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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 25, 2022 10:00am-10:31am BST

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this is bbc news. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. protests across america as the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion. here in tennessee it's one of 13 states that will make it impossible to have an abortion. this battle is now being fought across state lines. but many are delighted by the court's decision. around a dozen states are already moving to ban the procedure.
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we'll be looking at how the path america has taken compares to other countries around the world. the uk prime minister borisjohnson says he intends to "take the country forward" as backbench conservative mps consider fresh attempts to force him from power. i have to listen to all sorts of criticism that part of myjob as leader. police in norway say they're treating a shooting at a gay nightclub as a terrorist attack. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network begins, with only a fifth of train services expected to run. and it is the fourth day of glastonbury. sir paul mccartney will headline tonight — two years after his original performance date was cancelled because the covid pandemic. that is where he is playing. the pyramid stage. last night it was the
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youngest performer ever to play. for mccartney will be the oldest. —— paul mccartney. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. abortion clinics are closing this weekend in more than a dozen republican— controlled us states. that's after the conservative— dominated supreme court overturned decades of constitutional protection for abortion rights. it's a decision that divided america with conservative and religious groups celebrating victory. with conservative and religious for others it's a disaster that infringes human rights. president biden has said the lives of thousands of women are now at risk. we'll have more on that claim shortly — and look at how the us
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compares with the of the world. first this report from frances read. protest, from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe v wade is seismic. legal abortion on demand! pro—choice demonstrators say they are horrified that millions will lose their legal right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility, to make abortion unthinkable and illegal throughout our nation. to ensure no woman stands alone in a post—roe america to be the post—roe generation. cheering elizabeth made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding
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out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states already as of this minute that abortion access is denied and is illegal, i feel— pretty numb and pretty angry about that and, truly, i feel a little bit helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws which mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although, the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life is at risk. others are expected to either introduce these new restrictions or resurrect pre—roe bans. and in states where opinions on abortions are closely split, the legality of the procedure could be determined on an election by election basis or via legal battles. critics of the decision say it's an injustice and, without plans
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to support those who are pregnant will impact the poorest in society in a country, that, for the most part, has no universal health care or paid family leave. the harm is endless. what this means to women is such an insult. it's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment, to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. it's ignited protests around the world. the vatican has praised the supreme court's decision. singing # jesus loves the| little children...# but, within the us, this is only the beginning and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feeljustice has finally been served.
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francis read, bbc news. as we mentioned, several us states have so—called �*trigger laws�* that could see a near total ban on abortions in a matter of weeks. the bbc�*s rianna croxford reports from one of them, tennessee. it is the hen party capital of america. women celebrating their final night of freedom, as they lose the right to another. how did you feel when you heard about this? sick to my stomach. i hate to hear it. it is disturbing. and really unfortunate. it will impact everybody, more than they know. i personally believe that human life begins at conception. they don't get a right| over a woman's body.
