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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 25, 2022 11:00am-11:31am BST

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this is bbc news — i'm lukwesa burak. these are the latest headlines in the uk and around the world. protests across america — as the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion. here in tennessee it's one of 13 states that will make it impossible to have an abortion. this battle is now being fought across state lines. but many are delighted by the court's decision — around a dozen states are already moving to ban the procedure. we'll be looking at how the path america has taken, compares to access to abortion
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procedures, in other countries around the world. police in norway say they're treating a shooting at a guy nightclub as a terrorist attack. a second earthquake rocks an area in south—eastern afghanistan — causing yet more death and destruction. the uk prime minister, borisjohnson, says he intends to "take the country forward" — as backbench conservative mps consider fresh attempts to force him from power. i have to listen to all sorts of criticism that part of myjob as leader. and it's day two of performances at glastonbury — sir paul mccartney
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is the saturday night headliner. hello and welcome if you're watching in the uk or around the world. abortion clinics are closing this weekend, in more than a dozen republican—controlled us states. that's after the conservative—dominated supreme court, overturned decades of constitutional protection for abortion rights. it's a decision that's divided america — with conservative and religious groups celebrating victory. for others, it's a disaster, that infringes upon human rights. president biden has said the lives of thousands of women are now at risk. we'll have more on that claim shortly — but first — this report from the bbc�*s, frances read. protest, from kentucky to massachusetts. the decision to overturn roe v wade is seismic.
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pro—choice demonstrators say they are horrified that millions will lose their legal right to abortion. but others celebrate. anti—abortion activists gathered outside america's supreme court, happy to see the back of a legal precedent that had been in place for 50 years. we were called for this moment. and this is a heavy responsibility, to make abortion unthinkable and illegal throughout our nation. to ensure no woman stands alone in a post—roe america to be the post—roe generation. cheering elizabeth made the decision to terminate a pregnancy after finding out her twins wouldn't survive outside the womb. she later had another abortion when the pregnancy put her life at risk. the reality of it actually being overturned and seeing a number of states are ready
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as of this minute that abortion access is denied and is illegal, i feel— pretty numb and pretty angry about that and, truly, i feel a little bit helpless. while some states say they will keep full abortion rights, 13 have trigger laws which mean nearly all abortions are now instantly banned. although, the vast majority would allow abortions if the mother's life is at risk. others are expected to either introduce these new restrictions or resurrect pre—roe bans. and in states where opinions on abortions are closely split, the legality of the procedure could be determined on an election by election basis or via legal battles. critics of the decision say it's an injustice and, without plans to support those who are pregnant will impact the poorest in society in a country, that, for the most part, has no universal health care or paid family leave. the harm is endless.
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what this means to women is such an insult. it's a slap in the face to women about using their own judgment, to make their own decisions about their reproductive freedom. demonstrators in paris say they are standing in solidarity with americans and the vatican, praising the supreme court's decision. singing # jesus loves the| little children...# but, within the us, this is only the beginning and while some worry more rights could be rolled back, others feeljustice has finally been served. francis reed, bbc news. as we mentioned, several us states have so—called �*trigger laws�* — that could see a near—total ban on abortions in a matter of weeks. the bbc�*s, rianna croxford, reports
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from one of them — tennessee. it is the hen party capital of america. women celebrating their final night of freedom, as they lose the right to another. how did you feel when you heard about this? sick to my stomach. i hate to hear it. it is disturbing. and really unfortunate. it will impact everybody, more than they know. i personally believe that human life begins at conception. they don't get a right| over a woman's body. they don't get to make that decision for us. i cheering but, as one half of the city continues to party, the other begins to protest. like, would you not need women injail, for, you know what i mean? abortion? it has set us back 50 years. hands off our bodies! and they are scenes that
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will echo in more than 100 cities across the us. as abortion is no longer a constitutional right, but in the power of individual states. here in tennessee, it is one of 13 states that will make it impossible for women to have abortions, even in the most severe of circumstances. a battle that has, for decades, divided america, is now being fought out across state lines. doctor katrina green works in emergency care in nashville, and says ending abortion here will lead to heartache. the only exception we have in this state, when our law takes effect, is for the life of the mother. there is no exceptions for foetal abnormalities, rape or incest. and the impact will be felt across the country. millions of women in america will go to bed tonight without access to the health care and reproductive care that they had this morning.
