biggest age gap duet in pop history. she was fine last night, incredibly— history. she was fine last night, incredibly entertaining. she did her set, incredibly entertaining. she did her set. but _ incredibly entertaining. she did her set, but paul mccartney, he is going to kill— set, but paul mccartney, he is going to kill it _ set, but paul mccartney, he is going to kill it. . , , . ., to kill it. that is the prediction from neil— to kill it. that is the prediction from neil mccormick. - to kill it. that is the prediction from neil mccormick. we - to kill it. that is the prediction from neil mccormick. we will| to kill it. that is the prediction i from neil mccormick. we will tell you how he did, and if he does the
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frog chorus i will be a happy man! great build—up and great trivia. thank you, we will see you later on. that performance will of course be part of the coverage tonight. 10pm is the time that the big act comes on. headlines coming up. good morning and welcome to breakfast with naga munchetty and charlie stayt. our headlines today. protests in cities across the us, as the supreme court removes the constitutional right to abortion. in several states the ban becomes instant,
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and clinics begin to close, borisjohnson remains defiant as backbench conservative mps consider fresh attempts to force him from power. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network begins, with only a fifth of train services expected to run. playing with a new freedom — bairstow says he's gone back to young johnny, as he rescues england from likely collapse with a brilliant century against new zealand in the third test. and it's windy here and fresher out there for all of us this weekend. showers in the west but the southern east will stay dry. more details here on breakfast. it's saturday 25th june. protests have taken place in the us overnight after a supreme court ruling removed american women's constitutional right to abortion. clinics have already started closing in some parts of the country,
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with 13 states triggering bans on abortions immediately, as frances reed reports. protest, from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe v wade is seismic. pro—choice demonstrators say they are horrified that millions will lose their legal right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility, to make abortion unthinkable and illegal throughout our nation. to ensure no woman stands alone in a post—roe america to be the post—roe generation. cheering
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elizabeth made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states are ready as of this minute that abortion access is denied and is illegal, ifeel— pretty numb and pretty angry about that and, truly, i feel a little bit helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws which mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although, the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life is at risk. others are expected to either introduce these new restrictions or resurrect pre—roe bans. and in states where opinions on abortion is a closely on abortions are closely split, the legality of the procedure
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could be determined on an election by election basis or via legal battles. critics of the decision say it's an injustice and, without plans to support those who are pregnant will impact the poorest in society in a country, that, for the most part, has no universal health care or paid family leave. the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult. it's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment, to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. singing # jesus loves the| little children...# but, within the us, this is only the beginning and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feeljustice has finally been served. francis reed, bbc news. thejudgement made by the us supreme court has reignited the debate over abortion which has lasted for decades. our correspondent barbara plett—usher has sent this report from a demonstration
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in washington dc. there have been demonstrations around the country, and they continued into the night here in washington dc. this ruling has really exposed the profound divisions in this country over abortion rights. some states have already started to ban abortions, others will follow. some states are saying they will be safe harbours for women who want abortions. both sides are gearing up for a long and bitter political fight, and security agencies are warning about violence. they say there has been an increase in threats of extremist attacks. this decision to overturn national abortion rights, to overturn roe v wade, was a radical legal move. but it has in no way ended the political fight over abortion. that was barbara plett—usher with that report from washington. president biden will sign new gun safety measures into law later today after legislation was approved by the us house of representatives.
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ia republicans voted with democrats in supporting the measures, which include tougher checks for under—21s buying guns and school security upgrades, but does not ban the sale of assault—style rifles. police in norway say they're treating a shooting that killed two people and left ia others injured as an act of terrorism. the shooting happened overnight in three separate locations, including a gay bar, in the capital city oslo. a suspect has been arrested. oslo's annual pride march was due to be held later today but all events have been cancelled. the prime minister says he will not undergo a "psychological transformation" following two by—election defeats. it comes as some conservative mps
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who are critical of borisjohnson say they want to change the rules on party leadership contests. our political correspondent alex forsyth is in kigali where the prime minister is on a vist. alex — what has he been saying? the focus is not on the visit but on boris johnson's future. he's the focus is not on the visit but on borisjohnson's future. he's been talking after oliver dowden resigned. talking after oliver dowden resiuned. �* . talking after oliver dowden resiuned. �*, ., , . ., talking after oliver dowden resiuned. fl ., , . ., . talking after oliver dowden resiuned. �*, ., , . ., . resigned. it's overshadowed what was meant to be — resigned. it's overshadowed what was meant to be thing _ resigned. it's overshadowed what was meant to be thing about _ resigned. it's overshadowed what was i meant to be thing about commonwealth leaders, the effectiveness about the commonwealth, sustainability, climate change. instead, what everyone is talking about his conservative party dramas. today, borisjohnson conservative party dramas. today, boris johnson gave conservative party dramas. today, borisjohnson gave a series of interviews. he is on the today programme on radio four. he said he humbly and sincerely accepted the criticism he faces but he said he
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won't undergo a psychological transformation. but for some mps the problem is borisjohnson's personality and character. he says he's not gonna change that and not going anywhere. let's hear what he had to say. it’s going anywhere. let's hear what he hadtosa. v going anywhere. let's hear what he hadtosa. �*, ., going anywhere. let's hear what he had to say-— had to say. it's part of my 'ob as leader. when i had to say. it's part of my 'ob as leader. when things fl had to say. it's part of my 'ob as leader. when things are h had to say. it's part of my job as leader. when things are tough, | had to say. it's part of my job as i leader. when things are tough, of course _ leader. when things are tough, of course, people are going to rightly direct— course, people are going to rightly direct their— course, people are going to rightly direct their frustration, their irritation— direct their frustration, their irritation at the government and me. i'm the _ irritation at the government and me. i'm the leader of the government. to be absolutely clear, in the last few months. _ be absolutely clear, in the last few months, people in tiverton and wakefield have had far too much of stuff they— wakefield have had far too much of stuff they didn't want to be hearing about _ stuff they didn't want to be hearing about and — stuff they didn't want to be hearing about and not enough about what we want to _ about and not enough about what we want to do _ about and not enough about what we want to do moving forward. helping people _ want to do moving forward. helping people with a cost of living, our plan _ people with a cost of living, our plan for — people with a cost of living, our plan for a — people with a cost of living, our plan for a stronger economy and making — plan for a stronger economy and making sure that we continue to lead
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the world _ making sure that we continue to lead the world and stand up to russian aggression. he the world and stand up to russian aggression-— the world and stand up to russian an uression. . ., . ~ . aggression. he wanted to talk about the rlobal aggression. he wanted to talk about the global stage. — aggression. he wanted to talk about the global stage, he's _ aggression. he wanted to talk about the global stage, he's off— aggression. he wanted to talk about the global stage, he's off to - the global stage, he's off to meeting of g7 leaders next week but what he can't escape is a domestic troubles are home and interestingly, some of his own backbench mps, notably to his critics are suggesting they might stand for the body that runs the way that confers conservative parties manage. it might try to change the rules which means they could be another vote of confidence in the prime ministers sooner than the year which is currently guaranteed where he is safe. so let's see but you can hear that the prime minister is clearly not going anywhere but he has overcome the problems within his own party. overcome the problems within his own -a . �* overcome the problems within his own -a . . ., _ overcome the problems within his own harry gration, the former presenter of look north in yorkshire, has died suddenly at the age of 71. his career spanned more than a0 years, and saw him front many programmes,
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including the flagship saturday sports programme, grandstand. when he left the bbc in october 2020 he talked about what thejob had meant to him. i think i have always enjoyed when we have just got a good reaction from people. you know, we always say good programmes come with flashy packages and so on, but the truth of the matter is, it is when you talk to the people of yorkshire, who i love very much, you know i am passionate about this place, and i have enjoyed straight talking, as i do here in barnsley tonight, i've had it well and truly, and it is just great. harry gration, who has died at the age of 71. what is thought to be the world's tallest ceramic sculpture is being officially unveiled in st austell in cornwall today. earth goddess stands at around a6 feet high, making it taller than two double decker buses on top of each other. it aims to celebrate the area's connection to china clay but has divided opinion among the locals.
