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tv   BBC News  BBC News  June 26, 2022 7:00pm-7:31pm BST

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this is bbc news — i'm lewis vaughanjones — the headlines at seven russian cruise missiles strike the ukrainian capital, kyiv, causing large explosions, one person is killed. on the first day of the g7 summit in germany, a committment to mobilise 600 billion dollars for global infrastructure programmes in developing countries by 2027. through strategic investments, will have the sustainable amount and shared global stability. the prince of wales accepted a suitcase containing a million euros in cash, from a former qatari prime minister, according to the sunday times. there is no suggestion the payments were illegal. and at least 21 people are reported dead at a nightclub in the south african city of east london.
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the mp patrick grady steps away from his snp membership while police investigate allegations of sexual harassment against him. good evening. russian missiles have struck the capital of ukraine just as g7 world leaders gather in germany — and as president zelensky warned the war was entering a difficult phase. the russian strike hit a nine—storey residential building in kyiv, killing one person and injuring six others, including a 7—year—old girl. our correspondent nick beake has been at the scene. once again, ukraine's capital is under attack. this video said to show the city's horizon as more
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russian rockets hit. explosion and once again, civilians are in the firing line. a residential block in the centre of kyiv smouldering, ripped apart. screams inside, rescuers reach a young girl, pinned down by debris. they manage to bring her to safety and then taken to hospital. moments later, ukrainian official appears outside, brandishing a russian passport, saying that one woman still trapped is originally from moscow. shortly afterwards, paramedics bring her out but her condition is clear. whether or not this was the intended target, it's shattered the relative calm that had returned to the capital, kyiv, in recent weeks.
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it feels like this is vladimir putin sending his own message at a time when those g7 leaders are meeting. we find two residents trying to take it all in. translation: tamara says the first strike came after six _ in the morning and she had four in all. i can't find the words, she explains. elaine asks, "just tell me why they are doing this to us". among those arriving to see the damage, the former boxing champion mayor of kyiv and he makes clear this is just the latest of hundreds of missiles russia has fired onto his city. more than 300 buildings in our home town was destroyed, 220 apartment building and one of them destroyed today. these flats are near to an ammunition factory that was hit in april and could have been the intended target today. but the head of national police says they are now collecting evidence which could prove this attack was a war crime.
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there have been more explosions here as the day has gone on. this may be far from the fiercest fighting raging in the east of the country but russia has tried to strike fear and pain at the heart of ukraine's capital. nick beake, bbc news, kyiv. world leaders are meeting in germany for the first day of the g7 summit. the ukraine conflict is top of the agenda. but they're no longer as united on what happens next. our politicial editor chris mason reports. the leaders of the world's richest countries gather to work out what to do next about ukraine. they begin by mocking president putin. bare—chested horseback! the canadian prime minister suggests they should mimic the russian leader by riding bareback on a horse, as he has done. beyond the jokes, though, there are real differences of emphasis and approach here about how
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much and for how long ukraine should be helped. the uk insists it must be for the long haul. the prime minister, though, acknowledges some are tiring of it. i think that the pressure is there and the anxiety is there and we've got to be honest about that. the g7 has been solid and we continue to be solid. but in order to protect that unity, in order to make it work, you've got to have really, really honest discussions about the implications of what's going on. these two men look like the best of friends. a reunion of a year old, now... but in private, the prime minister emphasised to the french president any attempt to settle the conflict now, with russia having stolen ukrainian territory, would be a mistake. at this summit, the aim is to portray as much unity and resolve as possible as the conflict in ukraine drags on and its costs back
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home, not least rising prices, become more obvious. president biden in conversation with the summit�*s host, the german chancellor, stressed a sense of togetherness was imperative. we have to stay together. as putin is counting on from the beginning that somehow nato would... and the g7 would splinter and... but we haven't and we're not going to, so can't let that aggression take the form it has and get away with it. the fundamental truth for all of the leaders here is the democratic pressures they face back home from their parties and their public. borisjohnson is well aware of this, of course. this matters because the leaders have to mould and flex their views to reflect their domestic audience. unlike their opponent, president putin, who does not. the challenge, then, is how to stand together,