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as one side went to sleep rejoicing, another many in tennessee mourned the end of 50 years of reproductive rights. dr sydney calkin is from the queen mary university of london. she told me how the us now fares in comparison to the rest of the world when it comes to access to abortion. i think it's really important to note that this is actually really out of step with the trajectory of abortion laws around the world. for the most part, what we see are countries moving from having more restrictive laws to less restrictive laws. it's really very unusual to see countries go backwards on this so even though the us loomed so large politically, it's really out of step with the global trend on abortion rights. could you just take us through some of those trends that have been taking place around the world? sure.
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closest to the uk, we've seen changes recently in ireland and northern ireland. in 2018, ireland moved from having a constitutional abortion ban today and repealing that ban and bringing in a relatively progressive abortion law that allows for a up to 12 weeks on request and further into pregnancy for medical reasons. northern ireland we saw the decriminalisation of abortion in 2019. further afield, we've seen progressive changes across latin america, for instance. in mexico, and colombia, in argentina. and just yesterday, as the us supreme court released this decision, germany was, meanwhile, removing an old part of its abortion laws that had blocked doctors from advertising abortion services. now, part of your research is something called self—managed abortion. what is that? self—managed abortion is abortion undertaken outside of a clinical context. sometimes remotely supported through telemedicine, sometimes supported
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with community health providers. what's important about self—managed abortion is that across the world, self—managed abortion with medication abortion, that's with pills, has completely transformed the safety of abortion outside of a clinical context so it's something that we see across the world where abortion laws are restrictive and the reason for that is that restrictive abortion laws don't stop people from getting abortions, theyjust make them do it in more clandestine ways and sometimes in less safe ways. and do you see this as something that could well happen in america now that roe v. wade has been overturned? you know, it already does happen in the us. the abortion act, as it existed under roe, was already quite patchy. it depended on what state you lived in and across the board was very, very expensive so a lot of people faced enormous obstacles to accessing abortion,
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even before the supreme court decision, so self—managed abortion has already been a reality in the us for quite some time. of course, before roe, but then during roe�*s constitutional protection of abortion, self—managed abortion with pills was widespread and i think we will continue to see that accelerating, absolutely as many, many states implement abortion bans with varying degrees of severity. we move to norway now, where two people have been killed and 21 injured — in a shooting at a nightclub and nearby streets in the centre of the capital 0slo. the shooting happened in 3 separate locations, including a gay bar. a 42—year—old man has been arrested and charged with murder, attempted murder and terrorist acts. 0slo's annual pride parade was due to be held on saturday, but has been cancelled following police advice. on that, i am joined now by ehspen 0rs, journalist for the norwegian broadcasting
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corporation nrk, who is in oslo. hello and welcome. thank you for joining us on bbc news. i wonder if we could just start with the details that we do know about this attack. it all happened around quarter past one o'clock this morning local time and a lot of people were outside celebrating the big pride weekend here in oslo. and then a man came up to a bar, he was carrying a bag. in that bag he had two guns, one automatic gun and one handgun and he started shooting randomly at people. this is a very crowded area in downtown centre of oslo just a few minutes away from the parliament and government buildings, also close to
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the court buildings. and one of these buyers, as you say, is a gay bar. always pretty crowded with people and especially now because of the pride celebrations. and two people are confirmed killed, 21 injured, ten of these are badly injured. he was taken by police after a fairly short time and has been questioned but he has not said anything to the police just yet. [30 anything to the police “ust yet. do we anything to the police just yet. do we know why the police, did they say why they have designated as a terrorist attack? it is why they have designated as a terrorist attack?— why they have designated as a terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality _ terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality and _ terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality and the _ terrorist attack? it is because of the brutality and the obvious - the brutality and the obvious targeting of innocent people in the street. they do not yet know whether it was linked to this gay bar or if you just chose a place where a lot of people were gathered. because he has chosen not to speak to the police just yet but one who was heavily armed, and to attacking