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which way round the double—decker buses, charlie? are they to each other all on top of each other? i think it's the wheels. it's an interesting sculpture. a big thing! i think it looks impressive. i like it. no, no! it's beautiful. let's get the weather. now you can't stop thinking about buses. is it that end, or that end? thinking about buses. is it that end, orthat end? how thinking about buses. is it that end, or that end? how many buses? is that i held her skill to? how many... go on! say it. that's... how
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many... go on! say it. that's... how many double—decker buses make that? probably about three? will you get to the weather now? are there any buses, open top buses? is that the weather we will expect? you'd need to take a waterproof as well. good morning. shall we move on. he sustained at glastonbury but to what to expect there, if you've got friends of family camping out, it could be a day where you see some passing showers. but by the end of the day, most of the showers will fade out. feeling fresh. less of a chance of showers for those heading off for henley for the third test between england and new zealand. we mayjust between england and new zealand. we may just get away with it between england and new zealand. we mayjust get away with it but, again, it feels fresher out there. the reason? low—pressure to the west
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of the uk. getting closer. more rain tomorrow. scattered showers in south—west wales. into scotland, through much of wales, that there will be big gaps between them. eastern areas, staying dry. the north of scotland has lots of sunshine around. northern ireland, outbreaks of rain. the temperatures in these western areas 16—17 c. 20-22 in these western areas 16—17 c. 20—22 around the north of scotland. into the evening and overnight, a few showers around. they will clear and then more by the way of cloud and then more by the way of cloud and other outbreaks of rain spreading into wales. the wind picking up and temperatures around 9-11 c. picking up and temperatures around 9—1! c. tomorrow morning, a bright 9—11 c. tomorrow morning, a bright start, the best of the dry weather.
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a lot more cloud elsewhere but today, a greater chance of rain. wales, north—west england, scotland, northern ireland. it will feel cool here. 22—23 c. northern ireland. it will feel cool here. 22-23 c. 15-16 northern ireland. it will feel cool here. 22—23 c. 15—16 for some in the west. that's partly because there's a lot more cloud around with outbreaks of rain but also the strength of the which will be gusting to around a0—50 mph is. some big waves crashing into the shores of north devon and north cornwall. into the evening, outbreaks of rain. notice many eastern areas finished dry with a lovely sunset to come. through the week, eastern areas staying dry. low pressure dominates towards the west of the country. capital city forecast shows edinburgh, belfast, cardiff, typical of northern western areas, but the
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further south, say london, dry and bright weather. a few showers later on but warmest during the midweek. that is how it is looking. back to you in salford. it's 915. covid infections are continuing to rise in the uk, with the latest data suggesting around 1.7 million people were estimated to have covid last week. we can speak now to dr chris smith and professor linda bauld — who answered our questions on covid throughout the pandemic. good morning. liking your shirt. very lovely. linda, you are looking lovely as well. let's move on before i get into trouble! it feels like the first time in awhile that we talking about covert numbers. flan talking about covert numbers. can ou tell a talking about covert numbers. can you tell a happening? the reason we talking about this is because there are infection surveys with 23% increase up to 17th ofjune. we've
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seen consistent rises over the last few weeks and remember because we've got less testing that's a best population estimate. this is not where we wanted to be in the middle of summer but we've also seen a 23% rise in the number of people in hospital. it's still low. seven and a half thousand now but it's up from 5000 a little while ago. that's no comparison to what we had in april backin comparison to what we had in april back in winter 2021. but the reminder is coronavirus hasn't gone away and we are seeing secondary infections because we're dealing with a slightly different version of omicron which looks like it has a great advantage and we probably know people who have got it or have had it recently at the moment. we are not panicking but obviously, we're watching this very carefully. chris, what's your _ watching this very carefully. chris, what's your thoughts _ watching this very carefully. chris, what's your thoughts on _ watching this very carefully. chris, what's your thoughts on this - watching this very carefully. chris, what's your thoughts on this because there are lots of people who are getting it who aren't testing
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positive buzz it's certainly an increase in numbers, up by 150%. b5 increase in numbers, up by i50%. as linda says, not ideal for this time of year— linda says, not ideal for this time of year but — linda says, not ideal for this time of year but there are factors which would _ of year but there are factors which would explain why this is. we've the escalated _ would explain why this is. we've the escalated with less control measures and we've _ escalated with less control measures and we've had mass gatherings with the jubilee and that was great and everybody enjoyed getting out of about _ everybody enjoyed getting out of about but it afforded a virus and opportunity to spread. we've got these _ opportunity to spread. we've got these variants which are variants and do _ these variants which are variants and do have a transmissibility advantage. they spread better they would _ advantage. they spread better they would appear. so when you add that to the _ would appear. so when you add that to the fact _ would appear. so when you add that to the fact that it's now quite a long _ to the fact that it's now quite a long time _ to the fact that it's now quite a long time since people have had their— long time since people have had their vaccines or boosters of both, as a result — their vaccines or boosters of both, as a result of that, population immunity— as a result of that, population immunity has slipped a bit because that's— immunity has slipped a bit because that's the _ immunity has slipped a bit because that's the nature of the beast. that is what _ that's the nature of the beast. that is what happens and bringing all that together means we're seeing enhanced — that together means we're seeing enhanced cases but these are cases
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with very— enhanced cases but these are cases with very few severe consequences. people _ with very few severe consequences. people mainly have symptoms but thankfully it's not translating into severe _ thankfully it's not translating into severe divvy in the vast majority of cases _ severe divvy in the vast majority of cases -- — severe divvy in the vast majority of cases -- this— severe divvy in the vast majority of cases. —— this time last year when we stared — cases. —— this time last year when we stared freezing down the face because — we stared freezing down the face because of the arrival of delta, we had hundred more in intensive care. this shows — had hundred more in intensive care. this shows us that the vaccines are working _ this shows us that the vaccines are working we — this shows us that the vaccines are workinu. ~ . this shows us that the vaccines are workinu. 2 . ,, . ., . . this shows us that the vaccines are workin. . ., ,, . ., . . . this shows us that the vaccines are workin. . . ,, i ., . . . . working. we had sirjonathan van tam sa inc working. we had sirjonathan van tam sa in: he working. we had sirjonathan van tam saying he doesn't _ working. we had sirjonathan van tam saying he doesn't wear _ working. we had sirjonathan van tam saying he doesn't wear face _ saying he doesn't wear face coverings any more. he said it would depend on the circumstances but he says we've got to learn to frame those risks for ourselves? i think
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absolutely- _ those risks for ourselves? i think absolutely. he _ those risks for ourselves? i think absolutely. he was _ those risks for ourselves? i think absolutely. he was putting - those risks for ourselves? i think i absolutely. he was putting forward his perspective and he said that if he was in a busy crowded, cramped environment then he'd pop a face covering on. i'm looking at the data here. although we are strongly advised to wear one in scotland, 75% are saying they are still wearing one when they encounter people they don't live with outside their home. but this could be down to 29%. you do need to make your own risk assessments and decide what is right for you but when you can see that data, like ons, when you infection levels going up, you can think, i don't want to pick this up. even those at lower risk because it takes them out of education in the workplace i still think we should consider using that as an important all in particular settings like health and social care. we must continue to wear them to protect
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ourselves and others.— continue to wear them to protect ourselves and others. chris, talk to us about monkeypox _ ourselves and others. chris, talk to us about monkeypox because - ourselves and others. chris, talk to us about monkeypox because we i ourselves and others. chris, talk to i us about monkeypox because we were talking about that in those groups who may be vulnerable and where vaccination programme should be introduced. vaccination programme should be introduced-— vaccination programme should be introduced. �* 2, 2, 2, introduced. around the world now in more than 40 _ introduced. around the world now in more than 40 countries, _ introduced. around the world now in more than 40 countries, 2000 - introduced. around the world now in| more than 40 countries, 2000 cases of monkeypox have now been diagnosed and monkeypox is normally a very rare entity~ — and monkeypox is normally a very rare entity. 2000 is more cases than we've _ rare entity. 2000 is more cases than we've seen— rare entity. 2000 is more cases than we've seen in— rare entity. 2000 is more cases than we've seen in decades and outside the geography of where this thing normally— the geography of where this thing normally exists. it's normally endemic, _ normally exists. it's normally endemic, native infection, through small— endemic, native infection, through small animals, endemic, native infection, through smallanimals, rats, squirrels and mice _ smallanimals, rats, squirrels and mice. there's a handful of african countries — mice. there's a handful of african countries where this is an endemic disease _ countries where this is an endemic disease and — countries where this is an endemic disease and when we do pick up cases which _ disease and when we do pick up cases which we _ disease and when we do pick up cases which we rarely do in countries like this then _ which we rarely do in countries like this then usually there is a travel history— this then usually there is a travel history attached to them but from the middle of may we saw a jump and we started _ the middle of may we saw a jump and we started to see cases where no travel _ we started to see cases where no travel history was attached. when we
