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tv   Newsday  BBC News  June 26, 2022 11:00pm-11:31pm BST

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welcome to newsday, live from singapore, i'm st. the headlines. world leaders at the g7 summit call for unity to help ukraine defeat russia. we have to stay together. we did is counting on this from the beginning and somehow nato would in the g7 with splinter and we are not going to. in ukraine, residents reel from the latest act of russian aggression, as the capital kyiv is struck by a barrage of missiles. in south africa, forensic experts investigate how twenty—two young people died at a nightclub. diana ross helps bring the first glastonbury festival for three years to a glorious
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close it's 6am in singapore and midnight in germany where leaders from the g7 group of nations are meeting. it was the first day of talks in what will be a key week of diplomacy over the war in ukraine. britain's prime minister says ukraine should not be forced into a peace settlement with russia. if that means losing territory. and president biden has been calling for western unity to hold, to defeat russia. our political editor chris mason
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reports from bavaria in germany. the leaders of the world's richest countries gather to work out what to do next about ukraine. they begin by mocking president putin. bare—chested horseback! the canadian prime minister suggests they should mimic the russian leader by riding bareback on a horse, as he has done. beyond the jokes, though, there are real differences of emphasis and approach here about how much and for how long ukraine should be helped. the uk insists it must be for the long haul. the prime minister, though, acknowledges some are tiring of it. i think that the pressure is there and the anxiety is there and we've got to be honest about that. the g7 has been solid and we continue to be solid. but in order to protect that unity, in order to make it work, you've got to have really, really honest discussions
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about the implications of what's going on. these two men look like the best of friends. a reunion of a year old, now... but in private, the prime minister emphasised to the french president any attempt to settle the conflict now, with russia having stolen ukrainian territory, would be a mistake. at this summit, the aim is to portray as much unity and resolve as possible as the conflict in ukraine drags on and its costs back home, not least rising prices, become more obvious. president biden in conversation with the summit�*s host, the german chancellor, stressed a sense of togetherness was imperative. we have to stay together. as putin is counting on from the beginning that somehow nato would... and the g7 would splinter and... but we haven't and we're not going to, so can't let that aggression take the form it has and get away with it. the fundamental truth
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for all of the leaders here is the democratic pressures they face back home from their parties and their public. borisjohnson is well aware of this, of course. this matters because the leaders have to mould and flex their views to reflect their domestic audience. unlike their opponent, president putin, who does not. the challenge, then, is how to stand together, how to move as one. not easy and not guaranteed in the long term. chris mason, bbc news at the g7 summit in germany. i'm joined now by my colleague shaun ley in garmisch in the bavarian alps. nice to speak to you, the growing influence on china is also an effect. have leader spoke about how to deal with that? the?
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effect. have leader spoke about how to deal with that?— to deal with that? they have one owerful to deal with that? they have one powerful idea. _ to deal with that? they have one powerful idea. remember- to deal with that? they have one | powerful idea. remember china's to deal with that? they have one - powerful idea. remember china's been doing over the past years. part of its initiative is levering and support from other countries. it has been building its connections with other parts of the world and getting raw materials and resources from africa, caribbean nations, latin america and other parts of asia it's been doing it by offering money, loans and gifts of money to help those countries to develop infrastructure which funnily enough also helps china provide ports and the rest i will help them go forward. and therefore be able to provide those raw materials more efficiently. it is a latency of interest in the g7 is realised that china has stolen a march on it. and it will offer 600 billion us dollars of financial support to countries around the world like the president