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innocent people in the street, they are so far saying this is a terrorist attack but on the press conference this morning the police also said that it might be some level of psychiatry involved with this man. he is known to the police from earlier. 0ne because he was arrested for carrying an illegal knife and to because he was arrested with the drugs on him. he has also been known to the security police. memories are obviously going to come following this attack, of someone who killed 70 people. what sort of reaction has been in norway to this? well, just half an hour ago, out in the streets in central 0slo i saw people on the way down to the london pub which is the name of this gay bar carrying both these rainbow flags to celebrate pride and flowers and a suspect during the day the
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amount of flowers outside their will grow. pro—gay campaigners have now 15 or 20 minutes ago said to people, although it is not going to be a parade, but go out and celebrate. it was a popular weekend because of what has happened. just was a popular weekend because of what has happened.— what has happened. just very cuickl , what has happened. just very quickly. what _ what has happened. just very quickly, what are _ what has happened. just very quickly, what are the - what has happened. just very quickly, what are the gun - what has happened. just veryl quickly, what are the gun laws what has happened. just very - quickly, what are the gun laws like in norway? quickly, what are the gun laws like in norwa ? , ., quickly, what are the gun laws like in norway?— in norway? they are very strict so it is not very _ in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy _ in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to _ in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get - in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get hold - in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get hold of. in norway? they are very strict so it is not very easy to get hold of a| it is not very easy to get hold of a handgun and certainly not an automatic gun, as he was carrying. the police did not know that these weapons were registered in the press conference earlier today and i'm sure we will know more about that later. all police, although the norway today, has chosen to take up guns, temporarily, so they are going to be armed for the next few days at least. . ~ to be armed for the next few days at least. ., ~' , ., ,
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to be armed for the next few days at least. . ~ , ., , . to be armed for the next few days at least. ., ~ , ., , . ., ., least. thank you very much for that u date. least. thank you very much for that undate- thank— least. thank you very much for that update. thank you. _ thank you. russia has launched artillery and air strikes on 2 cities in the east of ukraine in the last few hours. one of them — severodonetsk — is where thousands of ukrainian forces are beginning to withdraw following russian advances. the strikes in severodonetsk hit a chemical plant, where hundreds of civilians were trapped. taking the city would bring president putin closer to gaining control of the whole eastern donbas region. earlier, i askjoe inwood how likely this is to happen. it's looking more and more lately. there's one city, once severodonetsk is fully ta ken, and that looks like it has basically happened now. it's just the city of lysychansk, the sister city of severodonetsk that he would still have to capture. that is heavily fortified. it sits on top of a hill and is protected by a river, the siverskyi donets, so it has protective advantages that severodonetsk did not have. but russian forces are advancing. they are coming in from the east, now they've taken severodonetsk, and they will be coming in from the south as well. we understand from the russian news
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agency, tass, that many thousand, a couple of thousand ukrainian service people, have been encircled in a village called zloty, but ukrainians say they are going to try and hold on. they have been moving forces. bbcjournalists have seen forces moving to lysychansk, and it is a defensible position. what we don't know now is, is their plan to try and make a stand there? to try and continue this process of grinding down the russian forces? of wearing them down, making them pay for their advances or are they going to conduct another tactical withdrawal, a managed retreat from lysycha nsk, and try and pull back, thereby giving up the luhansk region, but potentially saving lives and making their defensive positions more secure in the rest of the donbas? borisjohnson has said a " transformation" in his character is "not going to happen" after two by—election defeats, led to calls for change. the prime minister was asked to respond to yesterday's resignation of the conservative party chairman, 0liver dowden, over
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the election results. 0ur political correspondent, tony bonsignore, told me more about the prime minister and the party's response. i think the conservative party, tory mps are still ultimately trying to work out what those two big by—election defeats mean for them and their chances of being re—elected at the next general election. certainly, the 0liver dowden resignation did has made this a wider conversation and, yet again, through the spotlight on boris johnson and his leadership. undeniably, there mps that are not happy with boris johnson�*s formance as leader and that controversy over party gate but there are some who i think would like borisjohnson to lead them into the next election. who? there are some who are saying that he can pull this around but needs to change. but the question is, is he capable of that change and does he want to?