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investigated 99% of those cases are men and _ investigated 99% of those cases are men and almost all of them are men who are _ men and almost all of them are men who are either gay bisexual. so what we believe _ who are either gay bisexual. so what we believe is going on is that either— we believe is going on is that either the behaviour or past contacts— either the behaviour or past contacts or sexual behaviour, of that group — contacts or sexual behaviour, of that group of people has somehow facilitated that spread of the virus and its _ facilitated that spread of the virus and its lead to it causing outbreaks, notjust in the uk where we had _ outbreaks, notjust in the uk where we had 800 cases but in many other places— we had 800 cases but in many other places around the world. we don't know— places around the world. we don't know exactly what the trigger point was all— know exactly what the trigger point was all went but we think it's probably— was all went but we think it's probably recent and it's probably spreading partly because it's been afforded _ spreading partly because it's been afforded the opportunity to do so within— afforded the opportunity to do so within certain groups of people who need to— within certain groups of people who need to be — within certain groups of people who need to be aware, so sexual health clinics _ need to be aware, so sexual health clinics are — need to be aware, so sexual health clinics are being advised to look out for— clinics are being advised to look out for this, those in the gay community are being advised to look out for— community are being advised to look out for this — community are being advised to look out for this. we don't know what started _ out for this. we don't know what started to — out for this. we don't know what started to spread but one theory is with people travelling, in 1917 we
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stop vaccinating people against smallpox and it's the same group of viruses _ smallpox and it's the same group of viruses and — smallpox and it's the same group of viruses and we can treat that monkeypox with a vaccine that prevents — monkeypox with a vaccine that prevents smallpox i would think that over the _ prevents smallpox i would think that over the past decades, the number of people _ over the past decades, the number of people in— over the past decades, the number of people in the population who are immune — people in the population who are immune to monkeypox has slowly dwindled — immune to monkeypox has slowly dwindled and now we are at a tipping point where there's enough people who are _ point where there's enough people who are susceptible that it's easy for the _ who are susceptible that it's easy for the virus to sustain a transmission chain within the population. we don't know exactly how but _ population. we don't know exactly how but close personal contact is probably— how but close personal contact is probably the root and people cant catch _ probably the root and people cant catch this — probably the root and people cant catch this when they spend long periods — catch this when they spend long periods of time with those with lesions — periods of time with those with lesions. they can be quite subtle but if— lesions. they can be quite subtle but if you — lesions. they can be quite subtle but if you are close to somebody and they get _ but if you are close to somebody and they get onto your skin or clothing or other— they get onto your skin or clothing or other objects, the virus is quite stable _ or other objects, the virus is quite stable you — or other objects, the virus is quite stable you can pick it up from those objects— stable you can pick it up from those objects which can get through your skin. _ objects which can get through your skin. eyes. — objects which can get through your skin, eyes, nose and mouth. people
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need _ skin, eyes, nose and mouth. people need to— skin, eyes, nose and mouth. people need to look— skin, eyes, nose and mouth. people need to look out the same terms. if you binning — need to look out the same terms. if you binning pass contact with someone _ you binning pass contact with someone who's had it or been in close _ someone who's had it or been in close contact with someone who has had it _ close contact with someone who has had it then _ close contact with someone who has had it then you could catch it. you -et had it then you could catch it. you get bumps — had it then you could catch it. you get bumps on your neck and under the arms _ get bumps on your neck and under the arms it _ get bumps on your neck and under the arms it also _ get bumps on your neck and under the arms. it also causes muscle weakness. people then get the symptoms of the best is if they are going _ symptoms of the best is if they are going to _ symptoms of the best is if they are going to if— symptoms of the best is if they are going to. if you get those symptoms, please _ going to. if you get those symptoms, please call— going to. if you get those symptoms, please call for help and do please make _ please call for help and do please make sure — please call for help and do please make sure you don't go mix with other— make sure you don't go mix with other people until you've had a proper— other people until you've had a proper diagnosis. it could be chickenpox or shingles so we want to rule those _ chickenpox or shingles so we want to rule those things out too.— rule those things out too. linda, if we were going _ rule those things out too. linda, if we were going to _ rule those things out too. linda, if we were going to pick— rule those things out too. linda, if we were going to pick a _ rule those things out too. linda, if we were going to pick a topic - rule those things out too. linda, if we were going to pick a topic this. we were going to pick a topic this week that people are talking about, a condition of some kind, a problem would be hay fever i'm thinking. any thoughts for thus because it's really debilitating when it kicks in and anecdotally, hearing people being elected for the first time? . there's a number of things going on
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over previous years. we could go outside it when we had it of restriction during a pandemic that people weren't interacting in the same way. they went travelling or encountering on —— they were not encountering on —— they were not encountering pollen in the same way. as you say, hay fever is very common but if people haven't experienced the same severity then it can be coming back. cold flues. there's a real sign that a flu season at the moment. hay fever is something we have to manage every year. those who have to manage every year. those who haveit have to manage every year. those who have it will know what works for them. there's a lot of effective we talked about one that had a shortage but i understand that has been resolved. people should try their best to manage it and get through this period and keep an eye on the pollen
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this period and keep an eye on the pouenindex this period and keep an eye on the pollen index and think about the weather on what you will be exposed to. it's a reminder to all of us when we talking about people, monkeypox that is affecting a few people, coronavirus which is affecting many people. i know there are many people, even though men join the better weather, that this is a tricky time of year and they hoping to get through this summer and manage their hay fever symptoms. linda, you may remember around this time last year that chris invited you for a tractor ride. [30 time last year that chris invited you for a tractor ride.— you for a tractor ride. do you remember? _ you for a tractor ride. do you remember? i— you for a tractor ride. do you remember? i do _ you for a tractor ride. do you remember? i do remember. | you for a tractor ride. do you | remember? i do remember. i you for a tractor ride. do you _ remember? i do remember. i remember the video of chris on the tractor which is hard to forget! did the video of chris on the tractor which is hard to forget!- which is hard to forget! did you ever take him _ which is hard to forget! did you ever take him up _ which is hard to forget! did you ever take him up on _ which is hard to forget! did you ever take him up on his - which is hard to forget! did you ever take him up on his offer? | which is hard to forget! did you i ever take him up on his offer? no, no, i ever take him up on his offer? no, no. i haven't- _ ever take him up on his offer? no, no, i haven't. is— ever take him up on his offer? no, no, i haven't. is there _ ever take him up on his offer? iirr. no, i haven't. is there another of the coming? irate no, i haven't. is there another of the coming?— the coming? we will have to ask chfis? the coming? we will have to ask chris? chris? _ the coming? we will have to ask chris? chris? linda, _ the coming? we will have to ask chris? chris? linda, are - the coming? we will have to ask chris? chris? linda, are you - the coming? we will have to ask- chris? chris? linda, are you coming? we are going — chris? chris? linda, are you coming? we are going to _ chris? chris? linda, are you coming? we are going to do — chris? chris? linda, are you coming? we are going to do it _ chris? chris? linda, are you coming? we are going to do it again _ chris? chris? linda, are you coming? we are going to do it again tomorrow| we are going to do it again tomorrow and i got _ we are going to do it again tomorrow and i got the tractor and trailer,