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of indonesia and india and other countries to come to bavaria and there will be talking with the g7 leaders about things like energy, global food security and partnership arrangements and the theme of this g7 summit is about partnership and a just world, creeping circumstances in which everyone benefits may be even that is an acknowledgement that sometimes the g7 is lectured and doesn't understand enough. tomorrow, they'll be listening and see if there are further initiatives as a result of that. is there are further initiatives as a result of that.— there are further initiatives as a result of that. is a balancing act for so many _ result of that. is a balancing act for so many leaders, _ result of that. is a balancing act for so many leaders, what - result of that. is a balancing act for so many leaders, what are l result of that. is a balancing act i for so many leaders, what are we expecting to happen on day two? lease expecting to happen on day two? love the focus will — expecting to happen on day two? love the focus will be _ expecting to happen on day two? love the focus will be on _ expecting to happen on day two? lre: the focus will be on ukraine. the irony of that is ukraine was human on the agenda today but somehow it ended up dominating proceedings not least because of what we saw the
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bilateral routines. in the report, we saw emmanuel macron and boris johnson and both of those meetings, they talk about ukraine. they are worried. they're worried there was a political leaders of come together at some point, some of the nations are going to say, we are making big sacrifices because of the sanctions on russia, we cannot get oil, gas we certainly cannot get it is cheaply and connected crane at if ukraine suppresses are going up and we are hurting. we are willing to take our share of the pain ever brings the war to an end more quickly the sanctions putting on russia get them to pull out of ukraine. if ukrainian suffer less at the moment, there is no sign of that and at what point does the country populations into their leaders, enough already. reduces pressure on us because we cannot afford the pain and there is no gain. is there bringing the war to an end. so, tomorrow, president
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zelensky will be speaking via video link and trying to put some more steel into the backbone of the g7. and in ukraine, kyiv the capital city has suffered intense attacks —of more than a dozen missile strikes — launched by russia; the most sustained barrage in months. it happened hours after president zelensky warned that the war is entering a difficult phase. a nine—storey residential building in one district was damaged during the strike. one person was killed and five injured, including a 7—year—old girl. our correspondent nick beake reports. once again, ukraine's capital is under attack. explosion this video said to show the city's horizon as more russian rockets hit. and once again, civilians are in the firing line. a residential block in the centre
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of kyiv smouldering, ripped apart. screams inside, rescuers reach a young girl, pinned down by debris. they manage to bring her to safety and then take her to hospital. moments later, a ukrainian official appears outside, brandishing a russian passport, saying that one woman still trapped is originally from moscow. shortly afterwards, paramedics bring her out but her condition is not clear. whether or not this was the intended target, it's shattered the relative calm that had returned to the capital, kyiv, in recent weeks. it feels like this is vladimir putin sending his own message at a time when those g7 leaders are meeting. tamara says the first strike came after six in the morning and she heard four in all.
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i can't find the words, she explains. elaine asks, "just tell me why they are doing this to us". among those arriving to see the damage, the former boxing these flats are near to an ammunition factory that was hit in april and could have been the intended target today. but the head of national police says they are now collecting evidence which could prove this attack was a war crime. there have been more explosions here as the day has gone on. this may be far from the fiercest fighting raging in the east of the country but russia has tried to strike fear and pain at the heart of ukraine's capital. nick beake, bbc news, kyiv. later in the programme we'll look at the plight of children in ukraine with our correspondent orla guerin but first. forensic experts have been
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dispatched to the south african city east london to help investigate the deaths of least 2imostly teens at a popular liquor outlet. 17 people were found dead inside the premises at a popular liquor outlet. 17 people were found dead inside the premises and with no apparent injuries. the others died in hospital. the police have now confirmed that the youngest victim was 13. the cause of death is not yet known — but it's thought there may have been a gas leak. the bbcs southern africa correspondent shingai nyoka reports the nightclub where so many young people died. police remain at the scene of the incident in which the cause of these deaths remains far from clear. officers responded to distress calls at enyobeni tavern in the early hours of this morning. most of the victims were teenagers. at this stage, the parents have been told they have to visit the morgue to identify their children. the problem was police were trying to secure the crime scene, or preserve evidence, so they had to restrict access. south africa's president, cyril ramaphosa, expressed his condolences to the families and called for a thorough