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and that was the question he was asked this morning on the today programme. iam not i am not hearing you say, i have heard what the voters have said and i am going to change? what heard what the voters have said and i am going to change?— i am going to change? what we're auoin to i am going to change? what we're going to change. _ i am going to change? what we're going to change, if _ i am going to change? what we're going to change, if you _ i am going to change? what we're going to change, if you want - i am going to change? what we're going to change, if you want me, | going to change, if you want me, sorry, letsjust be going to change, if you want me, sorry, lets just be absolutely clear. if you're saying you want me to undergo some kind of psychological transformation i think our listeners would know that is not going to happen but what you can do and what the government what i want to do is to get on with changing reforming and improving our systems and our economy.— and our economy. fascinating from boris johnson- _ and our economy. fascinating from boris johnson. listen _ and our economy. fascinating from boris johnson. listen to _ and our economy. fascinating from boris johnson. listen to the - and our economy. fascinating from boris johnson. listen to the way i and our economy. fascinating from boris johnson. listen to the way he borisjohnson. listen to the way he phrases died. 0ur listeners know that that is not going to happen. but i think partly, in that, what
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you can read is that borisjohnson is saying, look, i got the majority. i lead this party to enormous majority in 2019. voters know what i'm like and they don't want me to change in the broader argument was that these arejust change in the broader argument was that these are just normal mid—term blues, that this is what happens, this is particularly what happens. people are upset because of inflation and ukraine and all the things going on at the moment but he remains convinced that, once it comes to the push and shove of a general election people will come back to him. he was that message too, then? the british public or their tory members because there is talk now of trying to change things from within using the 1922 committee, how likely is that to happen? if committee, how likely is that to ha en? , ., ., committee, how likely is that to ha en? ., ., committee, how likely is that to hauen? ., ., happen? if you would have asked me that question — happen? if you would have asked me that question a _ happen? if you would have asked me that question a month _ happen? if you would have asked me that question a month or _ happen? if you would have asked me that question a month or two - happen? if you would have asked me that question a month or two ago - happen? if you would have asked me that question a month or two ago i i that question a month or two ago i would have said, pretty unlikely. set in the immediate aftermath of the no—confidence vote i would have said, though, it has happened, did
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not seem to be a huge appetite for changing the rules but given those by—elections, it would always be a flashpoint if they lost, as they did. so it is a real possibility that they may to try to change those laws and if you're asking who those messages are too it is the waving conservative mps were thinking about the sorts of changes, wondering whether this is time for a new leader. that is clearly, from all the way in rwanda, this is clearly the way in rwanda, this is clearly the message is aimed at. a second earthquake has shaken southern afghanistan just days after a devastating earthquake killed more than 1,000 people. the taliban's health minister told the bbc that the country urgently needs international support. those who had barely enough to eat, have now lost their homes. hospitals, already close to collapse, since foreign funding was frozen, are struggling to treat the injured. from paktika province, the bbc�*s south asia correspondent yogita limaye sent this report. for people in afghanistan, pain is unrelenting. war, hunger and now an earthquake.
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80—year—old shakrina was rescued with injuries to her leg when her house collapsed. her elder sister died. in the next bed, their mother, mira. translation: we were under the debris until the morning i when some people pulled us out. they took us to a nearby clinic. i asked them, "where is my daughter?" they told me she had died. we are poor people. we have debts and now we lost everything. all around this room, there are similar stories. doctors told us that when the patients first came here, they were weeping loudly.