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so across— and i got the tractor and trailer, so across cambridgeshire were going to have _ so across cambridgeshire were going to have and — so across cambridgeshire were going to have and vintage tractors trundling through many villages so we would — trundling through many villages so we would love you to come. if you want _ we would love you to come. if you want to _ we would love you to come. if you want to be — we would love you to come. if you want to be in my party trailer behind — want to be in my party trailer behind this tractor it's going to be fantastic — behind this tractor it's going to be fantastic. average age about 10,000, that the _ fantastic. average age about 10,000, that the drivers of the tractors! no, that the drivers of the tractors! no. i'm — that the drivers of the tractors! no, i'm kidding! we going to coalesce _ no, i'm kidding! we going to coalesce on the fabulous village of barrington which has got a beautiful village _ barrington which has got a beautiful village green so if anyone wants to come _ village green so if anyone wants to come on _ village green so if anyone wants to come on c5. it will be from 11:30am. charity— come on c5. it will be from 11:30am. charity tractor run. there's room on the straw— charity tractor run. there's room on the straw bale in the trailer if you want _ the straw bale in the trailer if you want to— the straw bale in the trailer if you want to come and join us. i�*m the straw bale in the trailer if you want to come and join us. want to come and 'oin us. i'm going to send your — want to come and join us. i'm going to send your video _ want to come and join us. i'm going to send your video message. - want to come and join us. i'm going to send your video message. it's i want to come and join us. i'm going | to send your video message. it's my parents—in—law 65th wedding anniversary tomorrow. an astonishing 65 years. congratulations to them. i think i could send flowers or a video message to wish you all the
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best but hope that is a brilliant success and you make the most of the day. success and you make the most of the da . �* . 2. success and you make the most of the da . �* , . , success and you make the most of the da. �*, . , success and you make the most of the da. i,, ., success and you make the most of the da. i ., . day. it's a very good excuse, linda. i'm looking — day. it's a very good excuse, linda. i'm looking forward _ day. it's a very good excuse, linda. i'm looking forward to _ day. it's a very good excuse, linda. i'm looking forward to it. _ day. it's a very good excuse, linda. i'm looking forward to it. i'll - day. it's a very good excuse, linda. i'm looking forward to it. i'll let - i'm looking forward to it. i'll let take aet i'm looking forward to it. i'll let take get away _ i'm looking forward to it. i'll let take get away with _ i'm looking forward to it. i'll let take get away with that - i'm looking forward to it. i'll let take get away with that one! i i'm looking forward to it. i'll let - take get away with that one! chris, enjoy your tractor ride. linda, happy anniversary to the in—laws. one way to dodge that! i do know about the tractor thing. chris loves his tractors. a blue tractor. we've got a video of it here, as well. all for charity. at10am, we are at 10am, we are away. i've lost them. so, matt will pick up when his team. you've had some fantastic guests recently.— team. you've had some fantastic guests recently. who have you got toda ? guests recently. who have you got today? today _ guests recently. who have you got today? today with _ guests recently. who have you got today? today with got _ guests recently. who have you got today? today with got two - guests recently. who have you got today? today with got two special| today? today with got two special guests, the husband and wife team
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around never have i ever pod cast. how are you? i'm excited about the tractor— how are you? i'm excited about the tractor rally~ — how are you? i'm excited about the tractor rally. i'm from the west country— tractor rally. i'm from the west country so _ tractor rally. i'm from the west country so it's right up my street. we are _ country so it's right up my street. we are going to talk about your pod cast later which is essentially all the fun things in life on one pod cast. . �* . ' the fun things in life on one pod cast. . �* , ' i 2, the fun things in life on one pod cast. ,~ , . �* cast. yes. all the stuff you haven't done. a bucket _ cast. yes. all the stuff you haven't done. a bucket list _ cast. yes. all the stuff you haven't done. a bucket list pod _ done. a bucket list pod cast to keep ou bus . done. a bucket list pod cast to keep you busy- we're _ done. a bucket list pod cast to keep you busy. we're doing _ done. a bucket list pod cast to keep you busy. we're doing things - done. a bucket list pod cast to keep. you busy. we're doing things weakly, thins you busy. we're doing things weakly, things we've — you busy. we're doing things weakly, things we've never _ you busy. we're doing things weakly, things we've never done _ you busy. we're doing things weakly, things we've never done before. - things we've never done before. taking _ things we've never done before. taking listeners' suggestions. it's keeping _ taking listeners' suggestions. it's keeping us business and it's varied. we will— keeping us business and it's varied. we will talk— keeping us business and it's varied. we will talk about that later on. it happens rather fortunately, food wise, you both like the same things in that married couple way! we
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wise, you both like the same things in that married couple way!- in that married couple way! we 'ust love each other fl in that married couple way! we 'ust love each other so i in that married couple way! we 'ust love each other so much! i in that married couple way! we 'ust love each other so much! we h in that married couple way! we just love each other so much! we both | love each other so much! we both love each other so much! we both love cheesecake. _ love each other so much! we both love cheesecake. what _ love each other so much! we both love cheesecake. what do - love each other so much! we both love cheesecake. what do we - love each other so much! we both | love cheesecake. what do we hate rawns love cheesecake. what do we hate prawns and _ love cheesecake. what do we hate prawns and mushrooms! _ love cheesecake. what do we hate prawns and mushrooms! you - love cheesecake. what do we hate prawns and mushrooms! you got i love cheesecake. what do we hate j prawns and mushrooms! you got a brunch dish _ prawns and mushrooms! you got a brunch dish for _ prawns and mushrooms! you got a brunch dish for us _ prawns and mushrooms! you got a brunch dish for us haven't - prawns and mushrooms! you got a brunch dish for us haven't you? i brunch dish for us haven't you? smoked muscle and smoked haddock. —— smoked mackerel. smoked muscle and smoked haddock. -- smoked mackerel.— smoked mackerel. you'll be happy to hear no prawns- _ smoked mackerel. you'll be happy to hear no prawns. it's _ smoked mackerel. you'll be happy to hear no prawns. it's salmon - smoked mackerel. you'll be happy to hear no prawns. it's salmon with - hear no prawns. it's salmon with green _ hear no prawns. it's salmon with green chutney confit. it�*s hear no prawns. it's salmon with green chutney confit.— green chutney confit. it's like ou're green chutney confit. it's like you're accusing _ green chutney confit. it's like you're accusing me _ green chutney confit. it's like you're accusing me or - green chutney confit. it's like you're accusing me or taking| green chutney confit. it's like | you're accusing me or taking i green chutney confit. it's like - you're accusing me or taking i have bargained galore. i you're accusing me or taking i have bargained galore.— bargained galore. i don't know i'm shoutinu! bargained galore. i don't know i'm shouting! l'm _ bargained galore. i don't know i'm shouting! i'm doing _ bargained galore. i don't know i'm shouting! i'm doing a _ bargained galore. i don't know i'm
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shouting! i'm doing a you! - bargained galore. i don't know i'm shouting! i'm doing a you! this i bargained galore. i don't know i'm shouting! i'm doing a you! this is| bargained galore. i don't know i'm| shouting! i'm doing a you! this is a fiver— shouting! i'm doing a you! this is a fiver and _ shouting! i'm doing a you! this is a fiver and taste amazing. i got a real surprise from germany and depending on which way it goes, heaven— depending on which way it goes, heaven or— depending on which way it goes, heaven or hell, i have something that will— heaven or hell, i have something that will rock your world. i'm very excited _ that will rock your world. i'm very excited about seeing your face when you taste _ excited about seeing your face when you taste it. excited about seeing your face when you taste it— you taste it. next week, i'm away and ollie is _ you taste it. next week, i'm away and ollie is going _ you taste it. next week, i'm away and ollie is going to _ you taste it. next week, i'm away and ollie is going to take - you taste it. next week, i'm away and ollie is going to take over. i and ollie is going to take over. he's about this segment. how you guys are going to throw to him. i going to put him on the spot? share going to put him on the spot? are ou aoian going to put him on the spot? are you going to be nice? ollie, you know we are always lovely. i’gre know we are always lovely. i've alwa s know we are always lovely. i've always felt _ know we are always lovely. i've always felt you _ know we are always lovely. i've always felt you are _ know we are always lovely. i've always felt you are extensively and i'm glad _ always felt you are extensively and i'm glad to — always felt you are extensively and i'm glad to have the reassurance. ollie _ i'm glad to have the reassurance. ollie just — i'm glad to have the reassurance. ollie just looks so worried, even as he was trying to reassure himself. inside your own head everything is ok. it will be fine. absolutely
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fine. can i see your cocktail — tasting face? fine. can i see your cocktail - tasting face?— fine. can i see your cocktail - tasting face? fine. can i see your cocktail - - tasting face?_ sean tasting face? mine or matt's? sean conne ! tasting face? mine or matt's? sean connery! lt's _ tasting face? mine or matt's? sean connery! it's like _ tasting face? mine or matt's? sean connery! it's like 1970s... - tasting face? mine or matt's? sean connery! it's like 1970s... see- tasting face? mine or matt's? sean connery! it's like 1970s... see you| connery! it's like 1970s... see you later. plenty coming up in the next three minutes. plenty coming up in the next few minutes. a this is breakfast.
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massive protests have swept across the us in response to the supreme court decision to overturn the constitutional right to abortion. 13 states had trigger laws in place, meaning they could ban abortion straight away once the ruling was made. tennessee is one of those states, and our correspondent rianna croxford reports from the city of nashville. it is the hen party capital of america. women celebrating their final night of freedom, as they lose the right to another. how did you feel when you heard about this? sick to my stomach. i hate to hear it. it is disturbing. and really unfortunate. it will impact everybody, more than they know. i personally believe that human life begins at conception.