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they don't get to make that decision for us. i cheering but, as one half of the city continues to party, the other begins to protest. like, would you not need women injail, for, you know what i mean? abortion? it has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! and they are scenes that will echo in more than 100 cities across the us. as abortion is no longer a constitutional right, but in the power of individual states. here in tennessee, it is one of 13 states that will make it impossible for women to have abortions, even in the most severe of circumstances. a battle that has, for decades, divided america, is now being fought out across state lines. doctor katrina green works in emergency care in nashville, and says ending abortion here will lead to heartache. the only exception we have in this state, when our law takes effect, is for the life of the mother. there is no exceptions for foetal abnormalities, rape or incest. and the impact will be felt across the country. millions of women in america
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will go to bed tonight without access to the health care and reproductive care that they had this morning. as one side when chris to sleep rejoicing, another many in tennessee mourned the end of 50 years of reproductive rights. of reproductive rights, and march towards an uncertain future. rianna croxted, bbc news, nashville. where does this roe v wade deicsion leave the us in terms of the rest of the world? to discuss, i'm joined by dr sydney calkin, she's a senior lecturer in human geography at the queen mary university of london. thank you forjoining us. before i get the idea of that comparison,
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what was your initial reaction to the news yesterday? i what was your initial reaction to the news yesterday?— the news yesterday? i wasn't surprised _ the news yesterday? i wasn't surprised because _ the news yesterday? i wasn't surprised because we - the news yesterday? i wasn't surprised because we had - the news yesterday? i wasn't| surprised because we had the the news yesterday? i wasn't - surprised because we had the draft opinion leaked a few months ago so i think we knew this was coming. i was disappointed to see the decision they released was very similar to they released was very similar to the one that was leaked but we knew this was on the way, unfortunately. what is going on in america because this looks like such a backward step? i this looks like such a backward ste - ? ~ �* , this looks like such a backward ste? ~ 3 . , this looks like such a backward ste? ~ �*, ., , ., step? i think it's really important to note that _ step? i think it's really important to note that this _ step? i think it's really important to note that this is _ step? i think it's really important to note that this is out _ step? i think it's really important to note that this is out of - step? i think it's really important to note that this is out of step i to note that this is out of step with the trajectory of abortion laws from around the world. we tend to see countries move from more restricted to less restrictive laws and it's rare to see it go backwards. it's out of step with the global trend on abortion rights. can you take a three some of those trends that have been taking place around the world? closest to the uk,
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we've seen changes in ireland and northern ireland. in 2018, ireland moved from having a constitution of abortion ban to repealing that in a relatively progressive abortion law which allows for abortion at 12 weeks on requests. in northern ireland we saw the decriminalisation of abortion in 2019. further afield we've seen progressive changes in mexico, colombia and argentina. just yesterday, as this decision was released in the us, germany was meanwhile removing an old part of its abortion law which had blocked doctors advertising abortion services. ., ., , ., . doctors advertising abortion services. ., ., , , services. part of your research is discussing _ services. part of your research is discussing self _ services. part of your research is discussing self managed - services. part of your research is l discussing self managed abortion. what is that? it's abortion undertaken outside of a clinical
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context. sometimes supported through telemedicine or where the community health providers. what is important about it is that across the world, medication abortion with pills has completely transformed the safety of abortion outside a clinical context. it's something we see across the world where abortion laws are restricted and the reason for that is restrictive laws don't stop people from getting abortions, they just make them do it in more clandestine ways and sometimes in less safe ways. i5 clandestine ways and sometimes in less safe ways-— less safe ways. is this something that could well _ less safe ways. is this something that could well happen _ less safe ways. is this something that could well happen now - less safe ways. is this something that could well happen now in . that could well happen now in america, now that this precedent of roe v wade has been overturned. figs roe v wade has been overturned. is it existed under row, abortion access was already quite patchy. it depended on what state you lived in and across the border it was very expensive so people face enormous
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obstacles even before the supreme court decision. self— managed abortion has been a reality in the us. before and even during the constitutional protection, self— managed abortion with pills was widespread. i think we'll see an acceleration of that as many states implement abortion bans limited degrees of severity. this implement abortion bans limited degrees of severity.— degrees of severity. this doesn't make it illegal— degrees of severity. this doesn't make it illegal but _ degrees of severity. this doesn't make it illegal but removes - degrees of severity. this doesn't make it illegal but removes the l make it illegal but removes the constitutional access. it's now up to the states to go ahead and ban that. how is that going to impact, what sort of pace at going to take place with these bands coming into place? place with these bands coming into lace? ~ . place with these bands coming into lace? . ., ., place with these bands coming into lace? ~ ., ., place with these bands coming into lace? ., ., ., , place? what row said was that states could not ban — place? what row said was that states could not ban abortion _ place? what row said was that states could not ban abortion altogether. i could not ban abortion altogether. it could place minimal