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how to move as one. not easy and not guaranteed in the long term. chris mason, bbc news at the g7 summit in germany. i'm joined now by the former uk ambassador to the united states, sir david manning. which is heard president biden there saying that vladimir putin was relying on it splintering but that is not happen. as it slowly happening? i is not happen. as it slowly happening?— is not happen. as it slowly ha eninu? ~ happening? i think as the prime minister acknowledged, - happening? i think as the prime minister acknowledged, there . happening? i think as the prime i minister acknowledged, there are pressures and anxieties and the war has been going on for over a hundred days and we are feeling the effects in both energy supplies and difficulties of getting prints supplies out of ukraine and so it is impacting on all of us domestically. so, is surprising that it seems to me that overall, the g7 and indeed
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nato, there will be a nato summit on the back of this how to together very well and much more strongly than putin will of expected and they had for the leaders now is to reaffirm this while acknowledging the pressures and that is what i expect to come out of the summit. what kind of concrete commitment could reasonably be expected? i think they will continue with what they're doing. and what they can do for ukraine and here it is a question of strategic patients and keep supplying ukraine with the weapons and materials that it needs providing financial economic support and they will be talking privately among themselves about what they can do to try to ease these pressures of
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grain exports from ukraine which putin has weapon iced and also how to try to mitigate the pressure on energy supplies is also a question of further sanctions that can be asserted by putin. there will be discussing this at the g7 and i think be very important for them is to explain their populations that the cost of this for us is that if we want ukraine to succeed and we want to prevent the russians from invading and taking over this country and will have to be prepared to pay a price. country and will have to be prepared to pay a price-— to pay a price. people already -a in: to pay a price. people already paying the — to pay a price. people already paying the price _ to pay a price. people already paying the price here - to pay a price. people already paying the price here in - to pay a price. people already paying the price here in the i to pay a price. people already l paying the price here in the uk, energy prices and the sanctions that would really hurt russia and gas, those of the sanctions i would damage those in the g7 too. what realistically can bc be done on
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sanctions on gas? i realistically can bc be done on sanctions on gas?— realistically can bc be done on sanctions on gas? i would suspect that there will _ sanctions on gas? i would suspect that there will be _ sanctions on gas? i would suspect that there will be much _ sanctions on gas? i would suspect i that there will be much acceleration for this and i don't know, we shall see. i think for the moment, we have to know the sanctions taken against suppliers such as cutting of russian oil, getting western europe used to the idea that there will be diminishing supplies and rations may be necessary. i think that is probably the direction that it is going in, buti probably the direction that it is going in, but i don't expect that will suddenly find the european countries are going to turn off the gas or they won't take any gas. i think you're going to have to accept that this is a process, not an immediate action that they can take. thank you very much for being on the programme. it's emerged that the prince of wales accepted donations for his charitable projects of up to 3 million euros in cash — from the former prime minister
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of the gulf state of qatar. the sunday times has also reported some of the money was handed directly to prince charles. our royal correspondent, jonny dymond, explained what the prince's representatives are saying about this. the prince's office does not deny the substance of this story although they clearly have some concerns about some of the detail. but they acknowledge that a very large donation was passed over in cash to the prince. he passed it to his assistants and they put it in the bank account of his charities and the appropriate checks were made. there is no suggestion of any illegality or rule breaking. this is somewhat embarrassing partly because such a huge donation being made in cash. i mean, a bank transfer or a cheque would be more regular barley i mean, a bank transfer or a cheque would be more regular partly because there has been so much controversy around previous fundraising efforts from some of the prince's charities.