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it gives a right - over a woman's body. they don't get to make that decision for us. i cheering but, as one half of the city continues to party, the other begins to protest. like, would you not need women injail, for, you know what i mean? abortion? it has set us back 50 years. and they are scenes that will echo in more than 100 cities across the us. as abortion is no longer a constitutional right, but in the power of individual states. here in tennessee, it is one of 13 states that will make it impossible for women to have abortions, even in the most severe of circumstances. a battle that has, for decades, divided america, is now being fought out across state lines. doctor katrina green works in emergency care in nashville, and says ending abortion here will lead to heartache. the only exception we have in this state, when our law takes effect,
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is for the life of the mother. there is no exceptions for foetal abnormalities, rape or incest. and the impact will be felt across the country. millions of women in america will go to bed tonight without access to the health care and reproductive care that they had this morning. i am personally thrilled, and what i feel this really is, is a moment for us to get behind women and just start, really, in those states, now, some states have trigger laws, and abortion will be outlawed, and some states will still have abortion through nine months. as one side of the abortion debate went to sleep rejoicing... cheering angry chanting ..many in tennessee mourned the end of 50 years of reproductive rights,
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and march towards an uncertain future. rianna croxted, bbc news, nashville. we'rejoined now by donna jackson, a senior lecturer in american history at the university of chester. good morning to you. first of all so that people understand how this works in practice in the us, there is now is essentially about geography. where you live and what the state you are in the sights. absolutely, good morning to you both. the american system is fed so congress can make some laws that affect the nation as a whole but in other areas it is down to individual states to decide what is legal or not in that state. until yesterday, states will not allow to restrict abortion in the first trimester, the first three months, now they are. and some already have, of course. supposing, donna, i and some already have, of course. supposing, donna, lam and some already have, of course. supposing, donna, i am a woman who is in one of these 13 states that have already passed these trigger laws, which means, literally, as a
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judgment came out, abortion was illegal. if i am in one of those places, and i want, i need, to have an abortion, what am i allowed to do? 2 . an abortion, what am i allowed to do? 2 , . . an abortion, what am i allowed to do?2 , . . ., do? well, depending again on state law. states could _ do? well, depending again on state law. states could pass _ do? well, depending again on state law. states could pass laws - law. states could pass laws prohibiting pregnant women from travelling and that is assuming that any pregnant woman can afford to travel. these sort of laws attack women. this is not about the unborn child. this is an attack on women and it will affect poor women, disadvantaged women, the most. if you like, the people that society should be taking care of, they are the ones that are going to suffer the ones that are going to suffer the most. and bear in mind, as some of your other people have said, this is the extreme thing from the right wing of the republican party. they don't want to pass laws providing free health care. once the woman becomes pregnant she is on her own. they are not doing anything to help that unborn child. they are leaving the woman alone. theyjust want to prevent the right to seek an
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abortion, and basically, to tell women what they can do with their own body, in the first three months, so it is government interfering in an incredibly personal, private area, and much of the debate isn't about wanting to kill babies. it is not about that. it is about the right of women to choose what happens in their lives and do their own bodies. this is an absolute attack on women. the own bodies. this is an absolute attack on women.— own bodies. this is an absolute attack on women. the reality is that aeneration attack on women. the reality is that generation now _ attack on women. the reality is that generation now of _ attack on women. the reality is that generation now of women _ attack on women. the reality is that generation now of women have - attack on women. the reality is that i generation now of women have grown up generation now of women have grown up with the right to have an abortion. so it is radically changing, in the 20s, 30s, a0s, these are people who have grown up with that being a norm. lltlul’ith these are people who have grown up with that being a norm.— these are people who have grown up with that being a norm. with the roe decision it was _ with that being a norm. with the roe decision it was not _ with that being a norm. with the roe decision it was not an _ with that being a norm. with the roe decision it was not an unlimited - decision it was not an unlimited right. after three months all of the states could pass laws limiting abortion in some way. so there has always been qualifications to that right, and many of them rightly so, for example say you can only have an
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abortion in a hospital or clinic with qualified professionals, perfectly reasonable laws, but it is that first three months, that the time of choice were, especially if you're a victim of rape or incest, or of that there is a scandal which shows that child cannot survive, it is there is women —— there is a scan which shows. even those who may have made a mistake or whatever. it is society saying to them that you have to live with that mistake and we will not help you. you're on your own, and punishing women, not incidentally punishing the men who got them pregnant but punishing the women. this is absolutely as i said an attack on women, and taking their personal right, society saying to women, you're not capable of making a decision for yourself. it is downgrading the status of women. what we have seen in some of the protest is some of those who object to this latest decision. to what extent, donna, what are the numbers
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around the people who approve of this decision, who approve of the ban on abortion is micro—because this is a significant chunk of american society that is of that opinion, there is a significant number. just give me a sense of that. . , number. just give me a sense of that. , i , , i ., that. interestingly, because they do o-inion that. interestingly, because they do opinion polls _ that. interestingly, because they do opinion polls on _ that. interestingly, because they do opinion polls on this _ that. interestingly, because they do opinion polls on this constantly, - opinion polls on this constantly, this is a conservative estimate. those who are pro—life is about 35% stops some polls have it down as low as 25%. so the majority of people in america, and women, support basically the roe decision, so the right to seek an abortion should be there, it is a women's right even if there, it is a women's right even if there are some limitations on that right depending on how far advanced a pregnancy is and things like that, or rape or incest, the only exception is to protect the life of the mother, now, but that is because again the extreme right wing want those women to survive so that they can have more children. the pro—life
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argument is connected to the idea of where a woman should be, where they contribute to society. the idea that a woman's places in the home is still very much alive and well the certain people in america. but it is between 25—35%. if there was a national referendum, the pro—choice argument, apportioned with limitations as appropriate, would win. but, they are not represented on the supreme court. it is the supreme court that has made this decision. six people deciding the lives of millions.— lives of millions. donna jackson, thank you _ lives of millions. donna jackson, thank you very — lives of millions. donna jackson, thank you very much, _ lives of millions. donna jackson, thank you very much, senior- lives of millions. donna jackson, - thank you very much, senior lecturer in american history at the university of chester. taking us through the numbers and the way that decision works out in america, from the supreme court. sarah has all of the supreme court. sarah has all of the sport. and he is a very happy man. he is a little rejuvenated under the new england captain ben
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stokes. he saved their skin yesterday. we are going to see what unfolds today. it is such a roller—coaster watching england test cricket at the moment. but will we have —— we will have play starting in the third test between england and new zealand at headingley at 11 o'clock, finely poised after this dramatic fightback from england with the bat dramatic fightback from england with the hat on day dramatic fightback from england with the baton day two. england found themselves in all manner of trouble early in their innings as a brilliant spell of bowling from trent boult and tim southee ripped their top order to pieces. but debutant jamie overton struck a brilliant half century as he ended the day unbeaten just 11 shy of a maiden test hundred. you may get the later today. the star of the day, however, was johnny bairstow who struck a second successive test century... england will start
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day three on 26a—6 — 65 runs behind the kiwis. the roller—coaster keeps going. family and friends here on the western terrace. fantastic atmosphere last week. this place holds a special place in my heart. it is quite raucous at times over there. but it has been great craic from the people here. and it was up and down, wasn't it? england's women stepped up their preparations for the euros with an empathic 5—1win over the nation who won the competition last time out. the netherlands were european champions back in 2017 when they were coached by england's current boss serina wiegman, and though the lionesses needed a bit of luck to draw level, once they went ahead they were in control. two goals for beth mead made it a comfortable night at elland road, with 11 days now until the finals start.
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and one more warm up game. meanwhile, scotland were in world cup qualifying action, they beat ukraine 4—0 to close in on the 2nd place spot in group b, which would earn them a play—off place. wayne rooney has quit his firstjob in management. he's left league one derby county saying they need to led by someone with "fresh energy". despite relegation from the championship, rooney's been a popularfigure — staying with the club through huge financial uncertainty. derby do look to have found a new local buyer now and the administrators said they asked rooney to stay, but he has left pride park with immediate effect. and finally to golf as the women are in major action at the pga championship — south korea's in gee chun is the runaway leader — 6 shots clear of the field on 11 under. easy for her, less so for rory mcilroy however.