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investigation. the police have ruled out a stampede as the cause. there are suggestions that the revellers could have inhaled or ingested a toxic substance. shingai nyoka, bbc news. you're watching newsday on the bbc. still to come on the programme. why displaying nazi swastikas is being banned in the australian state of victoria. we'll be speaking to an extremism expert about the situation there. first ever ruling hong kong with spectacular celebrations. a huge fireworks display was displayed in the former colony. they said unification was the start of a new era for hong kong. the unification was the start of a new era for hong kong.— unification was the start of a new era for hong kong. the rules first clone of an _ era for hong kong. the rules first clone of an adult _ era for hong kong. the rules first clone of an adult mammal. -
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era for hong kong. the rules first - clone of an adult mammal. producing a sheep that was cloned in a laboratory using a cell from another sheep. for laboratory using a cell from another shee -. ., , :: sheep. for the first time in 20 ears, sheep. for the first time in 20 years. russia _ sheep. for the first time in 20 years, russia and _ sheep. for the first time in 20 years, russia and americans l sheep. for the first time in 20 | years, russia and americans in sheep. for the first time in 20 - years, russia and americans in the start— years, russia and americans in the start of— years, russia and americans in the start of a _ years, russia and americans in the start of a new era of cooperation in specs _ challenger smashes will record at almost _ challenger smashes will record at almost 50 — challenger smashes will record at almost 50 knots, _ challenger smashes will record at almost 50 knots, shattering - challenger smashes will record at almost 50 knots, shattering the i almost 50 knots, shattering the record _ almost 50 knots, shattering the record that _ almost 50 knots, shattering the record that stood _ almost 50 knots, shattering the record that stood for _ almost 50 knots, shattering the record that stood for 34 - almost 50 knots, shattering the record that stood for 34 years . almost 50 knots, shattering the l record that stood for 34 years and there _ record that stood for 34 years and there was — record that stood for 34 years and there was no _ record that stood for 34 years and there was no hiding _ record that stood for 34 years and there was no hiding the _ record that stood for 34 years and there was no hiding the sheer- there was no hiding the sheer elation — there was no hiding the sheer elation of— there was no hiding the sheer elation of the _ there was no hiding the sheer elation of the crew. _ this is newsday on the bbc. it's emerged that the prince of wales accepted donations for his charitable projects of up to 3 million euros in cash — from the former prime minister of the gulf state of qatar. the sunday times has also reported some of the money
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was handed directly to prince charles. our royal correspondent jonny dymond has the details. around 3 million euros were donated in three chunks, all of it in cash, in three chunks, all of it in cash, in euros, and banknotes. twice handed over once apparently in the carrier bag from a top and food store and another time, the suitcase into directly to prince charles. from his office, his office and residence, no denial at all of the core of the story. some quibbling of some the details and acknowledgement that yes, it's some the details and acknowledgement that yes, its is the former qatari prime minister did make a donation to prince charles but immediately
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into a charity account and appropriate checks were made on the donation word came from to make sure that it fitted in all governance rules of the charities. of the problem for the prince is not that any of this suggested to be legal, or that any resident broken, no one is saying that either. but it's the fact that it was done as a cash donation is probably not the way was very large donations are made here in britain the charities and the fact that there is always been controversy around some of the fundraising operations of prince charles charities and i think most importantly, the fact that one person made such a sizeable donation to prince charles charity and the concern that some people have is that gives that person undue influence over the air to the throne, the man who would be king.
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the australian state of victoria has banned the display of the nazi swastika. it comes amid concerns over a rise in anti—semitic incidents in australia. under a new law — people displaying the symbol face a fine of up to a year in prison. three other australian states have indicated that they will now look to introduce similar laws. for more on this we can cross to the australian capital canberra and join levi west who's the director of terrorism studies at charles sturt university. (2 boxes)(os) in this day and age, how problematic are these symbols? i5 in this day and age, how problematic are these symbols?— are these symbols? is been around for some time _ are these symbols? is been around for some time but _ are these symbols? is been around for some time but the _ are these symbols? is been around for some time but the catalysts - are these symbols? is been around for some time but the catalysts for| for some time but the catalysts for what is happened is the christchurch attack and associated rise in extreme right wing terrorism events.