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now they are silent in grief and shock. bibi lost 18 members of herfamily. three of her son were among them. both she and her daughter, sofia, have multiple fractures. translation: my heart is in pain. when i go back from here, my children won't be there. it makes me so sad. on the day after the earthquake, 75 patients were brought here, more than the capacity of the hospital that was already struggling to treat regular illnesses. stretched even before the earthquake hit, they are trying to do their best here, but even this main provincial hospital doesn't have the equipment
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to treat critical patients so those who have had injuries to their spine or their brain, they've had to send them to other facilities, which means people who already spent hours travelling to this hospital then had to make another long journey to get any treatment at all. public health care was almost entirely funded by foreign money, stopped after the taliban takeover, hospitals pushed into near collapse. i asked the taliban's health minister whether they had got the international support they had been asking for. we have received some aid and assistance from the neighbouring countries like iran, pakistan, india and some of the arab countries so we are waiting for our partners from different countries in the world as to how they can provide the humanitarian aid and assistance. but many would argue that the taliban has not lived up to its commitments on human rights or women's rights. how can the world then recognise
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this government in situations like this directly offer you assistance or money? i think there is some miscommunication between the international partners. they still cannot understand the scenario of the people and the statements of the taliban. ordinary afghans are caught in the politics. this labourer is trying to cope with the grief of losing his wife and the fear of the future. "my family and i worked so hard to make our house. now it's gone," he said. "we'll never be able to rebuild it without help. yogita limaye, bbc news, paktika. fans are making the most of glastonbury — one of the biggest musical festivals in the world — as musicians have already started wowing crowds. last night billie eilish became the youngest solo artist to headline at the event. it's the first time since
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the pandemic started that the festival has even taken place. and sound checks are starting to take place for later let's stay with glastonbury — our entertainment correspondent colin paterson is there and joins us live. the big news. i have had to wear my anorakfor the first the big news. i have had to wear my anorak for the first time this glastonbury this morning. only for about five minutes so thankfully still very solid under feet and that is good news because there are 200,000 people here today. it is estimated. that is bigger than
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portsmouth. it is bigger than oxford. it is the second—biggest city and somerset today, the glastonbury festival. and last night, billy eilish at the age of 20 the youngest ever headliner. she is from california, she came onstage, i have never heard so much screaming from the front of the glastonbury crowd. she attracts a very young fan base and they went right down the front. they were captivated. at the back, may be the curious were not quite as into it but any criticism of her until it is she is on tour in the uk at the moment and she did not really tailor the set for glastonbury. it was what she is playing at the o2 in london at the moment. she popped over to glastonbury and pretty much the same sad but, as when i spoke to people afterwards, that crude and the front incredible. top tier, top notch, top notch. billie eilish! youngest headliner! it was incredible. what was so good about it? just the atmosphere and everything, she was so good with interacting with the crowd. you seem to be quite emotional. i wasjust, like, screaming my heart out.
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as you will hear that, yes. very, very excited. they were right down the front that the pyramid stage and tonight, in this field, it is estimated there will be more than 100,000 people to watch paul mccartney become the oldest person ever to headline the glastonbury festival. he played it in 2004 but since then, both glastonbury and paul mccartney's legacy, in many ways, have become bigger. it feels like a real event. yesterday, 15 up the road in a little town called froom, paul mccartney played a gig to 800 people to warm up for the set. i have been trying to work out from that how much we should look into the set, we are expecting him to play everything to stop solar mccartney, beatles mccartney, wings mccartney. it will be a giant singalong. i love it, colin. and you were rocking that anorak, might i say? thank you, thank you. i hope it doesn't have to come back on. i'm
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sure viewers feel the same way. colin, thank you very much. now it's time for a look at the weather with matt taylor. a fine afternoon for the north of scotland and eastern england but evenin scotland and eastern england but even in central and western parts of the uk there will be dry weather abounds with not the only problem is the breeze is bringing passing showers. they will move to quite quickly but the odd heavier one as possible. they are more frequent the further west you are. close to an area of low pressure off the coast of ireland and it is here across ireland, particularly western ireland, particularly western ireland that we will see persistent areas of rain put up 22 in the north island and eastern parts of england. only about 16 or 17 in the west. the breeze continues to fashion for the night, cloud and longer spells of rain across ireland in south—west scotland, north—west england, north west wales by the end of the night.
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elsewhere rain was a clear and good clear skies to take us into start to sunday and some southern and eastern areas. not faring badly through sunday once again but generally speaking, here and across the south—east of england it is going to be a dry day with some sunshine for top isolated showers. more cloud in the west and some longer spells of rain at times but he bit of brightness to come, too. bye for now. hello, this is bbc news with lukwesa burak. the headlines: protests across america as the supreme court overturns a woman's constitutional right to have an abortion. here to have an abortion. in tennessee is one of 13 states here in tennessee is one of 13 states that will make it nearly impossible for women to have abortions even in the most severe circumstances. it has four decades divided america and is now being fought out across state lines. but many are delighted by the court's decision — around a dozen states are already moving to ban the procedure. police in norway say they're treating a shooting at a gay nightclub as a terrorist attack. the uk prime minister borisjohnson says he intends to "take the country forward" as backbench conservative
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mps consider fresh attempts to force him from power.

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