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constitutional protection. it basically saying now this has been removed at the state can do what they want now. states that want to ban abortion entirely, they are now free to do that. in terms of the pace of change, it's going to be rapid. there are states within hours of the decision who implemented trigger laws, meaning they have these laws on the books waiting for these laws on the books waiting for the moment that drove the wage was returned. —— rowe versus wade was returned. —— rowe versus wade was returned. i wanted to take you back to 1967 and the loving space. that momentous decision that went down. can you compare it to the supreme court of the day, what your thoughts on that? well, that case was the one
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that made interracial marriage possible across the us. there's a lot of other supreme court decisions that could go on the chopping block. there are worries we could see decisions like the one that legalised same—sex marriage, contraception, legalised same—sex intercourse, all of these are now potentially set to be rolled back by this court based on the reasoning on the decision yesterday.— the decision yesterday. thank you for our the decision yesterday. thank you for your time. _ the decision yesterday. thank you for your time, doctor _ the decision yesterday. thank you for your time, doctor sydney. - borisjohnson has said a " transformation" in his character is "not going to happen" after two by—election defeats led to calls for change. the prime minister was asked to respond to yesterday's resignation
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of the conservative party chairman, 0liver dowden, over the election results. 0ur political correspondent, tony bonsignore, joins me. tony, good to see you. how much of hit was this the borisjohnson? i hit was this the boris johnson? i think the conservative party, tory mps are still ultimately trying to work out what those two big by—election defeats mean for them and their chances of being re—elected at the next general election. certainly, the 0liver dowden resignation did has made this a wider conversation and, yet again, through the spotlight on boris johnson and his leadership. undeniably, there mps that are not happy with boris johnson's formance as leader and that controversy over party gate but there are some who i
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think would like borisjohnson to lead them into the next election. who? there are some who are saying that he can pull this around but needs to change. but the question is, is he capable of that change and does he want to? and that was the question he was asked this morning on the today programme. i am not hearing you say, "i have heard what the voters have said and i am going to change." yeah, so, what we are going to change, if you want me, sorry, let's just be absolutely clear with each other, if you are saying you want me to undergo some sort of psychological transformation, you know, i think that our listeners will know, that is not going to happen, but what we can do, what the government should do, and what i want to do, is to get on with changing, reforming and improving our systems and our economy. fascinating from him. if you listen to the way he phrases that. our
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listeners know that's not going to happen. i think partly in that what you can read is that he is saying, i've got the majority, i lead this party to an enormous majority in 2019. voters know what i'm like and don't want me to change. he just is treating this like normal mid—term blues. people are upset because of inflation, ukraine and all the things going on. but he remains convinced that once it comes to the push and shove of the general election, people will come back to him. he election, people will come back to him. . , election, people will come back to him. ., , ., , election, people will come back to him. .,, ., , him. he was that message to? the british public— him. he was that message to? the british public or _ him. he was that message to? the british public or to _ him. he was that message to? the british public or to the _ him. he was that message to? the british public or to the tory - british public or to the tory members, because there is talk now of trying to change things from within the 1922 committee. horse within the 1922 committee. how likel is within the 1922 committee. how likely is that _ within the 1922 committee. how likely is that to _ within the 1922 committee. fin" likely is that to happen? well, if you had asked me that a month or two ago i would have said pretty unlikely. certainly, in the immediate aftermath of that
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no—confidence vote, there doesn't seem to be a huge appetite for changing the rules. but given those by—election results, there's a real possibility they might try to change those rules and if you ask who is this message to its to those wavering conservative mps who are thinking about these changes. wondering if it's time for a new leader. that's clearly how it's aimed at, from all the way in ruan. —— ruan darth. —— rwanda two people have been killed and 21 injured in a shooting at a nightclub in a shooting at a nightclub and nearby streets in the centre of the norwegian capital, 0slo. the shooting happened
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in three separate locations, including a gay bar. a 42—year—old man has been arrested and charged with murder, attempted murder and terrorist acts. 0slo's annual pride parade was due to be held on saturday, but has been cancelled following police advice. on that, i am joined now by espen aas, journalist what more do we know? the main suspect who was arrested is a 42—year—old man of rainy and origin but a norwegian citizen. he's been observed around the area with a bag which he had kept an automatic weapon and handgun and started shooting at people around the bar. a well—known gay bar, london pub. he then managed to kill and injure 21.