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as a result of that, statements by governments passing legislation to ban swastikas, or of a public position of standing against this intolerance.— position of standing against this intolerance. . , ., , intolerance. received the swastika intolerance. received the swastika in asia which _ intolerance. received the swastika in asia which was _ intolerance. received the swastika in asia which was originally - intolerance. received the swastika in asia which was originally a - intolerance. received the swastika | in asia which was originally a hindu symbol which is used by buddhists as well. do you see any need for bands beyond australia?— beyond australia? there are eight jurisdictions _ beyond australia? there are eight jurisdictions were _ beyond australia? there are eight jurisdictions were -- _ beyond australia? there are eight jurisdictions were -- already - jurisdictions were —— already jurisdictions were —— already jurisdictions where they are all banned and it is true that both the legislation and also the consultation process working very closely with the indian and buddhist community ensuring that people, for
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are not prosecuted for displaying the traditional swastika. in the german context, for research purposes, and other places in the world. as important to contextualize the banning of the swastika flag and anti—discrimination and antiracism and speech regulation proposes around the world have this. this and speech regulation proposes around the world have this. as you sa , around the world have this. as you say, anti-semitism _ around the world have this. as you say, anti-semitism is _ around the world have this. as you say, anti-semitism is rising - around the world have this. as you | say, anti-semitism is rising around say, anti—semitism is rising around the world, presumably more of a concern for young people with them using social media so much. find using social media so much. and researching _ using social media so much. fific researching things like using social media so much. fific researching things like the extreme right groups and platforms like
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right groups and platforms like 4chan and anti—minority content and while banning the swastika is not an anti—terrorism measure, its not exactly preventing a terrorist attack, it is important that governments on behalf of the societies they represent next steps. —— make steps. let's take a look at some other stories in the headlines. the former us president donald trump has hailed the supreme court ruling that overturned the right to abortion as a victory for the constitution, the rule of law, and life itself. abortion rights defenders are set to hold a candlelight vigil outside the high court in washington on sunday night. in turkey, police stopped istanbul's pride event and dozens
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of people have been detained. the organisers managed to read a statement and start a small parade before the police arrived and broke up the event. this is the eight year running pride has been banned. it was 2014 when the last pride event took place with over 100,000 participants. well, the impact of the war on ukraine's children is ever more apparent — homes, schools and hospitals damaged or destroyed — water, power and food supplies affected; the separation of families. in the four months since russia invaded — aid agencies say at least two children have been killed every day and two thirds of ukraine's children have been displaced from their homes. our international correspondent orla guerin has more.
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there is a sense of permanence to the war here now. no more talk of quick victories. instead, a landscape of conflict and constant vigilance. and a vision of the future down the barrel of a gun. this is timor. just eight years old. we found him manning his own checkpoint, with a group of friends, armed with toy guns. keeping watch from morning till evening. flagging down cars. on the look out for russian infiltrators. they ask for ids and a password. this is their war effort.
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and timor, what do you know about the war that is happening in ukraine? "i know we are killing them and they are killing us", he says. are you scared because of the war? "very much". what is the most scary thing? "that they might come here. "with front lines not far away, the danger is all too real. just ask this boy, who is 12. "we know that russia invaded our country", he tells me. "of course our army is destroying the occupiers. "so they can't reach all of us. "regulars can pass freely,
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but they try to stop everyone else. the war they see around them is not a game. and this is not playtime. childhood here is another casualty of the invasion. orla guerin, bbc news, eastern ukraine. and diana ross taking top billing on the pymarid stage sunday afternoon. our culture editor katie razzall reports from worthy farm in somerset(tx
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and the oldest of paul mccartney who set nearly minutes sing—along. with archer performances, so much more than the headline acts. this festival celebrates creativity, imagination and inclusivity with a good dose of change the role thrown