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a quadruple bogey in his second round at the travellers championship. the world number two's first tee shot went out of bounds, his second found the rough. from there, he skewed the next shot into the bunker by the green. no recovery yet. he went over the green, then duffed his chip, rolled his seventh shot past the hole before tapping in for an eight. he chipped into the water a few holes later and despite all that — still finished the round level par! 6 off the lead. we have all been there! thank you very much. we can bring you right up to date. it is 9:45am. many people this week have been affected by rail strikes. as the national rail strikes enter another day, passengers across britain are being told to prepare for travel disruption this weekend. this is the third and final day
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of planned strike action, with thousands of rmt union workers walking out to protest pay and work conditions, with no agreement yet in place to stop further action later in the year. only a fifth of services are operating, and passengers are being urged not to travel unless it is absolutely necessary. services that are running will be restricted, and will finish at 6.30 this evening. there will be no trains running to smaller stations and in coastal areas, and sporting and music events are expected to be impacted. our reporter katie barnfield is in blackpool for us this morning, on the promenade. and many people would have wanted to be there despite the breeze, but for the travel disruption.— be there despite the breeze, but for the travel disruption. welcome back to this beautiful _ the travel disruption. welcome back to this beautiful day _ the travel disruption. welcome back to this beautiful day on _ the travel disruption. welcome back to this beautiful day on blackpool i to this beautiful day on blackpool promenade. what a lovely day to come
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out for a day out. but that is going to be impacted by these rail strikes, the third strike now as you say this week. blackpool is one of those seaside towns that is completely cut off today. there will be no rail services running here at all. on a normaljune weekend they would expect 25,000 people to come here by train. so of course that could have a big impact on businesses. what about weekend travellers? the people coming here and staying over? people staying in hotels and bed and breakfast, things like that. we are at queens mansions on the promenade, a group of self catering apartments. 12 apartments. have a look at this beautiful kitchen. this is what you get when you are staying here. a couple of bedrooms and the use of a shared kitchen. we will have a bit more of a chat about what this is going to mean. i am joined a chat about what this is going to mean. iamjoined by a chat about what this is going to mean. i am joined by nick, a chat about what this is going to mean. iamjoined by nick, who a chat about what this is going to mean. i am joined by nick, who is the owner. how are you? 156i"?
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mean. i amjoined by nick, who is the owner. how are you? very well. just tell me — the owner. how are you? very well. just tell me about _ the owner. how are you? very well. just tell me about your _ the owner. how are you? very well. just tell me about your business. i just tell me about your business. the kind of people you normally get visiting. fiat the kind of people you normally get visitina. �* . the kind of people you normally get visitina. . , . ., , the kind of people you normally get visitina. �* , .., , ., visiting. at this time coming up to the end ofjune — visiting. at this time coming up to the end ofjune was _ visiting. at this time coming up to the end ofjune was in _ visiting. at this time coming up to the end ofjune was in the - visiting. at this time coming up to the end ofjune was in the olden i the end ofjune was in the olden days— the end ofjune was in the olden days when— the end ofjune was in the olden days when you got more old—age pensioners coming back now it is different. — pensioners coming back now it is different, times have changed. unusually this time of year, today we have _ unusually this time of year, today we have nine lots coming in. there is only— we have nine lots coming in. there is only test— we have nine lots coming in. there is only test match, some coming in tomorrow — is only test match, some coming in tomorrow. so, the trains hasn't affected — tomorrow. so, the trains hasn't affected us, touch wood. and if they are local— affected us, touch wood. and if they are local to— affected us, touch wood. and if they are local to lancashire i will pick them _ are local to lancashire i will pick them up — are local to lancashire i will pick them up because people have been through— them up because people have been through a _ them up because people have been through a lot in the last couple of years _ through a lot in the last couple of years it — through a lot in the last couple of years it is — through a lot in the last couple of years. it is all regular custom so i will go _ years. it is all regular custom so i will go out — years. it is all regular custom so i will go out and bring them in. they have _ will go out and bring them in. they have looked after me, i will look after _ have looked after me, i will look after them. have looked after me, i will look after them-— have looked after me, i will look after them. ., . , after them. you will drive and pick customers — after them. you will drive and pick customers up _ after them. you will drive and pick customers up you _ after them. you will drive and pick customers up you can _ after them. you will drive and pick customers up you can get - after them. you will drive and pick customers up you can get you - after them. you will drive and pick- customers up you can get you because of the strikes 's i customers up you can get you because of the strikes '— of the strikes 's i would, we are a family business, _ of the strikes 's i would, we are a family business, we _ of the strikes 's i would, we are a family business, we are - of the strikes 's i would, we are a family business, we are not - of the strikes 's i would, we are a family business, we are not a - of the strikes 's i would, we are a
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family business, we are not a big| family business, we are not a big conglomerate. we have 18 holiday apartments. we have staff to keep as well. apartments. we have staff to keep as well no— apartments. we have staff to keep as well. no money, nojobs, really. they— well. no money, nojobs, really. they have — well. no money, nojobs, really. they have looked after me over the years _ they have looked after me over the years so _ they have looked after me over the years. so loyalty to me is everything. years. so loyalty to me is everything-— years. so loyalty to me is eve him. 2, . ., ,. everything. you are not expecting too much of _ everything. you are not expecting too much of an _ everything. you are not expecting too much of an impact _ everything. you are not expecting too much of an impact so - everything. you are not expecting too much of an impact so some i everything. you are not expecting i too much of an impact so some good news from nick. it is a mixed picture with businesses. some of the businesses that rely on the day trade, fish and chip shops, pubs and cafes, some have seen takings down 60% this week so it has a big impact on them and in terms of future strikes the rmt and the rail operating companies haven't yet reached agreement. talks are ongoing. they are not ruling out future strikes into the summer. that could have a bigger impact, as more tourists try to get away to destinations like this. thank you for that. the _ destinations like this. thank you for that. the advice _ destinations like this. thank you for that. the advice as _ destinations like this. thank you for that. the advice as always i destinations like this. thank you for that. the advice as always is| destinations like this. thank you i for that. the advice as always is to check carefully before you travel and look at the time tables but clearly, there will be disruption
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today. as there was for many who are going to glastonbury. now they are there and enjoying it. american singer billie eilish made history last night becoming the youngest person to headline glastonbury festival. the 20—year old from los angeles was also the first artist to headline the festival's pyramid stage since it returned after its three year break. a warning, there are some flashing images coming up. cheering # what do you want from me, what are you wondering, # what do you know? # why aren't you scared of me, why do you care for me? # when we all fall asleep, where do we go? incredible! top tier, top notch! youngest headliner ever! # today i'm picking apart the things that... # the way i'm taking you down...
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it was incredible. what was so good about it? it was just the atmosphere in everything, she isjust so good with interacting with the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional. yeah, i wasjust screaming my heart out. # step on the glass, staple your tongue... came to see robert plant hours ago and i got stuck and couldn't get- out, that is what happened. and you end up seeing billie eilish. and loving her, iam in love. converted. # i want to end me! cheering and applause that was the performance last night with what i think we can bring up now. it is getting busy. people are milling around. that is actually raindrops on the loan —— on the camera lens. matt did one is that
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there would be showers throughout there would be showers throughout the country today. colin patterson is there. of course paul mccartney playing live. going to be quite an occasion. �* . 2 playing live. going to be quite an occasion. . , . . , playing live. going to be quite an occasion. . , . ., , ., occasion. and since we last spoke to was a torrential _ occasion. and since we last spoke to was a torrential downpour. - occasion. and since we last spoke to was a torrential downpour. my - occasion. and since we last spoke to l was a torrential downpour. my anorak was a torrential downpour. my anorak was out for the first time this glastonbury. it is off again now. billy ellis played the main stage last night. this evening it is paul mccartney, who will be the oldest ever headline, after billy elise being the youngest ever headliner and someone who will be on the stage before paul mccartney playing at 1:50pm, joy crooks, thank you for joining us on the morning you are playing the pyramid stage. you watched that billie eilish set last night, how was it being in a crowd knowing you are going up there the next day? knowing you are going up there the next da ? 22 2. 2 ~ 2, knowing you are going up there the next da ? 22 . . ,, ., , next day? quite nerve-racking to be honest. it next day? quite nerve-racking to be honest- it was _ next day? quite nerve-racking to be honest. it was beautiful _ next day? quite nerve-racking to be honest. it was beautiful to _ next day? quite nerve-racking to be honest. it was beautiful to watch - honest. it was beautiful to watch her set~ — honest. it was beautiful to watch her set i— honest. it was beautiful to watch her set. i was thinking about being on the _ her set. i was thinking about being on the same stage and it made me