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perhaps most importantly, because of the suggestion, perception amongst some that one person giving such a huge donation may end up having undue influence on the air to the throne, on the heir to the throne, the man who will be king. johnny diamond, thank you. at least 20 young people have been found dead in a nightclub in the port city of east london in south africa. the cause of death is not yet known — there were no injuries on the bodies and its thought there may have been a gas leak. the bbc�*s shingai nyoka reports. the nightclub where so many young people died. police remain at the scene of the incident in which the cause of these deaths remain far from clear. officers responded to distress calls at enyobeni tavern in the early hours of this morning. most of the victims were teenagers. at this stage, the parents have been told they have to visit the morgue to identify their children. the problem was police were trying to secure the crime scene,
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or preserve evidence, so they had to restrict access. of course, there were so many people there and so many people that didn't know if their children were in the nightclub at the time, so it became a bit of a... um... situation to... to stop them from entering the space. south africa's president, cyril ramaphosa, expressed his condolences to the families and called for a thorough investigation. the police have ruled out a stampede as the cause. there are suggestions that the revellers could have inhaled or ingested a toxic substance. shingai nyoka, bbc news. the headlines on bbc news. one person has been killed after russian cruise missiles strike the ukrainian capital, kyiv, causing large explosions. on the first day of the g7 summit in germany, a committment to mobilise 600 billion dollars for global infrastructure programmes in developing countries by 2027. the prince of wales accepted a suitcase containing a million euros in cash, from a former qatari prime minister,
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according to the sunday times. there is no suggestion the payments were illegal. the snp mp, patrick grady, is to sit as an independent member of parliament, amid a police investigation into sexual harassment allegations. opposition parties have been critical of the way the snp leadership have handled the affair. here's our political correspondent, andrew kerr. patrick grady has been dominating the headlines. mr grady representing blasko north was suspended from the comments for two days after he had been found to have acted inappropriately towards a male snp staff member. now, it's emerged the metropolitan police have received an allegation of sexual assault. a snp spokesman said:
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both the first minister and the snp westminster leader have been criticised for their handling of the initial harassment allegations. the first minister expressed she is willing to meet while in said this last week. let's review everything that is going on and let me make this absolutely clear, if the complaint and feels aggrieved then i am sorry for that and it is important that we sit down and we listen and we learn any lessons that have to be addressed from that. no—one from the snp was available for interview today. the latest development comes from the beginning of a significant week for the party and the wider independence movement. with the first minister due to outline her plans on tuesday for a second referendum. nicola sturgeon said today that independence is essential to resolving the cost—of—living crisis. in speaking on today's sunday
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show, the conservatives are critical of the process. i'm not going to play sturgeon's games on this issue, i would take no part in her pretend referendum when there is real work to be done, real work to take with us crisis in scotland, will work to support the nhs. before the summer break, issues for the snp westminster will also feature in the days to come. an inquiry�*s been launched into the treatment of asylum seekers in glasgow, during the pandemic. it'll look at the events that led up to the deaths of 2 people, one of whom was the man who stabbed several people at a hotel, 2 years ago. the bbc�*s, suzanne allan, reports. is exactly two years since six people were stabbed at the park in glasgow. the attacker was shot dead by police. he was one of hundreds of asylum—seekers moved into city hotels at the start of lockdown
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and another took his own life. tandy was housed in the parking as well, the conditions were awful. we were not treated like human beings. just given two hours notice to actually just pack our stuff and go into hotels in the communication was really poor, the dietary requirements and all of those things were not taken into consideration. my mental health did deteriorate for a while. the campaign group that formed after the parking stabbings has been put into inquiry as to how they were treated in glasgow scotland. with no inquiries in the works, the group has commissioned its own, headed by a leading qc. it will examine what was done and why. where there are flaws in the care of those people over for bad decisions made about the housing or was there any question of monetary benefits in the mind of those who made the decisions to move those peoples to those hotels. since the incident...