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thank you for that update. russia has launched artillery and air strikes on two cities in the east of ukraine in the last few hours. one of them — severodonetsk — is where thousands of ukrainian forces are beginning to withdraw following russian advances. the strikes in severodonetsk hit a chemical plant where hundreds of civilians were trapped. taking the city would bring president putin closer to gaining control of the whole eastern donbas region. live now to kyiv. i'm joined by our correspondentjoe inwood. it's looking more and more likely that he will take control of region. 0nce that he will take control of region. once it's fully taken, the city, there's just one city left, the sister city, that he would still have to capture. that is heavily
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fortified and sits on top of the hill. it's protected by the river so it has protected advantages but russian forces are advancing. they are coming in from the east and they were becoming and from the south as well. we understand from the russian news agency that a couple of thousand ukrainian service people have been encircled in a small village but ukrainians say they're going to try and hold on. they've been moving forces. it's a defensible position but what we don't know now is that is their plan to make a stand there? grinding down the russian forces, running them down and making them pay for their advances or are they going to conduct another tactical withdrawal, a managed retreat from here and try and pull back, giving up the region but potentially saving lives and
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making their defensive positions more stable elsewhere. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network is taking place — with only a fifth of train services expected to run. around 40,000 members of the rmt union have walked out at network rail and 13 train operating companies — in a dispute about pay, jobs and working conditions. services across england, wales and scotland are primarily restricted to main lines and passengers are being advised not to travel. singer billie eilish became the youngest ever artist to headline the glastonbury festival last night. it's the first time the huge annual event has been held since the start of the pandemic and hundreds of thousands of people are at the event in southwest england. and billie is not the only artist who will be making history on stage. 0ur entertainment correspondent colin paterson
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is there and joins us live. who else will be making history, colin? i who else will be making history, colin? who else will be making history, coun? u, . who else will be making history, colin? ., , ., ., , colin? i can hear the piano is -la in: colin? i can hear the piano is playing let — colin? i can hear the piano is playing let it _ colin? i can hear the piano is playing let it be. _ colin? i can hear the piano is playing let it be. paul- colin? i can hear the piano is . playing let it be. paul mccartney becomes the oldest person to headline this festival.- becomes the oldest person to headline this festival. they are cleanin: headline this festival. they are cleaning up — headline this festival. they are cleaning up the _ headline this festival. they are cleaning up the ball— headline this festival. they are cleaning up the ball mccartneyj headline this festival. they are - cleaning up the ball mccartney and here are our litter pickers! cheering sous can tell it how this works. there was quite a lot of debris last night, wasn't there? i'm not trying to beat to disparaging to billie eilish fans.— to beat to disparaging to billie eilish fans. , ., ., eilish fans. every morning after... we start in _ eilish fans. every morning after... we start in the _ eilish fans. every morning after... we start in the morning _ eilish fans. every morning after... we start in the morning and - eilish fans. every morning after... i we start in the morning and finished ljy we start in the morning and finished by noon. we are all contracted to do 24 by noon. we are all contracted to do 2a hours. most of us are charity
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teams. i've got 2a of mine and there's lots of little teams. we do for down syndrome and hospices. they get their money back and then give it to charity? we pay exactly the same as any of the other punters coming in beforehand and after we've done the work, we get the money back and most of us then give it all to charity. ii and most of us then give it all to chari . , ., , and most of us then give it all to chari . , .,, ., ., . charity. if people are watching round the _ charity. if people are watching round the well, _ charity. if people are watching round the well, if _ charity. if people are watching round the well, if they - charity. if people are watching round the well, if they want i charity. if people are watching j round the well, if they want to charity. if people are watching - round the well, if they want to come to glastonbury and then how do it, this is one way to get in by volunteering?