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feel funny— on the same stage and it made me feel funny in my belly. how on the same stage and it made me feel funny in my belly. feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sian feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out — feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out of _ feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out of ten, _ feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out of ten, 12! _ feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out of ten, 12! word - feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out of ten, 12! word to - feelfunny in my belly. how nervous 's sign out of ten, 12! word to the i 's sign out of ten, 12! word to the acts stay, you have gone for hard core. i acts stay, you have gone for hard core. 2. 2. acts stay, you have gone for hard core. . . ., . core. i have a glorified tent with a lock on it called _ core. i have a glorified tent with a lock on it called a _ core. i have a glorified tent with a lock on it called a yurt. _ core. i have a glorified tent with a lock on it called a yurt. it - core. i have a glorified tent with a lock on it called a yurt. it makes i lock on it called a yurt. it makes me feel— lock on it called a yurt. it makes me feel warm and safe. i am sharing it with _ me feel warm and safe. i am sharing it with my— me feel warm and safe. i am sharing it with my two friends who sleep, my uncles. _ it with my two friends who sleep, my uncles. they— it with my two friends who sleep, my uncles, they wake me up with their snoring _ uncles, they wake me up with their snoring at — uncles, they wake me up with their snoring at 6am. i have made a big mistake! — snoring at 6am. i have made a big mistake! 2, 2, �* snoring at 6am. i have made a big mistake! ., ., �* ~ . , mistake! you got the brit awards nominations. _ mistake! you got the brit awards nominations, your _ mistake! you got the brit awards nominations, your album - mistake! you got the brit awards nominations, your album went - mistake! you got the brit awards | nominations, your album went top ten. how much does it mean to you to be playing the pyramid stage on the same day that paul mccartney is headlining? it same day that paul mccartney is headlining?— same day that paul mccartney is headlinina? 2, , ., .~ . headlining? it does not make much sense in my — headlining? it does not make much sense in my head _ headlining? it does not make much sense in my head which _ headlining? it does not make much sense in my head which is - headlining? it does not make much sense in my head which is why - headlining? it does not make much sense in my head which is why i - headlining? it does not make muchj sense in my head which is why i am 12 out— sense in my head which is why i am 12 out of— sense in my head which is why i am 12 out of ten— sense in my head which is why i am 12 out of ten nervous, but i thought i was _ 12 out of ten nervous, but i thought i was hung — 12 out of ten nervous, but i thought i was hung over, but it is an
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amalgamation of nerves and hangover, and it— amalgamation of nerves and hangover, and it is— amalgamation of nerves and hangover, and it is an _ amalgamation of nerves and hangover, and it is an incredible opportunity. i am _ and it is an incredible opportunity. i am very— and it is an incredible opportunity. i am very grateful. and i hope people — i am very grateful. and i hope people will turn up. that would be really _ people will turn up. that would be really nice! — people will turn up. that would be really nice! did people will turn up. that would be really nice!— really nice! did you go to a party last niaht really nice! did you go to a party last night 's _ really nice! did you go to a party last night 's l — really nice! did you go to a party last night 's i was _ really nice! did you go to a party last night 's i was waiting - really nice! did you go to a party last night 's i was waiting at - really nice! did you go to a party last night 's i was waiting at the | last night 's i was waiting at the pedestrian gate until 3am, waiting for them to arrive, but they had snacks, so i was happy. 3am, before playing the pyramid stage, shouldn't you be lying in bed with cucumber over your eyes? i you be lying in bed with cucumber over your eyes?— you be lying in bed with cucumber over oure es? ., . over your eyes? i saw someone eating a full english- _ over your eyes? i saw someone eating a full english- i— over your eyes? i saw someone eating a full english. i have _ over your eyes? i saw someone eating a full english. i have had _ over your eyes? i saw someone eating a full english. i have had a _ over your eyes? i saw someone eating a full english. i have had a full - a full english. i have had a full english. — a full english. i have had a full english. i_ a full english. i have had a full english, i am all right. the music is eclectic here _ english, i am all right. the music is eclectic here from _ english, i am all right. the music is eclectic here from around - english, i am all right. the music is eclectic here from around the i is eclectic here from around the world. you got the musical education in your diet�*s car on the way to dance class, what would he play? he would play everything from king tubby. — would play everything from king tubby, and we have been listening
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recently— tubby, and we have been listening recently to— tubby, and we have been listening recently to fontaines dc, king tubby. — recently to fontaines dc, king tubby, gregory isaacs, the clash, nina _ tubby, gregory isaacs, the clash, nina simone. will tubby, gregory isaacs, the clash, nina simone-— nina simone. will irish dancing feature in _ nina simone. will irish dancing feature in the _ nina simone. will irish dancing feature in the set? _ nina simone. will irish dancing feature in the set? i _ nina simone. will irish dancing feature in the set? i will - nina simone. will irish dancing feature in the set? i will not i nina simone. will irish dancingj feature in the set? i will not go nina simone. will irish dancing i feature in the set? i will not go to irish dance _ feature in the set? i will not go to irish dance in _ feature in the set? i will not go to irish dance in my _ feature in the set? i will not go to irish dance in my set, _ feature in the set? i will not go to irish dance in my set, ever! - feature in the set? i will not go to irish dance in my set, ever! this i feature in the set? i will not go to| irish dance in my set, ever! this is roisin murphy. — irish dance in my set, ever! this is roisin murphy, give _ irish dance in my set, ever! this is roisin murphy, give us— irish dance in my set, ever! this is roisin murphy, give us a _ roisin murphy, give us a demonstration, we can have an irish dance off. this is your fourth time playing at glastonbury, first of all with your group, moloko, and we heard from joy crooks up until 3am parting before playing the pyramid stage. i parting before playing the pyramid staae. 2 2. parting before playing the pyramid staae. u, ., i parting before playing the pyramid stare. . i parting before playing the pyramid staae. . i . stage. i came here and my boss and went to bed — stage. i came here and my boss and went to bed last _ stage. i came here and my boss and went to bed last night. _ stage. i came here and my boss and went to bed last night. you - stage. i came here and my boss and went to bed last night. you did - stage. i came here and my boss and went to bed last night. you did not i went to bed last night. you did not do the cucumbers? _ went to bed last night. you did not do the cucumbers? i _ went to bed last night. you did not do the cucumbers? i kind - went to bed last night. you did not do the cucumbers? i kind of - went to bed last night. you did not do the cucumbers? i kind of did, i do the cucumbers? i kind of did, es. you do the cucumbers? i kind of did, yes- you are _ do the cucumbers? i kind of did, yes. you are on _ do the cucumbers? i kind of did, yes. you are on stage _ do the cucumbers? i kind of did, yes. you are on stage at - do the cucumbers? i kind of did, yes. you are on stage at the - do the cucumbers? i kind of did, i yes. you are on stage at the same time as mccartney, _
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yes. you are on stage at the same time as mccartney, how _ yes. you are on stage at the same time as mccartney, how does - yes. you are on stage at the same time as mccartney, how does it i yes. you are on stage at the same i time as mccartney, how does it feel to be going up against one of the most famous names ever in music? aretha; most famous names ever in music? why did ou sa most famous names ever in music? why did you say that? don't say that! b cap i_ did you say that? don't say that! b cap i am _ did you say that? don't say that! b cap i am psyching _ did you say that? don't say that! b cap i am psyching you _ did you say that? don't say that! b cap i am psyching you both - did you say that? don't say that! b cap i am psyching you both up - did you say that? don't say that! b cap i am psyching you both up this| cap i am psyching you both up this morning! — cap i am psyching you both up this morning! so — cap i am psyching you both up this morning! so people _ cap i am psyching you both up this morning! so people do— cap i am psyching you both up this morning! so people do get- cap i am psyching you both up this morning! so people do get lost. cap i am psyching you both up this morning! so people do get lost in| morning! so people do get lost in glastonbury _ morning! so people do get lost in glastonbury. that— morning! so people do get lost in glastonbury. that is— morning! so people do get lost in glastonbury. that is what - morning! so people do get lost in glastonbury. that is what i- morning! so people do get lost in glastonbury. that is what i am i glastonbury. that is what i am hoping. — glastonbury. that is what i am hoping. that— glastonbury. that is what i am hoping. that they— glastonbury. that is what i am hoping, that they happen - glastonbury. that is what i am hoping, that they happen to i glastonbury. that is what i am - hoping, that they happen to wander past and _ hoping, that they happen to wander past and maybe _ hoping, that they happen to wander past and maybe draw— hoping, that they happen to wander past and maybe draw a _ hoping, that they happen to wander past and maybe draw a few. - hoping, that they happen to wander past and maybe draw a few. i- hoping, that they happen to wander past and maybe draw a few. i suspect that ou past and maybe draw a few. i suspect that you will — past and maybe draw a few. i suspect that you will draw _ past and maybe draw a few. i suspect that you will draw a _ past and maybe draw a few. i suspect that you will draw a different - past and maybe draw a few. i suspect that you will draw a different crowd i that you will draw a different crowd to paul mccartney.