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they describe the use of hotels as... flowers were laid today in commemoration of this inquiry with hopes insight will be gained. three crews taking part in a great britain rowing challenge, have been rescued near northern ireland and wales following bad weather. this footage from the coastgard shows the 6—strong crew being rescued off the antrim coast on saturday evening. the second vessel with 5 people on board was rescued from the irish sea on sunday morning, and the thrid morning, and the third off the coast of wales. all 16 rowers are reported to be safe and well. volunteers have been out in force in cumbria today collecting water samples from windermere. the "big windermere survey
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aims to analyse what dangers are in the water. it comes as one conservationist warns that england's largest lake is on the verge of "catastrophe" unless urgent action�*s taken to improve its water quality. suzanne hailey reports. the wonder of windermere. a crown thatis the wonder of windermere. a crown that is the lake district. but pollution is a growing problem. today, they're testing the water. it's important to me that the ecology of the lake is cared for and that we have some really solid evidence to back up any of the decision—making processes that we kind of take to make sure that the lake is healthy as it can be. volunteers of gathered samples from all around the lake. 51am volunteers of gathered samples from all around the lake.— all around the lake. such a good opportunity. _ all around the lake. such a good opportunity, really, _ all around the lake. such a good opportunity, really, to _ all around the lake. such a good opportunity, really, to get - all around the lake. such a good i opportunity, really, to get involved because _ opportunity, really, to get involved because so— opportunity, really, to get involved because so many times we have to look after— because so many times we have to look after the environment but don't always— look after the environment but don't always have opportunities to. after collection, they _ always have opportunities to. after collection, they are _ always have opportunities to. he collection, they are returned for initial tests. indie
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collection, they are returned for initial tests.— initial tests. we are testing the conductivity — initial tests. we are testing the conductivity of _ initial tests. we are testing the conductivity of electricity - initial tests. we are testing the conductivity of electricity in - initial tests. we are testing the conductivity of electricity in the j conductivity of electricity in the ph, conductivity of electricity in the ph, the — conductivity of electricity in the ph, the plants _ conductivity of electricity in the ph, the plants and _ conductivity of electricity in the ph, the plants and animals- conductivity of electricity in the l ph, the plants and animals they conductivity of electricity in the - ph, the plants and animals they can live within _ ph, the plants and animals they can live within the _ ph, the plants and animals they can live within the lake. _ ph, the plants and animals they can live within the lake. the _ ph, the plants and animals they can live within the lake.— live within the lake. the tests on the water will _ live within the lake. the tests on the water will inform _ live within the lake. the tests on the water will inform the - live within the lake. the tests on the water will inform the experts | the water will inform the experts who need to know the state of the lake so that they can manage and improve things going forwards. people in the windermere area get real information rather than hypothetical information that may be coming through. it also, will be able to advise the environment agency in will be interested in the results. and if there are problems that we can identify, they can take action. we are part of the big plan to keep windermere in good condition. to keep windermere in good condition-— to keep windermere in good condition. ., , , ., ., condition. poisons blue-green algae blooms are populating _ condition. poisons blue-green algae blooms are populating the _ condition. poisons blue-green algae blooms are populating the lake, - condition. poisons blue-green algae blooms are populating the lake, it i blooms are populating the lake, it is a sign that all was not well beneath the surface.- is a sign that all was not well beneath the surface. clinic in axis fertiliser for _ beneath the surface. clinic in axis fertiliser for algae _ beneath the surface. clinic in axis fertiliser for algae and _ beneath the surface. clinic in axis fertiliser for algae and we - beneath the surface. clinic in axis fertiliser for algae and we get - beneath the surface. clinic in axis| fertiliser for algae and we get lots of phosphorus coming in from sewage and septic tanks it creates this bloom event. it
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and septic tanks it creates this bloom event.— and septic tanks it creates this bloom event. , , ., , ., bloom event. it depletes oxygen out ofthe bloom event. it depletes oxygen out of the water — bloom event. it depletes oxygen out of the water and _ bloom event. it depletes oxygen out of the water and kills _ bloom event. it depletes oxygen out of the water and kills fish _ bloom event. it depletes oxygen out of the water and kills fish that - bloom event. it depletes oxygen out of the water and kills fish that is - of the water and kills fish that is fundamentally what we are seeing in windermere. it is fundamentally what we are seeing in windermere-— windermere. it is implementing measures to _ windermere. it is implementing measures to reduce _ windermere. it is implementing measures to reduce the - windermere. it is implementing i measures to reduce the phosphate contributions from its systems and the fact that it's affecting water quality in windermere is complex. one thing is that its future is secure. it's 25 years this weekend since the first book in the harry potter series — the philosopher's stone — was first released. a number of different publishers passed on the book before bloomsbury bought into the magic. in a tweet, authorj.k. rowling recalled the moment she first saw the book on the shelf of a book store in edinburgh, thanking the fans who have made it a global phenomenon. i'm joined now by harry potter fans, jennie bentley and ashley hodges from their magic—themed cafe, junction nine and three quarters. let's go back 25 years, and that's a