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in. whether it is an address from the ukrainian president or climate change activists. so the ukrainian president or climate change activists.— the ukrainian president or climate change activists. so many are going to die because _ change activists. so many are going to die because of— change activists. so many are going to die because of this. _ change activists. so many are going to die because of this. or _ change activists. so many are going to die because of this. or the - to die because of this. or the outraae to die because of this. or the outrage expressed _ to die because of this. or the outrage expressed by - to die because of this. or the outrage expressed by the - to die because of this. or the i outrage expressed by the recent to die because of this. or the - outrage expressed by the recent us supreme court decision on review weight. politics is neverfar away. we are not closed off in the world here, _ we are not closed off in the world here, we — we are not closed off in the world here, we are _ we are not closed off in the world here, we are not _ we are not closed off in the world here, we are not about _ we are not closed off in the world - here, we are not about escapism. for about— here, we are not about escapism. for about dealing — here, we are not about escapism. for about dealing with _ here, we are not about escapism. for about dealing with the _ here, we are not about escapism. for about dealing with the road, - here, we are not about escapism. for about dealing with the road, coming i about dealing with the road, coming together _ about dealing with the road, coming to . ether. . ~ about dealing with the road, coming touether. w ., ., , ., together. kendrick lamar is tonight headhne together. kendrick lamar is tonight headline act. _ together. kendrick lamar is tonight headline act, despite _ together. kendrick lamar is tonight headline act, despite making - together. kendrick lamar is tonight headline act, despite making the i headline act, despite making the artist line—up, the cloud still. this was british rapper ag treacy on the stage on saturday. this this was british rapper ag treacy on the stage on saturday.— the stage on saturday. as long as eve one the stage on saturday. as long as everyone is _ the stage on saturday. as long as everyone is being _ the stage on saturday. as long as everyone is being respectful, - the stage on saturday. as long as everyone is being respectful, the| everyone is being respectful, the privilege — everyone is being respectful, the privilege so you do have come or look— privilege so you do have come or look at _ privilege so you do have come or look at the — privilege so you do have come or look at the crowd, disgraceful, to
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be honest — look at the crowd, disgraceful, to be honest. —— i'mjust grateful. hello. even with the weekend's rain in the west, it's been a rather dry month so far across most parts of the country. but if i show you the rainfall animation for this week, notice how it mounts up across these western areas, the colours deepening. it's here where we could see anything between 40—80 mm of rain, more especially around the hills and the coast. some eastern areas where so far this june, we've seen onlyjust over a quarter of our normal rainfall, not a huge amount is expected at all. although there's still a chance we could see a bit more towards the south east corner through the middle part of the week. the reason, well, areas of low pressure are going to come in off the atlantic and then stall before working northwards, as this one did from sunday, leaving a trailing weather front to take us into monday, which will produce sunshine and showers working their way eastwards, but much lighter winds than we saw through the weekend.
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so, this is how we start the day, the commuting temperatures somewhere between 11—13 degrees, not desperately cold out there. but a line of cloud and showery rain western england, eastern wales to begin with, maybe just in the south east of scotland, too. that trundles its way eastwards through the day, fragmenting even more, but it does mean sunnier skies develop in its wake. just a few showers dotted around, not as many as we saw in the weekend, so western areas much, much brighter compared with sunday, though winds not as strong. still a noticeable breeze, though, coming in from the south—west, and it's a slightly cooler direction for some of you compared with what we saw for the weekend, especially in the east of the country, but actually with more sunshine, lighter winds in the west, it should feel a touch warmer. temperatures 7—21, around we should be. early peak in the pollen levels in east anglia, the south east, and then a later peak of the west. and of course monday sees the start of wimbledon. cloudy skies to begin with, brightening up, you could just see a few spots of rain around lunch time, but mostly dry through the day.
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now dry into the evening and overnight, to come across eastern areas, but the next batch of wet and windy weather pushes in through northern ireland and towards the west. keeping temperatures here in teens for one or two, but a chillier night in the eastern half of the country, 5—6 degrees in rural areas to start tuesday. so, this is the next area of low pressure for tuesday, and coming up out of the atlantic and stalling. the winds blowing up the weatherfront, so it doesn't move a great deal. it will clear away from northern ireland in the morning, but will will linger across parts of central, south—western scotland, wales and push into the western fridges of england. brighter skies in the west later, always dry and brighter through central, eastern england, where it will be a bit warmer, 24 degrees a potential high. overall, though, temperatures around average for the time of year. more rain in the north and west, driest to the south and east.
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hello and welcome to our look ahead
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to what the the papers will be bringing us tomorrow. with me are lizzy buchan, the deputy online political editor at the mirror and olivia utley — the assistant comment editor for the telegraph. hello to you both. tomorrow's front pages. starting with. .. the i leads with the news from the g7 summit in bavaria, and western leaders' commitment to doing more to stand up to russia and china, amid fear of countries' abandoning support for ukraine. the financial times also leads with g7 news, and the angle on the proposal to hurt the russian war chest with a price cap on crude exports. the front page of the metro reports on g7 leaders allegedly mocking russian president vladimir putin's macho image. the mail investigations unit has a story that britain has become the global capital of fraud, with losses rocketing to almost £3 billion a year. the guardian leads on prime minister borisjohnson telling other
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g7 leaders not to give ground on ukraine.

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