— to paul mccartney. there are crossovers — to paul mccartney. there are crossovers in _ to paul mccartney. there are crossovers in all— to paul mccartney. there are crossovers in all of _ to paul mccartney. there are crossovers in all of the - to paul mccartney. there are| crossovers in all of the crowds these — crossovers in all of the crowds these days _ crossovers in all of the crowds these days. music— crossovers in all of the crowds these days. music is - crossovers in all of the crowds these days. music is sort - crossovers in all of the crowds these days. music is sort of. these days. music is sort of blending _ these days. music is sort of blending a _ these days. music is sort of blending a lot. _ these days. music is sort of blending a lot. people - these days. music is sort of blending a lot. people have these days. music is sort of- blending a lot. people have very catholic— blending a lot. people have very catholic tastes. _ blending a lot. people have very catholic tastes.— blending a lot. people have very catholic tastes. you are not shy of -la ina catholic tastes. you are not shy of playing songs _ catholic tastes. you are not shy of playing songs by _ catholic tastes. you are not shy of playing songs by your _ catholic tastes. you are not shy of playing songs by your previous i catholic tastes. you are not shy of. playing songs by your previous band, playing songs by your previous hand, you do bang out the classics by moloko, sing it back, the time is now. 2 2. moloko, sing it back, the time is now. 2 . . moloko, sing it back, the time is now.2 . . . moloko, sing it back, the time is now.2 ., ., ., ., moloko, sing it back, the time is now.2 . . . ., . now. we are so far away now, we have had a pandemic— now. we are so far away now, we have had a pandemic in _ now. we are so far away now, we have had a pandemic in between _ now. we are so far away now, we have had a pandemic in between releasing i had a pandemic in between releasing my last _ had a pandemic in between releasing my last album — had a pandemic in between releasing my last album lt— had a pandemic in between releasing my last album-—
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my last album. it got a lot of --eole my last album. it got a lot of people through _ my last album. it got a lot of people through lockdown. i my last album. it got a lot of| people through lockdown. we my last album. it got a lot of - people through lockdown. we touring that now, people through lockdown. we touring that now. we — people through lockdown. we touring that now, we had _ people through lockdown. we touring that now, we had been _ people through lockdown. we touring that now, we had been doing - that now, we had been doing glastonbury— that now, we had been doing glastonbury two— that now, we had been doing glastonbury two years - that now, we had been doing glastonbury two years ago i that now, we had been doing i glastonbury two years ago type thing — glastonbury two years ago type thing so. _ glastonbury two years ago type thing so. it— glastonbury two years ago type thing so. it is— glastonbury two years ago type thing. so, it is so _ glastonbury two years ago type thing. so, it is so far— glastonbury two years ago type thing. so, it is so far away- glastonbury two years ago type | thing. so, it is so far away from that— thing. so, it is so far away from that that — thing. so, it is so far away from that that this _ thing. so, it is so far away from that that this time _ thing. so, it is so far away from that that this time around, - thing. so, it is so far away from that that this time around, we i thing. so, it is so far away from - that that this time around, we have brought— that that this time around, we have brought in— that that this time around, we have brought in a — that that this time around, we have brought in a lot _ that that this time around, we have brought in a lot of— that that this time around, we have brought in a lot of old _ that that this time around, we have brought in a lot of old songs, - brought in a lot of old songs, overpowered. _ brought in a lot of old songs, overpowered, and _ brought in a lot of old songs, overpowered, and some - brought in a lot of old songs, overpowered, and some of. brought in a lot of old songs, - overpowered, and some of them i can't _ overpowered, and some of them i can't remember— overpowered, and some of them i can't remember but _ overpowered, and some of them i can't remember but it— overpowered, and some of them i can't remember but it is— overpowered, and some of them i can't remember but it is a - can't remember but it is a singalong _ can't remember but it is a singalong-— can't remember but it is a singalong. can't remember but it is a sinaaalon. 2, . , ., ., singalong. you are still out of breath from _ singalong. you are still out of breath from dancing! - singalong. you are still out of breath from dancing! this - singalong. you are still out of breath from dancing! this is i singalong. you are still out of- breath from dancing! this is good. it has been so special this year because people have had this three—year wait. when you are on stage, are you thinking these people might not have been to a gig since the pandemic. i might not have been to a gig since the pandemic-— might not have been to a gig since the pandemic. i have been going all around and — the pandemic. i have been going all around and the _ the pandemic. i have been going all around and the feeling _ the pandemic. i have been going all around and the feeling has - the pandemic. i have been going all around and the feeling has been - the pandemic. i have been going all| around and the feeling has been like that. around and the feeling has been like that i— around and the feeling has been like that i wanted — around and the feeling has been like that. i wanted to _ around and the feeling has been like that. i wanted to make _ around and the feeling has been like that. i wanted to make a _ around and the feeling has been like that. i wanted to make a very- around and the feeling has been like that. i wanted to make a veryjoyfull that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show _ that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show that — that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show that is — that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show. that is why— that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show. that is why i— that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show. that is why i put _ that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show. that is why i put in— that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show. that is why i put in the - that. i wanted to make a veryjoyful show. that is why i put in the timel show. that is why i put in the time is now. _ show. that is why i put in the time is now. sing — show. that is why i put in the time is now. sing it _ show. that is why i put in the time is now, sing it back, _ show. that is why i put in the time is now, sing it back, familiar- is now, sing it back, familiar feeling. _ is now, sing it back, familiar feeling, from _ is now, sing it back, familiar feeling, from the _ is now, sing it back, familiar feeling, from the beginningl is now, sing it back, familiari feeling, from the beginning of moloko~ — feeling, from the beginning of moloko. �* i ., . moloko. and the venue you are -la ina moloko. and the venue you are playing caused _ moloko. and the venue you are playing caused a _ moloko. and the venue you are playing caused a sensation - moloko. and the venue you are - playing caused a sensation yesterday because tlc were on, and the crowds
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were so big they had to shut the roads leading to the venue. thea;t roads leading to the venue. they were probably — roads leading to the venue. they were probably not _ roads leading to the venue. they were probably not expecting that. roads leading to the venue. they i were probably not expecting that. i hope were probably not expecting that. hope you get the same thing were probably not expecting that." hope you get the same thing tonight. would you leave us with a bit of irish dancing? you are getting it, come on, joy. irish dancing? you are getting it, come on. joy-— irish dancing? you are getting it, come on, jo . ,, ., come on, joy. she would murder me! on the same — come on, joy. she would murder me! on the same stage _ come on, joy. she would murder me! on the same stage as _ come on, joy. she would murder me! on the same stage as macca, - come on, joy. she would murder me! on the same stage as macca, we - come on, joy. she would murder me! on the same stage as macca, we will| on the same stage as macca, we will tell you how it all goes tomorrow on breakfast. 2 2 tell you how it all goes tomorrow on breakfast. 2 . ., i ., ~' breakfast. which song do you think paul mccartney _ breakfast. which song do you think paul mccartney will _ breakfast. which song do you think paul mccartney will open _ breakfast. which song do you think paul mccartney will open with? - breakfast. which song do you think. paul mccartney will open with? which sona do we paul mccartney will open with? which song do we think— paul mccartney will open with? which song do we think paul _ paul mccartney will open with? “wi tn song do we think paul mccartney paul mccartney will open with? m“i tn song do we think paul mccartney will open with? i song do we think paul mccartney will 0 en with? 2, �* song do we think paul mccartney will oen with? 2, �* ~' 2, song do we think paul mccartney will open with?_ it _ song do we think paul mccartney will open with?_ it is - song do we think paul mccartney will open with?_ it is a - open with? i don't know. it is a tricky one- _ open with? i don't know. it is a tricky one. last _ open with? i don't know. it is a tricky one. last night _ open with? i don't know. it is a tricky one. last night he - open with? i don't know. it is al tricky one. last night he opened with a song that he wrote for the
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rolling stones, i wanna be your man, because the rolling stones played liverpool for the first time in 50 years and they played it, he gave it to the rolling stones, they played it at liverpool, and now he could be claiming it back so he might go old school with that. we claiming it back so he might go old school with that.— school with that. we will find out toni a ht. school with that. we will find out tonight- full— school with that. we will find out tonight. full of— school with that. we will find out tonight. full of trivia. _ school with that. we will find out tonight. full of trivia. that - school with that. we will find out tonight. full of trivia. that is - school with that. we will find out tonight. full of trivia. that is it i tonight. full of trivia. that is it for now, we will be back tomorrow, goodbye.
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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. protests across america as the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion. here in tennessee it's one of 13 states that will make it impossible to have an abortion. this battle is now being fought across state lines. but many are delighted by the court's decision. around a dozen states are already moving to ban the procedure.
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we'll be looking at how the path america has taken compares

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