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long time, do you rememberfirst getting the book in first reading it first falling in love with it? i can first falling in love with it? i can remember _ first falling in love with it? i can remember as _ first falling in love with it? i can remember as in _ first falling in love with it? i can remember as in primary - first falling in love with it? i can remember as in primary school and my teacher gave it to me to read. i don't know, i was about seven or eight so oscar need to get to reading and the films are released and we both had grown up with them as they were in the films and so, it's almost like we're growing with them. . �* , . it's almost like we're growing with them. ., �*, ., ., it's almost like we're growing with them. ., ,, them. that's a magicalthing because as a whole generation _ them. that's a magicalthing because as a whole generation of _ them. that's a magicalthing because as a whole generation of kids - them. that's a magicalthing because as a whole generation of kids who - as a whole generation of kids who follow the story to the school years in the film magnified that. when you started reading and getting into them, was there any idea that this is going to be such a phenomenon a century later? i is going to be such a phenomenon a century later?— century later? i had actually read the books and — century later? i had actually read the books and i _ century later? i had actually read the books and i was _ century later? i had actually read the books and i was younger. - century later? i had actually read| the books and i was younger. and century later? i had actually read l the books and i was younger. and i read the _ the books and i was younger. and i read the books after watching six of
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the films _ read the books after watching six of the films and with the sentiments, admin— the films and with the sentiments, admin want to read the books because i admin want to read the books because i never— admin want to read the books because i never read _ admin want to read the books because i never read as a kid. 30 admin want to read the books because i never read as a kid.— i never read as a kid. so you do the other way around _ i never read as a kid. so you do the other way around but _ i never read as a kid. so you do the other way around but the _ i never read as a kid. so you do the| other way around but the magic was still the same? i other way around but the magic was still the same?— still the same? i want to make sure to finish the — still the same? i want to make sure to finish the series _ still the same? i want to make sure to finish the series of _ still the same? i want to make sure to finish the series of books - still the same? i want to make sure to finish the series of books before | to finish the series of books before the final— to finish the series of books before the final two films came out and that's— the final two films came out and that's how. the final two films came out and that's how— the final two films came out and that's how. �* , ., , , ., , . that's how. and you guys are such fans that you _ that's how. and you guys are such fans that you want _ that's how. and you guys are such fans that you want to _ that's how. and you guys are such fans that you want to incorporate | fans that you want to incorporate the themes into a business, what have you guys done?— the themes into a business, what have you guys done? clinic it was in aril last have you guys done? clinic it was in april last year _ have you guys done? clinic it was in april last year post _ have you guys done? clinic it was in april last year post covid-19 - april last year post covid—i9 restrictions and things and be at the idea that we could do something but there on business will be decided to do was a mac harry potter theme thing, and you can see the floating themes.—
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theme thing, and you can see the floating themes. houses are going eve hint floating themes. houses are going everything spend _ floating themes. houses are going everything spend great _ floating themes. houses are going everything spend great and - floating themes. houses are going everything spend great and we - floating themes. houses are going i everything spend great and we really can ask for anything more. it’s everything spend great and we really can ask for anything more.— can ask for anything more. it's been incredible. revenue _ can ask for anything more. it's been incredible. revenue supported - can ask for anything more. it's been incredible. revenue supported us i incredible. revenue supported us what _ incredible. revenue supported us what is _ incredible. revenue supported us what is it— incredible. revenue supported us what is it about the magic that is caught so many peoples imaginations over so many years? i caught so many peoples imaginations over so many years?— over so many years? i don't think he and summarise _ over so many years? i don't think he and summarise it _ over so many years? i don't think he and summarise it in _ over so many years? i don't think he and summarise it in one _ over so many years? i don't think he and summarise it in one answer, - and summarise it in one answer, realty _ and summarise it in one answer, really it— and summarise it in one answer, really. it appeals to so many different _ really. it appeals to so many different people for semi—different reasons— different people for semi—different reasons and the characters in the writing _ reasons and the characters in the writing in— reasons and the characters in the writing in the booksjust captures the reader— writing in the booksjust captures the reader and you canjust, i writing in the booksjust captures the readerand you canjust, i mean for me _ the readerand you canjust, i mean for me i_ the readerand you canjust, i mean for me i watch the films first but for me i watch the films first but for those — for me i watch the films first but for those reading of the first time, you get— for those reading of the first time, you get to — for those reading of the first time, you get to get this magical world of the nuance — you get to get this magical world of the nuance of her written about it all thought about before and i think. — all thought about before and i think, you feel like you're really in it _ think, you feel like you're really in it. ., , ' in it. you still feel different, it's like reading _ in it. you still feel different, it's like reading the - in it. you still feel different, it's like reading the books i in it. you still feel different, - it's like reading the books again, it's like reading the books again, it's reading them again and still