— this is one way to get in by volunteerin: ? ., ., ., volunteering? you can go through the re clina volunteering? you can go through the recycling crew- _ volunteering? you can go through the recycling crew. contact _ volunteering? you can go through the recycling crew. contact the _ recycling crew. contact the recycling crew. contact the recycling crew. contact the recycling crew and they can put their names down. i recycling crew and they can put their names down.— recycling crew and they can put their names down. i want to have a no? can i their names down. i want to have a go? can i have _ their names down. i want to have a go? can i have a — their names down. i want to have a go? can i have a go? _ their names down. i want to have a go? can i have a go? i _ their names down. i want to have a go? can i have a go? ijust- their names down. i want to have a go? can i have a go? ijust pull- go? can i have a go? ijust pull that there. there we go! he's got his festival voice on. just before i
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90, his festival voice on. just before i go, are you going to see paul mccartney tonight? yes! those of the people that count, colin. thank you very much indeed. enjoy your day at glastonbury. that's quite a good to get, isn't it? lucky him. you have been watching bbc news. plenty more coming up right here. don't go away. it will remain dry and sunny the saturday. was seasoned passing showers like here in penzance earlier in the day. more to come in the west because you are closer to an area of low pressure which is
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dominating weather charts this weekend. is that closes in on sunday more to come, especially in the west. they will blossom a bit more across parts of england and scotland in the afternoon. but things will stay dry towards the south—east, east anglia, although it will cloud over later, and in the north of scotland, but the winds will be strong, feeling cool and fresh at times. more cloudy moments in the west, 17 the high, maybe not in the sunny spots of northern scotland, 22, 22 across some parts of eastern england as well. going through this evening and overnight, some showers dotted around. close to glastonbury and headingley through the day. they will fade back then that area of low pressure, here it is, the centre pushing towards northern ireland, and on the edge of it outbreaks of rain becoming more extensive across ireland, south—west scotland, the isle of man and north—west wales later on. temperatures much like
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this morning, 9—12. a bright start to eastern england and northern scotland. this is where the best of the dry weather will be on sunday. generally speaking more cloud elsewhere, and in the west there will still be some glimpses of sunshine, with more of a chance of rain at times. certainly in northern ireland, but certainly so in central and southern scotland and in the eastern fringes of england and wales. the sunshine, best towards the east. 22—23, in eastern england back, only 15—16 for some in the west, partly because you have not got as much sunshine around and there is a bit of rain, as you can see from the chart at four o'clock, but also because the breeze will be stronger. these are the wind gusts, 40—50 mph around the north channel of the irish sea, and towards the south—west, and that will be pushing some very high seas in across parts of wales, cornwall and north devon. going into sunday evening, still some cloud across many western areas, with outbreaks of rain, but it should be dry, i think, for the end of glastonbury. lovely sunset for the south and east, and the week ahead looks largely dry for some in the south—east of england and east anglia, and as you can see from our london forecast,
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just a small chance of a shower. elsewhere, though, plenty of showers around, with the heaviest of the rain always in the west. see you soon.
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hello, this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines: protests across america — as the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion. here in tennessee it's one of 13 states that will make it impossible for women to have an abortion even in the most severe circumstances. this battle is now being fought across state lines. but many are delighted by the court's decision — around a dozen states are already
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moving to ban the procedure. the uk prime minister borisjohnson says he intends to "take the country forward" as backbench conservative mps consider fresh attempts to force him from power. police in norway say they're treating a shooting at a gay nightclub as a terrorist attack. a third day of strike action on the uk's rail network — only a fifth of train services are expected to run. now on bbc news... the travel show. this week on the travel show — venice puts forward plans to make us pay to visit the city via an app. they understand that the city is very complicated, very unique, very fragile, so i think that the people that love venice will understand, of course. cat's in northern ireland to take in the sights and sounds as the tourists return. really, with bushmills, it's very friendly on your palate. so thatjust draws you in. and actually, put it to your ear.
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it's saying "try me! "drink me!

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