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feels like the magic now even when he's reading them again after so long, even though he's seen the movies everything. it’s long, even though he's seen the movies everything. it's timeless. would you _ movies everything. it's timeless. would you enjoy _ movies everything. it's timeless. would you enjoy so _ movies everything. it's timeless. would you enjoy so much - movies everything. it's timeless. would you enjoy so much about i movies everything. it's timeless. - would you enjoy so much about them? i dislike that they're perfect for all generations and it's not and for —— | all generations and it's not and for —— ijust like that all generations and it's not and for —— i just like that they're all generations and it's not and for —— ijust like that they're perfect for all generations. grandparents, everyone, everyone since looks at it and it's amazing it's a fantastic however one just loves it and every thing just gets involved. it's not about anything in particular, the books of the movies, just brings everyone together. books of the movies, 'ust brings everyone together. congratulations for havin: everyone together. congratulations for having an _ everyone together. congratulations for having an idea _ everyone together. congratulations for having an idea and _ everyone together. congratulations for having an idea and good - everyone together. congratulations for having an idea and good luck i for having an idea and good luck with the business venture. the glastonbury festival is drawing to a close this evening, after 3 days of performances including sir paul mccartney on the pyramid stage last night. the final acts include
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kendrick lamar — and diana ross — as our culture editor, katie razzall reports. # hey, jude, don't make it bad... 36 songs, an incredible two hours and 50 minutes, with an almost five minute sing—along to heyjude. # na, na, na, na—na, na—na.... a night in which glastonbury history was made. mr bruce springsteen! cheering. sir paul mccartney, the oldest ever solo headliner, joined onstage by another old—timer. # how could i dance with another... dave grohl. # everybody had a hard year # everybody had a good time... and movingly, on screen, byjohn lennon. that is so special for me, here i am singing withjohn again. we're back together.
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so emotional and overwhelming. obviously his presence and the history he brings and how generously he brought all the band members back together, like, both past and present. there are 100 performance stages at this festival. soon the other stage, which saw a packed—out olivia rodrigo set, will host the years & years singer and star of the tv drama it's a sin, olly alexander. obviously, we've played here a few times, but to be back here now, 2022, it feels so special. i'm just, i'm excited. i'm so excited. diana ross! yeah, tell me about diana ross. woo! i'm just very, very excited. she's a legend. i mean, so many hits. obviously, i'm coming out, like, that's just going to be amazing. # i'm coming out, i want the world to know... diana ross, a legend in the glastonbury teatime legends slot, opened her show with that anthem. later tonight, the festival closes
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with kendrick lamar. katie razzall, bbc news. now it's time for a look at the weather with lucy martin. hello there. it's a fairly unsettled picture as we move through the next few days. today's weather dominated by an area of low pressure that is going to clear away, but the next area of low pressure hot on its heels, so we are looking at further wet weather to come. and it will remain breezy as well. so as we go through tonight, we have got further outbreaks of showery rain. you can see that line extending its way south, gradually pushing its way north and east as we go through the night. ahead of it, drier with clear spells. behind that area of rain, some showers feeding in. some of those could be heavy. temperatures not falling too far, generally staying in the double figures. we could just see one or two showers creeping into the south and east into the early hours. so we have that band of showery
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rain around first thing in the morning towards the west. it will gradually push east as we move through the day. drier skies following on behind. turning cloudier, though, for northern ireland from the west, with some rain later. temperatures at a maximum of 21 celsius. bye— bye.
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hello, this is bbc news. iam i am lewis vaughanjones. the headlines: russian cruise missiles strike the ukrainian capital, kyiv, causing large explosions. one person is killed. on the first day of the g7 summit in germany, a committment to mobilize $600 billion for global infrastructure programmes in developing countries by 2027. the prince of wales accepted a suitcase containing a million euros in cash from a former qatari prime minister, according to the sunday times. there is no suggestion the payments were illegal.
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and at least 21 people are reported dead at a nightclub

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